Pattern Design: From Straight to Wonky Lines With Adobe Illustrator & Fresco | Maja Faber | Skillshare

Pattern Design: From Straight to Wonky Lines With Adobe Illustrator & Fresco

Maja Faber, Surface Pattern Designer & Illustrator

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11 Lessons (1h 13m)
    • 1. Introduction

      1:22
    • 2. Your Project

      0:29
    • 3. The Basics - Straight Lines

      10:35
    • 4. The Basics - Diagonal Lines

      6:54
    • 5. The Basics - Zig Zag

      9:19
    • 6. The Basics - Waves

      4:12
    • 7. Wonky Lines - Draw in Illustrator

      12:07
    • 8. Wonky Lines - Draw in Adobe Fresco

      13:05
    • 9. Wonky Lines - Make the Repeat

      8:45
    • 10. Finalise the File

      5:14
    • 11. Thank You

      0:56
15 students are watching this class

About This Class

In this class I will teach you all about line patterns. Line patterns can be so tricky to get right, especially the wonky ones. But once you get the hang of it - you’ll feel that you’ve taken your pattern design to the next level.

This is a technical class for you who want to learn a smooth and easy ways of creating wonky lines patterns. Maybe you’ve struggled preciously with it or you’re completely new to it all.

The class is built up so that it get’s more and more advanced for every lesson. We will start with the basics and you’ll learn how to create four different types of line patterns: straight, diagonal, zig zag and waves. We’ll then use these basics techniques to create our final wonky lines repeat.

You need to have basic understanding of Adobe Illustrator to take this class. As a bonus I will show you how to draw wonky lines in Adobe Fresco on an iPad and export a PDF to create a repeat pattern in Illustrator from our drawings. It’s no must to use an iPad to draw in this class, most of the class will focus on designing in Adobe Illustrator.

I would love to see what you create! Be sure to share your project here in class and if you post it on Instagram feel free to tag me @maja_faber

