Piano Lessons - Chapter 2: Basic Chords | Daniel Pinelli | Skillshare

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Piano Lessons - Chapter 2: Basic Chords

teacher avatar Daniel Pinelli, A practical approach to learning piano

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Lessons in This Class

5 Lessons (1h 6m)
    • 1. Major & Minor Chords

      13:23
    • 2. Suspended Chords

      12:09
    • 3. Augmented & Diminished Chords

      14:13
    • 4. 6th Chords

      12:47
    • 5. Voicings & Inversions

      13:33
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Lesson Plans

Lesson 2.1 - Major & Minor Chords

Welcome to Chapter 2! This chapter will be all about basic chords, which can sound amazing and are great tools for all musicians. In today’s lesson, we’ll be learning major and minor chords, which are the basis for a lot of the more advanced chords to come later. We’ll also discuss inversions, which is a powerful method for improving our chords. Take your time and be sure to practice in all 12 keys!

Lesson 2.2 - Suspended Chords

In today’s lesson, we’ll be learning suspended chords, which are a great alternative to your typical major/minor chords. These beautiful sounding chords are recognizable for their lush, open sound, created by the wide interval between their notes. Take the time to familiarize yourself with the shape and sound of these chords, including their inversions, so you can apply them in your own music and add some colour to your playing.

Lesson 2.3 - Augmented & Diminished Chords

Today we’ll be learning augmented and diminished chords, which are great at creating tension and transitioning between chords. Don’t hang on one of these chords for too long or you might get someone throwing something at you, but played in the right spot, these chords can sound amazing. It’s not what you play, it’s how you play it! Learn to use these chords properly and you’ll add another great tool to your musical toolbox.

Lesson 2.4 - 6th Chords

In today’s lesson, we’ll be learning 6th chords, which are the last of the basic chords that we’ll be covering here in Chapter 2. These chords sound great on their own, but really shine when played in a complimentary role within a chord progression. They’re simple, easy to learn, and a great way to add variety to our playing and keep our music sounding interesting. Remember, it’s not what you play, it’s how you play it! Learn to apply these chords in the right context and you'll add another tool to our growing musical toolbox.

Lesson 2.5 - Voicings & Inversions

Today we’ll be learning how to apply two very important concepts called voicings and inversions. These concepts give us an almost unlimited number of ways to play the chords we’ve learned so far, and really open up the door for our creativity. They allow us to take a regular chord and turn it into something that sounds unique and interesting. Learning how to use voicings and inversions will not only make your life easier as a musician, it’ll make your chords sound better. Take the time to understand these concepts and you’ll open up a whole new realm of possibilities for constructing chords and chord progressions.

