Painting Watercolor Florals Part 3 : Learn to Paint Lilac, Daisies, Roses and a Floral Wreath | Lisa Lam | Skillshare

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Painting Watercolor Florals Part 3 : Learn to Paint Lilac, Daisies, Roses and a Floral Wreath

teacher avatar Lisa Lam, ( blue.lisart )

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

12 Lessons (1h 48m)
    • 1. Introduction

      1:28
    • 2. Materials Needed For This Class

      2:26
    • 3. Watercolor Techniques

      7:46
    • 4. Color Palette for Painting a Bouquet of Daisies

      2:47
    • 5. Painting a Bouquet of Daisies

      25:34
    • 6. Color Palette for a Painting Lilac Flower

      5:40
    • 7. Painting a Lilac Flower

      23:12
    • 8. Color Palette for Painting a Bouquet of Roses

      2:55
    • 9. Painting a Bouquet of Roses

      19:19
    • 10. Color Palette for Painting a Floral Wreath

      3:54
    • 11. Painting a Floral Wreath

      11:49
    • 12. Final Thoughts

      1:02
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About This Class

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Welcome to this class Painting Watercolor Florals Part 3.

This is a step-by-step class and is suitable for all levels.

In this class you will learn : 

* How to paint daisies

* How to paint a lilac 

* How to paint a bouquet of roses

* How to paint a floral wreath

* How to create a beautiful floral composition 

* Watercolor techniques such as wet on wet, wet on dry, bleeding technique and lifting technique. You can apply these techniques in other floral paintings

*How to control the spread of wet paint on wet paper

* How to mix “ white “ for painting white florals 


The supplies that you will need for this class are :

* 100% cotton, cold pressed watercolor papers in 300gsm

* Small and medium size round brushes ( size 2,6 and 8 )

* Watercolor paints 

* An old rag or paper towel

* A jar or two of clean water

Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

Lisa Lam

( blue.lisart )

Teacher


Hi! I’m Lisa and I’m a watercolor artist from Malaysia. 

I started painting with watercolor in 2017 and what made me fell in love with this medium was it’s unpredictable character ! It is this unpredictability that makes watercolor so special and unique. Magic happens when pigments and water come together to create the most beautiful effects and textures on  paper! 

Join me in my classes and I will share with you what I have learnt throughout the years.
Learning is a never ending process for me and I hope it is the same for you!

If you would like to see more of my artworks, do visit me on Instagram at @blue.lisart

 

 

 



 

 

 