Transcripts

1. Introduction: Hi, I'm Maja Faber and I'm a surface patent designer from Stockholm, Sweden. This class is all about lines, straight lines, diagonal lines, zigzag lines, waves, and most of all wonky lines. Line patterns can be so tricky to get them right, especially the wonky ones. Before I learned these techniques that I will share with you here in this class, I could get really frustrated when I tried to make my wonky line repeat patterns. But once you get the hang of it, you'll feel that you have taken your pattern design to the next level. The class is built up so that it gets more and more advanced for every lesson. We will start with the basics and you will learn how to create four different types of line patterns, straight, diagonal, zig zag and waves. We'll then use these basic techniques to create our final wonky line repeat. We used Adobe Illustrator as our main tool and as a bonus, I will teach you how to draw this wonky lines on the iPad in Adobe Fresco as well. It's not a must to use an iPad to join this class but you need to have at least basic understanding and know how to create a basic repeat pattern in Adobe Illustrator to be able to follow along. So let's get started with our wonky lines. 2. Your Project: Your project in this class is to create a wonky line repeat pattern using any of the techniques that I'll show you in this class. I would love to see your work. So please do share your project here in class. And if you want any specific feedback, just let me know and I will try to answer your questions and give you some tips and tricks. And if you share your project on Instagram, please feel free to tag me with Maja_faber. 3. The Basics - Straight Lines: Let's get started. To make a wonky lines repeat, you need to know the basics of how to create basic line repeat patterns. In this lesson, we will create the very basic straight-line repeat pattern, and then we will move on to diagonal lines, waves, and zigzag. In this class, we will create REP patterns in Adobe Illustrator. Let's just start a new document. I will go for my standard size when I create patterns 1000 pixels square. As I will share my work digital, I go for RGB color mode, and a 300 PPI for high resolution. Hit Create, and here we have our document. A little note before we start, if you feel that this class is moving too quickly through the pattern-making process, then you could have a look at my other class here on Skillshare from Skillshare pattern, where I give you a more detailed instructions on the pattern tool and that part of the pattern making process. We will go through it all here. But if you feel that this is too advanced for you, check out that class first and then head back to this class. With that said, let's start with a basic straight line repeat. As I like to have a color palette to start with, that is what I will do here too. I have an old color palette that I will use for this class. If you want to use the palette, you can, or you can just pick random colors when you create this wonky lines repeats. I just start with deleting all of the colors in the swatches panel except black and white, and then I go and fetch my saved color palette, and move the group to my swatches panel. What we will start with in this lesson is to create the basic straight line repeat pattern. This is the simplest kind of line repeat. The simplest way to do this kind of repeat pattern is to just head straight into that pattern tool. Go to Object, Pattern and Make, just hit Okay. When you have your patent tile here, you can change the width and height to the same as the art board. This is just a matter of preference, but I usually have the same size of the pattern tile as I have on my art board. Then we will select the line segment to No Fill and a stroke, and you can just pick any color you wish. I'm just going to go for orange for this one, and click, hold down Shift and drag to make your line. If you make sure that you have your smart guide selected, it should be easy to create a line that is 1000 pixels, the same as your pattern tile. You can also click on your art board when you have the line tool selected, and just type in 1000 pixels. Select your line, and let's just increase the stroke weight. We're going to try out 30 pixels. That looks okay. You can see that we have already got a line repeat. To repeat the line, I usually just hold Option and Shift on Mac and click and drag to duplicate the line and drag it underneath the other line. If you want to repeat your last move, hit Command D on Mac, and you'll get a bunch of lines. Here, you actually have a basic line repeat pattern. Maybe you want to distribute these lines even on your art board, you can just hit Dim Copies here to see which ones of your lines are the original ones, and if you have your smart guide turned on, it should be easy to just drag one line to the center of the top. Then you have one line to the center of the bottom, and then select all and in your Align panel, which I have up here as well, I select Align To Selection, and then Vertical Distribute Center. There, you have your basic lines repeat pattern. Maybe I want to increase my stroke width a bit, and I think that I will make them pink, so I'm just going to change the color, and here we have our basic lines repeats. What I do now is that I select all, and I copy Command C, all of my objects, hit Done in the pattern tool, and Command V to paste my objects. I then hit Command G to group them together, Align To art board in the Align Panel, and I center my lines to my art board. After this, I make sure that all of my lines are selected, and I want to expand the lines so that they are not lines anymore, but they are outlined objects. Go to objects, expand, and you will get this little option box, hit Okay, and then all of your lines have been outlined to objects. What we want to do now is to add a background layer with a color. Select your Rectangle Tool, click One Time on your art board, type in 1000 pixels width and 1000 pixels height, hit OK. For this, I'm just going to choose a background color, center it to the art board, move the background to the back, hit Command C to copy the background, and Command V to paste another rectangle on the back of the first rectangle. This new rectangle, I will remove the fill color so that it has no fill and no stroke. As I