Painting Homages to Three Unrecognized Female Artists | Devochkina Oksana | Skillshare

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Painting Homages to Three Unrecognized Female Artists

teacher avatar Devochkina Oksana, To be an arists is a life long canvas

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

6 Lessons (34m)
    • 1. Introduction to the course

      1:35
    • 2. Dénes Valéria. A modern landscape

      6:11
    • 3. Cubistic Sketching. Creating a diptych.

      6:15
    • 4. Portraying in the style of Amrita Sher-Gil

      9:19
    • 5. Lucia Moholy. Painting in black&white

      7:09
    • 6. A monochrome pallet: technical part

      3:04
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About This Class

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In this course I will be telling you about three Hungarian female artists whose works are not represented in the collection of the National Gallery in their homeland. They have rarely been published in art history books, and some of their works even indicate the name of the artist's husband, instead of their own.

  1. Dénes Valéria
  2. Amrita Sher-Gil
  3. Lucia Moholy

In this course we will be learning from the techniques of the artists, which we will use to paint a homage inspired by each one of them. 

After this course  you will be able to:

  • sketch in a cubistic style
  • mix oil colors
  • paint in a modern style
  • and in a monochrome palette

 

This course is useful for non-professional painters, designers, architects, illustrators and those who are interested in art history, feminism and great dramatic stories. There will be three stories about devotion to art, feminism and about love. I will share you new painting techniques as well as my own experience. Join me!

Music: Musica Moralia

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Video 2. Homage to Dénes Valéria

Materials

  • Oil colors:

    - White titanium
    - Nero Avorio (or any black)
    - Parigi Blue
    - Bruno Van Dyck
    - Emerald Green
    - Cadmium yellow light
    - Indian Yellow
    - Cadmium Yellow Orange
    - Madder Lake Red Permanent

  • Canvas 50 X 40 cm, 2 piece for a diptych
  • Turpentine
  • Cloth
  • Bristle Brushes 10-16 size
  • Jar


Music: Musica Moralia

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Video 4. Homage to Amrita Sher-Gil


Materials

  • Oil colors:

    - White titanium
    - Indian Yellow
    - Burnt Umber
    - Raw Sienna
    - Lamp Black (or any black)
    - Cadmium yellow light
    - Cadmium red light
    - Scarlet Lake
  • Canvas 70 X 90 cm
  • Turpentine
  • Cloth
  • Bristle Brushes 10-20 size
  • Jar

Composer: Bela Bartok
Modern Art Orchestra (BMC Records, 2018)

IMPROVISATION ON ROMAN. FOLK DANCES NO.4 
IMPROVISATION ON ROMAN. CHRISTMAS CAROLS NO.7  


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Video 5-6. Homage to Lucia Moholy


Materials

  • Oil colors:

    - White titanium
    - Lamp Black (or any black)
    - Bruno Van Dyck
    - Cadmium yellow light Hue
  • Canvas 50 X 40 cm
  • Turpentine
  • Cloth
  • Synthetic Brushes, rectangular and wide
  • Jar

Composer: Bela Bartok
Modern Art Orchestra (BMC Records, 2018)

IMPROVISATION ON ROMAN. CHRISTMAS CAROLS NO.7  

Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

Devochkina Oksana

To be an arists is a life long canvas

Teacher


I am an artist. 

In 2018 I've established a multi-educational space called Kunstfuck Art Residency, where I teach painting and art history. For the past year, I've helped over 200 students to realize their creative potential, from their very first sketch to an exhibition! 

 

 

In November 2019 I’ve opened the first exhibition of my graduates at Kunstfuck Art Residency. We’ve dedicated the exhibition to the city's local architecture, and moreover — to its architectonics. The term 'Painterly Architectonics' is taken from Lyubov Popova who reduced her depiction of the city to squares and rectangles. 

