Photoshop for Lunch™ - Text Over Image Effects - Type, Glyphs & Layers | Helen Bradley | Skillshare

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Text Over Image Effects - Type, Glyphs & Layers

Helen Bradley, Illustrator for Lunch™ & Photoshop for Lunch™

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5 Lessons (36m)
    • 1. Photoshop for Lunch™ - Text Over Image Effects - Intro

      1:09
    • 2. Photoshop for Lunch™ - Text Over Image Effects - Part 1

      9:45
    • 3. Photoshop for Lunch™ - Text Over Image Effects - Part 2

      8:59
    • 4. Photoshop for Lunch™ - Text Over Image Effects - Part 3

      10:51
    • 5. Photoshop for Lunch - Glyphs Panel Workaround for CS6 and Earlier

      5:26

About This Class

Photoshop for Lunch™ is a series of short video courses you can study in bite size pieces such as at lunchtime. In this course you'll learn to add text to images. We'll use short quotes and free downloadable high quality photos which you can use for any purpose without attribution. You will see three different "text over image" effects and learn some handy tips and tricks for working in Photoshop along the way. Here is one of the examples from the class:

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More in the Photoshop for Lunch™ series:

10 Photoshop Pattern Tips and Techniques - A Photoshop for Lunch™ Class

Circle Patterns - Step by step seamless repeat patterns - A Photoshop for Lunch™ class

Creative Layer Styles in Photoshop - A Photoshop for Lunch™ Class

Make Patterns from Sketches & Digital Art - A Photoshop for Lunch™ Class

Photoshop for Lunch™ - 10 Blend Tips in 10 minutes 

Photoshop for Lunch™ - 10 in 10 - 10 Brush Tips in 10 Minutes or Less

Photoshop for Lunch™ - 10 in 10 - Ten Top Photoshop Tips in 10 minutes (or less)

Photoshop for Lunch™ - 10 Selection tips in 10 minutes (or less)

Photoshop for Lunch™ - 3 Exotic Patterns - Shapes, Paths, Patterns

Photoshop for Lunch™ - 4 Most Important File Formats - Choose & Save As: jpg, png, pdf, psd

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Abstract Glowing Backgrounds

Photoshop for Lunch™ - B&W, Tints & Isolated Color Effects - Adjustment Layers, Masks & Opacity

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Bend Objects with Puppet Warp

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Clean & Color Scanned Line Art

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Color a Scanned Sketch - Blends, Brushes, Layer Styles

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Color a Sketch with a Texture - Masks, Dodge/Burn, Hue/Saturation 

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Complex Pattern Swatches

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Complex Selections Made Easy - Master Refine Edge & Select and Mask

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Create a Color Scheme Graphic

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Create a Custom Character Font

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Create a Mandala - Template, Rotation, Texture, Gradients, Pen, and Shapes

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Create a Reusable Wreath Design

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Create an Award Badge and Ribbon - Shapes, Warp, Rotate  

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Create Backgrounds for Projects - Halftones, Sunburst, Patterns

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Create Complex Half Drop Repeating Patterns

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Create HiTech HUD Rings - Repeat transform, Filters & Textures

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Create Mockups to Use and Sell - Blends, Smart Objects, Effects

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Create Organic Patterns - Pen, Offset Filter, Free Transform and More

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Create Plaid (Tartan) Repeat Patterns

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Create Text on a Path - Paths, Type, Pen tool

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Create the Droste Effect with Photoshop and an Online Tool 

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Critters with Character - Pen Free, One Color Designs

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Curly Bracket Frames - Shapes, Paths, Strokes

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Cutout & Frame Photos - Clipping Mask, Layer Mask, Rotation, Shapes

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Demystifying the Histogram - Understand & Correct images with it

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Double Exposure Effect - Masks, Blends, Styles

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Draw a Fantasy Map - Brushes, Patterns, Strokes & Masks

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Emboss and Deboss Text and Shapes

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Folded Photo Effect - Gradients, Guides, Stroke, Drop Shadow 

Photoshop for Lunch™ - From Ho Hum to WOW - Everyday Photo-editing Made Easy

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Get Your File Size Right Every Time - Size Images for Web & Print 

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Glitter Text, Shapes and Scrapbook Papers