said before, if you think that this part of the process is going too quickly for you, then you can have a look at my class from sketched droopy pattern here on Skillshare, where I teach you the basics of how to create a pattern in Illustrator. Maybe I want to change that to orange. After this, we select all, and drag our pattern into the swatches panel. Then we can try out the pattern and see how it looks by creating a rectangle and the pattern. If we zoom in, it looks like it has a little bit of a space here, a white line. Sometimes, you will get this white line when you haven't aligned your objects in the center, and sometimes it's a matter of how Illustrator is working with the alias, which basically just means that the white line doesn't exist, but you can see it anyway. But to make sure that we don't have our white lines, I will just make our lines a little bit wider, so that they go outside of our pattern tile. With the line selected, I will send them to the art board, and then select everything again, and drag in the pattern to the swatches panel. Then we can fill the square with our new pattern, and see if the lines are gone. It looks like they are. Now, we have our basic lines repeat pattern. You can zoom out of your pattern by going to object Transform and Scale, and check the box Transform Object, check their box Preview, and you can scroll down the percentage in the uniform scaling box. That's a basic lines repeat pattern. 4. The Basics - Diagonal Lines: Now we have our straight lines repeat pattern, let's create diagonal lines repeats. This can be a little bit tricky to understand how to make them tile and the simplest way to create a diagonal line to be a pattern is a little cheat and that is to have your straight lines repeat. Go to object, transform and rotate. Make sure that you have your transform pattern box checked in and not your transform object and preview. Now you can type in 45 degrees, hit ''Preview'' and there you have your diagonal lines. Hit "OK" and let's see what happened. We have the visual of a diagonal line here but what happens if we drag out our original pattern? It is still a straight line pattern. This will only work if you don't need your pattern tile in your final project. Probably if you create some digital work and it won't be printed on anything. As we need the pattern tile most of the times, I will show you another way that isn't the cheat to do this tile. For this we will not work inside of the pattern tool, we will do it the good old way to create a pattern on our original art board. We can just make a copy of this, hold down option, click and drag to make a copy and then I will select the background square and the tile square with no fill, no stroke. Hit "Command 2" to lock those objects. Just zoom out a bit and delete your lines. To make a diagonal lines pattern, we will draw a line just like we did before with the line segment tool. Make sure you have the stroke selected, a color. I will just hit 40 pixels in the stroke weight and this time you need to draw a line that is longer than your art board, much longer. Something like that. You can either use the line tool as we did here or you can use the rectangle tool and draw a line with the fill, it really doesn't matter. Then we take our line, rotate this, I will hold down Shift to get it to 45 degrees and then I want to make sure that the center point of my line is at the zero point of my art board. If you have your smart guide selected, it should be easy to just snap that right in position. You can check if you have the right position of your line if you go to transform and here I can see that I don't. You should have a zero X value and a zero Y value. Now we have one line, the start line of our pattern and what we will do is to create a line that is the repeat from this one over here. The quickest way is as before, hold down the option key, click and drag to make a copy and if you have your smart guide selected, it should work fine. Just click and drag and that will place it in the direct opposite corner. The X and Y value should say 1,000 pixels. Now we have one line that is repeated in our pattern tile and what we want to do is to place lines in between. To do this in the simplest way, select both of your lines and then double-click the blend tool, change your spacing to specified steps and here we just select how many lines we want to create. This number needs to be an odd number otherwise it won't work, so I will just hit seven. With the blend tool selected, you click one line and the other line. There you have it. Diagonal lines that are even distributed along your art board and pattern tile. What's important to know here is that this is a blend which means that these lines in between isn't really there until you expand the blend. With this blend selected, go to object, expand, just make sure that all of these boxes are checked in and hit "OK." Then we also want to expand our lines to make them outlined objects, so go to object and expand. Make sure fill and stroke is selected and hit "OK." Now we have our lines outlined and expanded and each of them are a separate object. Let's try to drag this in the swatches panel, make sure that you unlock your background square and your pattern tile square then select everything on your art board and drag it in to the swatches panel. It looks good there, so let's just make a new square and a perfectly tiled diagonal lines repeat pattern. Now we know how to create the basic lines repeat, this one and diagonal lines repeat pattern. Let's move on to the next lesson where we will learn how to create a basic zigzag pattern and a waves pattern. 