Paint Loose & Expressive With Acrylics - Brushwork | Robert Joyner | Skillshare

Paint Loose & Expressive With Acrylics - Brushwork

Robert Joyner, Making Art Fun

Play Speed
  • 0.5x
  • 1x (Normal)
  • 1.25x
  • 1.5x
  • 2x
6 Lessons (29m)
    • 1. About This Class

      0:35
    • 2. Part One

      5:38
    • 3. Part Two

      4:15
    • 4. Part Three

      5:20
    • 5. Part Four

      6:13
    • 6. Color & Brushworks REMAKE HD 720p

      6:52

About This Class

7da21677

In this class you will discover the art of creating expressive paintings by improving how you apply brushwork and color. When you are finished with these lessons you will have a much better approach to creating loose artwork with acrylics. These methods can be used with other mediums such as oil & gouache as well.

Who Is This Course For?

It's perfectly suited for painters of all levels that want to get away from creating tight artwork. If you desire to paint in a more abstract representational manner this will certainly open you up to a few new techniques.

MY OTHER ACRYLIC CLASSES ON SKILLSHARE

Landscape Painting Fundamentals Course Part 1: Paint Your Own Stunning Landscapes

Landscape Painting Part 2; Sunrise, Sunset, Cloudy, Back And Front Lit Scenes + Composition & Color

How To Blend Traditional And Contemporary Color Theories With Acrylics

Acrylic Painting Essentials For Beginners With Easy Step-By-Step Project Part One

Acrylic & Mixed Media Essentials Part Two

Abstract Acrylic Cow Painting

Paint Roosters With Acrylics - From Charcoal To Finished Painting

Tips For Painting Loose With Acrylics

5 Stages Of A Painting

Paint Loose & Expressive With Acrylics - Brushwork

Acrylic Seascape Painting - Basic Fundamental Demonstration

Add Value To Your Art - Basic Acrylic Painting Fundamentals

Paint Loose Techniques Using Acrylics And Mixed Media

Expressive Flowers With Acrylics - Learn An Approach That Gets Results

Advanced Acrylic Landscape Techniques - How To Plan Your Painting

Explore Expressive Mark Making And Collaging - Abstract Cow Painting Class

Have Some Fun Creating With Acrylics, Collage And Graphite - Expressive Painting Techniques

Expressive Flower Painting Techniques With Collaging And Acrylics

Contemporary Owl Painting Techniques Using Pattern & Collage

Expressive Still Life Techniques - Secrets To Painting Abstract Style Art With Acrylic

How To Paint Loose With Acrylics And Mixed Media

Learn Tips For Painting More Expressively - Acrylic & Collage Class For Intermediate Artists

