Paint Tropical Watercolor Fruit on Your iPad in Procreate + 9 Free Watercolor Brushes | Liz Kohler Brown | Skillshare

Paint Tropical Watercolor Fruit on Your iPad in Procreate + 9 Free Watercolor Brushes

Liz Kohler Brown, artist | designer | teacher | author

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7 Lessons (1h 5m)
    • 1. Paint Tropical Watercolor Fruit on Your iPad in Procreate + 9 Free Watercolor Brushes

      3:13
    • 2. Brushes & Inspiration

      13:04
    • 3. Ink & Selections

      7:17
    • 4. Layering Color

      9:17
    • 5. Masking Method

      13:21
    • 6. Sketching Method

      7:56
    • 7. Layering & Erasing

      10:56
53 students are watching this class

About This Class

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In this class I'll show you the easy steps to paint tropical watercolor fruit on your iPad in Procreate.  I’ll show you how to work from both pictures and real life, so whether you’re at home looking at some fruit on your kitchen table or sitting in the airport, you can use this process to create a beautiful watercolor painting.

I’ll show you how I get inspiration for my images, and how I set up photographs for watercolor sketches.  When you watch this class, you’ll get the 9 watercolor brushes that I created for Procreate, plus the watercolor texture paper that I use to add a real watercolor texture to my paintings.

I'll show you:

  • how to do a simple pen and ink drawing, then add layers of watercolor to the drawing to get a simple and soft watercolor look.
  • how to use a masking process to mask out portions of a lemon slice, then fill those masked sections with layers of watercolor.
  • how to create a pencil drawing, then build up layers of color to create a loose watercolor painting.

The techniques in this class can be used to create any watercolor painting, so once you learn the steps, you can apply this process to any objects you want to paint!  

All you need to take this class is your iPad, the app Procreate, and a stylus.  I’ll be using the Apple Pencil, but you could use any stylus, or even your finger.  Let’s get started!

You can see my Pinterest Inspiration Board here.

You can get the class downloads here. (The password is shown at the beginning of the class.)

The sites Unsplash and Pixabay offer free images for personal or commercial use.

Here are the tropical fruit planner stickers that you can get as a free download on my blog.