 ... See full profile

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Transcripts

1. Introduction: Hello everyone. Welcome to this class, painting watercolor florals. My name is Lisa, and I'm a watercolor artist from Malaysia, fluoro, so one of my favorite subjects to paint. So in this class, we're going to paint some lovely watercolor florals. So first we'll go through some of the materials that you'll need for this class. Then we'll practice some basic but important watercolor techniques for painting florals. I'll also share with you some tips and tricks on how to control the flow of paint when we're painting wet on wet. And we also practice some bleeding and lifting techniques. So there'll be for class projects. File first class project. You'll learn some color mixtures for painting white flowers. And we also paying this bouquet of white BCs. Then we'll pin this lilac far our second class project. And fall third project, we will paint a bouquet of roses. And for our final project, we are going to paint a floral wreath. Now this is a step-by-step class, so beginners are welcome to join. So let's get started and I'll see you in the next video. 2. Materials Needed For This Class: Okay, Let's talk about the materials that you need for this class. So let's start with the paper. Now I highly recommend a 100 percent cotton watercolor paper. So are we using this bow home watercolor paper? It is a 100 percent cotton paper in 300 GSM. So this is quite a large sheet of paper, so I'm going to cut it in half later on. Now I also have it in a smaller size, which I will use to paint our bouquet of roses later on. Now for brushes, you need a medium sized round brush. So I have a size six and size eight from silver black velvet, but are mostly be using the size six. So these brushes are quite solve as they're made from squirrel hair and synthetic hair. Now you will also need a smaller round brush. So I have to size two round brushes. The first one is a synthetic round brush from Princeton snap. And the second one is this real sable brush. This is softer than synthetic brush from Princeton. Now you also need a pallet to mix our colors. Or you can just use a white ceramic plate. And of course you need some water, the cleaner brushes. So I usually have two jars of water. One to rinse off colors from the flowers, and the other one to rinse off colors from the stems and leaves. You will also need an old rag on some paper towels to remove excess paint and water from your brush. So this is a very important and useful tool to have, especially when we're painting wet on wet. Now for the colors are listed on the individual colors in our class projects later on. Now there are three colors that you must have. They are burnt sienna, ultra marine, and surrealism blue, cause we be using these colors to mix a bluish gray to paint our white daisies later on. And for the rest of the colors, you can replace them with any similar colors from your palette. 3. Watercolor Techniques: Okay, in this video, we'll go through some basic watercolor techniques. Now mastering these techniques will enable you to create the desired results in your paintings. Let's start with the first technique, which is called wet on dry. So this is basically just applying wet paint on a dry paper. With this technique, we can get defined and hard edges. Okay, now the next technique is called wet on wet. This is my favorite technique. So this is where we apply wet paint on a wet paper. So as you can see, the paint spreads once it comes in contact with a wet paper. And this creates some lovely soft edges. Now the amount of water in the brush and the consistency of the pin will determine how fast the pin spreads. So let's try painting with two different consistencies of paint and we'll see how they react on the wet paper. So let's start with a thin consistency of burnt sienna. So you can see that the pin spreads quickly and it loses its shape. Now let's try with a thicker consistency of burnt sienna. So this mixture has more pigment and less water. Now you can see that the stroke is more defined and it doesn't lose its shape unlike the previous one. Now let's paint some dots. And now let's pin with a thin consistency or burnt sienna. Here the paint spreads quickly and loses its shape. So when we use a thick consistency of paint, the paint doesn't spread as much and it creates a more defined shape with soft edges. So this gives us better control when we're painting wet on wet. So we can use a thicker consistency of paint when B1 and more control wet on wet outcome. So here I've darkened these edges with a thick consistency of burnt sienna. And we can still see the shape of the dots. They are soft and a bit blurry. So just keep in mind that the thicker the consistency of paint, the less able spread and the shape or stroke we'd be more defined. Now there's another way to minimize the spread of paint on wet paper. So if you find that your pin spritz a bit too much when you're painting wet on wet. Just blot out the excess water by lightly touching the sides of your brush to the paper towel. Okay, let's try that again. Now our blood are the access pane and you can see that the spirits less now. And if I plot that in a bit more, I can get a modifying shape. So if you're not sure how your ping we react on wet paper and you're afraid that in my spirit too much, just gently dab your brush on a paper towel before you start painting. And if you find that it's a bit too dry, just load your brush with a bit more paint. Okay, Now let's move on to the next technique, which is the bleeding technique. This is also one of my favorite techniques. This technique allows us to create some very interesting textures in our painting. So there are painting doesn't look too boring and predictable. So when we have two wet areas of different colors touching each other, we will get one color bleeding into the adjacent area. So in this case, we have the purple pigments bleeding into the yellow area because the puppet pin is more saturated and wet. So we can create some lovely color bleeds in our flowers using this technique. Now let's ping II proposed center for our flower. And we'll paint some yellow petals around the center. So once my brush touches the purple center, you'll get some purple bleeding into the pentose. So over here we have a lot of purple bleeding out. Now this is because the bottom part of this purple center is very wet and saturated. So if you want less color bleeds in our petals, we have to make sure that the center isn't too wet. Okay, now let's paint another one. And this time we will make sure that the center isn't too wet. So as you can see, we have less color bleeds here compared to the first flower. So if you don't want too much color bleeds, make sure your center isn't too wet. We are going to paint these daisies and Laila in our class projects later on. And we will create some color bleeds in the pentose. So in this lilac painting, you can see your luckily beliefs in the tiny flowers cause these flowers were painted next to each other while they were still wet. Okay, Now let's move on to the next technique, which is the lifting technique. So we use this technique when we want to create highlights or to correct any mistakes in our paintings. So I'm going to