Transcripts

1. About This Class: Hi there. I'm Robert Joyner. With paint lose. I'm excited to share these lessons with you here on skill share. How to maximize color and brushwork is a fabulous course, loaded with tips and techniques that will have you painting war loose and expressive subjects. The techniques and tips are easy to apply for all levels of artists well suited for digital designers and painters as well. So if you're ready to get started, I wrote a day. I hope to see you on the inside. Thanks for watching again. I'm Robert Joyner. I love the paint. Lose. I love the maximize color brush. 2. Part One: so too accurate they lose. All right. Now, for the sake of just having something here to go with, I will say I want you know, my background color. Let's just say we want that. And this is true for both of, um, we want that background color to maybe be in here somewhere. OK, maybe that's even to light. Let's let's lighten that up a little bit. Fine. All right, so that's kind of the bulk of that back. Let's say we want our bottle. We have a nice little brown here and it's biz pretty brown. It's pretty dark in the image. I don't want it quite. Doesn't need to be that dark for this. Say we want that bottle to be in there somewhere. OK, let's say we want the foreground or that little table. Push that more to ah, bluish on grayish color here that's not quite blue. Eso mix until I get what I want. This mix and I can get the basics now make green and all that stuff. But I look at what I have in front of me and I mix until I get what I want. Also, look, rely on what I'm seeing that works. So let's say we want that. Excuse me. So we have our background. I'll just put back. We have our bottle, I'll put bottle. And we have our foreground put foreground. Too lazy to read it all out. So those are the basic colors. I'm working with those in the areas I'm going to focus on. I mean, all the other details in the bottle. I don't give two cents about right now, but this saying this is ultimately where I want to be. And in that kind of final stage, this is this is what I kinda and after, right? So this artist's over here too accurate Kind of starts to go there. Okay. Well, yeah, yeah, I see what I want there and again. I mean, this is not in the image. Actually, if you look at this color is probably more like the background. But just for the sake of this painting, we're gonna put it in the foreground. This this artist goes, Oh, yeah, I nailed that color, right? I got it. I've got that foreground color. Boom. Take that and they pop that in there. Okay, Awesome. Hey, look at that. background and go. Oh, yeah, I see that background color. Oh, yeah, I got you boat. Right. And they give that background color. You know, I'm having fun with this. I'm not going to get too serious about trying toe to nail this in terms of making a beautiful painting. This as you know now, my lessons air. Not really about that. My already isn't even about that. Okay, Beukeboom got it. Got it? Yeah, rolling along here, crusher. So now? Oh, yeah, I know where I want my bottom to be right in there somewhere. Awesome. And they put that color in there, and they're absolutely stoked and just amazed how close to riel this thing is looking and got me. I could do this loose, too. But the point is, I'm basically representing those colors initially in the beginning, on this very, very first layer, right where that they should be okay. 3. Part Two: Let's go over here. This this one. So again, this is where I want to be. Okay? I don't even key. I won't even get crazy like I won't like, go yellow When I know I wanted to be here, I'll keep it in the same, you know, relative color, family and everything there. But I'm certainly going to play with where this color is and where I wanted to be. So let's say that we will push that to kind of Ah, I kind of looks more on that blue side, but it's much darker, right? It's only OK, Well, that's fine. If I know I want to be there. I don't want to go there in the beginning, for reasons you will see later on. All right. Not even not even close. Much darker. Right, Then where? This one wise and certainly where I want to be. A scare, that background. So I take a little bit of this green a little bit. This yellow. It's going pop. A little bit of this violent in there. That was actually crimson s go, uh, school. Even darker. I could go lighter or darker. Doesn't have to be one of the other. And then that's pretty spot on where I want to be. So now the way I pushed that I don't want to go blue because this is so blue. This kind of pushed this more Teoh a reddish color. I'm gonna go. I'm more of a violent type of color here, mixed with these greens. Way off, way off the mark There. All right, now we've got the bottle. So that's where I want to be with a bottle. Just kind of stick to maybe some transparent yellow orange, maybe a touch of the yellow Perfect. And we'll go. And here somewhere, while paying all over that I know. Well, Andi Good. So completely different approaches for this example here and of beginning of painting. The beginning is so important. How you begin a painting is you either limit yourself or you give yourself options. And over here Yeah. I mean, there's a lot more I can do here, you know, I can go another layer. I can, you know, more accurate. Aiken, you know, whatever. And then you know same thing here, but the colors are much different than where I want to be. Ondas done intentionally right. You saw you witnessed it. And for good reason. And I will share that with you when I come back after this dries. Okay, So Cibak shortly. 