5. The Basics - Zig Zag: Let's move on to the zigzag and the waves lines pattern. Both of these patterns have the exact same basics. If you know how to do one of them, you know how to do the other as well. The zigzag pattern is a little bit more complicated to get to tile on the edges. Let's start with that, and then the waves pattern will feel really easy to create. We start with going to the Pattern Tool, Object, Pattern and Make. Change your tile size to 1000 pixel square, and move the tile to your art board. Now, this again is just a matter of preference, but this is how I do it. We start with drawing a line, make sure you have a stroke color selected. I will select the same orange as I did before, and a stroke width of 40 and I will click one time on the art board, make sure that I have 1000 pixels length on my line and hit Okay. Then I make sure that my line is aligned to the center by clicking on horizontal align center in the align panel. Now, we have a straight line and we want to make this zigzag. What we do is to go to Effect, Distort and Transform and then zigzag. In this option box, we have a lot of options. What we want to do is to have the corner selected, Absolute selected, and then we can play around with Size and Ridges per segment. Make sure that you have the Preview box selected. What is really important here is that you need to have an odd number in the ridges per segment. If you look at the edge here, you can see that if you have a four, an even number, the edge won't tile up. But if you have an odd number, it will. I will just go for five ridges per segment. Then I adjust the size. You can play around with the Relative as well and Absolute. But I will go for Absolute. I think that I will go for something like 30 pixels. Size 30 pixels, Absolute, five Reduce per segment and Corner selected. Hit "Okay", and here we have our zigzag line. Now this is just an effect, so we need to expand this effect to make this a real object. Go to Objects, Expand Appearance. There you've got your line back and we will also expand this to outline it as the shape. Go to Object, expand again. Make sure you have all of these boxes, Object, Fill and Stroke selected. Hit "Okay", and there we have our outlined object, our zigzag line. If it would be this easy to create the zigzag pattern, that will be awesome. But if you zoom in, you will see that you have a little glitch here where your pattern is supposed to tile up. Here comes the little trick to get the edges to match and this can be a little bit tricky, so make sure that you follow along now. What I do here is that I count how many zigzags I have. I have one, two, three in this line, because this one is the same as this one, so three zigzags. Then I hit "Command K" to get my general preferences up. You can also go to Preferences and General. In the Keyboard Increment box, I now have the size of my art board, which is 1000 pixels. Then I take the size of my art board, the length of my art board, 1000 pixels divided by the amount of zigzags that your line has. Mine had three, and then I hit "Okay". If I hit "Command K " again, I will have 1000 pixels divided by three in my keyboard increment. Next step is to duplicate this line and move it horizontally with the distance that you typed in in your keyboard increment settings. To do that, select the line, hold down your "Option key", and click on the right arrow on your keyboard. As you can see, we have one line that has been duplicated and moved a third of our art board to the right. If I change that fill color, you can see in the little glitch here that we have that glitch covered with our new line. Next step is to unite both of these lines so that we don't have this glitch here between the lines. Select both of your lines and in your Pathfinder panel, you can go to Window and Pathfinder, if you don't have it, you hit "Unite" and this will make both of your lines into one line. If you uncheck the box "Dim Copies", you will see that you have a zigzag pattern that is perfectly aligned and you don't have a glitch between your lines. What we want to do now is to create a few copies of this one. I will just align these vertical to the top and then create a few copies by holding down my "Option" key, click and drag to make a copy, and then hit "Command D" to repeat. Then I want to make sure that I distribute all of my lines evenly. I select the top line. Hit "Command K" again, type in the size of my art board, 1000 pixels. Hit "Okay" and then I hit "Option" and the "Down key." If I check in the Dim Copies box in the pattern options panel, you can see that this is the first line and this is the last line, which is just a repeat of this one in my pattern tile. But you need to create this line now to distribute them evenly on your art board. Select all of your lines, make sure that you have aligned to selection and hit "Vertical Distribute Center." Now, you have all of your lines evenly distributed along your art board. What you can do now is delete that extra line and to create a pattern with a background rectangle, we do exactly as we did before we copy all of our objects, hit "Done". Paste our objects, group them together. Then create a rectangle to use as a background color. Align its center to the art board. Hit "Command C" to copy it and "Command B" to create a copy at the back. Make sure that the square in the back have no fill, no stroke. Align your squares center to the art board. Make sure that they are on the front. Object, Arrange, Bring to Front, and there you have your zigzag pattern. Select everything on your art board and drag it into the Swatches panel. Let's check out our zigzag pattern. Now we have our zigzag pattern. Let's move on to the waves pattern. 6. The Basics - Waves: To make a wave, pattern is actually much easier because it will tile perfectly from the start. We will start with the exact same technique. Makes sure that you underline segment Tool, selected stroke color.I will change the stroke weight to 4D, and it's click and drag to make a 1000 pixels line. Then we go to Effect, distort and transform and six sack again. But this time we will check in this smooth box. Hit preview. Let's go for five again and the same settings as before, 30 pixels. So 30 pixels, absolute five and Smooth. As I mentioned before, you can play around with these settings, as you wish. But for this example, we will just use exactly the same settings as we did in this exact pattern. Hit Okay. Zoom in and you see that the wave is perfectly tile in the edge of your pattern type. Now we do exactly as we did six sack , as this is just an effect and not an object at this moment, we need to expand the appearance. We go to object expand appearance. Now we got our line and there we go again to object expand, makes sure all other boxes are selected and hit Okay. Now we have our outlined shape. Let's create a few copies. Hold them out, click and drag and hit command D. We make sure that the top wave is aligned, to the top of our art board. Select the top line. Make sure you have aligned to