Transcripts

1. Paint Tropical Watercolor Fruit on Your iPad in Procreate + 9 Free Watercolor Brushes: [MUSIC] Hi everyone, I'm Liz, I'm an artist, illustrator and teacher. And today I want to show you how to paint tropical watercolor fruit on your iPad in Procreate. When you watch this class, you'll get the nine watercolor brushes that I created for Procreate, plus the watercolor texture paper that I use to add real watercolor textures to my paintings. First, I'll show you how to do a simple pen and ink drawing. Then add layers of color to the drawing to get a simple and soft watercolor look. Next, we'll use a masking process to mask out portions of a lemon slice, then fill those masked sections with layers of color. We'll add highlights to the layers to create juicy looking lemon slices. Next, we'll make a pencil drawing of some lime slices and build up layers of color to create a loose watercolor. painting. The techniques you learn in this class can be used to create any watercolor painting. So once you learn the steps, you can apply this process to any object you want to paint. I'll show you how to work from both pictures and real life. So whether you're at home, looking at some fruit on your kitchen table or sitting in the airport, you can use this process to create a beautiful watercolor painting wherever you are. You can also use your iPad as a way of gathering resources for your paintings. I love going to the grocery store and finding some really beautiful pieces of fruit and taking pictures with my iPad. Then when I go home, I can take a lot of time to make a nice watercolor painting from those pictures. What I love about this process is you can do this anywhere. If you're sitting on a park bench, or sitting at a cafe, with your favorite coffee drink, you can pull out your iPad and create a beautiful watercolor painting. Another amazing thing about this process is that you have access to every color in the rainbow. It's not like real watercolors where you have to buy a new tube every time you want a new color, you have every color at your fingertips. So you can really just play around with the process and use whatever colors work well for your style. You know that feeling you get when you take out an expensive piece of watercolor paper and you wonder if you're going to mess it up, when you paint digitally, you don't have to worry about that. You can easily step backwards if you make a mistake and you can easily start over and you don't have to use any extra paper to start a new piece. So you can forget about wasting materials, you can forget about making mistakes, and just play around with the process. That's the amazing thing about painting on your iPad. All you need to take this class is your iPad and a stylus. I'll be using the Apple Pencil, but you could use any stylus or even your finger. So let's get started. 2. Brushes & Inspiration: The first thing I want to do is show you how to get the brushes and paper that you'll need for this class. You'll see the link to download the brushes in the about section of the class and you'll need a password to get into that page. I'll show the password on screen right now. Once you get into that page, you'll see the full list of brushes and the watercolor paper at the bottom. To get each brush, I'll click on the brush and that'll open up a new tab. This will open up a page that shows the brush name, and then it'll say "Open in". You may say a different program if you have other programs that could use brushes on your computer. Click "More" if you don't see the word Procreate there, but you should see Procreate and just click that. That will open up Procreate. Once you open up a new document and go to your brushes and go to the imported section, you'll see the brush at the top of the list. There's the cloud brush that I just downloaded. You have to do this process with each brush, and then for the watercolor paper, same thing. I'm going to click at one time. Then once that page loads, I can click and hold to get the "Save Image" option, and I'll click "Save Image", that'll save it to your iPad photos. Then we can open up Procreate, and go to the gallery. I'm going to click the plus symbol to create a custom size. I'm going to work at 10 by 10 inches today. You can work at any size. It just depends on what your final use for the project is. Ten by ten is usually great for most uses online, but if you were going to print this out onto paper, you may want to use a different size depending on your paper size. I'll use 10 by 10 at 300 DPI and click "Create". Then I want to bring my watercolor paper onto this Canvas. I'll click the tool symbol, click "Insert a photo", go to all photos and then click on the watercolor paper that we just saved. Then I will use two fingers to make this fit the paper. The important thing about these paper layers is making sure they're set to the right blending mode. These blending modes will blend multiple layers together. This is great for when you're painting because it makes the paint look like it's part of the paper and blends them together. I like to do two layers of paper and I'm going to do the first layer on multiply. Then I'll swipe left, click "Duplicate", click the "M" symbol again, and click "Linear Burn". Now I have two different blending layers going on. You could do more. I haven't experimented with those, but you may want to play around and see if there's a different blending mode combination that you like. I'm also going to reduce the opacity of each of these layers. I don't like my paper to be really dark, I like to get that tiny bit of texture on the paper but not too much. Next I want to play around with these brushes a little bit. I'm going to create a new layer. Click the end symbol and set this layer to multiply. Now all three of my layers are set to some blending mode and they're going to blend really nicely together. Every time I create a new paint layer, I'm going to make sure it's set to multiply. That's one thing to double-check, everytime you create a new paint layer with this process. Let's play around with the brushes. I've put all my rushes in this new section I created called Fruit Brushes. If you want to do that, just click the plus symbol and then you can name your set, and then you can drag each brush into that set. That makes it a little bit easier