4. Part Three: All right. Welcome back now. Per pretty dry to the touch there. And they're very dry over here. Almost start over here with this one. Just get back to my square brush. And again, You know, the whole, um point of this was that These were the This is where the colors are going to end up for both of, so no matter. But the beginnings. Air different. Okay, so this artist says, OK, you know, I want this to be here, so I'm gonna go there in the beginning. This artist says, Yeah, I'm gonna be here. I'm gonna go somewhere else. Same thing, same thing. OK, so, um, that's the deal. You have to kind of keep that mind as I'm painting here. All right, So what this artist has done is a condom painted themselves, you know, and to a little corner here, so we can kind of put another layer on, and maybe you'll get a little bit of, ah, punch there, but for the most part, they're not going to be a whole lot of excitement in terms of brushwork. Is it? Right, Because there's no there. There is nothing there for that second layer to go on to make it exciting because I went there in the beginning. I can put another layer on and beef it up. You know, add a little bit of meat to the bone or whatever, but it's not going to make an impact a whole lot in terms of brushwork, because I went there too early and kind of the same thing for that color there for the this color, Aiken put another color layer on it. Daggone it. I mean, it's not knowing anything but this, simply adding another layer to it, so it's making a little bit stronger in terms off the color. But again, um, I didn't leave myself any room to play. So basically everything I'm doing now. Yeah, it's making a difference. It's certainly adding a little more depth and meaning to those colors into the painting. But the brushwork, it's stiff, right? And that's kind of what I really, really want to emphasize with this lesson. That and then just kind of tweaking colors a little bit there, touching on how we can use color to paint loose, too. But this is kind of Maura about how we can take brush were and make it a tool. Four taming loose. So look now. Ah, how loose then brushwork, looks and the reason it looks that way. It means that the main reason is I I gave myself that freedom in the beginning so that that background by not going here in the beginning gave me some wiggle room to showcase some brushwork. Right? And of course, as I put that layer on, I'm letting some of that, um, darker color so through okay, very, very important. I understand that part, so I'll keep on rockin here, and we'll get down here and do the same thing. You kind of see how that is showcasing the brushwork. And believe me, this would have a similar look had undone the initial background or the first layer in, um or arbitrary went so. But I didn't. I went right for those colors that I was seeing in that final painting right away. 5. Part Four: So now with this one, I'm there. So I'm kind of come in here and have some fun. Leave a little bit of that under layer visible. But look how that brushwork has an impact over here, doesn't you? Don't really see in the brushwork is somewhat and visible. You over here you see that brushwork of interesting, right? I think so. I love stuff like this because it's really an easy concept, but you have to be aware of it. And you you need to understand these things when you're starting to develop a painting because that, like I said before we start to develop, are beginning painting. I mean, it's so important. It's a it's usually where you know, a lot of style of the artist and in turn, this just say were painting loose. And then the looseness happens. If you go to representational to accurate in the beginning, you're not gonna have these opportunities later on. The only way I can get that now would be to go to a different color. And of course I could on that. That wasn't the point on the lesson and the lesson one. If you remember, we know these This is the color is where we're gonna shoot for in both pains. Okay, This one started there. This one got there to quit. This one was much more tactful. This artist said, Well, you know, if this is where I want to be, this is where I'll go first. Kind of dark eggplant color. This is where I want to go. I'm gonna go with more of darkest green turquoise, and this is where I want to go. I'm gonna go with a more of a lighter orange, right? So that way I can showcase some of my loose brush boom. That that's what I'm talking about, right? I mean this. This is the art of painting loose right here, people. It is unfolding right in front of your eyes. All right. Painting loose brushwork can be used as a tool. It is a huge tool is so important. Brushwork is huge, huge in the style of an artist. And how you know the in painting looks, you know, it really just has a major role in a play. And you can do things in a very representational way. You can get tight and get things here, and then have areas that are very loose and playful with brushwork, if you know how to set up. Okay. Ah, hoping this lesson. These lessons here. I gave you some solid ideas on how you can set up brushwork. Okay, think about that. Think about your backgrounds. Are you gonna go with a lighter, new key background? Do you want to start, like or do you want to start meeting him a little bit darker so you can really punched that background with some brushwork? Okay, think about your subject. If you want to end up here, do you really want to start right there or do you want to kind of put something over here some grayish, murky, nasty old color so that when you go there and that brushwork and then wherever you do, has