PNG Alphabets for Scrapbooking & Digital Crafts in Adobe Photoshop - Graphic Design for Lunch™ | Helen Bradley | Skillshare

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PNG Alphabets for Scrapbooking & Digital Crafts in Adobe Photoshop - Graphic Design for Lunch™

teacher avatar Helen Bradley, Graphic Design for Lunch™

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

9 Lessons (43m)
    • 1. PNG Alphabets in Photoshop Introduction

      1:19
    • 2. Pt 1 Create a Reusable Letter File

      8:42
    • 3. Pt 2 Extract the Letters To As Layers

      4:12
    • 4. Pt 3 Save Letters as Files

      2:46
    • 5. Pt 4 Create a Second Alphabet with Borders

      2:50
    • 6. Pt 5 Designing a Second Solution

      2:12
    • 7. Pt 6 A Second Reusable Customizable Alphabet

      11:17
    • 8. Pt 7 A Second Example Alphabet

      8:50
    • 9. PNG Alphabets in Photoshop Project and Wrapup

      1:15
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About This Class

PNG Alphabets for Scrapbooking & Digital Crafts in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ class

This class teaches a range of techniques for creating PNG alphabets for digital scrapbooking and digital crafts in Photoshop. These alphabets are digital assets that can be packaged and sold online or given away as blog and social media giveaways. This class teaches two methods for creating reusable documents in which to assemble your alphabets so you can make each alphabet in a few minutes. We'll explore tips and techniques for saving time when making alphabets such as saving photos to use as patterns so they can be applied to characters easily, and a command for saving all the characters to individual files at once so you don't have to do it twenty six times. Basically this class is a jam packed mix of creativity and productivity.

By the time you have finished this class you will be able to create alphabets within minutes with a range of fill and stroke options. And, as with all the Graphic Design for Lunch™ classes you will find plenty of additional tips and techniques that will be helpful when using Photoshop everyday. 

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Meet Your Teacher

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Helen Bradley

Graphic Design for Lunch™

Top Teacher

Helen teaches the popular Graphic Design for Lunch™ courses which focus on teaching Adobe® Photoshop®, Adobe® Illustrator®, Procreate®, and other graphic design and photo editing applications. Each course is short enough to take over a lunch break and is packed with useful and fun techniques. Class projects reinforce what is taught so they too can be easily completed over a lunch hour or two.