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Grab Bag of Fun Text Effects - Fonts, Clipping Masks, Actions & More

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Grid Collage for Social Media - Clipping masks, Shapes & Layer Styles

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Hi-tech Mosaic Effect - Brushes, Patterns & Pixelization 

Photoshop for Lunch™ - In the Footsteps of Warhol - Create Awesome Animal Images

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Intro to Photoshop Actions

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Isometric Cube Patterns - Shapes, Repeat patterns, Smart Objects

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Layered Paper Collage Effect - Layers, Layer Styles, Gradients,

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Layers and Layer Masks 101 for photographs and photographers

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Make & Sell a Shapes Collection

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Make & Sell Photoshop Brushes - Brushes, Templates, Preset

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Make & Sell Scrapbook Designs - Formats, Files, Marketing Materials

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Make & Use Photo Brushes - Brushes, Masks, Watercolors

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Make a Photo Collage for Social Media - Masks, Selections & Patterns

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Make and Sell Geometric Overlays for Social Media - Shape, Transform, Fills

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Make Custom Shapes - Combine, Exclude, Intersect & Subtract

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Making Kaleidoscopes - Rotation, Reflection & Smart Objects

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Metaball Patterns - Structured and Organic

Photoshop for Lunch™ - More Patterns - Diagonal Stripes, Chevrons, Plaid, Colorful Polkadots 

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Overlapping and Random Circles Patterns

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Paint a Photo in Photoshop - Art History, Color, Texture

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Pattern Bombing Effect - Patterns, Selections, Mask, Warp, Vanishing Point

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Pattern Making - Seamless Repeating Patterns

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Patterns as Photo Overlays for Social Media 

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Photo Texture Collage - Gradient Map, Blending & Textures

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Photoshop Inking Techniques

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Preparing images for Social Media, Blogs and eBooks

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Recolor Objects without Making Selections - Master Color Change Tools

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Recolor Pattern Techniques

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Remove Unwanted Objects & Tourists from Photos

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Reusable Video Glitch Effect - Use Channels, Shear, Displacement Map & Noise

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Seamlessly Blend Two Images - Masks, Content Aware Fill

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Set up Colors, Tints and Shades for Working Smarter in Photoshop

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Sketches & Brushes to Whimsical Patterns

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Snapshot to Art - 3 Photo Effects - Faux Orton, Gradient Map, Tritone

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Surreal Collage Effect - Paths, Cloning, Warp, Blend 

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Text Over Image Effects - Type, Glyphs & Layers

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Turn a Photo into a Pattern - Selection, Filter, Pattern Swatch

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Upside Down Image Effect - Masks, Selections, Flip Images

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Using Illustrator Objects in Photoshop - Files, Smart Objects, Shapes

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Using the Scripted Patterns Tool in Photoshop

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Valentine's Day Inspired Hearts

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Vintage Image Cutout Effect - Selections, Drop Shadows, Transparency

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Whimsical Rotated Patterns 

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Whimsical Scrapbook Paper Designs using Displacement Maps

Photoshop for Lunch™ - Whimsical Textures for Drawings

Photoshop Type Basics - Tips Tricks and Techniques - a Photoshop for Lunch™ class

Using Textures in Photoshop - A Photoshop for Lunch™ class

 

Transcripts

1. Photoshop for Lunch™ - Text Over Image Effects - Intro: Hello, I'm Helen Bradley. Welcome to this episode of Photoshop for Lunch, Text Over Image Effects. Photoshop for lunch is series of Photoshop classes, everyone of which teaches one or two Photoshop techniques. You'll get plenty of opportunity to practice your new skills in the project that you'll create. Today, we're making text over image effects in Photoshop. We're going to find some different ways to apply text over an image. You're going to learn how to fill text with a photo. You're going to learn how to access dingbat and glyph fonts in Photoshop. You're going to learn some techniques for working with text in Photoshop. As you're going through this video when you see the prompt to give it a thumbs up, please, if you're enjoying the video, give it a thumbs up. That helps other people identify that this is a course that they may also want to take. Please, if you would like to, leave a comment, I read all of your comments and I view all of your projects. So if you're ready, let's get started with today's Photoshop for Lunch class, Text Over Image Effects. 2. Photoshop for Lunch™ - Text Over Image Effects - Part 1: Before we get started with these text effects, I want to introduce you to a site called unsplash.com. Now, unsplash.com, you get access to a large number of photos that you can use for your own projects. There is no limit to what you can do with these photos. You will need to sign up at the site, but you can download those photos free of charge and use them for any purpose. So what I'm using in this particular set of videos is a number of images from this site, just so that you're able to download and follow along with the tutorial. The other reason why I really like this site is because the quality of the images is really quite high. They've very, very artistic images, and so they lend themselves to the type of project that we're doing here today. Now, the first of the images that we're going to use is from the site here, and I'm just going to show you how you go ahead and download it. This is the image that we're going to use, so I'm just going to click on it to open it in a new browser window. I'm going to right-click and choose "Save image as," and I can just save it to my disk and open it in Photoshop, and it's as easy as that to do. Let's go ahead now and do just that, and I'm going to open the image that I already previously downloaded, and here it is here. Now, I want to start off with this image by cropping it, so I'm going to click on the "Crop" tool here to select it, and I want to do a square crop, which is a 1:1 ratio. In later versions of Photoshop, you can click on the original ratio link here and just choose something like 1:1 Square. You can also, on older versions of Photoshop, just drag out the crop rectangle holding Shift as you do so, and then you'll be constrained to a square shape. So I'm just going to crop this to a full size image because I want the full height of the image, but I want it to be square, so I'll click the check mark here. Now, the text effect that we're going to create is going to be three lines of text. I'm going to click on the "Text" tool here, and I'm just going to click on the image, and let's just see how we are going here. Well, the font is really small. You can see that this little indicator is only just visible. So because this is a really large image, I want to a very large font size, so I'm going to start with about 72. I'm going to make it black, and I'm going to make it left justified. I'm just going to click "Left justified" here, right now, and I want this to be a italic font because I want this to be the word the, and I want it to be by itself. I chose a font to use that you may or may not have on your computer, but you should be able to find something that will do just as well. The font that I'm using is called Pristina, and it's Pristina Regular. In the list here, you can see that it looks like a slightly script font, slightly italic font. It's just going to have a little bit of character, so choose anything in your font list that you think might be appropriate. I'm just going to type the word the, and it's going to be in lowercase, and I'll click the check mark. I'm just going to ignore size and everything for now. I just want to get my text elements down. I'm going to click here for the next piece of text and this needs to be much larger still. You can see here in the textbooks that we run out of point sizes as, well, that's a [inaudible]. You can just click in the box and type whatever you want, or you can press Shift up arrow to just increase the font size to quite a large font size. I'm going to choose 222 for now. Left justified, and the font I'm going to use is one that you will have installed, and it's just Myriad Pro Regular, and it's a nice little font. It's just an understated font. So I have selected here now, Myriad Pro Regular, and I'm just going to type the word JOURNEY in all uppercase, and click the check mark, not worried that there's too over the top of each other for now. Next I'm going to do one last piece of text. I'm still going to do it in Myriad Pro Regular for now, but I'm going to do it in lowercase. So the quote is, "The JOURNEY is my home." I'm just going to click the check mark here. Now, I want to do something with this particular piece of type, the last one that I put in because I don't want it to be the same as this one here, but I've already used two typefaces in my document and to throw another one in is probably one too many. But Myriad Pro comes in a whole lot of varieties. So I'm going to select this layer. I'm going to select the "Text" tool. I'm going to drag as my text