 



In my personal projects, I research what is to be a woma... See full profile

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Transcripts

1. Introduction to the course: Hi, my name is Oksana Devochkina. I am the curator of Kunstfuck Art Residency in Budapest. At Kunstfuck, I teach painting and introduce students to artists and their work. I will be telling you about three female artists whose works are not presented in the collection of the National Gallery in their homeland. They have rarely been published in art history books. And some of their works even indicate the name of the artist's husband instead of their own. In this course, we will be learning from the techniques of different artists which we will use to paint a homage inspired by each one of them. After this course, you will be able to sketch in a cubistic style. Mix, oil colours. Paint in a modern style, and in a monochrome palette. This course is useful for non-professional painters, designers, architects, illustrators, and those who are interested in art history and great dramatic stories. I will show you new painting techniques as well as my own experience. I will be sharing three stories about devotion to art, And of course, love. Join me! 2. Dénes Valéria. A modern landscape: Wikipedia says Dénes Valéria was the wife of the artist Galimberti Sandor and she herself painted in the style of cubism. Dénes was a talented, strong, outstanding painter in her own right. In 2019, her work depicting the city of Bruges, sold for 110 million forints, a record price for a painting by a Hungarian artist. In this demonstration, I will create an urban landscape in the style of Dénes, perhaps by copying her technique, we will gain a deeper understanding of her work. In 1906, she enrolled in the School of Matisse, one of the leaders of fauvism, and later even accompanied him on his travels to the East. Perhaps it is through Matisse's influence that Valeria embraces the love of black contours. After all, the French Fauves were looking for a new visual methods. They used saturated, unnatural colors, flattened volumes, and reversed perspective. In Dénes depiction of the city of Bruges, art historians were looking for the viewpoint from which the picture was painted, but they could not find it. A distinctive feature of the Fauves was that they tried to convey the mood and not the so-called reality. In her work, Dénes conveyed the rhythm of the roofs and the colour sensation from the Belgian city, but did not depict any specific place at all. A whole generation of Hungarian artists of the early 20th century went to Paris where Matisse taught at the time and to the Julian school. Fashionable trends in French painting, which use clear contours, inverted perspective and bright colors made a great impression on young artists. Returning to Hungary, they founded an art residence in the city of Nagybanya and began to call themselves the Hungarian Fauves. In Dénes's painting, one can see the influence of the light, elegant French of the early 20th century and German expressionism. With it's heavier, tense range of colors, as well as the Cubists with their geometric forms, need for abstraction and muted color palette. Dénes was considered a cubist, and this is partly true as her canvases resemble Picasso, Léger, and Braque. Among the works, there are also oval-shaped compositions beloved by French Cubists. Terracotta, Indian yellow, an abundance of browns and neutrals in contrast to blue. By the way, my blue shade was rightly called Parisian blue because of the love of French modernists for this color. I will paint the trapezoids and triangles of roofs flat, but I will not completely paint over the shapes. The painting technique of Dénes was very fast, almost sketching as if she was creating an under painting or sketch and does not complete the picture. Dénes Valeria died at the age of 38. Her beloved husband left for the war. She became very worried, eventually falling with pneumonia, and soon after died of a nervous condition. Galimberti Sandor could not cope with the loss of his wife and shot himself in the gallery. Their little son was left an orphan. The tragic fate and early departure from life is also overshadowed by the fact that most of her works were lost. and today only about a dozen paintings remain. Her sister Dénes Zofia, publicist and historian who inherited Dénes's paintings after her death, wrote in her monograph, I have never seen such self-denial in a woman. Such a desire to live for the cause. This absolute and unshakable artistry that went its own way and viewed people and institutions only through the prism of its artistic interest. 