paint a square here. And then I'll rinse my brush and blot out excess moisture. And now with a clean, damp brush, I can create a highlight, my lifting out some of the color while the penis to them. So I can repeat this a few times, but each time after, after listed on the color, I need to rinse my brush and blend our excess moisture again. So our brush has to be dried and a paper in order to lift our colors. And you can only live dark colors while the ping is still them. Once the paint has dried, it will be a bit more difficult to lift our colors. In that situation, you need to use a very stiff brush and slowly scrap out the peak. Okay, now I'm going to show you how to soften some hard edges. So for this, you need to use a clean damp brush. So just rinse your brush, plot our excess moisture, and then just slowly soften the edges. So you can repeat this a few times until there are no visible hard edges. Okay, so these are all the watercolor techniques that we'll be using in our class projects later on. So if you're a beginner, I highly recommend that you practice these techniques a few times before you move on to the class projects. 4. Color Palette for Painting a Bouquet of Daisies: So before we begin our class project, I'm going to show you how to mix the colors for painting white flowers. So we are going to mix a bluish gray color using burnt sienna, ultra marine, and surrealism blue. So first, I'll add some ultramarine to my palette, and then I'll mix in a bit of burnt sienna. So now we have a gray color. Then I'm going to add in a bit more ultramarine. And our diluted with some water then are in a tinge of surrealism, blue and some water. And let's see how it looks. So it still looks a bit dark. So let's add more water. Okay, let's add a bit more water because we want it to be lighter. And now let's test it out. Okay, this is the color that we're after. So as you can see, this is a very light bluish gray color. So we're going to use this to paint the petals for our daisy. Okay, now we're going to mix a darker color for the shadows on the petals. So I'll transfer this mix to another well, and we'll darken this with a bit of burnt sienna and ultramarine. And let's test it up. Okay, this needs to be a bit darker, so let's add a bit more burnt sienna. Now it's a bit too brownish, so let's add more ultramarine. Okay, I think this looks just right. So let's compare it to the light, the shape. So this darker sheet looks more grayish than a lighter shade. So we're going to use this to paint some shadows and textures on our petals. So to create this darker shade, just add a bit more burnt sienna and ultramarine to the previous mix. Now we'll also be using permanent yellow, deep orange, burnt sienna CPR and a bit of yellow ocher to pin our daisies. 5. Painting a Bouquet of Daisies: So before we begin painting our class project, I'm going to show you how to paint the daisies for our bouquet of disease later on. I'm just mixing a bit of yellow ocher into my permanent yellow mix. So first we need to create a yellow center for our daisy. And then we'll darken the edges with some orange and burnt sienna. We are only darkening the lower edge of the center. So I'm just making marks with a small synthetic round brush. Now make sure to use a thick consistency of burnt CNS so that it doesn't spread too much on the yellow center. Next, we'll paint the petals while the center is duet, because we want to get some of that color bleeds from the center. So we're using the lighter shade of the bluish gray mix. Now we can add some shadows using the darker shade of the bluish gray mix. So once you have completed the petals, you can darker in the lower edges a bit more. If you find that the colors have faded. So we can darken it with some burnt sienna and sepia. Now again, you want to make sure that these colors are not too watery cause we don't want it to spread too much onto the petals. But if it's too watery, you can blot off the excess on your paper towel before you drop in the color. Okay, So this is how we pin a front-facing Daisy. Now for the next one, whooping a side angle DZ. So we'll start with an oval center. And then we'll darken the lower edges with a bit of burnt sienna and orange. Next we'll add a path those. So the front petals we will cough downwards slightly. And the plateaus at the back will be shorter because they are partially hidden. Okay, So this is a site and go Daisy. Okay, next we're paying a site DC, which is partially open. Now this is very easy to pain. So all you have to do is to paint some CBOs and a stem and then just add the pentose. Okay, now the last one will be a flower bud. So again, we're starting with some sepals and a stem. And then we use the bluish gray mix to complete this part and just leave a bit of whitespace in the flower, but now darken this lower edge a bit more with some burnt sienna, cause it has faded a bit. And also some orange. Now we can use the darker shade of bluish-gray to create some shadows and textures on our petals. So we are going to include all these flowers in our bouquet of Daisy later on. Okay, so now let's pin our bouquet of disease. So I've already prepared my colors. So this here is permanent yellow, deep yellow ocher, cadmium orange. And these are the bluish gray colors for the white petals. This is the lighter shade and this year is a darker shade. And I also have sepia and burnt sienna here. So first, I'm going to add some water to this yellow mix cause I don't want it to be too pigmented. And I'll also add a bit of yellow ocher just to make it less bright. Okay, So now let's start with our first DZ. Are pleased this daisy right in the center of the paper. And this will be a front-facing Daisy. Then I'll add a bit of burnt sienna to my orange mix, and I'll apply this to the lower edge of the flower center. Then I'll darken the edge with a bit of burnt sienna using dot landmarks. Now you want to make sure that your burnt sienna mix isn't too watery, otherwise, it might spread all over the flower center. So I've added a bit too much burnt sienna at the top. So I'll just use a clean damp brush to lift up the excess color. Now let's add the petals starting from the center. So SMI brush touches the wet center, I'll get some nice color bleeds into the pentose. So I'll let this dry a bit more before I darken it with some burnt sienna. Because if I were to add the burnt sienna now, it would spread too much into their patios because the paper is still quite wet. Now let's move on to our second DZ Mu. Place it over here where it will be partially hidden behind the first Daisy. And we'll make this the front-facing DZ as well. So now let's pick up some orange and we'll meet dot like marks followed by some burnt sienna. Okay, not that this area has dried up a bit. It is now them instead of red, we can darken this area wee bit of sepia and burnt sienna and it will not spread too much. Now let's add the pathos for this second Daisy, while the center is still red costs we still want some of that color from the center to bleed into the pentose. Now, I'll carefully paint these two paths here, which are partially hidden behind the first DZ and darken it with the dark bluish gray mix to create some shadows. And I'm leaving a bit of whitespace, so I don't touch the first DZ K. I'll also add a bit of shadow lines to the adjacent petals. Okay, next, we are going to darken the edge with a bit more burnt sienna and orange. And because the petals are still wet, we are going to get some nice color bleeds into the petals. So here I'm just going back into define the edges of these petals a bit more. Okay, now let's add a stem for this daisy. So I'm using olive green, but you can use any greens of your choice. Okay, now for the second easy, I'm just deciding where to place the point of intersection between these two stems called status, where we are going to paint a string for the bouquet later on. So I'm just going to darken this a bit more. I'm going back into darken the edges of the center. And I'll also add a bit of orange. And I'm dropping in a bit of yellow costs, it looks a bit too pale. Okay, Now for the daisy, I'm starting with yellow for the center, and followed by some burnt sienna and orange. So this daisy will be at an angle where the petals are curved downwards and the pathos in the back are shorter. Costs, they are partially he didn't. So now I'll rinse my brush and grab some green for the stem. And I'm making sure that the stem goes through the point of intersection. Now let's pin a DC at the top. So this will be similar to the DC where the petals are curved downwards. So I'm just repeating the same steps from earlier on. So now let's add the petals. And okay, there's too much color bleed on that path over there. So I'm going to lift up the excess paint. And now our darken some parts of the pathos to make it look less flat. Okay, Now let's add a stem for this daisy. Again, you wanna make sure that it goes through the point of intersection. Now let's move on to the next Daisy. This will be at an angle where it is facing the upper left corner. So I'm repeating the same steps as earlier on, where I am adding dots of orange burnt sienna and CPR to the edge. Okay, now let's add some petals. And as you can see, we're getting some nice color bleeds from the center. I also darken the tips of these petals just to add some depth. Okay, now for the stem, we're going to make sure that it goes through the point of intersection again or close to the point of intersection. Then I'll just darken the stems here a bit more. Okay, Now let's move on to our next Daisy. So this time we are going to ping a site DZ, where the stem you bent downwards. This we add interests to our overall painting because the key to a good floral composition is to have your flowers pointing in different directions. Again, we'll make this go through the point of intersection, because later on we'll paint a string around this point of intersection. Okay, now let's add the pentose. So I'm picking up some of that bluish gray mix and these petals pointing downwards. Now let's add a flower bud for our bouquet. So we'll start with the stem from the bottom. And we're paying them, but pointing towards the upper right corner. So now I'm grabbing a bit of my bluish gray mix to complete that, but then I'll drop in some green and a base and let that bleed a little. Okay, I've painted this flower but a bit too big. So I'm going to scrub off a bit off the paint using clean water. Now, the penis t Then so I can still remove it. Then I use a clean towel and I'll press it firmly onto my paper to soak up the color. So you let this dry completely and then we'll come back in to fix it. So while waiting for that to dry, let's move on to our next DZ. So this one here will be in either side angle Daisy pointing towards the upper right corner. And again, I'm starting with yellow for the center and followed by some burnt sienna, orange and sepia to darken the edge. And then I'll complete this daisy and by painting some curves patterns. So here I am darkening the edges. I'm dropping in a bit of yellow to the flower center because it looks a bit too pale. Now you can skip this step if you're happy with the color of your flower center. So this final step, we will go through the point of intersection. Again. I'll darken some parts of the Stan. And now let's go back into fix the flower. But so I'm creating a roundish shape for the flower bed. And at some Zappos. Okay, I'll also darken some areas which have faded a bit. Okay, Now we are going to add some leaves to our bouquet. So I've loaded my brush with some olive green from my other palette. And I'm going to add some random leaves here and there. So I'm using a very light wash of olive green for the leaves. I'm carefully painting around the flowers. Okay, Now we're going to paint a string around the point of intersection. So this is where the string is tied around the bouquet. So far this part of the painting, if you have whitewash, please use whitewash. Cause we'll be painting over the stems and it's best to have something which is opaque. Now if you don't have whitewash, you can use white watercolor, just like what I'm using now. So I've really squeeze out some white watercolor into my palette. And what I'm doing now is I'm adding a bit of sepia, burnt sienna, and yellow ocher to this mix to create a light brown color. Then I'm going to paint this over the stem. So I'm going to paint three lines. And I'm going to add a bit more white paint to make it a bit opaque. I'm just grabbing some white paint straight out from the tube. And I'm just layering it over the tree lines. And now I'll ping two loops on the left to show that this twined Austria is tied up in a bow. So I'm adding a bit more white paint to make this a bit more opaque. I'm going to add a bit of sepia along the edge to give it a two-dimensional effect. And then I'll touch up with a bit of white paint on some parts of the string. Okay, so this completes our painting. So I hope you've enjoyed painting this and I look forward to seeing your paintings. 6. Color Palette for a Painting Lilac Flower: Hi guys. So in this video, I'm going to show you how to make some lovely shades of purple and pinks for our lilac. So the colors that we are going to use, lavender, opera, rose, and carmine. But before we start, I'm just going to swatch out these colors. So if you don't have these exact colors, just pick something similar from a pellet. So the first one then I've got here is lavender from Shinzen. Next is opera from me, Jello. And this one here is rose from White Nights. This is quite similar to permanent rose. So if you don't have this shape, you can use permanent rose. And the last color is Carmine from White Nights. So now for the first color, I'm gonna mix lavender with a bit of opera. So what I want is a light shade of Tessa Violet. So as you can see, this is a lovely shade of light pinkish purple. Now for the second color, we will mix lavender and opera again, but this time we'll add more opera to get a more pinkish color. Okay, I think this looks quite similar to lilac. So if you have Laila in your palette, you can just use lilac. Now for the next color, wheel makes lavender rows. So what we want is a darker shade of pinkish purple. And for the last color will mix lavender with carmine. And again, we want a dark pinkish purple. I think this looks a bit too diluted. So I'm going to start again. But this time I'll use less water. So I'm just grabbing some lavender. And carmine. I need more carmine, so I'm just going to grab