solid is selected, and then I'm going to have a look and see what comes with Myriad Pro Regular. The answer is that Myriad Pro comes with a whole lot of other varieties of Myriad Pro and it's acceptable to use this as a different type of font, but still keeping within the same font family. What I want to do is to use Myriad Pro Light Semi Extended. Now, this is a semi-extended font, but it's lighter, so it has a slightly different character to Myriad Pro Regular, so I'm going to select that, and let's click the check mark. Now I'm going to look at these paces in positions. I'm going to move is my home roughly into the position I want it to be in. I'm going to move JOURNEY into roughly the position I want it to be in. Then I'm going to select the word "the," and go and do pretty much the same with that. Now I want to put the right over the top of "JOURNEY," but I think it's a little bit small, so I'm just going to hold the Shift key as I enlarge it a little bit and place it in position. I'm pretty happy with the and JOURNEY, but I'm not happy with is my home. The reason I'm not happy with it is firstly, it's getting a bit lost in the rest of the picture, and secondly, it's not very neatly positioned. So the getting lost in the rest of the picture problem is easily solved. I'm going to go below all my text objects, I'm actually just going to click on the background layer, and I'm going to click to add a new layer. I'm going to drag over a rectangle. So I'm going to a rectangular marquee tool. I'm just going to test it out against JOURNEY because I want it to be about the same size as the word JOURNEY. Maybe a little bit taller, but certainly about the same width, so I can test it out by just drawing it here, and this is my rectangle. I'm going to fill it with white. I have my empty layer selected, white is my foreground color. I'll press Alt Backspace Option Delete on a Mac to fill that selection with white. Now I'm going to the Move tool and I'm going to move that selection down because I want it to appear where is my home is, because I'm going to put this text over the top of this box. So I'm just going to line things up reasonably neatly here right now, and now let's go and get the text. So I'm going to click on the "Text" tool, I'm going back to the text object, and I'm going to select over it. Now, my font is too big, so I'm going to start reducing it. I'm going to click here in the font box. I'm just going to press Shift Down Arrow to start reducing it. If I'm getting close to where I want it to be, I can just press the down arrow. I'm going to click the check mark, and now let's just move it into position and see how it looks over this background. But the background still is selected right now so I'm going to press Control or Command D to deselect the selection so I can move my text into place. If I want my text in this box, it is still a bit too big. Again, we're going back to the Text tool, back to selecting over the text, and I'm just going to make it a bit smaller and re-position it. What I'm looking for is the alignment of the white box to be along the side of the J and the Y here. I can check it if I want to by choosing "View" and making sure that Rulers has a check mark. If it doesn't, I'm going to select it, but mine does, so I'm just going to click away from here. I can just drag some guides in. So I'm going to just going to drag a guide into the beginning of the letter J, just to test and see how my box is there. I'm going to do the same just to the very end of the letter Y. Well, it seems like my box is just a little bit big, so I'm going to zoom in, grab the Move tool, select my box layer, and just drag it in to align with these guides. To move the image, I'm just holding the space bar as I move the image. If everything looks good, I'm going to click the check mark and then get rid of the guides by choosing "View," and then "Clear Guides." Now, I'm going to get is my home again and I'm just going to move it down a little bit into that box. So I'm going to press Control or Command 0 to zoom out. I think the white box is now two white, so I'm going to click on this layer and just reduce the opacity of it. That shows a little bit of the image underneath, but it does provide a background for that finer text so it's a little bit easier to see it. If we want to make sure that everything is nicely centered, we're going to select everything that needs to be nicely centered. That is, the white layer, the JOURNEY layer, so I'm Control or Command clicking on that and the is my home layer. I'm not selecting the because I don't want to center that. Now, if I press Control or Command A to select the overall image, you can see I get these alignment tools up here and I want to align everything so it's nicely centered. So I'll click "Align horizontal centers," and that just aligns everything neatly. I'll press Control or Command D deselect the selection, and there's the completed text effect. 