art board selected in the align panel and then hit vertical aligned top. Then we can just remove this little fella down here, and we make sure that we have our keyboard increments set to 1000 pixels, the same size as the height of our art board. Hit Okay. Then hit option and down arrow, to duplicate your wave to exactly 1000 pixels below. Then we select all, makes sure that you have aligned to selection, selected in the align panel. Then you distribute vertical center. They can just go on and delete, the extra wave that we created just to make these waves, evenly distributed. Delete that one and then we go back again. The same process as previously, we copy our objects, hit done. Paste the objects, hit command G to group them align to our Board selected in the align panel, and align your waves centered to your art board. Makes sure that your background is on locked and then select all and drag into the swatches panel. Let's try out our waves pattern. There you have your perfectly aligned waves pattern. Okay, great. Now we have learned how to create the four basic line repeat patterns. The straight line, the diagonal line, the six sack and the waves. These four patterns is a must to know and understand how to create, in order to be able to make a wonky lines repeat pattern. When you get the hang of, all of these four types of lines patterns, let's move on to the next lesson, where we will start to create a wonky lines repeat pattern. 7. Wonky Lines - Draw in Illustrator: It's time for the wonky line repeats. In this lesson, you will learn how to create the wonky line repeats, all in Illustrator. Meaning that we will create the lines in Illustrator and then also create the pattern in Illustrator. So let's get started. So the tricky thing with wonky lines is that you need to match the lines in the address. And to do this, the simplest possible way, we will start with creating a basic line repeat pattern that we will use as a guide. You can also, if you're used to working with a grid, match up the edges of your line. I find that it's hard to use the grid to visualize the endpoint and start point of my line, so what I do is to create the basic line repeat and use it as a guide. So go to object, pattern and make. We will just change the pattern tile to 1,000 pixels, and move the pattern tile to our art board. Then we will create a few lines. I will go for the curvy lines in this example, but you can use any type of basic lines that you wish. The curvy, the zigzag, or the straight lines. This time I will create a little less curvy line than in the previous lesson. Maybe something like that. Then duplicate the line a few times, expand the appearance, and expand the lines so that we have outlined objects. Then align your line to the edge of the art board, hit command key, make sure that you have the same size as your art board in keyboard increment, 1,000 pixels. Hit option and the arrow key to create a duplicate of your first line. Select all and make sure that you have line two selection, selected and then hit horizontal distribute center. Delete your extra lines that are outside of your pattern tile and then we can hit dim copies. So now we have 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 wavy lines that we want to make wonky. So in this lesson, I will show you how to create wonky lines with three different techniques in Illustrator. So I will create three different types of lines so that you easily can see how these different techniques vary. So let's start with the simplest way, it's kind of a shortcut to create wonky lines. Just make sure that all of your lines are expanded so that they are outlined objects. So let's start with the orange lines. I'm just going to go for select same and fill color to select all of my orange lines and then I go to effect, distort and transform and roughen. I hit preview, and that looks a little bit crazy, so go to smooth and instead of relative, I select absolute. So there you can see that you have some wonkyness in your lines already. So you can play around with the settings here. Maybe something like that is nice, not too obvious, but still wonky. Hit okay, and as we did on effect, we need to expand the effects. So go to object expand appearance and then I always just go to object expand once again, make sure object and fill is checked in and hit okay. So now you've got all of your orange lines a little bit wonky. So what we do next is to zoom in, you can uncheck the box dim copies. Zoom in and make sure that the orange lines are tiled up in the edges. If they aren't like here there's a little glitch, double tap the blob brush tool and make sure I have a small size and then I just go in and fill in the little glitches. So this is the most important part when you make a wonky lines repeat but you make sure that your edges tile in a way that makes it impossible to see where your line starts and ends. So there we have our first wonky lines. So what I will do next, just to show you the other ways of creating wonky lines is that I will lock all of the orange lines that I already made. So I will go to select same fill color, hit command two to lock the orange lines. So the next way to create wonky lines is also pretty simple, and that is to use the warp tool. Then I select one of my green lines by holding down my command key and just clicking one of the lines, and then I just start to click and drag to make that line a little bit wonky. So this is also a really quick solution to create wonky lines in Illustrator. Don't mind if the edges don't tile up great now, we will fix that in a minute. But first we will just make all of these green lines a little bit wonky. So there you have your wonky green lines. Now we will go in with a blob brush tool as we did previously on the orange lines and we will fill in the gaps. So that looks pretty good. So we've done the wonky lines with the roughing effect, and we done the wonky lines with the warp tool. So now we will move on and create the wonky lines with the last technique that I will show you. I will just double-click the blob brush tool, increase the size maybe to 30 or something like that, make sure that I have the pink color selected with the eyedropper tool, and I think that I will go down in size a little bit maybe 20 points on the blob brush tool, and then I will just start to drop. So what I do