than having it down in your imported brushes section. I'm in my fruit brushes set and let's take a look at the largest brushes first. These first two brushes are cloud brushes. I really only use these for erasing. They don't really look like watercolors when you paint them normally, but when you erase the center of some of these other brushes it looks really nice. I'm going to skip those two for now. The splatter brush creates a nice flattering effect. You can drag your brush like that or you can just tap. This is really great for creating a splattered fruit effect. The next branch is the droplets brush. This is similar to the splatter brush, but these are larger droplets in a more organized shape. You can use these to create layered droplets, and you can also change the size of all of these brushes. You could get a slightly smaller size and create a nice texture. We use this brush when we do some of the outer edges of fruit because they have those tiny little pores on the outside of the fruit. I'm just clicking two fingers to undo all of these. The next is the blunt edge controlled huge. This is a huge brush that's really good for just covering a background with a water color texture. If you don't like how the texture lays down on the first path, you can keep going over that section and it'll change the texture each time. I'm going to go to my Eraser tool and get my cloud brush huge and come in and erase this layer a little bit. You can see how I'm adding in some watercolor variation with the cloud brash. The next brush is the blend edge controlled brush. This one has a really nice even stroke, but it also has some nice watercolor texture especially on the edge, you can really see that frayed look. Let's step back and do this again so you can really see the texture. You'll get some nice variation there. You can do this brush with a single stroke, but you can also cover large shapes with this brush. Just don't lift up your stylus or pencil and just keep moving. If you see some little areas where the brushstroke is visible, just keep working over those areas and it'll cover them up. That looks like a little watercolor shape that you painted on paper. I'm going to grab the cloud brush here and add a little bit of variation to this. That can help it look a little bit more like a real watercolor to just add in that natural variation look. Another thing you can do is swipe left and duplicate to add even more variation. I'll do that again, so you can see the dramatic variation you can get. We've got really dark orange, light orange with some texture and then some really white color over here. You can really get a lot of variation with this effect. The next is the blend edge rough brush. That one's a little bit lighter and a little bit rougher on the edges. It creates a nice watercolor texture look. The next is a sharp edge blotchy brush. This one starts out with a really sharp edge. This is great for doing tiny details that need a sharp edge in the top there/ some of these fruit pieces would be really great to use with that brush. The next one is the fine detail. I'm going to put this on its largest size. You can see even at its largest size, it's pretty small. You can get even smaller with that brush and just do really tiny almost hair sized strokes. I really like that brush for adding in some high detail. The next is the wet blotchy brush. This one I think is really great for adding in another color. I'm going to choose a slightly darker color. It can let you add in a little bit of variation. It doesn't look great on its own. It doesn't really look like real watercolor on its own, but if you use it in random places on an existing watercolor painting, it can help add some color. You can get this at a really large size and just drop in some color to add some more variation to that piece. Then the last brush is the heavy bleed. This is a really large brush that does a nice textured whitewash. If you wanted to do like a background or really large shape, this would be a great brush to use. Let's go ahead and delete all of these layers. I'm just swiping left and clicking "Delete", and then create a new layer set to multiply and we'll start our first piece on this layer. Before I do that though, I just want to take a minute to look at some inspiration. This is always the first thing I do when I start a piece. I'd like to go to a market or a grocery store and find some fruit that stands out to me. Sometimes I just take pictures and sometimes I buy fruit and bring it home with me. Then I can cut it up and take some close up pictures of the inside of each fruit. You can work from pictures that you find online, but you have a lot more control when you take your own pictures or when you have the fruit right in front of you. Plus it's just really inspiring to see all of the incredible colors and shapes in person. I also like to go to Pinterest for painting inspiration. I created a watercolor fruit Pinterest board, and I'll put a link to this in the about section of the class so you can take a look if you'd like to, or you can just go online and find your own inspiration. I like to do this to decide from the beginning what style I'm going for. There are so many different styles when it comes to watercolor. It's good to start out with a general idea or a general layout for what you think you might want to try. Something like this is really nice and simple shapes with just a few strokes of texture over each one. You could also do something that's more of an ink drawing where you're just filling in the color. Or something really simple with just some little bleeds of color and creating a really simple composition. I'd like to do this as my first step just to get some inspiration for color and layout. Not necessarily to copy any of these, but just to get an idea of what I'm going for. You may also want to do something like a greeting card where you just create one slice of fruit and then duplicate it around the page and add some text in the center. Or you could do an up-close view of a single piece of fruit to do a study of that single piece. This is a great way to get started to get an idea of what are you drawn to, what pieces speak to you as you're scrolling through this. For me, I really like the ink drawing. I'm going to start with that style. 