3. Photoshop for Lunch™ - Text Over Image Effects - Part 2: This is the next text effect that we're going to create. For this you're going to need a few bits and pieces. Firstly you want the image. You can download that from unsplash.com and it's in the travel section. Go search for the word travel. When you locate this picture, just click on the download link. Then when it opens in your browser, you can just right click and choose Save Image As and just save it to your disk. It's one of the pieces that you need. The next thing that you want to is this font called Amatic. I think it's a really, really nice font and it's going to work very well for this particular project. I'm going to give you the link to download this from fontsquirrel.com and it's the font Amatic that you want. You'll want to go ahead and install it. There are two fonts that you install out of this download, you'll install the regular and then the bold version. Finally, you're going to need a dingbat font. The dingbat font that you want as called Nymphette. It's from DaFont. Again, I'm going to give you the link to locate that and download that. It's 100 percent free so it's available for commercial and personal purposes. Just click to download it and go ahead and install that. Once you've got the two fonts and the image, you're ready to get started. I'm going to open the image that I just downloaded. Now this is at 100 percent size, so this is a very small image. Just be aware of the fact that it is quite small. A little bit unusual for Unsplash since their images are usually a bit bigger than this. I'm going to click the text tool and I'm going to make sure that I have my downloaded and installed font selected, that's Amatic SC regular. I'm just going to use the regular version. It does also of course come in the bold version which is just here but I'm going to select regular. I'm going to make sure that my text for now is left justified. So I'm just going to click here on this left aligned text option. I'm going to test the font. I'm just going to click here on the image and just see how the font looks. Well, the indicator here is telling me it's really quite small, so I think it's a bit too small. I'm going to select now something larger here, something like 36 points. You can see that the indicator now is showing us that it's quite a bit larger. I'm ready to go ahead and to type my quote. Now, Amatic is an all caps fonts so don't be surprised that you don't get mixed case with this, it's all uppercase. I've got one line in. I'm going to do this as two separate lines. I'm just going to click to put that in. I'm going to click again to create the second line. Now I've deliberately made a spelling mistake here. I'm going click the check mark and we're just going to continue to work on this but I am going to show you how you can spellcheck in Photoshop and you probably should because it's easy to make mistakes. I have the author of the quote also to come in here. I'm just going to copy that because I have it open in a browser window here. I've just copied it. Let's go to the last palette. I'm going to add a new layer for this with the Text Tool. I'm just going to click and then I'm going to just paste her name in with Control or Command V, because I copied it from the Web and I'll click the check mark. Now because each of these pieces of text are in separate lines, it's going to be easy to move them around. With this one, I might want to do just that. I certainly do want to enlarge the type. I'm going back to make sure that the layer is selected. I've got this travel line selected, I'm going back to the type tool, I'm going to be very careful about just dragging over the text and now I can increase the font size. I'm going to click in here. I can try at 48. I still think that's a bit small so I'm just going to press the up arrow to just enlarge it. I'm going to make a note of what I choose for my font size and I'm choosing 55 right now, so I'll click the checkmark here. I'm going to do the same with this next line. Again, selecting layer, making sure I have the Text tool selected, select over the font, being very careful to pick it up and then just making this 55, click the check mark. Now I'm just going to rearrange these pieces. I'm going to take the author of the quote down here. I'm going to take each of those pieces. I think I'm going to right align them but that's going to be easily done by just selecting all of those layers. I'm going to select on all of these three text layers. That displays these options up here on the toolbar because I have the Move Tool selected. I can just click this option which has gone to align everything to the right edges and it just neatens everything up nicely. Now as I said, there was a spelling error here, at least one that I can see. Let see how we would spellcheck in Photoshop. We're going to choose "Edit," Check Spelling. Photoshop is going to go through not only the piece that I had selected, which in actual fact was this top line, but also the rest of the document and it's going to check all my text. Here is the misspelling, and I do want to change it to this correct spelling so I'm going to click "Change." It's picked up the author's name as being a misspelling. Well, that's not correct, so I'm going to tell it to ignore that. Spellcheck is complete. Now, spellchecking this and correcting the error has also knocked the alignment out. I'm going to want to re-select those layers and just recheck the alignment and get everything aligned up nicely. Now what I want to put in is a little sort of swash from the Nymphette font. Now Nymphette is what's called a dingbat font. If I go to the text tool here, but just drop this down and we go and have a look at Nymphette, it's going to be in the list here. You can see that all you're seeing here are the elements from the fonts. It's going to be very hard for us to work out exactly where the elements are in the font and how we're going to get access to them. But there is a tool in Photoshop that's going to give you access to those fonts. It's on the glyphs panel. I'm going to window and I'm going to choose glyphs. I'm going to go and find my Nymphette font. I'm selecting Nymphette and the glyphs panel shows me what all the characters look like in this font. There's a little slider here so you can make them bigger or smaller as you wish. Now, the one that I want is one of the ones that has a sort of heart shape in it. One of these, and I'm thinking this is the