some more carmine from my other palette. And let's add a bit more lavender. So I think this looks just right. Now. Let's just test it out. Okay, So we have another dark shade of pinkish purple. Now it's actually okay if you only want to use one shade of dark pinkish purple cars anyway, we'll mainly be using the light colors to paint lilac. So if you only want to stick to one shade of dark pinkish purple, that's perfectly fine. So these are the colors that we'll be using to pin on lilac later on. Okay, now for those who do not have lavender, I'm going to show you how you can make their own shade of lavender. So this lavender from Xin Han actually contains three pigments, purple pigment, a blue pigment, and white pigment. So I'm going to mix a bit of purple, ultra marine and white to create. Now you can actually use cobalt blue. Okay, this looks quite similar to 11. So they're going to use this 2D shape. So it looks a bit opaque, but once we dilute it with a bit of water, it should look just fine. So just make sure to prepare a large amount costs, you'll be using it to mix these pinkish and purple sheets. 7. Painting a Lilac Flower: So before we start our class project, I'm going to quickly show you how to paint the petals for our lilac. So you need a size two round brush, preferably a synthetic brush because that holds less water and that helps to prevent forming puddles on the small petals. So the lilac is made up of four petaled flowers. So here I'm using the tip of my brush to create some tiny potato shapes. For the lilac buds are Pingdom in clusters of three. So these bots are scattered all over the lilac. And I'll use a darker color to differentiate them from the petals. And for those flowers which are partially hidden, will paint them as tree petal flowers. Now the lilac has varying shades of color. So when we paint our lilac, we are going to alternate between those colors, which we prepared earlier on. So we use a different color for each flower and we let them touch to allow some color bleeds. So here, where the wet petals are touching each other, we are going to get some nice color bleeds. Now let me show you again. So as you can see, we're starting to get some color here. Now do keep in mind that you only get color bleeds when both flowers are still wet. So here I can drop in a bit more pain and let it bleed into the next petal. Now, I can also drop in a bit of purple on the wet petals. So these flowers have dried up and you can see some nice color bleeds over here. So this is how we are going to paint our lilac will alternate between the colors which we prepared earlier. And we're going to let the flowers touch. So for those flowers which are still wet, we're going to get some nice color bleeds. Now for the greens, you can use any green and if you want to darken the green, you can add a bit of violet. Ok, so now let's start painting our lilac. So I've really prepare the colors in my palette. This is lavender and this is the light paste or violet. This is the pinkish shape which has more opera. This is carmine with lavender. And I've got some violet here. This is green and this is lavender with rows. So first, let's sketch a stem for our lilac will make it a bit bent. And we're going to create a conical shape for our Laila, where the base will be wider than the top. And then you add some leaves at the base of the Laila. So to make it look a bit more natural, we are going to pin some parts of the stem peeping out of the flowers. So if you lie, you can include these parts of the stem in your sketch before you begin painting. Okay, so you can start with any colors. And we are going to start from the center of the stem and slowly work our way out widths. So I'm going to paint a flower here. And then I'll rinse my brush, blot off excess water, and pick up another color. And pea next to the first flower and let the petals touch so I can get some nice color bleeds. Then I'll switch to another color. So now we can see color bleeds where the wet petals touch one another. Now if we want more color bleeds will have to work quickly while the adjacent petals are still wet. But having said that, it's not necessary to have color bleeds for all of the flowers. So as long as we have color bleeds in some of the flowers will still be able to create a nice painting. Okay, Now let's move on to the right side of the stem. Cause we want to leave a bit of GAM here for the center stem. And now I'll switch to another color. So basically we are just alternating between the colors in our palette as repeat the flowers. And we're letting the petals touch one another so that you can get some nice color bleeds. Now for those partially hidden flowers, we can pin them as tree petal flowers. Okay, now let's pin in part of the center stem and also some smallest stance branching out from the center stem. So it's okay to have some greens bleeding into the flowers. I think it actually looks quite nice. Let's extend the stem downwards and some smaller stamps on the right. And we will continue painting the flowers. I'm going to ping a flower using this dark pinkish purple. Now, I will be using a lot of these colored pink. The flowers are only use it when I want to add some contrast and also to paint the flower buds. So majority of the flowers will be painted using the lighter colors. We can also drop in some violet onto the wet petals to create some color variation. Now let's paint some stems in between the flowers on the left. So I'm darkening my green with a bit of violet. Now as we move outwards, we add less flowers. Now let's add some flowers on the lower right. So I'm adding a darker flower here among the lighter flowers, just to add some contrasts so that our lilac doesn't look too flat. Now let's attach a smallest stem to this flower. Okay, now let's cover this part of the center stem of a flower so that the entire center stem will not be visible. So I'm just painting part of the stem here, and then you continue adding more flowers on both sides of the center stem. Now let's work on the upper part of the lilac. So do keep in mind that the upper part will be narrowed and a base. So we'll be adding less flowers here. Now let's connect these flowers to the main stem. Okay, now we add some buds right at the top, and some lighter flowers here. And now we'll grab some green and you connect them to the main stem just so we can get some bleeding into the stem. Okay, I'm going to fill in these gaps here with a few more birds. Let's fill in this space here we a flower. Now darken some parts of the stem. And I'll connect this flower to the means then. Okay, now let's extend the stand downwards and you add some short stems branching out from the main stem. So these are the stems of the flowers. Now let's paint some flowers at the end of the stems. Now for those flowers that are partially hidden, we can also paying them as two petaled flowers. So I'm going to drop in some violet here where the petals are still wet. And let's paint another flower here. And another one at the end of this short stem. Now let's add some buds along the upper part of the lilac. So basically we're just slowly adding in some buds and flowers too slowly form the shape that we want. Okay, now let's move on to the bottom part of our lives. We leave some gaps in