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Transcripts

1. PNG Alphabets in Photoshop Introduction: Hello and welcome to this course creating PNG alphabets for scrapbooking in Photoshop. My name is Helen Bradley and I'm a Skillshare top teacher with over 250 courses here on Skillshare and over 145,000 student enrollments. I get to spend my days diving deep into applications like Photoshop to find new tools and techniques to show you that will help you as designers to do what you do best, design cool stuff. In this class, cool stuff is going to equate to making PNG alphabets. These alphabets that are created one letter per file, and they can be used for digital crafts and scrapbooking. Of course, you can make and sell them as digital assets. I'll show you a couple of methods to create these alphabets, and one thing we'll focus on is not having to do the same thing 26 times to create each individual letter. If we can streamline the process we'll do so. Once you've completed this course, you'll be able to create a full alphabet of 26 letters saved as individual files in minutes and with only one save command. As always, it wouldn't be a Graphic Design for Lunch class if they weren't also a bunch of handy additional tips thrown in. If you're ready to get started with your first PNG alphabet for scrapbooking in Photoshop, let's get going. 2. Pt 1 Create a Reusable Letter File: The first thing that we're going to look at in terms of creating our PNG alphabet is some of the basics to make sure that the process that we go through doesn't have to be gone through from scratch every single time we create an alphabet. The first thing I'm going to do is to create a Photoshop document that can be re-used. We're going to start with a document that is actually scrapbook paper size, I'm going to choose File and New scrapbook paper is traditionally 12 by 12 inches at 300 pixels per inch. Now if you wanted super-large letters, say letters that are a quarter of the sheet of scrapbook paper, then you'll need to start with a much larger document. But let's just start with something that would be an alphabet that would fit relatively comfortably on scrapbook paper. It can obviously be reduced. It can be increased a little bit in size, but typically you don't want to be asking your users to increase your letters enormously. That's something that you're going to take into account later on when you're creating your own alphabet. But for now, my alphabet, I want it to be reasonably comfortable size on a scrapbook sheet of paper, so I'll click Create. Now the setup that we're going to do for this particular document is going to involve creating a text box full of our alphabet. I'm going to go to the Type Tool and I'm going to drag a box over my document. Now it fills automatically with just some sample text. That's just fine. I'm noting here that my font is an upper and lowercase font. That's pretty important at this stage, you will want to choose a font that has a lowercase set of letters. The reason for this is that we can go from lowercase to uppercase really easily but we can't go the other way. We're going to start with lowercase, so basically, if you ever intend to use this document to create lowercase letters, do it now. I'm just going to type the alphabet again. It's really important that for structure's sake, that we do this in order, so a through to z in order. Just go through and just make sure that you've got every single letter of the alphabet in the correct order. The top is really small. I'd like it to be a whole lot bigger. But before I make it bigger, I know that my uppercase letters are going to be bigger than my lowercase letters. I'm going to turn this into uppercase. This is a undoable process. I'm selecting over all of my type. I'm going up here to the Character panel. You can also get to it by choosing Window and then Character. The third icon across here is, make everything capitals, so if I click on that, my lowercase letters become uppercase letters. I haven't had to retype this over again. That's one of the ways that we can save time and effort, and this is just easily undoable, so that's just a click. My letters are really small, so I'm going to start increasing the size of them, so I'm going into the type area here, and that's actually the type size. I'm just going to increase that, make sure that everything is going to fit within this sheet of paper. I may want it to be even a bit smaller because I may not want my letters to be quite so big. You choose how big you want your letters to be. A couple of things here in terms of building some space. If you're a little bit short on space, you can close up this space. It's the interline spacing. It's over here. At the moment, it's set to auto, and typically since our font size here is about a 158 points, that's probably something like about 200. If I click in here, I can start reducing that value. You can get your line height down to pretty much the same size as your font here, it's a 158, and there's still plenty of room. Just going to check with my lowercase letters. What I don't want is for these letters with descenders to run into these letters that have got ascenders because I need to make selections around these letters in a minute. Again, building this document up to be as easy as possible to work with. We don't want to be making fiddly selections. Well, of course, right now we're going to have to make some fiddly selections because this letter i is nearly on top of this letter j. What we'll do is we'll make the space between them bigger. This here is what's called kerning. It's the spacing between two characters, but this one is spacing between every letter. We're going to use this one. I'm just going to click in here, and I'm going to start increasing it. What I'm looking for is, firstly, for my font to all fit in the sheet of paper, let's just switch to uppercase letters for now, and make sure that there's plenty of space for me to select around these characters, i and j is one of the areas that I'm looking at in particular to make sure that these characters are far enough away from each other that I can make a pretty easy selection. Let's check the lowercase. I can select around everything pretty easily here, so we're pretty good at this point. I'm just going to go back to the move or the selection tool here, just to deselect the type. I'm not concerned about the color of the letters because for this one I'm actually going to fill the characters with a pattern. To fill them with a pattern, let's just have a look in the layers palette. I've lost it. Let's just