one that I want. Once we are able to select it, now we have to get it in to the document and we do that by going to the last palette. I'm just going to move this out of the way for a minute. I'm going to add a new layer and I'm going to select the Text tool. I'm going to click roughly where I want my character to go. Now that I've selected all of that and set Photoshop up to type something. I'm just going to double-click here on the character that I actually want to use and Photoshop just adds it to the document. That's a very handy way of getting access to your dingbat fonts which would otherwise be really, really difficult to get access to. I'm just going to click the check mark. I'm going to zoom in here a little bit because what I want to do is to put this a little bit closer to the rest of the text. I actually want to enlarge it a bit. I'm going to hold the Shift key as I drag it out to make it a slightly larger character. Then I'm just going to move it into position. I want it to come out of the text here. I'm going to press Control or Command zero to zoom back out. Now, one other thing that you may want to do with this is to just lighten this image underneath. To do that, we're going to select the background and we're going to unlock it. We can do that in a number of ways. One simple way is to just click to get rid of the lock icon. But in earlier versions of Photoshop that's not available. You can drag and drop it however onto the trash can and that just frees up this layer. By freeing up the layer, it allows us to put something underneath it. I'm going to Control or Command click on the New Layer icon so that this new layer goes below the image layer. As white is my foreground color here, I'm just going to fill it with white with Alt backspace option Delete. Now that I've got a white layer behind this one, I can just click on this layer and just adjust down to opacity. We're going to see through this layer to the layer underneath. That just lightens the image a little bit. It's just the image layer that is having its opacity reduced. The travel quote itself becomes more a feature of this image. There's another way of placing text over an image. 4. Photoshop for Lunch™ - Text Over Image Effects - Part 3: For this next text effect in Photoshop, we're going to use this image and again it's from unsplash.com. You can find it by searching for travel and you'll want to download it to your computer and then open it in Photoshop. I have it open here. Now, we're going to crop this one to a one-to-one ratio as well. I have the crop tool selected from the ratio drop-down list. I'm going to choose one-to-one square and then click the check mark. If you're working with earlier versions of Photoshop, then you can just drag the crop tool over the image, holding shift as you do so to constrain it to a square, and you want the largest version of this image that you can get. Now, the image itself is on a background layer here, and we need to unlock this so that we can work underneath this layer. To do that, I'm going to click on the "Lock icon". If you are working in early versions of Photoshop, you can just drag the lock icon onto the trash. I'm going to add a layer beneath the current layer by control clicking on the new layer icon. White is my foreground color, I'll press "Alt Backspace Option Delete" to fill this layer with white. What I want to do is I want to crop this layer here. I want to crop it to a circle. I'm going to go and get the elliptical marquee tool. I'm going to hold the shift key as I drag out a circle shape here. Now, I don't want it to be quite the size of the document itself. I want there to be some space around, and I want to delete the outside and cap my ellipse, so I need to invert my selection. I'll choose Select Inverse. Now, what was selected is no longer selected. What wasn't selected is selected. I have selected all the outside of this shape. I'm just going to press the "Delete" key and that just gets rid of all the excess that I don't want. Now, I'm going back to the move tool and I just want to make sure that this shape is centered in the documents. I'm going to press "Control" or "Command D" to deselect the selection. Then I'm going to select this layer, and I'm going to do it by control clicking on the layer thumbnail and that makes sure that the layer is selected. Now I'm going to press "Control" or "Command A" to select everything. This displays these icons here, and I'm going to click the two center ones. I'm going to align vertical centers and then I'm going to align horizontal centers, so that this shape is now centered right in the middle of the image. Now I'm ready to go ahead and to add my type site. I'm going to click here to add a new layer to the document and I'm going to select the "Type tool". Now, I'm talking in black, which is fine and my text will be centered, which is fine. I have selected Myriad Pro semi bold, but I think that's probably not going to be bold enough. So I'm going to choose Myriad Pro bold. I want a fairly chunky font for this, Mary Pro is a nice plain font, but it is quite chunky because I want to be able to see through it. I'm just going to click here and start typing. I'm checking my font size, that's 250 points. I think that's probably going to be a little bit small, so I'm going to type 300 in here. Let's go ahead and type the quote which is "Eat Well Travel Often." I'll click the check mark. I'm going to move the type into the middle of the document. Now, I think it's a little bit too small, a font size still. So I'm going to go and re-select the type tool. Select either the text, because I just pressed "Enter" or "Return" at the end of each line. I'm going to increase the font size by