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Daniel Pinelli

A practical approach to learning piano

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Transcripts

1. Major & Minor Chords: Hey everyone, Daniel Pinellia here. Welcome back to another lesson. And in today's lesson we're going to be learning major and minor chords. So this is the first lesson of chapter two, basic chords. And this is where we're going to put all the skills we learned in Chapter one into action and start creating some beautiful music will also be learning about inversions, which is a powerful tool for improving our chords. And then I'll show you how to play that little piece that I just played, which is a good example of what we can do with just some basic major and minor chords. Let's jump in. So first of all, congratulations on completing chapter one, notes and scales, and welcome to the first lesson of chapter two, basic chords. Now, don't let the word basic fool you. These chords can sound amazing and there's a lot we can do with them. In fact, most of your favorite songs are probably made up of just a few basic chords. So as is often the case in music, the less is more principle really applies. And it's the simple, more basic chords that can mean the most and really leave an impression. So a chord is a group of notes played together. A chord progression is a group of chords played in a certain order. Most songs are made up of one or more chord progressions. And so chords are the basic building blocks of most songs. So today we're gonna be learning major and minor chords, and these are based on the major and minor scales respectively. Ok, now if you don't understand the major and minor scales, you need to go back and review that content first. Otherwise, you won't be able to follow along with this lesson. So let's start with major chords. And the most basic demonstration of a major chord is the 135 chord, which contains the first, third, fifth notes of the major scale. Okay, so if we want to, for example, in the key of C, play a C major chord, we need to play together the first, third, fifth notes of the C-Major scale. So recall the C major scale. Okay? And also recall that numbering system that we started using in chapter one where we number those notes according to the order that we play them. So 1234567 and we're back to one. Ok, so if we want to play a C major chord, we need to play the first, third, fifth notes. So why are they? Well, C is 123, E is 345, g is five. So putting those nodes together, we get a c major chord containing C, E, and G. Okay, now, before we go any further, I need to introduce a very important topic called inversions. Now an inversion is a reordering of the notes within a chord. And inversions are based on the principle that a court is defined based on what notes are present, not their order. Ok, now what this means is that we can reorder the notes within a chord. We can play them in any order we want, and the chord remains unchanged. Let me show you. So continuing with our C major example and remembering what we know about octaves, how the keyboard repeats itself every 12 keys, we know that these two keys are the same. No, they're both C. So we can replace this C and R C major chord with this higher c. And we get this. This is also a C major chord because it contains the same notes. We're just playing them in a different order. Ok? And we could do this one more time. We can replace this E with this higher e, And we get this. Again. This chord is also C major because it contains the same notes. We're just playing them in a different order. So now we have three different ways to play that C major chord here in what's called root position. Here in first inversion and here in second inversion, okay? All of these chords are C major because they contain the same notes. We can also play these inversions in different octaves. So we can play root position up here. We can play first inversion. Say down here, we can play second inversion all the way up here. Okay? Again, all of these chords are C major because they contain the same notes. We can even go one step further by playing the notes in different octaves. So remember the C major chord contains C, E, and G. But there's no reason why we have to play these notes all in the same octave, okay? We can, for example, play the C down here, okay, and the g and the e up here. Oh, that's a nice sounding chord, nice and sparse. Now, we're gonna talk about this more at the end of Chapter two when we discuss voicings, which is redistributing the notes within a chord. For now, let's just focus on inversions. So as a review, here's C major in root position, C major in first inversion, and C Major in second inversion. Okay? Remember, a chord is defined based on what notes are present, not their order. So now that we understand inversions, let's get back to major and minor chords. So we already looked at the key of C. Let's try another key. Let's try D. Let's play a D major chord. And we're gonna do this by playing the first, third, fifth notes of the D major scale. So recall the D-major scale. Ok, so d is one. 23, G flat is 345, a is five. So putting those notes together, we get a D major chord containing d, g flat, and a. Now let's play the inversions of this D Major chord. So here it is in root position. Here it is in first inversion, and here it is in second inversion. Again, all of these chords are D major because they contain the same notes. Let's try one more key. Let's try g. Let's play a G major chord. And again, we're gonna do this by playing together the first, third, fifth notes of the G-Major scale. Recall the G major scale. Okay, so G is 123, B is 345, d is five. Putting those notes together, we get a G major chord containing G, B, and D. Now let's play the inversions of this G-Major chord. Here it is in root position. Here it is in first inversion, and here it is in second inversion. All of these chords are G major because they contain the same notes. Okay? Now let's talk about the minor chords. Now, all of the same rules still apply. We're just going to be using the minor scale instead of the major scale. So let's start on C. Let's play a C minor chord. And we're gonna do this by playing the first, third, fifth notes of the C minor scale. So recall the C minor scale. Okay, so C is 123, E flat is 345, g is five. And putting those notes together, we get a C minor chord. Let's play the inversions of this. Here it is in root position. Here it is in first inversion, here it is in second inversion. All of these chords or C minor, because they contain the same notes. Let's try one more. Let's try D. Let's play the D minor chord. So recall the D minor scale. Okay, and we need to play the first, third, fifth notes. Why are they? Well, D is 123, f is 345, g is five, sorry, a is five. So putting those nodes together, we get a D minor chord containing D, F, and a. Let's Play the inversions of this. Here it is in root position. Here it is in first inversion, and here it is in second inversion. Okay? Again, all of these chords are D minor because they contain the same notes. So that's it for the content for today, we learned the major and minor chords, which contain the first, third, fifth notes of the major or minor scale respectively. We also learned inversions, which is a reordering of the notes within a chord. Remember, a chord is