some punch to it has something to sit on to give it some contrast and to make it interesting. Okay. Again, If I were to have started this painting Ray over here with these with these colors, you would have seen some of that brush work guarantee. But I didn't. You know, I went again to to accurate too soon. Here I stayed loose in the beginning and allowed me some freedom. I could go on here, and, um, and they put these and put the label in and all that stuff. But you know the point is it brilliant is just trying to understand how important that is to show brushwork. Okay, practice this. People practice very, very, very simple. Easy compositions. You're not going to get it. Once you might see this. I guarantee you'll see it in the beginning. You go. Oh, yeah, I got this. I am. Thanks, Robert. High five. But to really making your own to you and t build to use it confidently. And then you start using it in your own subjects. Not just then the wine bottle. Here. You know it. You want to develop that, and as you start to develop it, you start to get better at it. And then that tool really becomes Ah, huge asset for your loose artwork. Okay. I hope you enjoy it. Thanks for watching. I'll see you the next 6. Color & Brushworks REMAKE HD 720p: so too accurate. Stay lose. All right. Now, for the sake of just having something here to go with, I will say I want, you know, my background color. Let's just say we want that. And this is true for both of them. We want that background color to maybe be in here somewhere. That's kind of the bulk of that background. Well, let's say we want that bottle to be in there somewhere that works. So we have our background, I'll just put back her bottle, and we have our foreground. So there's the basic colors. I'm working with those in the areas I'm going to focus on. But let's say this is ultimately where I want to be in that kind of final stage. This is This is what I kind of and after, Right? So this artist's over here too accurate kind of starts to go there. Okay, Well, yeah, yeah, I see what I want there and again. I mean, this is not in the image. Actually, if you look at this color is probably more like the background. But just for the sake of this painting, we're gonna put it in the foreground. This this artist goes Oh, yeah, I nailed that color, right? I've got it. Boom! Hey, look at that background and go. Oh, yeah, I see that background color. Oh, yeah, I got you. Awesome. I'm basically representing those colors on this very, very first layer. Right where that they should be. Okay, let's go Over here. This this one again. This is where I want to be so only. Okay, well, that's fine. If I know I want to be there. I don't want to go there. In the beginning, I'm more of a violent type of color here. All right, Now we've got the bottle. So that's where I want to be with a bottle. Just kind of stick to maybe some transparent yellow, orange, maybe a touch of the yellow. Good. Clearly different approaches for beginning of painting. Ondas done intentionally, right? You saw you witnessed it. And for good reason. And I will share that with you when I come back after this dries. Okay? So see back shortly and almost start over here with this one. Just get back to my square brush. And again this is where the colors are going to end up for both of that's the deal. You have to kind of keep that mind as I'm painting here. All right, so what this artist has done is they kind of painted themselves into a little corner here so we can kind of put another layer on. There's not gonna be a whole lot of excitement in terms of brushwork. There's no there. There is nothing there for that second layer to go on to make it exciting, because I went there in the beginning, too early and kind of the same thing for that color there for the this color, Aiken put another color layer on it. Daggone it. I mean, it's not doing anything but just simply adding another layer to it. So it's making a little bit stronger in terms off the color. But again, I didn't leave myself any room to play. So basically everything I'm doing now. Yeah, it's making a difference. It's certainly adding a little more depth and meaning to those colors into the painting, but the brush work, it's stiff. And that's kind of what I really, really want to emphasize with this lesson how we can take brushwork and make it a tool. Four paining loose. So look now at how loose that brushwork looks and the reason it looks that way is I I gave myself that freedom in the beginning so that that background, by not going here in the beginning gave me some wiggle room to showcase some brushwork. And of course, as I put that layer on, I'm letting some of that darker color so through okay, very, very important to understand that part. And we'll get down here and do the same thing. Can kind of see how that is showcasing the brushwork. I'm there, so I'm kind of come in here and have some fun. Leave a little bit of that under layer visible. But look how that brushwork has an impact of interesting, right? I think so. I love stuff like this because it's really an easy concept. You have to be aware of it. The art of painting loose right here, people. It is unfolding right in front of your eyes. Painting loose brushwork can be used as a tool to really making your own to use it confidently and then you start using it in your own subjects. Not just then the wine bottle. Here you want to develop that, And as you start to develop it, you start to get better at it. And then that tool Ruli becomes Ah, huge asset for your loose artwork. Okay? I hope you enjoy it. Thanks for watching. I'll see you the next.