3. Ink & Selections: Let's go back to our original paper. I've got my two paper layers, linear burn and multiply, and then I have my new paint layer set to multiply. I'm going to create another layer for an image that I want to drop in. I'll click the Tool symbol, click Insert a photo. Then I have this image, I got this from the website unsplash. There are two sites I'll put links to in the About section. These are sites where you can get images that are free for commercial use, so you can use these images for anything at all and you don't have to credit the author, but still, it's not a good idea to directly copy. Just use the picture as a loose basis for your composition. I'm going to go to this layer and I reduce the opacity a little bit. This makes it a lot easier to add in my inclines. I'm going to create a new layer for my inclines. I like to use the technical pen for this. I got this from the inking section of procreate and then just put it in my fruit brushes, so this will come along with your procreate program. I'm going to go to my Color palette and double-click in the black area to get a pure black. Then I'll just go through and add some varied lines. I think I'm going to put this on medium size. What I'm trying to do here is start with a really light touch and then move into a thicker line. This brush is really great for getting variation. You can start out really light and then push down really hard and get a nice technique. If you make a mistake on the side, I like to use the mono line for erasing. I'm just going to erase here. I'll go through this whole piece and do the same process using the technical pen. Now that I have the basic outline of this image, I'm going to remove the image itself and add in a little bit of variation. If you look at these oranges, you can see there's these tiny little pods all throughout each wedge. I'm going to go in and draw some little shapes that mimic those pods. These don't have to be perfect. This is a semi abstract piece. You can feel free to use your creative license here and just illustrate this in any way that works with your personal style. I'm happy with that drawing. I am just going to click the Move tool and move it a little bit more into the center of the canvas. Then I also want to add a background to this. I'm going to click my Selection tool and click Automatic and then click one time to try to select the background. Now it looks it's selecting way too much. It's selecting everything in here. That means my threshold is too high. If I click and hold and drag down, the threshold you'll see at the top here. That controls how much is selected. If I click my Selection tool again, click Automatic, and then click again. Now that my threshold is lower, I'm not selecting too much. I can zoom in and click and hold and see my threshold up there and just see where it gets to be too far. It looks at about 85 percent, that's a little bit too far. I'm going to go down to about 74. That's going to vary based on the piece that you're creating. That looks good at selecting everything in the background. Then I'm just going to tap that piece in the middle because that's part of the background too. Now I'm going to create a new layer and set that to multiply because this is going to be one of my watercolor layers. Then I'm going to grab a nice light turquoise color and get my blend edge controlled huge brush, and I'm going to paint the whole background here. The nice thing about doing that selection is, I don't have to worry about getting any paint on my actual fruit. I'm just creating a nice textured background for it to sit on. We can leave it at that or we can grab the cloud brush huge and add a little bit more variation. I like that lighter version. If you want it a little darker, you can click Duplicate and then you've got two background layer, so let's leave it at that for now. We can always change this later on though. The next thing I want to do is start painting the insides of this. I can paint directly on the piece or I can paint in a selection. I like to paint in a selection because it's a lot easier to keep your paint within the lines. I click the Selection tool to undo that first selection we did. Now I'm going to click it again and make sure I'm on my ink layer. Then click one time to select the background and the other piece of the background there. Then I'm going to click Invert Selection. That's going to select everything but the background. It would be really hard to go in and select all these little pieces, whereas selecting the background and then saying inverse this selection, so much easier. Now I can create a new layer, set that to multiply and any painting I do will stay within the lines. I don't have to worry about my background getting covered. 4. Layering Color: I'm going to grab my blend edge controlled brush with a light orange color, and I'm just going to come in and lay down my first watercolor layer. I'm going to cover the whole orange, and I'm just trying to avoid the leaves. If I hit the leaves a little bit, it's okay, I can always erase. It's really fine if the color overlaps a little bit, makes it look more like a real watercolor. Just trying to make sure none of the brush strokes are showing, rubbing over that a little bit before I pick up my brush. Now I'm going to do the other one too. These brushes can be a little bit hard to control because they've got that real watercolor texture. If that bothers you, you can grab the Monoline eraser, and I got that from the Calligraphy section of Procreate. You can just come in and use your eraser to clean up those edges. Personally, I like those edges, I think it makes it look more like a real watercolor, so I'm going to leave them as they are. Sometimes I intentionally go over the line to make it look more realistic. I'm going to duplicate that layer because I want it to be a little bit darker. Then I'm going to use my fingers to pinch and merge those two layers together, so now I have one nice orange layer. I'm going to grab my cloud brush and get it slightly smaller here, and just add in some variation. I think I'll let the top part be lighter, and let the bottom part be darker. I'm happy with that as a start, I'm going to create a new layer for the next color. I'm going to get a slightly more red orange. This part is totally up to you, you can stick with the