defined based on what notes are present, not their order. Okay, now let's talk about the homework for today. So the homework for today is to play the major and minor chords in all 12 keys, and additionally to play them all in root position, first inversion, second inversion. So one more time. Here's the C major chord in root position. C major chord in first inversion, C major chord in second inversion. And the minor chords, C minor in root position, C minor in first inversion, C minor in second inversion. Okay, so Homer for today play the major and minor chords and all 12 keys, and additionally play them all in root position, first inversion, second inversion. So we've covered the content for today. We've talked about the homework. Now I'm going to show you how to play that little piece from the introduction. Let me play it one more time here. Okay, so a pretty nice little piece there. Let's start with the left hand side. The left hand is playing this shell chord, I'll call it that is just the 15, the first fifth notes. So we're starting here, I'd G and playing G and D. Then we go down to see and play C and G. Then we go back to G, G and D One more time back down to C, C and G. Now we go to E. So E and B one more time down to C, C and G. And that backup to E and B to D, and finally C and G. Okay, that's the left-hand. Now let's talk about the right hand. The right hand plays pretty much the same thing for the entire song, made up of two parts. The first part goes like this. So this is a hammer onto a G major chord in root position. Okay? There's G major in root position. And this, this here is actually a g suspended chord. We're going to learn about this in the very next lesson. For now, just think of it as a hammer on to G major in root position. So I'm just going in between a and B. Okay? The first part of the right-hand, The second part plays this melody here. Okay, so that's GA, GB, ga, ga. And I'm just keeping this D note in that melody as I'm playing it, so okay, so right-hand altogether. And that's it. So you just play that over and over again, over the changing chords in the left-hand. Okay, so that's it for today. I hope I've given you a good overview of major and minor chords. If you have any questions, please go ahead and post them in the comments. Thanks for watching. Have a great day and I'll see you in the next lesson. 2. Suspended Chords: Hey everyone, Daniele Fanelli here. Welcome back to another lesson. And I'm super excited for today's lesson because we're gonna be learning suspended chords. So as you get here, these chords sound amazing there, so lush and open sounding, and they're also very simple and easy to play. So I'm going to show you how to construct a suspended chord. We'll look at the inversions of these chords, and that'll show you how to play that little data that I just played, which is a great example of suspended chords in action. Let's get to it. So suspended chords are beautiful sounding chords that are a great alternative to the typical major minor chords that we learned in the previous lesson. They're useful when we want to substitute a regular cord for something that has a bit more character. Suspended chords are based on the major and minor scales from chapter one, but they're not major or minor specific. What this means is that we can play these chords in conjunction with either major or minor chords, will discuss this more in just a few minutes. But first, let's look at the construction of these chords. So there are two types of suspended chords, Sox2 and SAS for, let's start with the SIS two chord. So the SIS two chord contains the first, second, fifth notes of the scale. Now you might be saying which scale, the major or minor scale. And the answer is, it doesn't matter. We can use either the major or minor scale to construct this SAS to court because the first, second, fifth notes of the major and minor scales are the same. Let me show you. So let's go through an example in the key of C. Okay, now I'm going to just choose to use the C Major Scale to construct this CSS2 chord, you could use the C minor scale as well and you would get the same result. So recall the C major scale. Ok? And also recall the numbering system where we number those notes according to the order that we play them in. So 1234567, and we're back to one. Ok? So to play a CSS2 chord, we wanna play together the first, second, fifth notes of the scale. What are they? One, C is 12, d is 2345, g is five. Putting those notes together, we get this C sus to chord containing C, D, and G. And boy, I just loved the way that sounds. Even this simple voicing of a CSS2 chord sounds amazing. We can play it over some base nodes in the left hand to give us an even warmer and richer sound. Okay? So what about the sus four chord? So the sus four chord contains the first fourth, fifth notes of the scale. So one more time. The C major scale. So to play a C sus four chord, we wanna play together the first fourth, fifth notes. So one, again, C is 1234. So F is 45, GD is five. Putting those nodes together, we get this C sus four chord that just wants to resolve to a C major chord. Okay, here's C-Major in root position. We learned this in the previous lesson. Now before we try this in some other keys, recall from the previous lesson where we learned inversions. Remember, and inversion is a reordering of the notes within a chord. And it's based on the concept that a court is defined by what notes are present, not their order. Let's apply that here and play the inversions of this CSS2 chord. So here it is in root position. And remember to get to first inversion, we just wanna take the lowest note, in this case this C, and replace it with the same note, one octave up, which is this c. So making the substitution, we get this. So here's CSS2 in first inversion. And to get the second version, we just do the same thing one more time. We replaced the lowest note, which now is this d, with the same note, one octave up, which is this D up here. Okay? Making the substitution, we get this, which is CSS2 and second inversion, root position, first inversion, second inversion. Remember all of these chords are CSS2 because they contain the same notes. So now that we understand the construction of suspended chords and we're comfortable with the inversions. Let's try playing them in some other keys. So we already went through the example in the key of C. Let's try another key. Let's try B. Let's play the B suspended chords, both SAS to and sus four. So recall the B major scale. Okay, so starting with SAS to, we want to play together the first, second, fifth notes of that scale. So one, B is one, to D flat is 2345, G flat is five. Putting those notes together, we get this be cis to chord. Let's play the inversions of this chord. So here it is in root position. Here it is in first inversion, and here it is in second inversion. Again, all of these chords are be cis to because they contain the same notes. Let's try the sus four chord, which remember contains the first fourth, fifth notes of the scale. So B is one, again, 234, so e is 45, G flat again is five. Putting those nodes together, we get this be sus four chord. That again just wants to resolve to this B major. Okay? Let's try one more key. Let's try a flat. Let's play the a flat suspended chords. So recall that a flat major scale. Okay, starting with S2, that