now is that I will just draw a little bit more wonkyness to these pink lines, and also as previously, make sure that they tile up in the edges. So I will just speed up this a little bit for you while I continue to draw the pink lines with the blob brush too. So now we have all of our wonky lines. It looks a little bit crazy as I've mixed so many techniques, but this was just as an example to show you how you can create much more beautiful wonky lines. So what we do now is that we will copy all of our objects, hit done in the pattern tool and paste our objects to our art board. So as you can see now it's a little bit crazy over here, but we will fix that in a minute. First, let's just create a background square with a light pink color and align that to the art board then hit command C and command B to create the tile in the background with no fill and no stroke. We can lock the background layers so that it won't get in the way. So first, group all of your objects together, command G. Place them at the center of your art board. Make sure that you bring them to the front, and then I will just drag them to a place that feels natural. Then I make sure that I have my objects ungrouped. Next, I will select what's outside of the edge of the tile to the right, hit Command K, makes sure that I have 1,000 pixels in the keyboard increments. Then hit option and left arrow to duplicate what's on the right side of my art board to what's on the left. I also need to tile up the top and the bottom. So I will just select all objects, hit my option key and arrow up, and once again, option key and arrow down. So now everything is perfectly tiled up. We don't need to worry about that the lines are floating outside of the art board, we will go through that in the last lesson of this class where I will show you how to finalize the file and also make sure that everything is expanded. So go to object and expand. One more time object expand, just to make sure that everything is outlined. Unlock all on your art board and drag it in to your swatches panel. Let's see how this pattern looks. There you have it. A perfectly tiled, wonky lines repeats. Maybe not the most beautiful wonky lines repeats that I've ever seen, but now you know the technique to create a wonky lines repeat in Illustrator. So now we have our wonky lines repeat, all made in Illustrator. Let's head over to the next lesson where I will show you my standard technique actually, and that is to draw the lines in Adobe fresco on my iPad and then turn them into a pattern in Illustrator. So if you have an iPad or are curious of how to do this on an iPad, join me in the next lesson. Otherwise, you can just skip the next lesson and head straight to lesson where you learn how to finalize your file. 8. Wonky Lines - Draw in Adobe Fresco: In this lesson, you will learn how to draw the wonky lines in Adobe Fresco, and then turn them into a pattern in Illustrator. If you want the easiest way, this is not it. To draw the lines in Illustrator is a much quicker way of creating wonky line patterns. But if you're like me and enjoy to draw all of your motifs on your iPad to get a more hand-drawn look, then this lesson is for you. If you're still with me, let's get started. Just a little note before we start, if you are new to Adobe Fresco, I would suggest that you have a look at my other class here on Skillshare, pattern design workflow, sketch and draw motifs in Adobe Fresco, where you learn all of the basics of vector drawing in Fresco. Let's start a new document in Adobe Fresco that is 1,000 pixels square and makes sure that you have 300 as PPI. Hit "Create document". The first thing we do is to create guide lines that we will use to draw our wonky lines. At this moment in Fresco, you can't use any type of grid. So we will draw straight lines. Make sure that you have your straight line setting first, go to the Little Wheel settings, Experimental, and make sure that you have your hold for a straight line on. Then we will select the vector round brush. Black is fine for this. I think 10 is a good size. I will just do a mono-line brush. So no pressure dynamics and no velocity dynamics. Then we will just draw a few guides. So draw a line, hold down your touch shortcut. There's really no way to know when this line is straight in Adobe Fresco. You can notice that it sticks at one place and that is where I believe that it's straight, so I will let go of it there. Instead of drawing all of these lines, I will just duplicate the layer to create more lines. Tap the Layer, Duplicate, Selection Tool, Hold touch shortcut, and drag your line to the right. Once again, duplicate layer. Use the Selection Tool, Hold down touch shortcut, and drag to the right. Let's make five lines. These things happen sometimes with my iPad touch screen. So let's just try again. Maybe something like that. Now we have five lines. I will just merge these to one layer. Then I will turn down the opacity of this layer. When I draw my lines in fresco, I won't mind that much that they are evenly distributed. I can always fix that later on in Illustrator. So I just want to have this simple guide lines that I can follow when I draw my wonky lines. Next step, which will make it easier for us to see if our line matches up in the edges, is that we will create a background square in another color. So just use the fill tool. I will go for light pink color and fill with vector. Then I press and drag that layer beneath our lines layer. Then we will increase the size of our art board to 1,500 pixels. Just tap "Done". Now it will be much easier for us to see if our lines will match up. Just create a new layer and we will start to draw our lines. Select the vector round brush again. Let's just go for an orange color. Make sure that you have your pressure dynamics on. If you want wonky lines, you can adjust the size. Let's just try that out, and then just draw a line on top of your guide lines. If you want a wonky straight line, you can just use the pressure dynamics to create the wonkyness. Lets just continue to create some more wonky straight lines. That looks pretty good. The next thing we will do is that we will erase the edges on top and at the bottom of your lines. This doesn't need to be perfect, but just erase so that it has a straight line with your edge. Now is not perfect straight lines, but you