colors of a real orange, or you could add in a lot of different colors. Maybe layer some reds and some pinks in here, and blending different colors like a real watercolor, it's totally up to you. I tend to start simple and then try out different versions, you may want to start with that. I'm going to do a red layer here, let's get a red color and I'm doing this on a new layer. Now I've got a few different layers here; I've got my red layer, my dark orange layer, and my light orange layer. If I go to my red layer with my cloud brush, on a large size, and do a little bit of erasing, it's removing red and showing the orange. Then if I go to the orange, click one time on a layer. You can get a little bit more red to peek through. Let's say you want a little more red, just duplicate that red layer, and then I get that nice red bold color there. I'm going to create another layer here, and I think I want to add in some splatters. Because if you look at the bottom of these oranges, they have all these little texture marks here, so I want to add some of that in. I'm going to get my splatter and let's stick with the red for this and see how it looks. I'm going to put this on a medium size, and just come in and splatter. I'm not going to worry about getting it on different areas because I can always erase that. I'm happy with that texture, I'm just going to grab my Monoline eraser and remove all these little splatters, but you may like those splatter. Feel free to use that in your piece to show a little bit of texture. Now I've got the rind taken care of. I think it's a little bit too red, so I'm going to remove one of those red layers. Another thing you can do is change the overall color. Let's say you're not happy with that base orange color that you created, click the Adjustments panel, click Hue, Saturation, Brightness, and then you can come in and adjust that. I could make that a little more yellow, a little more pink, that's more of a grapefruit look. You can always come in and adjust these colors on any layer as you're working. Next I want to come in and add a little bit of color to these wedges. I'm creating a new layer. You can see that I do every single paint layer on a new layer set to multiply, because I like to always be able to go back and change things. If you don't create on new layers, you are committing to that color and you can't go back if they're on the same layer. It's totally up to you, but for me, personally, I like to have everything on a separate layer. Let's get a slightly smaller brush, and I'm just going to go in and color each of these. I'm not going to worry about staying within the lines because this is really a loose ink drying and I want it to show that it's a watercolor painting. I'm going to let the watercolor go outside the lines a little bit. There's an orange layer, I'm going to do another layer with a yellow because I want to get some color variation on this piece. I'm going to grab a orange yellow, and I'm going to do this same process on each of these wedges. Just painting each one, letting it go outside the lines a little and letting it overlap the other color, and even go outside the other color sometimes, so that you can see that there's two colors there. Now if I go back to my orange layer with my cloud brush eraser and do a little bit of erasing, I can reveal yellow. I think I'm going to duplicate this orange layer to make it darker, and duplicate the yellow layer too, and then merge the yellow layers and merge the orange layers. Now I'm just working with a slightly darker tone. When I erase orange, I'm really revealing a lot of yellow and when I erase yellow, I'm revealing a nice bright orange. You can see how that adds in some nice color variation to the piece. Next, let's work on the leaves. Let's start with a yellow tone, and I'm on a new layer set to multiply. Let's go to another layer and use green. I like that green color, so I'm going to duplicate that and then merge my two green layers together. Then come in with the cloud brush a little bit and erase some of that green to reveal some of my yellow green color. I think I want to add a little bit more yellow, so I'm going to do another yellow layer, and I'm going to merge my two green layers together. Now when I erase green, I'm revealing a nice bright yellow. I like having a lot of color variation in my pieces. You could certainly use a single color on this, it's totally up to you. Let's go ahead and remove our selection so we can take a look at this piece. I'm happy with how this turned out. I'm going to call this piece finished, but you could certainly go in and keep adding more detail if that's more your personal style. 5. Masking Method: For this next piece, I want to do a really simple lemon slice. I'm going to take a picture of a lemon, and we'll pull that into Procreate, and then use some masks to cover up the areas that we want to paint to make it really easy to fill in the shapes. The nice thing about these paintings is that you could really use this for anything. You could turn it into a seamless repeat, you could use it for website background or greeting cards, anything at all. Let's start by taking a nice picture of these lemons. I just want to capture these lemons in really bright light. I want to be sure I'm getting straight on with a light facing the actual lemon, so that I can really see all of the detail, the piece in the picture. Now that we have our pictures, we can click the tool symbol. Click Insert a photo, go to moments, and just look through and see which ones look really straight on. I think that's going to be the best one here. That's really straight, really bright so I can see all of the detail. I really like that one. I'm just going to reduce the opacity of this a tiny bit to make it easier to see. I'll create a new layer and then double-click in the black area to get a pure black. On my brushes, I'm going to grab the monoline brush, and I pulled this from the calligraphy section of Procreate. I'm on that new layer. I'm going to go through and trace the entire outside of this lemon. What I'm doing here is creating a mask. I can select this area and then paint only within this area. That makes it a lot easier to cover areas with these watercolor brushes. You can certainly do it free hand as well, but if you want to get a really sharp high