between some of the flowers so that we can pin in the stems later on. Now let's add a smallest stem, and we'll attach a flower to the stem. We also add some flower buds here. And we'll connect these two flowers to the main stem. And I'll just fill in this gap with some flower buds. Now, some of these stems and let some of that green bleed into our flowers. So now I'm going to add some flower buds to balance out the overall shape of our lives. Okay, I'm going to extend the stand and I'm going to add a bit more flowers here on the left. I do want to look too symmetrical. So I'm extending this part of our lilac downwards by adding more flowers at the base. And add one last flower here on the H, just to make the overall shape a bit irregular and in perfect. We don't want the shape to be too symmetrical because that will just make it look more natural. So once we're happy with the overall shape of our line, we can move on to painting the leaves. So I'm going to load my brush with some green. Let's add a heart-shaped leaf over here. Then our darken this leaf with a bit more green. So now I'm painting wet on wet. And next I'll lift out some colors to create a highlight on this leaf. We'll add a smaller leaf here. I'll add some lavender to my green to create a muted green. And we'll use this to paint a leaf behind on my line. So we'll draw an outline flower leaf, and then we'll fill in the color. So now I'm carefully painting around the petals to show that this leaf is behind the flowers. Now make sure that your flowers are completely dry before you begin painting this leaf. Otherwise you might get a lot of green bleeding into your flowers. I'm going to add some wispy strokes to create a wispy look for our leaf. Now because this leaf is in the background, we want it to have less defined edges. So what we can do is we can lift up some colors from the edges. Okay, so now I'm going to darken this leaf a bit more. And before we complete our painting, I'm going to darken this area here around the flowers so that we can define the shape of the petals. So this completes our painting. So I hope you've enjoyed painting this, and I look forward to seeing your paintings. 8. Color Palette for Painting a Bouquet of Roses: In this lesson, we are going to make some colors for our roses. So we are going to paint two different colors for our roses. For the first color, we'll mix carmine with burnt sienna. And for the second color, when you mix yellow ocher with sepia, Let's make our first color using burnt sienna and carmine. So what we want is a reddish brown K. Now let's watch out the color. So we'll use this color dipping the center of our rows and also the shadows on the petals. And for the petals will just dilute this color to create a lighter value. Now for the second color, when you mix yellow ocher with sepia. And we'll use this color for the center of our rows and also for the shadows on the petals. And for the petals we'll just mix a very light and diluted yellow ocher. Now for the leaves, we are going to mix a few shades of greens, ranging from light to dark tones. So you can use any green from your palette. I'll be using this green from White Nights. And we're going to mix our green with the colors that we use for our roses so that we can create some color harmony in our painting. So we are going to make some are green with sepia, burnt sienna, and yellow ocher to create a few different shades of green. So let's mix a dark green using sepia. So this will be our darkest green. Now let's mix up our green with burnt sienna and we'll get a warm green. And for our lightest green will mix our green with yellow ocher. Now we can add a bit of the sepia mix to dislike green to create another sheet of light green. And we can also add a bit of burnt sienna to create a warmer shade of light green. So we have these different shades of greens, which we can use to paint our stems and leaves later on. 9. Painting a Bouquet of Roses: Now for our bouquet of roses, we are going to paint some side angle roses. So here are some examples of sight angle roses. Now because this rose is at an angle, we'll paint the center a bit higher. And there'll be more petals at the bottom and less at the top because some of these back petals are hidden from our view. Now if you compare it with a front-facing rows, you see that with this front-facing rows, the center of the rose is right in the center. Whereas we decide angle ROS, the center is slightly at the top and some of the back petals are hidden. Whereas all the petals on this front facing roles are visible. Now for the rows, but we'll create an over center, which is made up of C strokes. Okay, now I'll show you how to paint a side angle ROS, European more petals at the bottom and less at the top. And we'll use a darker color for the center. And also for the shadows on the pentose. Now for the shadows, we are going to pin down a bit differently from our previous rows class. We'll use a slightly different technique to add the shadows. So we'll use a size two brush to paint the center and the shadows, and a medium-size brush to paint the lighter petals. Now make sure you have a paper towel to blood off excess moisture from your brush. So I'll load my size two brush with the darker color and are paying some overlapping C strokes to form a center for our rose. And I'm leaving some white spaces in between these strokes. Now I want these outer strokes to be a bit wet so that the oblique into my lighter petals. Now we are paying some lighter and larger C strokes around the center. And our touch, the darker strokes to allow some color bleeds. And I'm still leaving a bit of white spaces in between these strokes. As we move outwards, we apply more pressure on our brush to create larger C strokes. And we are still leaving some white spaces in between these strokes. So I'm painting more petals at the bottom and less at the top. Then I'll use a bit of clean water to soften the edges. Now for the shadows, will paint them by the petals are still a bit wet. So we are going to paint these kind of bee species strokes while the petals are still wet. So you can see that my brush isn't too wet. Now we do want it to be too wet because we want to create some soft and define strokes. We can also use our people towel to blot off excess paint if we want a more defined stroke. And we can also soft and nice shadows strokes with a clean damp brush. So the important thing to remember is that these shadows strokes shouldn't be too wet. Because we want our strokes to be defined and soft when we paint them on a wet pentose. So practice painting these shadows strokes with a small round brush. And then you can practice painting them on a red paper. And if you find that it bleeds too much, just blot off the excess paint on your paper towel. Okay, So these strokes shouldn't be too wet because we want a soft and defined stroke when we paint them on the webpack dose. Now if you don't have a size two brush which is soft and meat of natural hair. You can also use any synthetic size two brush. So now let's pin some shadows strokes using this synthetic size to Princeton snap. So with a synthetic brush, we can still create some wispy strokes. So practice painting these we species strokes with whatever size two brush that you have. So