contains the first, second, fifth notes. What are they? So, one, a flat is one to B flat is 2345, and E-flat is five. So putting those notes together, we get this a flat sus to chord. Let's play the inversions of this. Here it is in root position. Here it is in first inversion, and here it is in second inversion. Again, all of those chords are a flat sus too, because they contain the same notes. Sas for, remember, contains the first fourth, fifth notes. So again, a flat is 1234, D flat is four, and again, five, E-flat is five. Putting those notes together, we get this A-flat sus four chord that is just dying to resolve to this a flat major chord. Okay? So that's it for the content for today. We learned suspended chords, which are a great alternative to your typical major minor chords. We learn SAS to and sus four chords. Remember the SIS two chord contains the first, second fifth notes of the scale, and the sus four chord contains the first fourth, fifth notes of the scale. We understood that suspended chords aren't major or minor specific, so we can play them in conjunction with either major or minor chords. And finally, we looked at the inversions of suspended chords. Remember, accord is defined by what notes are present, not their order. So now let's talk about the homework for today. So the homework is to play the suspended chords, both SAS to and sus four in all 12 keys. And additionally, to play them all in root position, first inversion and second inversion. One more time, CSS2 and root position. Css2 in first inversion. Css2 and second inversion. And the sus four. So C sus four and root position. C sus four in first inversion. And CSS for in second inversion. Okay? So homework for today, play both the cis to and SAS for courts can all 12 keys and additionally play them all in root position, first inversion, second inversion. So we've covered the content for today. We've talked about the hallmark. Now I'm going to show you how to play that little piece of music from the introduction. Let me play it one more time here. Okay, so let's start with the left hand. The left hand starts on this a flat shell chord containing a flat and E flat, the 15, by which I mean the first fifth notes of the a flat scale. So the left hand plays this twice, and then goes up to B-flat and places same thing on B flat. So the one in five in the key of B flat, which is B flat and F. And then we go quickly down to g and f. So this is like a G minor seven shell chords. So here's a G minor seven chord containing the first third, fifth, seventh notes of the G minor scale. We're just playing the first seventh note, G and F, and we're playing at one octave lower down here. We're going to learn about minor seventh chords in a later lesson. For now, just think of it as g and f. So the left-hand altogether one more time. Okay, so the left-hand just repeats that throughout the song. Now let's have a look at the right-hand side. The right-hand starts with this. Okay, so that's B flat, C, E flat, and then B flat and E flat. And this B flat and E flat is the Q to play the first chord and the left-hand. Okay? And this here, this is our a flat sus to court. We learned this in the lesson. During the lesson it looked like this. And all we've done here is we've moved as a flat down one octave to here. And we've duplicated the fifth note, E-flat. We've duplicated that down here in the left-hand. Okay, so here's our A-flat sus to court, just played in a different voicing. So the first part of the left hand one more time. We'd find that twice. And then this, so that's just B flat and F going down to B flat and E sy. Okay, and the right hand just repeats that throughout the song over the change in courts in the left-hand. Okay, so that's it for today. I hope I've given you a good overview of suspended chords. If you have any questions, please go ahead and post them in the comments. Thanks for watching. Have a great day and I'll see you in the next lesson. 3. Augmented & Diminished Chords: This is this. Hey everyone, Daniel Penelope here. Welcome back to another lesson. And in today's lesson we're going to be learning augmented and diminished chords. So these chords are great at creating tension and they're often used as stepping stones to get from one chord to the next. Let's have a look at how they're played. We'll practice the inversions, and then I'll show you how to play that little piece that I just played, which is a great example of how we can use augmented chords to build and release tension in our music. Let's get started. So augmented and diminished chords are very useful and adding variety to our plane. Now, these courts don't sound the greatest on their own. And in fact, if you hang on one of these chords for too long, you might get someone throwing something at you. But when played in the right spot within a chord progression, these chords can sound amazing. This is a good example of one of the universal laws of music, which is that it's not what you play, it's how you play it. So it's not the court itself that sounds good or bad. It's where you use it and how you play it that makes the difference. So a chord that sounds bad on its own can be the best sounding thing in the world when used properly and played in the right context. Now, augmented and diminished chords are both simple variations of the major minor 135 chords that we learned in lesson 2.1. If you aren't familiar with those chords, you need to go back and review that content first because we'll be building off of those chords in today's lesson. So as a quick review, here's our C major one, 3-5 court, containing C, E, and G, the first, third, fifth notes of the C major scale. And here's our C minor 135 chord containing C, E flat, and G. That first third fifth notes of the C minor scale. Now, augmented and diminished chords are major minor specific, so we'll actually be learning for courts today. Major augmented, minor, augmented, major diminished and minor diminished. Let's start with the augmented courts. So in music, augmented means sharp five. And if you remember all the way back to Lesson 1.1 where we learned sharps and flats. Sharp means a half-step above. So a sharp five therefore, is a half-step above the five. So it's a play, an augmented chord. We want to move the fifth note of the scale up by a half-step. Let's go through an example in the key of C. Okay, so here's our C major. And if we want to play a C Major augmented chord, we want to move the fifth note of the scale, which remember is G, up by a half-step, which brings us to a flat. So here's our C major augmented chord. Now, where might we use a chord like this? One example is on the fifth of a major progression. So let's say we're playing along in the key of F, F major. And remember that c is the fifth of F. So recall the F major scale. Okay, so 12345, C is the fifth of F. Ok? So we're playing along in F major, B flat major, C major, and F-major, get, everything's fine. Now when we get to this C, maybe we want to do a little more with it. We wanna create some tension. So we can replace this C major with our C major augmented chord, which you can hear creates some nice tension before we resolve back to the F. Ok, so there's an example of where you might use the major augmented chord. Now let's look at the minor augmented chord. So starting now from our C minor chord, remember to play an