detailed piece, then this is a great easy way to get that done. I'm just trying to vary my line a little bit and follow the texture of the rind of this lemon. Then I'm going to grab this black circle and just drop it into the center. Now, I have a black circle that's the outline of the lemon. I'm going to make that invisible. On a new layer, I'm going to do the same thing with the wedges, because I want to be able to mask out these areas where the wedges are. Now that I have those wedges masked out, I can make that layer invisible and also make my picture layer invisible. Now I just have these two masks, and I have my picture for reference if I need it, but it's, I think easier to work just from the lemon right in front of you. I'm going to create a new layer and set that to multiply, and that's going to be the layer where I paint my base lemon shape. I'm going to make my black circle visible, click at one time and click Select. Then go to my painting layer and make the black circle layer invisible and the picture invisible. Now I've got this new layer set to multiply, and it's selected based on what's in this other layer. I'm going to grab a bright yellow color here. Let's make this a lighter yellow, and I'm going to grab my blend edge controlled huge brash and just cover that area. Now I have a nice base for starting my lemon. Now I want to do the same thing with the wedges. I'll click Select to de-select that circle and make my wedges visible. Click One time, click Select. Now I've got those wedges selected. I can make those invisible, create a new layer set to multiply, and now I can paint my wedges on that layer. Let's get a slightly darker yellow for that. Now we have our wedges mast out. I'll click Select to set that. That's a great base shape to start with. You could paint this by hand, you don't have to do all the steps that I just did, but I really like the process of tracing the actual lemon and getting the wedges the correct proportions. The next thing I'm going to do is make my circle visible and click Select and create a new layer set to multiply. I've got my circle area selected. I want to work on this rind a little bit. I want to add in all these little dots that you see on the edge of the rind, and also the white area that you see around here. The first thing I'll do is add those little dots around the very edge, and you can see those are in the brightest yellow that are on the lemon. I'll get a really bright yellow, and I'm going to use the droplets brush here. I'll zoom in to try to decide what size I want. I'm going to click Invisible. I clicked two fingers accidentally and that undid hiding that layer. I need to go back create a new layer and create multiply. That's one thing about Procreate. Sometimes you just set your hand down and you accidentally do a step, but just double-check your Layers panel and you should be fine. I'm on a new layer, set to multiply and the circle is selected. I've got my droplets brush, and I like that size, it's about 30 percent. I'm going to stick with that. I'm going to go around the edge and try to get some variation. Sometimes I'm pressing really hard and sometimes I'm pressing really lightly. I'm happy with how those look. They're more dense in some areas and lighter in others, so that's great. I'm going to grab the Eraser tool with the wet blotchy brush and go through and just lighten up some of these, so that they really fade into the rind. I don't want them to be really prominent, I just want them to be a tiny little light texture on the edge of this lemon. Now, I want to add in the white area that's around the rind. I'm going to erase that yellow layer that we put in the background. I've got my wet blotchy eraser on about 80 percent, and I'm just going to go through here and really lightly add some of that rind lightness to this piece. I think I'll also do that in the center because it's really the same color in the center and on the rind. Now I can remove my selection and take a look. That's a great start. I'm going to go to my Wedges layer and I want to add a little bit more texture to those wedges. If we look at the actual lemon, there's all these little pods and layers of different shades of yellow in there, so I want to add some of that in. I'm creating a new layer set to multiply, and I'm going to get a slightly darker yellow that I was using before so we can add some shading in here. I've got my wet blotchy brush on a medium size. Let me just do one of those and see how it looks. That looks good, it's just a tiny bit of variation. I'm just going to go through and add some of these little veins and little bubbles throughout the piece in a few different shades. I'll start with this darker color and then I'll do the same thing with some lighter and medium shades. I want to add in a little bit of white. I'm going to go to the Wedges layer and get my wet blotchy eraser, and just come in and add some little highlights. I think I want to add a little bit of variation to these wedges. I'm going to get my cloud brush on a medium size and just come in and add some lighter areas. You could even duplicate that yellow, merge those two together and then get even more variation when you erase. I'm also going to try duplicating my rind layer because I like how that looks, but it could be a little bit darker. You can turn those on and off to try to decide if you want to make that change or not. I think that's a little too dark, so I'm going to stick with the lighter version. This is a great start, we could keep going and adding more variation. It's really totally up to you here. I want to add some really light highlights. What I'm going to do is merge all of my layers together, grab my wet blotchy eraser, and come in to these rinds and just adds some little random highlights here. I'm happy with that lemon as it is. I'm going to go to hue saturation brightness and just play around a little bit. We could increase the saturation and brighten it up. We could also increase the brightness but I think that's a little too much. Let's just increase the saturation a little bit to get a nice bright yellow lemon. One thing you could do with this is create a seamless repeat pattern. I'm going to duplicate this a few times. Swiping left and clicking duplicate, and then just moving those around the canvas. If you want to create an actual seamless repeat, I have another class on making seamless repeats on your iPad, so check that out if you want to learn how to do that. But this would be fine if you are creating a greeting card, you could just throw some of these down, adds some text in the center, and that would be a great greeting card or website background, anything like that. Another thing I like to do with these is use these in my digital planner. For example, I created some digital planners stickers out of a bunch of different fruit pieces and created a banana and a pineapple using the first technique we used, and then I have this as a free download on my blog, if you want to check those out. Those are just a few things you can do with those simple slices. Let's go ahead and move on to a slightly more complex project with a different process. 