go to Window and then Layers. Here we've got the background which is white. Because we're going to be creating PNG image letters, we're not going to want a background in a minute, but right now we do just so we can see things clearly. We've got our type layer here. To fill these letters with a pattern, I'm going to put a pattern fill layer on top. I'm going to Layer, New Fill Layer, and I'll go to Pattern and click Okay. This is the default pattern in the newer versions of Photoshop, but you can select other patterns, there will be patterns that come with Photoshop. You may also have made your own patterns. I happen to have one here that I'm going to use. I can scale a pattern, make it bigger or smaller at this point, I'm pretty happy with these colors and this pattern. I'm just going to click Okay. The pattern layer is on top of the type layer. To fill the type with the pattern, what we do is we create what's called a clipping group. For a clipping group, the shape that you want to use is always underneath the thing that you want to fill a shape with. If you get it wrong, it's going to be really obvious and so you just switch the layers around. This is the correct order. I'm going to target the topmost layer, the one that is the one I want to use to fill the letters with. And over here, I'm going to choose Layer and then Create Clipping Mask. I'm just going to press Control or Command Z to undo that because I wanted to show you another way that you might have been used to using or you might've seen this before. You can also hover between these two layers. Hold down the Control and the Alt key, that's Command and option on a Mac. You get this bent arrow. That tells you that if you click here, you're going to create this clipping mask effect. You can do it through the menus. You can do it through the panel here. You'll get this little bent arrow and that tells you that this layer is being clipped to the shape of the letters. We've got all our letters here. Everything that we've got here right now is fully editable, so we can change the type, we can change the typeface, the size, we can make it uppercase or lowercase. That's all really critical, but we are going to have to make this just a single layer to to the next step. What we're going to do is we're going to save this in a way that we can reuse it. I'm going to take both these layers, click on one, shift, click on the other. I'm going to drag and drop them onto the New Layer icon here. I get two sets of this layer, two pairs of it. The bottom-most pair, I'm going to turn off. They are just tucked away so I can reuse them in a moment. They are not being deleted, they're not being changed. These, we are going to change. What we're going to do with these, is we're going to permanently sandwich them together. I'm going to right-click these selected set of layers and just choose Merge Layers. I've lost my text layer. I've lost my pattern fill layer, I've lost my clipping group. What I've ended up with is a layer that is just these flattened letters. That's a perfect start for getting these into individual files. 3. Pt 2 Extract the Letters To As Layers: Now that we've got the letters that we want to use, it's time to assemble them in such a way it's going to make it really easy for us to turn these into PNG images. So I'm going to create a brand new file, I'm just choosing File New. I'm going to use something that is easily big enough to save these letters to. For that, I'm going to choose a document 1,000 pixels by 1,000 pixels and I'm going to make this again 300 pixels per inch and click "Create". I have a document that's smaller than the original document. I'm going to use this document to assemble all my letters. This is the tedious part of this process. What I'm going to do is turn off the background so we can see what our letters are going to look like. I'm going to the rectangular marquee tool. I'm going to select over the first letter and you can see now why it was important for us to create plenty of space between these letters because we don't want to waste a lot of time being highly accurate. I'm going to use the keyboard at this point, I'm going to press Control and the letter C to copy and I switch to my other document Control and the letter V. Now on a Mac, that's Command C and Command V. We're just going to do this for every single one of the letters. This is probably the most tedious part of the process to selecting either each of them Control or Command C Control or Command V, and go back and do the next one. I'm going to continue with this and I'm going to come back in a minute once it's all done. You will have noticed that as I was making selections, I wasn't concerned about selecting very closely to any of these letters. You simply don't need to do that because we've got a transparent background, the only thing that's ending up on these layers here is the actual content so there's not extra that's appearing around these letters. This is a pretty efficient way to operate. Now that I've got all of my letters inside a file, you'll note that I've got the layers back to front so they running from z at the top all the way through to a at the bottom. They're called layer 1, 2, 3, 4, etc. To make it easy for us to save these later on, it would be really helpful if one of these layers was named what we're going to call the actual file. Typically these letters would be distributed as A, B, C, D, E, etc. If you're not particularly good at running through the alphabet in reverse, and I certainly am not, let's turn our layers into reverse so that we put a at the top and then we're going to look at a super-fast way of renaming layers. So I'm going to select layer z and I'm going all the way down here and I'm going to select layer a, we're not going to do anything with the background. We just want to reverse these with our layer selected, we're going over here to the Layer menu. We're going to arrange and we're going to choose reverse and when I do that, they're all reversed. So letter z is at the bottom and letter a is at the top. To rename our layers is simplicity itself. We're going to double-click here to select the layer name. I'm going to type the letter a. I'm using lowercase because that will match the letters themselves. I'm going to tap the Tab key on the keyboard that takes me to the next letter, which of course is letter b tap to get letter c. I can very easily run down the alphabet here, renaming all of these layers. So now everyone of my layers is named for the letter that is actually on the layer. We're ready in the next video to go and save these letters as individual files. 