augmented chord. We just want to move the fifth note, which again is G, up by a half step. Again, we get to a flat. And here's our C minor augmented chord. Where might we use this court? One example is on the third of a major chord progression. So let's say we're playing in the key of a flat major, OK. And remember that C is the third of a flat major. Recall the A-flat major scale. Ok, so 123, C is the third of a flat major. And so we're playing along in a flat major, B flat minor, C minor, D flat. So this, this C minor here, it sounds. Okay. I mean, there's nothing really wrong with it, but what if we try substituting our newly learned C minor augmented chord there? Oh, that's got a whole something else going on. Let's hear that again in contexts. So to me that C minor augmented just sounds so much better than that regular C minor. It's so much more transparent and really pushes nicely up to that D-flat major. So there's an example of where you might use the minor augmented chord. So there's the augmented chords. Remember, augmented means sharp five. And to play an augmented chord, we just move the fifth note of the scale up by a half-step. Now let's have a look at the diminished chords. So in music, diminished means flat five. So to play a diminished chord, we just wanna move the fifth note of the scale down by a half step. So continuing with our C major example, if we want to play a C Major diminished, we want to move the fifth note, which again is this g, down by a half step to G flat, okay? And here's our C major diminished chord. Now, where might we use this chord? And the answer is, whenever you want to create some tension. So let's say we're playing along between G and C, G major. C major, Okay? But we wanna do a little more with this C chord, so we can substitute it for our C major diminished chord. Okay, already that sounds a little bit nicer. We can even add some melody over this, so okay. This here is a G major seven. We'll learn this chord and just a few lessons. But you can here already how this C major diminished chord, it didn't sound too hot on its own. But when played here in the right context, it actually sounds pretty good. Okay, so now let's look at the Minor Diminished chord. So here's our C minor chord. And again, to play diminished, we just want to move it the fifth note down by a half step. Again, we get to G flat, and here's our C Minor Diminished chord. Okay? Where might we use this chord? One example is in-between two major courts. So let's say we're on B major. And we want to get up to D flat major again. But instead of just going there directly, we can play the C Minor Diminished, right? And then go to the D flat major so you can hear how the C Minor Diminished chord create some nice tension and it really pushes us up to that D flat major. Okay, so there's an example of where you might use the Minor Diminished chord. So that's the diminished chords. Remember diminished means flat five. So to play a diminished chord, we move the fifth note of the scale down by a half step. So the last topic for the content for today is inversions of augmented and diminished chords. Remember an inversion is a reordering of the notes within a chord. And it's based on the concept that courts are defined by what notes are present, not their order. If you don't understand inversions yet, you can go back and review my lesson 2.1 video where I go into detail about how to create inversions. So all the augmented and diminished chords we played today were in root position. For the sake of time, I'll just go through one example with you and show you the inversions. Ok, so here's our C major augmented chord in root position. Here it is in first inversion, and here it is in second inversion. Remember, all of these chords are C major augmented because they contain the same notes. So that's it for the content for today, we learned augmented and diminished chords, which are great at creating tension. Remember, augmented means sharp five and diminished means flat five. We looked at some common uses of these chords. We practice their inversions. Remember, accord is defined by what notes are present, not their order. Which brings us to the homework for today. So the homework for today is to play the augmented and diminished chords in all 12 keys, and additionally, to play them all in root position, first inversion, second inversion. So all of the augmented and diminished chords we played today we're in the key of C, But of course we have to be able to do this in all 12 keys. So again, in the interest of time, I'll just go through one other example with you here. Let's try one more key then have a D flat, just a half-step. Ok, so let me play for you all the new chords we learned today in the key of D flat. So starting with our D flat major chord, okay? Here's D flat major augmented and D flat major diminished, okay? And the minor chords. So here's D flat minor. Here's D flat minor augmented, and D flat minor diminished. Okay? So again, homework for today, play the augmented and diminished chords in all 12 keys. And additionally, play them all in root position, first inversion, and second inversion. So we've covered the content for today. We've talked about the hammer. Now I'm going to show you how to play that little piece from the introduction. Let me play it one more time here. Okay, so this song is in the key of E-flat. Let's start with the left-hand, which is very simple, and we're just going back and forth between these two E-flat notes. I think it does it six times in total. And then we go up to this, a flat octave, and then to be D flat and back to E flat. Okay, So left-hand altogether. Okay. Now let's have a look at the right-hand side. The right-hand starts on this E-flat major chord. This is an E-flat major in second inversion. Remember, here's E-flat major in root position. Here's E-flat major in first inversion, and here's E-flat major in second inversion. Again, this is 513, the fifth first, third notes of the E flat major scale. Okay, so that's the first coordinate. Second chord is very similar to the first. We're just gonna move this B flat up to be gay. And knowing that this B flat is the fifth of the chord, we're moving the fifth up by a half step. This is an augmented chord, so this is an E-flat major augmented chord again in second inversion. Okay, so that's the second court. Third chord. We do the same thing one more time. We're moving this B, offer up a half step to C. Ok. We're playing this over and E-Flat. So this is actually an E-flat major six chord. We're going to learn sixth chords and the very next lesson, okay? So that's the third chord, and then we just go all the way back down. So now for the second part of this on, we repeat the first part just up until this point. And then this is when we go to the A-flat and the left-hand. Okay, so this is an A-flat Major seventh chord containing a flat, c, E flat, and G. The first, third, fifth, seventh notes of the A-flat major scale. We're going to learn a major seventh chords in just a few lessons, okay? And from here, the left-hand goes to B, right hand goes back down to this. But since we're now playing this over B, this is a different chord. Now, this is a B major augmented chord in root position containing B, E flat, and G, that 13 and sharp five in the key of B major. Ok. And then finally, we go up to a D flat sus to court. We learned suspended chords in the previous lesson. So this is a D flat sus tube containing D flat, E flat, and a flat, the 125 in the key of a flat. And then we go back to E-flat. Okay, so, so that's it for today. I hope I've given you a good overview of augmented and diminished chords. If you have any questions, please go ahead and post them in the comments. Thanks for watching. Have a great day and I'll see you in the next lesson. 