6. Sketching Method: I'm starting this next piece in the same way with 10 by 10 and two layers of texture paper with the blending modes. For this one I want to use a few different limes combined together so I'm going to set these up and take some pictures. I'm going to try and get a few different compositions so that I can play around with these in Procreate and see which one looks best. I'm going to open my photos here and take a look at these. I like that one because we've got two different angles of the slices. This one I'm not crazy about because you can't really see the rind on those. I like this one. That one's boring. This one's okay. But I think I actually like the first one. We've got three different angles. We've got a slice, we've got this nice edge of the rind and then we've got a whole lime so I'm going to stick with that first one. I'll open this in Procreate and click "Insert a Photo". I'm going to reduce the opacity of this a little bit so it's easy for me to see. Rather than masking these out, I'm going to create a pencil drawing for this one. I'll grab the narinder pencil and I got up here black on my color palette and I'm going to go through and mask out all the basic shapes of this piece. I'll go ahead and remove my picture layer or make it invisible so I can start doing some painting, but I'm going to keep it there as a reference. I'm going to start with what I think is the easiest piece, which is this big piece. If you want to grab some colors from this picture, this is a really good way to get your color palette going for this piece. I'm going to go to my lime picture, just click the color wheel, click "Pallets", click the plus symbol, and then click "Untitled Palette". Let's call this limes. Then that'll automatically be set as your default color pallet. When you click the disk, it's empty here so you can start adding in new colors. I'm going to click and hold and then tap over here to get that color over in the color palette. You can save all of your color palettes here. Anytime you want to go back to this, you'll have it. I really like to make these color palettes. It's a really easy way to get all the colors from a picture. I've already created one of these for the lime so I'm going to click "Set Default" and then when I go back to my desk, I've got all of my lime colors there. Remove this picture and I want to start with this big circle here. I'm going to get the blunt edge controlled brush and I need to make sure I want a new layer that is set to multiply. I can test that size, that looks good. Let's go ahead and fill this piece with this color. You can see these brushes are textured on the edge, so you won't be able to get a perfect line doing this method but that's really fine. This is a hand painted watercolor look, so it's really fine to have that texture and go outside the lines a little bit. If I look at my original picture, I've got a darker area on this side and the lightest area in the center here. I want to try to capture that in my picture. I'm going to duplicate that green layer and make the first one invisible, click "Hue Saturation Brightness", and then change that color a little bit. What I'm doing here is I'm trying to get a few different shades of green because I want to be able to erase and get a lot of different colors in this lime. I'm going to make all three of those visible. Each one is a slightly different color. I've got a blue-green, I've got a darker green and then a muddy green. If I make all of those visible and come in with my cloud eraser brush on a large size, when I erase and switch to different layers, I'm going to be getting some really nice color variation. This is one way to add a little bit of variation to your piece. If it's not enough variation for you, go to one of the layers and start playing around with that layer and see what it does. You can get a really big variation or just a tiny bit of variation. We can increase the saturation to get a brighter lime color. Now I'm going to merge all three of those together, get my eraser tool and really bring out that lighter area. I think I'll also duplicate this layer, so we have that really dark lime color that's in the picture itself. Merge those two together, and then do a little bit more erasing with the cloud brush to just bring out some of that shading. That's a good start. I think I'll also get a lighter green. I want to capture these little dots that are all over the texture that's all over the back of this lime. I think I'll try this with a lighter color and see how this looks with the splatter brush. I'm going to make sure that's set to multiply. You can see how setting it to multiply really changes how it looks, here It's just like a neon green splatter. Then when I change it to multiply, it melds with the color so it looks really nice when you add that multiply on. Just adding in some texture here. That looks good. I'm going to get my monoline eraser brush and erase some of these little sprinkles that got outside the lines. 