you can first practice painting them on dry paper, and then practice painting them on a wet paper. Okay, so now let's move on to our class project. So far, bouquet of roses, we are going to paint three roses and some flower buds. So I have made a light pencil sketch of three circles. This is where we are going to place our roses. I'll start by loading my size two brush with T darker mix of carmine and burnt sienna. And my size six brush with the diluted mix. So you start with the center of the rose. So I'm making small overlapping C strokes to form the center. And I'm leaving some white space in between these C strokes. Okay, so now I'm going to switch to my size six brush and I'm going to touch some of those darker strokes to get some kind of bleeds. So as I move outwards, I'm making larger and loses the strokes. I'm also picking up some water to dilute some of the color. Now, I'm making sure that my brush stays wet. So I'm constantly picking up more paint so that I can easily alter the shape of the petals without leaving any hard edges. This rose is at an angle, So we're paying more petals at the bottom. Okay, now switch to my size two brush and I'll start adding the shadows and our blood out excess moisture so data pin doesn't spread too much. Okay, and now I'm going to soften the edges with a bit of clean water. So we'll paint some leaves around the rows. Are the petals are still wet so that we can get some nice color bleeds. So try to vary the color and shape of the leaves so that it looks more interesting. We can also drop in a darker green to the leaves while they are still wet. Okay, now let's move on to the second rows. We'll ping this rose at an angle and let it phase the upper-right corner. So I'll just rotate my paper to make it easier for me to paint. Now we are going to use the yellow ocher for this rose. So I'll load my size two brush with the CPR and yellow ocher mix. And I'll use this to pin the center of the rose and also the shadows. Then I'll load my size six with the diluted yellow ocher, which I will use to ping the outer petals. Okay, So we'll start by painting some small overlapping C strokes to form the center for our rows. We also use this color to paint the shadows later on. Next, I'll load my size six brush with some yellow ocher and our touch, those diagnoses drugs to get some color bleeds are also drop in a bit of that sepia mix just to get more color bleeds. As I move outwards, I'll add more pressure on my brush to create larger petals. Now, I'll add some shadows with my size two brush. And you can see that this brush is not very wet. We don't want it to be too wet so that we can get some soft and defining strokes. Now let's add more petals at the BSW and then we'll use some clean water to soften the edges. I'll just add a few more darker strokes. And at this point my brush is quite dry, so I'm able to get some soft and define strokes. So just like the previous rows, we'll add some leaves or the rose is duet, and we vary the color and shape of the leaves. Now let's add some leaves in between these two roses. I'll rinse my brush and pick up a lighter green. And our pain and our belief right next to this darker leaf. Okay, now let's paint our final rows, which is at the upper left corner. This is another side angle roles. And we've used the common and burnt sienna mix for this rows. So again, I'm starting with the darker color mine burnt sienna mix for the center. I'm wetting the strokes a bit more so that you bleed into the lighter petals later on. Okay, so now I'll switch to my size six brush and I'll touch those darker strokes to allow some color bleeds. I also drop in a bit more color to let that bleed into the petals. So since this rose is at an angle, we're only paying a few petals at the top. Most of the petals will be at the bottom. So I'm adding more water to my brush SIP and the outer petals so that it'll be easier for me to create larger strokes. Okay, Now let's add the shadows and some water to soften the edges. So now let's add some leaves. So in my previous roles class, I painted on the bow home to a 100 GSM paper. And now I'm using the 300 GSM paper. So I find that with this paper I can create more beautiful color bleeds. The pain tends to bleed faster. And it's just so relaxing to watch it please. Okay, I'm going to add some random strokes here to define the shape of our first rows. K. Now let's add some tiny rose buds at the top. So I'm just creating a basic leaf shape. And I'll add a stem and let the green bleeding. And then I'll drop in a darker color on the tip and let it bleed. Now we'll add the cycles and since the paint is still wet, we need to use a thicker consistency of green to get a defined stroke. Our just make sure that your brush isn't too wet. Our pin and I didn't leave here to define the shape of our yellow rose K. Now let's paint the stems. I'll start with a lighter green, and then I'll drop in a bit of darker green along the edges. Now let's paint some leaves branching off from the stems. We can make some a bit darker and some may be lighter just to add more contrast. And we can also fill in the spaces with some stems. Okay, now let's pin a larger row spot on the lower right. So I'm going to use the carmine and burnt sienna mix. So I'm making some C strokes to form the center of the rose spot. And then add a stroke to indicate the path UFO. And now I'll fill in the row spot with the lighter color. I'll darken it a bit more with the darker color. And now let's add some samples and connect it to a stem. We'll pin some rose spots here to fill in the empty space. And then we'll add some stems and sepals. Now let's pain more stamps at the base and we'll vary the colors of the standards. So we'll pin some a bit darker and some a bit lighter just to add some depth. Okay, now we're going to fill in the rest of this bouquet with more leaves. And again, we'll vary the color and shape of these leaves. And we can also paint some thin stems, just a fill in the empty space. Okay, Now I'm going to add some droopy leaves to add interest to the composition. And for the final touches, our darken some of the leaves and stems just to add more contrast to our painting. Okay, so this completes our bouquet of roses. I hope that you've enjoyed this lesson and I look forward to seeing your paintings. 