3. Cubistic Sketching. Creating a diptych.: This stinks. I promise you, this sign as a promise just now. Okay. So this this year she makes me as a speaker. Lovely. And now shake me. Now. A greater during the shape of flowers. This this time machine makes me sticky. It's tiny. Hey, calculate for the cause me to my shoulders. The problem is just the sign as a promise was just sine. So this this year she makes me as a speaker. Nine years. Lovely. Shake me, shake me. 4. Portraying in the style of Amrita Sher-Gil: Amrita Sher-Gil became the first and most famous female artist in India. She was the first painter to address women's issues than the untouchables in India. Her work had a substantial impact on Indian identity. However, in her homeland, Hungary, there is not a single work of Amrita Sher-Gil in the permanent museum collections or even in the archives of the national gallery. In the West, Amrita is not represented in world art history. She even wrote about it herself: Europe belongs to Picasso, Matisse, Braque and many others. India belongs only to me. We will be painting a homage to Amrita Sher-Gil. Perhaps depicting her and copying her technique, we will gain a deeper understanding of her work. Amrita Sher-Gil was born in Budapest in 1913. Her Indian father was an eldest son of raja and a spy. Her mother was a Hungarian opera singer. She received an excellent home education. Amrita began painting at the age of five and grew up surrounded by artists, poets, writers, and scientists. Her uncle was a famous Hungarian orientalist and their neighbor was the leading Hungarian composer, Bela Bartok. Amrita herself played the piano and violin superbly. She studied art in Florence. An Italian sculptor was temporarily invited to their home to live in Budapest. In the early 20th century, during the heyday of modernism, a whole generation of Hungarian artists traveled to Paris. Amrita Sher-Gil did the same. She ended up in the Parisian Academy of Fine Arts and in the studio of Lucien Simone, which was next door to Gauguin's workshop. Later, Amrita wrote that Lucien Simon taught not so much technique as he taught to listen to the call of the heart. During the Parisian period, Amrita not only studied the heritage of the Great Western masters. Brueghel, Hals, Manet but was also inspired by famous French modernists (Cézanne, Gauguin and Modigliani). From them, she inherits flattened volumes, sometimes black strokes, and a special primitized expressive form. In addition to the great masters, she was influenced by teachers and colleagues. So from Lucien Simon she spies on genre plots of a Breton village, from Robert Humblot- large eyes, from Boris Taslitsky- political plots. Social stories and expressive views will later be reflected in the most famous works of the Indian period. In Paris, she painted her companions and mistresses. and was increasingly inspired by the portrait genre. Her muse Marie Louise Chassagne, also inspired other students of Lucien Simone. Georges Ronet, Robert Humblot. In letters to her mother, Amrita wrote that female sexuality attracts her no less than male sexuality. However, the female images she created are devoid of objectification. She painted a gypsy young woman because she felt the personification of freedom in her. She portrays two naked girls and tells a story of friendship and female support. In her paintings of Indian women we can see resignation to fate, the pressure of caste, prejudice and doom. Upon traveling to Hungary, Amrita Sher-Gil painted cemeteries, churches, and landscapes, filled with a sense of sadness and detachment. But despite this fruitful period, she is drawn to India because it is there that she seeks to embody her vocation as an artist. In 1935, she moved to India, where she became acquainted with Bengali and Bombay painting traditions. Here she finds a connection between art and religious practices, self-knowledge and storytelling. At this time, a new Amrita artist is born who connects two worlds, Eastern and European. Depicting social problems with European painting techniques. she finds her own unique style and becomes the leader of Indian modernism. A good example is the painting Woman on Charpai, where Amrita depicts a woman and a maid with a fan. She is simultaneously inspired by the red and green of Indian miniatures. On the other hand, by Manet's Olympia and The Sleeping Venus by Titian. Sometimes Amrita is considered a neo-realist, although her realism is in the depiction of real feelings, the Indian way of life and social injustice. As a Hungarian she allows herself a lifestyle that no Indian woman could afford. As an Indian she empathizes with women's way of life and to some extent becomes a follower of Gandhi. At age 25, she marries her cousin Victor Egan He was a close heartfelt friend of Amrita, who upon becoming a husband, did not try to infringe on her freedom or interfere with her work. However, after a couple of years, Amrita writes to her sister, that she is losing touch with Victor and is losing him as a friend. According to other sources, Victor was increasingly worsening from his wife's love of freedom and was overcome by jealousy. At 28, Amrita suddenly falls into a coma. According to Victor Egan, the cause is dysentery. But according to other sources, Amrita's condition was caused by complications after an abortion or poisoning. Since Victor was the only doctor who examined the artist and who did not warn his parents until the last day of Amrita's life. Her mother accuses him of killing her daughter. Amrita's body was cremated in Lahore, according to Indian tradition, the next day. Translated from Hindi, the name, Amrita means immortality. And although Amrita Sher-Gil passed away very early, her name continues to live thanks to her works. 