have erased your wonky lines at the top and the bottom of your art board. Next we will duplicate the layer with your lines. Use the Selection Tool, Hold down your touch short cut, and drag up new lines so that they match in the top of your art board. Go back to your original line layer, use the vector brush again. Now we can just fill in the glitches where they don't match indigenous. When you have filled in the glitch, you duplicate your original layer again. Use the Selection Tool, hold down the touch shortcut and, move that layer so that it matches your bottom layer. The way that it matches up in the edges here doesn't need to be perfect. We will fix that in Illustrator later. But I just find it easier to make as much as possible on my iPad and then just fix the details in Illustrator later on. The next thing we will do is to merge these layers, use the eraser tool, and we'll just erase a little above the edge. Then I will just increase the Eraser tool and erase all of this extra lines. There you have your straight line sketch that we can take into Illustrator and create a repeat pattern of. But what if you want to do waves or six arc lines? I'll just turn off the visibility of that layer. The technique is exactly the same as with straight lines. I will just select my vector round brush, and I will try to draw some waves. I can imagine that I want to have three waves. I know that it needs to start here and end here. I will just start to draw and let's see what happens. Let's just make this a little bit thicker. Maybe I will just increase the size of my brush. Something like that. Just make sure that you have drawn across the edge. Then we do exactly as we did with our straight lines. We erase just the sides a bit. We erase so that we have straight edges to our lines. Then we duplicate this layer. Use the Selection Tool, hold down the touch shortcut, and drag that layer up to match it in the top. Then we make sure that we have our original line layer selected. Use the vector round brush again, and fill in the little blanks. You could also of course use the eraser tool to fix details. So maybe something like that. Then we will duplicate our original layer. Use the Selection tool, hold down the touch shortcut, and drag down your lines so that they align in the bottom, something like that. Then you go back to the original layer and your vector round brush. Now, you can just fix the details so that we have a nice smooth look to our wave lines. Then we can merge all of these layers and use the Eraser tool and erase so that you have just a little bit left above your [inaudible]. Then just erase the extra, and there we have our wonky lines. As I mentioned before, the edges, the top and the bottom, there doesn't need to be perfectly tiled. We'll fix that in Illustrator later. For now we will just turn off the visibility of our guides layer. Then we can export this art work published and export, export as a PDF. Let's just call them wonky lines. I will just air drop the PDF to myself. Let's head over to the next lesson where we will open up this PDF in Illustrator and create a pattern of these wonky lines that we draw in Adobe Fresco. 9. Wonky Lines - Make the Repeat: Let's open up our PDF in Illustrator. What I usually do is that I copy the artwork from the PDF and paste it in an AI document. This is just to save us from complications later on that might happen if you continue to work in the PDF from Adobe Fresco. At least, that is my experience. Here, we have our art work. When you bring in artwork from Adobe Fresco, what you need to do is to release a clipping mask. If you go to view and outline, you can see that there are a bunch of different squares and strange things happening here. Let's go to view preview again and object, clipping mask, and release. Next, we will just go in and delete all of these strange squares. There you will get around your object. I don't really mind those squares that much. I think that it depends on how many layers you have drawn your objects on. If you have drawn all of your objects or merged your objects to one layer, then you will only get one strange square around your objects. But if you had drawn one object per layer in Adobe Fresco before you exported your file, then you will have a bunch of strange squares here. But it doesn't really matter. We will just remove the squares and everything will be fine. Go to the outline mode, and I will just delete that square and this square. Here is a little dot that I don't want to have there. Go to view preview again, and let's just delete our background layer as well. Now, we go to view outline again. If you have a look at your objects, you can see that they are not united. The orange is not united. As all of our objects are orange, we can just select all and then hit "Unite. " If we have a closer look at this, you can see that Adobe Fresco gives you a lot of anchor points. Usually, as I work with really simple shapes in vector, it really doesn't matter that much to me. My file size won't be that much larger if I have a lot of anchor points on these simple objects. But if you want to, let's go to view preview again and you can simplify your objects. Go to path and simplify. I normally like to have the whole option here, so tap the three little dots. If I go to maximum, this is my original objects. The lower you go, the less anchor points you will get. You can see here, the original was 1,000 points and now you have 167 points. Let's just go for that. Hit "Okay". Then, to make it easy to see if these objects line up, I will just copy them and go to the pattern tool again, 1,000 squares tile, and move the the tile to my art board once again, as we did in all other previous lessons. Then, paste your objects. Make sure that you scale them down so you can see what is happening. Then, I will just increase the size until I have them on the edge of my art board. It's maybe something like this. Now, it should be really easy to go in and use the blob brush tool to draw in the little glitches that we have at the top and the bottom of the tile. But first, I will just distribute these evenly on the art board, so ungroup, and as I want this a little bit more wonky, I think that I will just do this by looking with my eyes and not distribute them completely even. Hit "Command K" and I will type in five pixels in the keyboard