clicking in the font box there and just pressing "Shift up arrow." That will increase it quite a lot every step. Now, I'm going to take it up a little bit bigger than you might think is safe for this. I'm going to click the check mark and let's just move it back into position. Now, I think the font is still a little bit too small, but the problem is going to be that if I make it to much bigger, it's going to extend over the age of the shape. Well, we can solve that because there's a lot of wasted space between these lines of type. When you have really large type, you can close up the gap or the leading between these lines. Again, I'm going back to the type tool. I'm going to select over my text and I'm going to go into this character box here. You can also get to that by choosing "Window" and then "Character." This is the character dialogue and it has in it the tool for adjusting line spacing or leading. Here it is, here at the moment it's set to auto. I'm just going to start reducing it. Well, I reduced it to zero. Now let's just push it out so that we can set the lines of type just separated from each other, but a lot closer than they were previously. I've set this to about 407, which is just a bit smaller than a typeface is itself. It's 460 points. I'm just going to click that to select it. Going back in here, I'm just going to make the font size a bit bigger still. I've taken up to 530 points and I'm just going to increase the leading just a little bit to compensate for that. So here is my type, and it's taking up a fair bit of this shape. You can also see that a little pink guide appear when I have it centered. That's a smart guide. You'll have those in the more recent versions of Photoshop. If you don't have a recent version of Photoshop, you can come to the layers' palette here. Click on this layer, this text layer so you have it selected, press "Control" or "Command A" to select the entire document and just center using this tool here. That will center the text within the document. Press "Control" or "Command D" to deselect your selection. I'm finished with the character palette here, I'm just going to close it. What I want to do is I want to cut the font out of the image underneath, but I also want the image underneath as well. I want to have my cake and eat it too. I'm going to take this layer here and I'm going to duplicate it. I have two circle layers, I'm going to move one of them above the text. I'm going to turn the bottom one off just for now because we won't be able to see the effect if that's turned on. I'm going to the top most circle and I'm going to create a clipping mask and I'm going to do that by choosing layer create clipping mask. What that does is it clips the image to the text below. What effectively we've got is a cut out from this image that is the shape of the text. The beauty of this is that the text is still editable. There's still a text object here on this layer and if we've made a spelling mistake, for example, we could just come in and edit the text and everything would be just fine. I've got my text effect, but what I wanted to do is to bring back a little bit of the original image. I have a circular shape in my document. If I bring it back at full capacity, you can see that this happens. I'm not able to see my text effect. I'm going to select on this layer and I'm going to reduce its opacity, and so I get the impression of the image underneath with the text through it. The text, of course, because it's using the exact same copy of the image. These elements that we see through the text are actually exactly the same element is as on the image underneath. So far so good. This is a really nice effect, but I think it would be nicer if we could actually read the text a little bit more clearly. I want to make my text a bit darker. To do that, I'm going to use a layer style. I'm going to click on the "Text layer" because it's the text layer that I want to effect. We're going to click here on the fx icon and I'm going to choose inner glow. Because inner glow can be used to darken things up. By default, it's used to lighten things because it's set to screen blend mode, but we can set it to multiply and use it to darken things up. So I'm going to select the color swatch here, and I'm just going to click on a color in the underlying image. I want a dark green. I've just clicked on that to select it. I've got multiply selected. I've got high opacity here, but right now, I've got my effect at the very edge of the ticks. I'm going to move it to center. You can see that that has the immediate effect of darkening the text. It also shows me that I've got way too higher level on my opacity here. I'm just going to dial back my opacity. But let's have a look at the preview. This is the before. The effect that we wanted but the text wasn't quite dark enough to be able to be seen clearly. Turn the preview on and now we've got darker text. It's exactly the same text, it's the exact same clipping effect, but using this multiply blend mode with a color that is sourced from the image itself and setting it to center rather than edge has given us this inner glow effect, which effectively darkens our text. I'm going to click "Okay". Here's another text effect created in Photoshop. We've cut a circular shape out of an image. We've made a duplicate of it. We've added text, and then we've clipped one of these shapes to the text. Then we've altered the opacity of the second version of the shape down quite low so that we get a lightening effect behind it. Then not happy that our text was dark enough, we've applied an inner glow effect using multiply blend mode and a darker color, to darken the text. Your project for this Photoshop for Lunch class