4. 6th Chords: Yes. Hey everyone, Daniele Fanelli here. Welcome back to another lesson. And in today's lesson, we're going to be learning sixth chords to these chords are another great alternative to your typical major minor chord, and they're often used in a chord progression to compliment other courts. Let's have a look at how they're played. We'll practice the inversions, and then I'll show you how to play that little piece of music that I just played, which is a great example of how we can use Sixth Chords within a chord progression to create some beautiful music. Let's jump it. So sixth chords are great sounding chords that can serve a couple of different purposes. Playing. As I mentioned, there are a good alternative to the regular major minor chord, and they're particularly effective when used in a complementary role within a chord progression. The more we learn, the more we want to try and find alternatives to the more typical chords and court arrangements that we hear all the time. And for this reason, I feel like sixth chords are some of the most underutilized chords in music. So sixth chords, like a lot of chords that we've learned so far are based on the major minor 135 chords that we learned in lesson 2.1. Now if you aren't familiar with those chords, you need to go back and review that content first because we'll be building off of those chords in today's lesson. As a quick review. Here's our C major 135 chord containing C, E, and G, the first third, fifth notes of the C-Major scale. And here's our C minor 135 chord containing C, E flat, and G, the first third fifth notes of the C minor scale, okay? So sixth chords, as you probably guessed, contained the sixth note in the scale. So if we want to, for example, in the key of C, play a C major six chord, we need to include the sixth note of the C major scale. So recall the C major scale. And also recall the numbering system we'd been using where we number those nodes according to the order that we play them in. So 1234567, and we're back to one. Ok. So 1-2-3, 4-5-6, a is the sixth of c. Okay? So again, here's our C major chord. And now to play a C major six, we want to include this a, which is the sixth. No. Now we can either replace the five which is G with the six, which is a, or we can leave the 5'7 and just add the six. Okay? These are both the same chord because adding or removing the fifth of a scale doesn't change the chord. Okay, I'm just going to choose to replace it. And in doing so, we get the C Major Sixth Chord containing C, E, and a. Okay? Now a quick note on omitting or keeping the fifth, it's really up to you. So if we, if we keep the fifth note in the scale, we get a more full and rich sounding chord. If we, if we omit the fifth and we've got a chord that sounds a bit more sparse. Ok, so feel free to include or omit the fifth note when playing these chords according to what kind of sound you're looking for. Now, where might we use a chord like this? So one example is on the third of a minor chord progression. So let's say we're playing along and the key of a minor. Okay, so here is a minor in first inversion, C major in root position, and D major in second inversion. Okay? So this C major chord, it sounds okay, but what if we try substituting r nu C major six chord in there? Okay, so that might sound a little bit better. Let's hear that in context. Okay, so to me that C major six coordinates just sounds so much better there than not regular C major. Ok, so there's an example of where you might use the Major Sixth Chord. Now what about the minor six chord? So it's very similar to the major six. We're just going to build off of the minor 135 chord instead of the major ones 3-5 chord. So remember, here's our C minor chord containing C, E flat, and G. And to make this into a sixth chord, we just want to include the sixth note of the scale, which remember, is this a? And again, we can either replace the five with the six or we can keep the Five and just add the Sex on keeping both notes. Again, I'm just going to choose to replace it. And in doing so, we get this C minor sixth chord containing C, E, a. Okay? Now, where might we use this chord? One example is in conjunction with a regular minor chord or a minor seventh chord. So let's say we're hanging on this C minor seven chord containing C, E, G, and B-flat, that 1357 in the key of C minor. We're gonna learn minor seventh chords in just a few lessons. But let's say we're hanging on this C minor seven chord, okay? And let's say we have a pretty good groove going in the key of C, so we don't want to change the base notes. We can just go down to this C minor six. Okay? And we can just play those two chords back and forth to create a pretty funky grooves. So, okay, so this is a great example of how good a sixth chord can sound when it's played in a complementary role in a chord progression. So you can hear this C minor six. It doesn't sound very good on its own, but it does an amazing job of all say being the other half of this C minor seven chord, Okay, you can hear those two chords just fit together very nicely. So there's an example of where we might use the minor sixth chord. So the last thing we need to talk about for the content today is inversions of these chords. So remember an inversion is a reordering of the notes within a chord. And it's based on the concept that cords are defined by what notes are present, not their order. So all of the sixth chords that we've played so far today were in root position, but we need to be comfortable with the inversions as well. Let me go through just one example with you. So remember, here's our C Major Sixth Chord and were playing it here in root position with the 136. Okay? Here it is in first inversion with the 361. And here it is in second inversion with the sixth 13. Remember, all of these chords are C major six because they contain the same notes. If you don't understand in versions, you can go back to my lesson 2.1 video, where I go into detail about how to construct inversions. So that's it for the content for today. We learned sixth chords, which can sound pretty good on their own, but really shine when played in a complementary role within a chord progression. We looked at major six and minor sixth chords and looked at some common examples of where we might use those chords. And finally, we practice their inversions. Remember, accord is defined by what notes are present, not their order. Now let's talk about the homework. So the homework for today is to play the major six and minor sixth chords in all 12 keys. And additionally, to play them all in root position, first inversion, and second inversion. So all of the sixth chords that we play today were played in the key of C. But of course, we have to be able to do this in all 12 keys. So let's go through just one example and one more key. Let's try D flat. Let's play the new chords we learned today in the key of D flat. So here's