5. Lucia Moholy. Painting in black&white: Lucia Moholy. Lucia Moholy created the image of the Bauhaus, perhaps the first design school of the 20th century to develop functional interiors and mass-produced utilitarian objects. It is from Lucia's photo negatives that we know what a leading German design institution looked like, in what kind of spaces the students worked in and what they created. However, for 30 years, her photographs and books carried the name of the artist's husband or the founder of the school, not her own. Even after decades spent recovering her authorship, Lucia Moholy was able to reclaim the rights to only part of her works. In Hungary, there is only one of her works in the collection of the National Gallery. Together, we will be making a painting in the style of Lucia Moholy, perhaps by creating a homage to this photographer we will gain a better understanding of her artistic merits. Lucia was born in 1894 in Austro-Hungary. In Prague. She studied philology, philosophy, and art history. This would later allow her to edit art books in different languages and also to write her own. At the age of 27, Lucia met the Hungarian Laszlo Moholy-Nagy. This notable alliance with the director of the Bauhaus school was very creatively productive. Over eight years, they experimented with photography, light, focus, optical effects, and compositions without the use of cameras, known as photograms. However, at the Bauhaus School, they both lived only at Laszlo's headquarters and only one woman was officially employed there in the textile department. Until 1929, photographers from the Bauhaus school did not have a specialized education, which allowed Lucia not to limit herself to the standards of the nineteenth-century, but to go beyond them, creating bold, unique solutions. Her portraits are not built in full face and three-quarters, but instead at different angles. and with uneven lighting. In general, her work was much less predictable than what was seen at this time. It was Lucia who made the most famous photo-portraits of her husband, reflecting his approach to design at the Bauhaus, which was practical and functional. Moholy became a follower of the New Objectivity movement -an artistic movement in Germany in the second half of the 1920's, when artists sought to perceive things as they really were without idealization and romance. They had an exaggeratedly sharp depiction of reality. All of this suited the Bauhaus concept. While doing product photography, Lucia experimented with scale and used shadows as part of her images. She is one of the first photographers to create wide angle architectural photography. Asymmetry, with diagonal compositions or strong contrasts, her works also reflected avant-garde movements. The school's founder, Walter Gropius, believed that it was necessary to document everything that happened within the walls of the Bauhaus. And Lucia Moholy first used photography as a way of documentation. Her photos appeared in books, brochures, posters about the Bauhaus and made the school popular. Her photographs attracted advertising customers to the school, which allowed it to survive when the country was in crisis. Lucia created a series of photographs of Bauhaus spaces and buildings and used architectural fragments as part of abstract images. In her hands, exposure, the contrast of windows and walls became tools for building a rhythmic image. In 1925, Laszlo published the book "Painting, Photography, Film" which did not indicate the co-authorship of his wife. This created a crack in the relationship. In 1929, she divorced her husband, moved to Berlin, and the former dean of the Bauhaus, Johannes Itten, took her to the Department of photography as a teacher. However, Lucia's work in Berlin lasted only for four years. The Nazis arrested her partner for her communist views and for safety reasons she no longer returned to the apartment where all her negatives remained. Walter Gropius took all her negatives to the United States. In 1938, he held a Bauhaus retrospective at MoMa in New York based on 50 of Lucia's photographs. None of these photographs were credited to her. The correspondence between Lucia and Walter has also been preserved, where she vainly requested for her authorship to be returned. After the war, Lucia devoted years to suing Gropius for her negatives and articles. But even after winning the trial and getting some of the negatives back, Lucia still fought to claim the name back to her works. Thanks to Lucia Moholy, we know how the Bauhaus was remarkable, who taught there and what subjects they created. Without her, the Bauhaus would have remained in the background of history and exclusively in the memory of those who studied and worked there. This unique archive is valuable not only as a Bauhaus catalog, but also as one of the first examples of photography as art. Lucia Moholy was one of the first photography artists to create the style and image of her era. Her faith in herself and in her work helped her regain her name and inspire those who encounter it. 6. A monochrome pallet: technical part: And the family.