will be to take one or more of the text effects that you've seen in this video and to reproduce them yourself. Go to unsplash.com to download an image or use an image that you've shot yourself. You can find a font to use if you liked our font Dot.com is a good place to look for fonts or use one of the fonts that you have already on your computer. I'll look forward to seeing your projects as you post them. Please, if you see a thumbs-up sign and if you enjoyed this class, give it a thumbs up. That will help other people recognize that this is a class that they too might want to take. If you'd like to leave a comment, I read all of your comments and I view all of your projects. So I'm Helen Bradley. Thank you very much for joining me for this episode of Photoshop for Lunch. I'll look forward to seeing your projects for this class, and I look forward to seeing you in an upcoming episode of Photoshop for Lunch. 5. Photoshop for Lunch - Glyphs Panel Workaround for CS6 and Earlier: This is an add on video for anyone who is using an earlier version of Photoshop that does not have a Glyphs panel available in it. So if you're using Photoshop CS6 or earlier and you don't have a Glyphs panel available, this is what you're going to do. Now, the solution is different on a Mac to what it is on a PC because of the font handling in each of these operating systems. So we're going to look at the Mac first. I have Photoshop open here on my Mac, I have my Type tool selected. I'm going to select my font because I know I want something out of my Wingdings regular font, but I don't know what the characters are in that font. So I'm going to open up Font Book. You can find Font Book by going to Finder and then go to Applications and look up Font Book, and when you open it, you have access to all the fonts on your system. So I'm going to Wingdings here because I want a character out of the Wingdings font. All I need do is to select the character that I want to use. So let's select this skull and cross bones, and press "Command" say copy that character to the Mac clipboard. So I can now click to return to my Photoshop document, go back to the Type Tool, click in the document and just press Command V to paste this symbol in. Now likewise, I can go back to Font Book and try a different font. Now I know in Webdings I've got some interesting characters in here, and let's say we want to use this island with a palm tree on it. So I'm going to select it and press "Command" say, I've copied it to the Mac clipboard, but I do want to note the font that it's come from. So I'm going back into my document, I'm going to the Type tool, just going to click and I'm going to press "Command V". Now, I don't get the right character, and that is because Photoshop is still using Wingdings instead of Webdings. So I'm going to select over this character and I'm going to type in Webdings, and when I select Webdings Regular, then I get the font character that I expected to see. So you'll be able to see inside your fonts very easily if you open up Font Book, and then you can just copy and paste those fonts into any regular Photoshop document, and they behave just like regular characters. All you're doing is using Font Book as a way of having a look at your glyph characters. So you can recolor things. For example, we could go and make this a dark turquoise blue, and we can also re-size the character should we wish to do so. That's the workaround for the Mac. Now, the solution to the missing Glyphs panel in Photoshop CS6 and earlier, if you're on a PC, is this. You're going to go to your Start menu and you're going to type in here, charmap, it's spelled C-H-A-R-M-A-P, and you're going to run the application called charmap.exe. Now, this is a Character Map tool. So you have a whole heap of fonts here available on your PC, and you can go and select one of these fonts. Let's go to the Webdings font that we were using on the Mac, and we have access to these fonts here. So you can just click on any of these characters that you want to use in your document. Let's go and get the same palm tree as we were using. We're going to click here to select it, and then we're going to click to copy it, and it's copied again to the Windows clipboard. Now, I can come back into Windows with the Type Tool, and I'm just going to choose Edit, Paste. I could also press "Control V". Now, I'm seeing a character here from a font that I have here that Photoshop is set to use. All I need to do is to type in the name of the font that I actually want to use, and that's of course, Webdings. So I'll just press "Enter" and then the character is reproduced in the Webdings font. You will of course, need to make sure that you select the character before you reapply the font type. So let's go back to charmap, and let's go and get something, this time from Wingdings. So I'm just going to the regular Wingdings font, and I'm going to get a character here. Let's take this old telephone. I'm going to remove this one. I'm going to click "Select" to add this character. I'm going to click "Copy" to copy it. Going back to Photoshop, back to the Text tool, click and paste. So I'm just going to press Control V this time, it's not the character I expected because I'm not using the correct font. To go type in here Wingdings, and press "Enter" and we're left with the character that we did want. So there's your workaround for a Windows PC where you don't have access to the Glyphs panel because you're using Photoshop CS6 and earlier. The CharMap tool has been in Photoshop since the year dot, so it's going to be there somewhere on your system. I hope this helps you making characters from Dingbat fonts and glyphs within font files, a little bit more accessible.