7. Layering & Erasing: That's a good start. Let's leave that as it is for now. I want to go ahead and start working on the rind on this side. Now, what you could do is work on both of the rinds at the same time, so that you're guaranteeing the same color. But it's totally up to you. It's sometimes nice to have a lot of variation in the piece, so you may want to do each piece separately and just see what variation comes out of that. I'm using my blunt edge, rough brush to just come in and loosely make that rind shape. Then I'm going to do the same process, duplicate that layer three times, and go to each layer and change the color slightly. We've got a brown, a green and then a blue-green here. Now when I go through with my cloud brush and erase, I can reveal some of that color variation. Let's merge all those together and duplicate. I think that was a little bit too dark, so I'm going to leave it as one layer. Then I'm going to add a little bit of that splatter texture again on a new layer set to multiply. If you're splatter layer is a little bit too much, you can grab the cloud brush and just erase some of it, so that it's just really faint in the background. I might do that on this other piece too. I feel like the splattering got a little out of control in the lighter areas. I'm just going to lighten it up a little bit. I like that these are two different shades of green. It makes it look like a real watercolor. I'm going to leave that as it is and start working on the wedges. I'll set this new layer to multiply, and I'm going to get a lighter green for this. I'll go through with my blunt edge controlled brush and just fill in these wedges. I want to go ahead and give that a little bit of variation. Now I'm going to paint in the wedge shapes. I think I'll get a lighter green for this. I want a new layer set to multiply with the blunt edge controlled brush. I'm going to make this brush a little bit smaller. These are just really faint wedges, these don't have to be really prominent, just a suggestion of the wedge. That's a nice start, I want to start adding the texture to the rind. Same thing we had with those lemons, we've got the little bit of dotting, that's all the way around the rim. I want to add that in with my splatter brush. I've got this set to multiply. I've got my splatter brush with a dark green. I think I'm going to use my droplets brush for this, because I want to create a really dense dotting, I think I'm going to do that. I'll just go around this whole thing and just add these tiny little dots. Now I'm going to grab my wet blotchy eraser on a somewhat small size and just clean up the areas where this got outside the lines too much. I'm happy with that loose painting, I'm going to get a new layer and set it to multiply. Then I'm going to go in with my blunt edge controlled brush on a somewhat small size and just give this a nice defined outline. I just want the edge of this lime to be really prominent. I'm going to do one layer, and then I'll probably duplicate this a few times to make it really dark. I'll duplicate a couple of times and then merge all the layers together. Now I'm going to go through with my we blotchy brush, and erase just the very outer edge of it. What that does is it gives me a nice thin line for my rind. It's super dark, it's like the outside of this lime is so much darker than the interior, so I'm trying to create that effect here. Let's start adding in some variation to the wedges. I'll click "Multiply" and I'm going to click and hold to get that color, and then I want to color that's slightly darker because I want to add in some dark variation. I'll get my we blotchy brush on a medium size, and I'm on a new layer set to multiply. I'm just going to go through and add a little bit of variation with the wet blotchy brush. I'm just making these little pods where you get the darker and lighter areas. I removed my pencil lines and that's a nice start for a really simple watercolor painting. I want to start adding in some white highlights. I'm going to merge all my wedges layers, all the layers that are in this area, because I want to be able to come in and add in some large white areas to really bump up the variation. But you can see how at this process you can really create a loose watercolor painting that really looks like it's on paper. If you try this painting 10 different ways, you'll get 10 different effects. Feel free to play around with ideas you have as you're doing this different ways of layering these, different ways of combining the brushes and erasing. It's totally subjective process here, I'm showing you how I like to do this, but there are a million different ways to do it. I'm also going to get my mono line brush and clean up some areas that bother me. But then I've got that sharp edge, so I'll get the wet blotchy brush and just clean up that edge a little bit, it makes it less like a hard erased edge. We could keep going with detail here, but I'll go ahead and call this piece finished. Let's merge all of the green layers together and go to the hue saturation brightness. This is where you could go all the way to neon. You could even increase the brightness or make it darker. I think what I'm going to do is bump up the saturation a little bit. I like that really bright lime color. Those are just a few different ways that you can paint watercolor fruits. I just wanted to show you this one last piece. This is the same idea with a banana. I mast out the big yellow shape and these brown shapes. Then just went through and added layers with the wet blotchy brush, some darker layers, some lighter layers. Then I came through with the splatter brush and just splattered a little bit of spots on the top. You can do a piece like this in 10 minutes. This is a really great quick warm-up piece. I hope you enjoyed this class and that you feel inspired to start creating your own watercolor fruit paintings. If you liked this class, you may like some of my other classes where I cover a lot more ways to design and paint on your iPad and how to paint, wash and procreate using the brushes I created. Check those out on my profile if you want to see more classes like this one. Also I share a lot of free downloads on my site. If you want to get more downloads like the ones you got for this class, check out my website. I would absolutely love to see the finished project that you create for this class, so please share it with me. You can do that here on Skills-hare in the project section, or you can tag me on Instagram or Facebook. If you have any questions about the process you learned in this class, please let me know. You can reply to my discussion here on Skills-hare, or you can contact me through my website, Instagram or Facebook. Thanks so much for watching this class and I'll see you again next time. Bye bye.