our D flat major chord. And here's our D-flat major sixth chord. And again, I got there by adding this B-flat, which is the sixth note in the key of D flat and the minor chords. So here's our D flat minor chord. And here's our D flat minor six chord again, by just adding this B flat, which is the sixth note in the key of D flat. Okay, so homework for today, play the major six and minus six chords in all 12 keys, and additionally play them all in root position, first inversion, second inversion. So we've covered the content for today. We've talked about the homework. Now I'm going to show you how to play that little piece from the introduction. Let me play it one more time here. Okay, so this song is in the key of F major, but start with the left-hand. So the left-hand starts on this f shell corn containing f and see that wine. And five, by which I mean, of course, the first fifth notes of the F scale, okay, then we go down to E flat and play the same thing, E-flat and B-flat, the one in five in the key of E flat. And we go down one more time to D. So DNA, the one in five in the key of D. And then one more time down to D flat, to D flat and E flat, the one in five in the key of D flat. The left-hand just repeats that and then eventually goes to this B flat octave. Okay? So the left-hand altogether. Okay? Now let's have a look at the right-hand side. The right-hand starts on this F major chord. This is just a regular F-major 135 chord in root position containing F, a and C, the 135. Okay, so that's the first court, second chord is this. And that's being played over an E flat and the left-hand. So this here is really the chord that I wanted to showcase in today's lesson. This is actually an E-flat major six add to chord. Okay, let's have a look at what notes are present. So again, in the left hand we have the 15, and the right hand we have the three, the five, the six, and the two. Okay? So just a beautiful sounding chord that fits just perfectly with the F-Major chord that we just came from. Okay, so this is just another great example of how good a major sixth chord can sound when played as a complimentary cord within a progression. Okay? So the second chord is this major six add to coordinate. Okay? Third chord in the right hand is actually the same as the first chord. It's the same notes were playing F, a, and C. And we're just playing it over a, D And the left-hand, which makes this a D minor seven chord, okay? And the last cord right-hand looks like this. Okay, and we're playing that over a D flat. And the left-hand, which makes this a D flat major seven chord. We have the 15 and the left-hand, and the 3573 and the righthand. Righthand altogether. And then we just repeat that until we get to the end where we go to the B flat and the left hand. And then we play this B flat sus to chord in the right-hand containing the 5125. And then at the end there I was just repeating those notes as we go up the keyboard. So that's it for today. I hope I've given you a good overview of sixth chords. If you have any questions, please go ahead and post them in the comments. Thanks for watching. Have a great day and I'll see you in the next lesson. 5. Voicings & Inversions: Hey everyone. Daniel Pinellia here. Welcome back to another lesson. And in today's lesson, we're going to be learning how to apply two very important concepts called voicings and inversions. So we've learned a lot of great courts so far. And these two concepts will give us an almost unlimited number of ways to play these chords and really open up the door for a creativity. So I'm going to walk you through it and then I'll show you how to play that little piece that I just played, which is a great example of voicings and inversions in action. Let's get to it. So voicings and inversions are both pretty simple concepts that can make a big difference in our plan. Now, how to effectively use voicings and inversions is something that you might not learn in a typical piano chords course. But it's the kind of thing that can really make your playing stand out and sounds special. There are so many different ways to play the same chord. And this is where we can use voicings and inversions to add some great variety to our Planck had to keep it sounding unique and interesting. So this is the last lesson of chapter two, basic chords. Up next is chapter three, basic chord progressions, where we're going to take all the chords we've covered and learn how to arrange them into songs. We've learned so many great courts already. And once we understand how to apply voicings and inversions, we're gonna open up even more possibilities for playing these chords. For this reason, voicings and inversions are great tools for you to use to start to develop your own musical style and sound. So let's start with a review of inversions. So an inversion is a reordering of the notes within a chord. And it's based on the concept that cords are defined by what notes are present, not their order. What this means is that we can rearrange the notes in a chord. We can play them in any order we want, and the chord remains unchanged. So for example, here's our C major 135 chord containing C, E, and G. The first third, fifth notes of the C major scale. We learned this chord and others like it back in lesson 2.1. So knowing that this chord contains C, E, and G, and knowing that the order doesn't matter, we can replace this low sea with this high C, and we get this. So here's C-Major in first inversion, and we can do it one more time, replacing this low E with this high Y0, and we get this. So here's C-Major in second inversion. So now we have three different ways to play that same C major chord. Here in root position, here in first inversion, and here in second inversion. Okay? All of these chords are C major because they contain the same notes, which is playing the notes in a different order. And this applies to any chord. So let's try playing the inversions of another chord that we learned in chapter two. Let's try a suspended chord. So we learned these chords in lesson 2.2. A, C sus to chord containing C, D, and G, that 125. So here it is in root position. Here it is in first inversion, and here it is in second inversion. Again, all of these chords are CSS2 because they contain the same notes. Remember, accord is defined by what notes are present, not their order. So why are inversions important, right? Why do we care? And the answer is because they allow us to keep our cords close together when playing a chord progression. And they save us from having to jump all over the keyboard with our hands. Not only does this make things easier, it makes things sound better. So in general, chords that are closer together and have more notes in common tend to sound better. So let me show you, let's, let's play a simple chord progression. Let's say C major and F-major. So here's C-Major in root position. Here's F major in root position. And maybe we play a G at the end. So Here's G-Major in root position. So C, F, and G, a 14x five in the key of C. Let's play that chord progression using only the root position chords. Okay, so that really doesn't sound very good. Okay, there's nothing special going on. And then let's see if we can improve that chord progression by using inversions. So instead of playing the C major in root position, let's play it here in second inversion with a 