10. Color Palette for Painting a Floral Wreath: So in this lesson, I'm going to show you the colors that we'll be using to paint our floral wreath. And also show you how to mix this brownish beige color. So we'll paint some roses and disease in our floral wreath. And we also include some rosebuds and Daisy bots. So for our first rows, we are going to use the yellow ocher and CPR for the center and also the shadows. And for the petals will use a diluted mix of yellow ocher. And for our second rows, I'll be using this color dunes from White Nights. So I'll use that to paint the petals. And for the center, I'll mix it with a bit of sepia. So if you don't have dunes, I'm going to show you how you can mix this color. So we're going to make some white, yellow ocher and CPR to create this brownish, beige color. So let me swatch out this color for you to see. Kr. I'll make it a bit more saturated with less water. And now our diluted with a bit of water. Okay, so now let's make this column. So first I'll squeeze out some white and then I'll add a bit of sepia. Now let's mix them together. And I'll add a bit of water. Okay, and now we add some yellow ocher and we'll see how it looks. Okay, it looks a bit too brownish, so we'll add a bit more yellow ocher to the mix. It still looks a bit too brownish, so let's add more white and yellow ocher. Now let's see how it looks. Okay, this looks quite close to the color dunes from White Nights. I think we just need to add a bit more water. Okay, So this is very close to the color dunes. So you can mix this color on your own using white, yellow ocher and CPR. So we use this to paint the petals. And for the center and the shadows. We will darken it with a bit of sepia. Okay, so now let's darken this mixture with a bit of sepia and we'll see how it looks. So we are going to use this to paint the center of the rose and also the shadows. Now for the leaves, we are going to use varying shades of greens. And we're going to use the seeming greens from our rose bouquet. So I'm going to mix green with CPR, burnt sienna, and yellow ocher to create several sheets of greens. And for the daisies, you use the same colors from our previous class project. Okay, so in the next video we are going to paying our floral wreath. 11. Painting a Floral Wreath: Okay, now let's paint our floral wreath. So every draw now a circle for our reef. And we are going to start with the yellow ocher rows. So I'll load my size six brush with some diluted yellow ocher and my size to read the yellow ocher and CPR mix. I'll start by making some small overlapping C strokes to form a center for our rose. And I'm leaving some white spaces in between the strokes. Then I'll lose my size six will be diluted, yellow ocher mix. And our touch, these darker strokes to allow some color bleeds are leaves a bit of whitespaces between these darker and lighter strokes. Now, I'll drop in a bit more of the sepia mix and let that bleed into the lighter petals. So as I move, our words are making larger petals. And I'm still leaving a bit of white spaces in between these larger petals. Now this is a front-facing rows, so all the petals are visible. Then I'll soften the edges with a bit of clean water. Ok, and now I'll load my size two brush with the darker mix and I'll start painting the shadows. So I'm blotting our Access pinned to make sure that my brush isn't too wet so that I can get some soft and define strokes. Our darken some shadows a bit more. And I'm making sure that my brush isn't too wet so that it doesn't spread too much. Okay, now let's paint some leaves around this rows. So we vary the size, shape, and colors of these leaves just to make it look a bit more interesting. And we can drop in a darker green while the leaves are still wet. This will create some color variation in the leaves. Okay, now let's ping a side angle ROS pointing towards the upper right corner. So for this rows we are going to use the brownish beige color. So again, I'm starting with the center of the rose and making small overlapping C strokes, leaving some white spaces. Now because this is a side angle rows, we're paying less petals at the top and more petals at the bottom. This rose is partially hidden behind the yellow rose. So I'm just selecting these petals a bit more before I ping in the shadows because I can see that they're starting to dry. So now my size two brush, I'll start painting the shadows. Now let's paint some leaves around this rose. And we'll vary the color and shape of these leaves. I'll drop in a darker green while the leaves are still wet and I'll let that bleed. Now use a warmer green to paint some leaves over here just to vary the colors of the leaves around this rose. And I also paint some thin and short stems, and I'll fill in this gap with a smaller leaf. This helps to define the shape of our yellow rose. So let's add a few more leaves around this rules. Okay, now let's paint a rose bud. So I'm starting with the center of the roles. And then I'll fill in the shape with a lighter color. And for the sepals, I'm using a thick consistency of greens so that I can get some soft and define strokes. I also paint some thin leaves along the stem. And we're also paying a smaller rowspan here. Okay, I'm going to paint the Zappos again. And this time I'll use a thicker consistency of paint so that I can get some softened defined strokes. My previous green mix was a bit too watery. Okay, now we'll darken the tip of this row spot and we'll continue adding more leaves and stems along this reef. So I'm using a lighter shade of green here so that we can add some dimension and depth to our painting. Okay, now let's paint the other half of this reef are attached some leaves and stems to this yellow rose. And you pin some smaller leaves pointing in different directions. So try to vary the color of your leaves. Now, let's add some DCs to our wreath. I'll start with a front-facing Daisy, and then I'll darken the lower edge with some sepia and burnt sienna. Now P NOPAT those using the same bluish gray mix from our earlier class project. Now let's pick a side. These are facing downwards. And we can add some stems emerging from behind this daisy. Daisy but pointing upwards. Okay, now let's paint some leaves emerging from behind this daisy. So try to paint them in different directions. And you can also vary the colors of these leaves. You can make some a bit darker and some a bit lighter. So this we add more interests to our wreath. Now let's extend our reef upwards. And whooping another site, DC here. Now let's fill in these gaps here with a bit more leafs. And let's extend the reads upwards. So here I'll pin and I do the easy part, and I'll paint some lighter leaves next to it. Now as we move outwards, we are going to paint these leaves to be lighter. Because we wonder focus to be on a two roses and we are surrounded by larger and darker leaves. Now let's extend the left side of this wreath with a bit more leaves. We can also pin some stem sticking out. So if there are any gaps in your reef, you can just fill in those gaps for me for some leaves or stems sticking up. So the key thing to remember is to vary the colors, size, and also the direction of the leaves in order to create a natural looking reef. And for the finishing touches, are few in any remaining gaps with some leaves and stem sticking out. Okay, so this completes our floral wreath. I hope you've enjoyed this lesson, and I look forward to seeing your paintings. 12. Final Thoughts: So thank you for taking this class. I hope that you've learned something new and that you've enjoyed this class. I really look forward to seeing your paintings. So do share them by uploading them in the project gallery. Or if you're sharing on Instagram, you can tag me at Blue doubtless art. Now if you have any questions, feel free to reach out. I'll be happy to help. If this is your first time taking my classes. I do have other classes on painting florals. And if you're interested to learn more about painting roses, I highly recommend this class. Now, if you have enjoyed this class, please support me by leaving a class review so that this class can reach more students. So guys, thank you so much for watching and I hope to see you in my next Skillshare class.