increments. You can just move your lines until you get them in the position that you want them. Maybe something like this would be nice. Then, we will use the blob brush tool and go in and fix the edges. We will just draw here. I will do this rather quickly here just to show you when you do this to make a final piece, a final pattern that you will use for something. Then you should be really detailed with this so that it won't be obvious where your tile starts and ends. Next, we can copy all of our objects just as we did in the previous lessons. Hit "Done" in the pattern tool, "Command V" to copy and then group your objects together. Align them centered to the art board, then hit "Command K" and make sure that you have the height of your pattern tile in the keyboard increment box. I have 1,000 pixels. Hit "OK." Then, hit the "Option" key and arrow down. Once more, select your original objects, hit the "Option" key, and arrow up. Now we have our wonky lines repeated at the top and the bottom of your tile. Then let's create the background layer with a color. I'll go for pink. Align it centered to art board. Make sure to center the back, hit "Command C" to copy it, "Command P" to paste it to the back. Make sure that your square on the back has no fill, no stroke. Then, select all of your objects. One more thing is that you can unite all of your objects, all of the orange wonky lines into one object so you don't have these different objects that are divided. Make sure that you select everything in the same fill color and then go to your pathfinder tool and hit "Unite". Now, last move is to select all of your objects. Drag them in the swatches panel, make a square, and fill it with your pattern to see if it tiles up. That looks pretty good. This is the basics of creating a wonky line repeat pattern that you will draw in Adobe Fresco on your iPad, and then export to PDF and create the pattern in Illustrator. I have only made an example here but you can do so much more with this. You can create wave lines, zigzag lines, all kinds of wonky fun lines. The only thing you need to worry about is that they tile up and start an end point of your pattern tile. When you're finished with this pattern that you've drawn in Fresco and made into a pattern in Adobe Illustrator, let's move on to the next lesson where we will finalize the file, and make sure that we have cleaned up our repeat pattern tile. 10. Finalise the File: In this lesson, we will just clean up our file. Our repeat pattern so you can use it as a pattern tile or you can print on all sorts of products and stuff. As this is more of an intermediate class, if you think that this is moving too quickly, you can check out my class from sketch to repeat pattern here on Skillshare where I will walk you through this a little bit slower. Let's get started with this. We have our one kilo, I repeat from the lesson where you created it in Illustrator. Let's get started with cleaning up this pattern. What we want to do is to clean up all of the things, that are moving outside of our tile. How do you do that? Well, I found that the best way is to lock your background layers, and then make sure that all of your objects are grouped together. Then you create a square that is 1000 pixels. The same as your tile and art board. Align the square to the center of your art board. Select all, and then go to object, clipping mask make. You will get your perfect tile. But if you look here, you can see that the clipping mask only hides what's outside of the mosque. It doesn't really delete it. What we will do now is to select our clipping mask and then click crop. We have cropped all of our objects to the same square as our pattern type. As you can see when I have all objects selected, that they are not united. The colors are not united. I will just go in and select the color, and then hit select same fill color and unite. I go to the green, select same fill color, unite. The orange, select same fill color, and unite. Now I know that I have all of my colors united. The pink with the pink. The green with the green, and the orange with the orange. I select all again, and I hit on group. Now, make sure that you unlock everything. Here you have your pattern tile. If you drag this into the swatches panel, and try it out in a square. If you drag this out of a swatches panel, you will have a perfect tile. If you drag out your previous made pattern, you will see that you have a lot outside of the edges that you don't need. That's actually it. You can save this tile as JPEG or an AI, or it all depends on what your end purpose is of your pattern. Before we save this file, I think that I will just change the green color. Because I'm not quite happy with it. I will just go in and open up another one of my color palettes. I will select the green object. Go to select same fill color. I will just try to change the green to blue. There I think that looks so much better. I'm just going to be happy with this here. For this lesson, we will just say this file as a JPEG then we can use online. I go to file, export, export for screens, and I only have one art board. I don't need to mind this top option. Here you can just select where you want to save your file. I'm going to say mine as JPEG 100. My settings, JPEG 100 is baseline optimized as compression method, and anti-alias art optimized. I just have the embed ICC profile checked in. Then I just hit export art board. Here I have my final file, and that's it. You created a one collide repeat, with cleaned up pattern tile. 11. Thank You: So that's all for this class. I hope you enjoyed this technical class on how to create a wonky lines repeat pattern in a few different ways. Thank you so much for watching. If you don't want to miss my future classes or just like my teaching style in general, hit the follow button by my name here below, and if you have any questions at all, please ask them on the community page, and feel free to leave a review to let me know if you enjoy this class. I would love to hear your thoughts. It will be so much fun to see your wonky lines patterns, so make sure you share your project here in class. If you post it on Instagram, feel free to tag me with @maja_faber. If you want any specific feedback, just let me know and I can give you some tips and tricks. Thanks again for watching and have fun creating.