513. Ok, and instead of playing the F-Major in root position, let's play it here in first inversion with the 351. Okay? And you can here already that these chords sound so much better together than they did when we played them in root position. And the reason why is because these chords are closer together and they have this C note and common. Okay, so now let's try playing again the same chord progression, but using the inversions root position there. Okay, so how much better does that sound than when we played the same progression using only root position chords, it's night and day. And this is what I mean when I say that knowing how to use voicings and inversions can make all the difference in your plan. Okay? Any great musician knows how to use inversions to not only make their life easier, but also to make their chords sound better. Okay, remember chords that are closer together and have more notes in common, generally sound better. So now let's talk about voicings. So a voicing is a redistribution of the notes within a chord, for example, across multiple octaves. Ok, so going back to our trusty C major chord example here, we already know the inversions of this chord, Okay? So we've got some choice there for how we want to play the chord. But we can even go one step further by playing these notes in different octaves. So all of the inversions that we learned to play all the notes in the same octave. But there's no reason why this has to be the case. We can play the C down here, and we can play the G and E up here. So this is a different voicing of the same C major chord. But how much better does this sound than this? Okay, this has so much more character. And we can even go one step further and play some repetitions of these notes. So right now we're playing the C1's, the G 1's, and the 1's. But we can play the C twice. We can play the C twice and the g twice. We can play this C three times and that g twice. Okay? And this is where things really start to open up, is when we realized that we can play these three notes. We can play any amount of repetitions of these three nodes. We can play them in any order or in any octave, as long as the same notes are present, the chord remains the same. Okay, Let's try playing a different voicing of another chord from chapter two, let's go back to the suspended chord, but let's play in the key of E flat instead of C, just because we're always playing in the key of C. So here's an E-flat SAS to chord in root position. Now, let me show you one of my favorite voicings of this same chord. Okay, so you can hear how much more rich and full That sounds than just this plain old E-flat SAS to. So how did I create this voicing? Well, really all I did was I moved this node in the left hand down one octave and I duplicated the fifth note, which is B flat case when playing E flat and B flat and the left hand. And then in the right-hand, I'm just duplicating again the B flat, which is the fifth. So you can see here how we used repetitions and spacing along the keyboard to create this beautiful sound in voicing of this same E-flat SAS to court. Okay? So I hope I've shown you now just how many different options there are for playing the same chord. We can use voicings and inversions to create an almost unlimited amount of possibilities. And this is such a powerful tool when writing and playing chord progressions, as we're gonna see in the next chapter, chapter three. Okay? Remember it doesn't matter how many of each note we play, What Octave we're playing in, or what order we play the notes in. If the same notes are present, that chord remains unchanged. Okay, so that's it for the content for today. We learned voicings and inversions, which are very powerful tools for expanding our chords. And inversion is a reordering of the notes within a chord and a voicing is a redistribution of the notes, for example, across multiple octaves. Remember, inversions are useful for keeping our courts close together when playing a chord progression. And voicings are just all-around awesome and helping us to create new and interesting ways to play the same courts. So now let's talk about the homework. So the homework for today is to pick CT that we learned in chapter two and come up with a cool new voicing for it. So you can use inversions, you can use repetitions of the notes. You can play them in any order or in any octave, but come up with a cool new voicing for one of your favorite chords. So homework for today is to get creative and play around with different voicings if some of the chords we learned in chapter two. So we've covered the content, we've talked about the homework. Now I'm going to show you how to play that little piece from the introduction. Let me play it one more time here. Okay, so this song is in the key of E minor. And if we start on this beautiful voicing of an a add to court, so right off the bat, this is a great example of how we can use voicings to create an amazing sound and court out of something pretty regular. So this court comes from just are a major 135 chord in root position here. The first thing we did was we put this BN. So this is the second note of the a major scale. So here's our a major, here's our assess two. And by playing all those notes together, this is now an, a add two chord. Okay? So that's already a pretty good improvement over the regular hey, Major chord. But let's use our knowledge of voicings to go one step further and spread these notes out along the keyboard. So let's move this B-flat, sorry, this D flat, which is the third note of the chord. Let's move that down to the left hand, okay? And we get this amazing sounding voicing. Okay, so we've got the 13 in the left-hand, that 125 and the right-hand. So the first chord is this beautiful voicing of this a addtwo chord. Okay? Second chord is this E minor seven chord, and this is actually an inversion of E minor seven. So here's E minor seven in root position containing E, G, B, and D, the 1357 in the key of E minor. And we're just moving this low E up here. Okay, so that's the right-hand and the left-hand were playing D, B, and E That 151. So the second chord, this is nice voicing of an inversion of an E minor seven chord. Okay? We just play those two chords back and forth until we get to the end where we play this B7 augmented chord. So we're going to learn seventh chords and just a few lessons right at the start of chapter four. But you should recognize this chord, okay, this is a B major augmented. We learned this in less than 2.3, I think. So. Here's our regular VII major one, 3-5 court. And we've got this sharp five in here, which makes it an augmented chord. And then the only difference now, as I'm playing this note, which is an a instead of a B, which is the seventh. We'll talk about all this at the start of chapter four. But this is a B7 augmented chord. Okay? And then we'll go down to this beautiful E minor ninth chord, which again, we're going to learn in chapter four, advanced chords. But this E minor nine chord contains E, G, B, D, and G flat, that 123579 in the key of E minor. Okay, so just a beautiful chord there to finish it off. So that's it for today. I hope I've given you a good overview of voicings and inversions. If you have any questions, please go ahead and post them in the comments. Thanks for watching. Have a great day and I'll see you at the next lesson.