4. Pt 3 Save Letters as Files: Now that we've got a file full of letters, saving these letters as individual files is simplicity itself. First of all, I'm going to turn off the background layer because I don't want that to get in the way. I'm going to select all of these layers. I'm going to click on the first one, and I'm going to Shift-click on the last one. Then I'll right click and choose Quick Export as PNG. I'll be prompted to choose where my alphabet is going. I have a folder here called PNG Alphabet. I'm going to right-click and choose a sub folder in here, and I'm going to call this Lower Case Pattern Fill. It's a smart idea to create individual folders for these alphabets just so you've got everything saved nice and neatly. You'll be able to zip them up into files for distribution much more easily if they're in their own folder. I've selected this folder, I'll click "Select Folder". Photoshop is now going ahead and saving every one of those letters as its own PNG file, and it's using the layer name, the letter of the alphabet that we created for each one of these layers as the name. It's going to be a.PNG, b.PNG, etc. We can go to that folder using File Explorer and just see what's happening. Here is the folder and inside the folder are all of these letters. Now as I hover over these letters, you'll see that each one of them is a different size, it's a size appropriate to the letter itself. The height of the letter n is about 316 pixels. The height of the letter m is the exact same 316 pixels. Well, that's consistent because the letter m and the letter n should be about as tall as each other. But obviously, the letter m is a lot wider than the letter n. We'd expect the letter o to be the same height or near enough. Well, it's near enough. We'd expect the letter l to be quite tall. It's 452 pixels, pretty much the same height as the letter k, it's 460. We'll also note that the letter h should be about that same height because again, it's got this ascender on it. Even though these letters look different sizes, in actual fact, they are being saved as PNG images with all the excess cropped from them, but lined up all these letters are going to line up really well beside each other because they were lined up originally in the original document, exactly that same way. They're appearing as PNG images exactly as they should. 5. Pt 4 Create a Second Alphabet with Borders: Let's consider the situation where we really like these letters, but we'd like to create a second set that had perhaps a white border around them. Let's go to the letter a, and let's just select the letter a and hide all the others. I'm going to right-click here and choose "Show/Hide all other layers". We're just focusing on the letter a. To create a white border around this, I'm going to choose the fx icon here and choose "Stroke". Now this is already preset, so let me just delete this stroke and let's go and add a new one. I'm just going to click here on fx and let's just choose "Stroke". This has got the default settings. When we look at our letter, we can see that it's got this default black stroke around it. Let's increase the size of the stroke because there's one thing happening here that we may not want to happen. You can say that the larger the stroke is, the more it's eating into the character. I'd like a white stroke around this character, but I'd want it to be on the outside and not on the inside, so here from position I'm going to select "Outside". That gives me my same size letters, just with a border around them, and of course I want this to be a white border so I'm going to make sure this is set to 255, 255, 255 here in the color picker, and so this letter now has a nice thick white border around it. We can adjust the size, we can adjust anything we like before clicking "Okay". I'm going to right-click here and I'm going to choose "Show/Hide all other layers" because I want to see all my other layers as well. I'm going to right-click on this stroke here, and I'm going to choose "Copy Layer Style". I'm going to select every single other layer, clicking on the first layer and then holding the Shift key and clicking on the last layer, I'll right-click and I'll choose "Paste Layer Style". What that does is to paste that exact same layer style with all of its settings on to every single other letter. Let's turn off our background. I have all my layers selected. Well actually I probably don't have the first one, so let me just go and make sure I've got all my layers selected. I'll right-click and choose "Quick Export as PNG". I'm in my lowercase pattern fill alphabet. I'm actually going to make this a new one, so let's make a new folder. I'll click to select this folder, and let's go and have a look at the result. Here we have the exact same set of letters, but this time they've all got white borders around them. Photoshop has exported all our files for us with that desired border effect. 6. Pt 5 Designing a Second Solution: The process that we just stepped through is very useful when you want to have every single one of these letters picking up a different element in an image. It's also really good for photographs, because we could easily replace the pattern fill that we had with a photograph. Let's go and see how we might do that. I'm going to grab the text here, just this text layer, and make a duplicate of it. I don't actually want to make a duplicate of the pattern fill, so I'm just going to turn those layers back off again. I'm going to find an image to use and for this I'm going to unsplash.com. I really like this image, so I'm going to use it. I'm going to save it to my downloads folder. Let's swing back to Photoshop and let's place this image. I'll choose File and then Place Embedded. Let's go and select our file and click "Place". Now, it's placed inside my image over the top of my type. You can see it's not quite big enough, so I am going to make it a little bit bigger. Now, I'm just stretching it a little bit. As I do that with this particular image, stretching doesn't matter because it looks just fine. If it was something that was recognizable and couldn't be stretched, then you would need to scale that in proportion, but I'm just stretching it because I think it looks fine this way. Now, in exactly the same way as we created our clipping group previously, let's create a clipping group of this photo layer and then create clipping mask. Now we've got every single letter in this alphabet filled with a different portion of the image. But if you wanted to speed up the process and if you weren't concerned to have every letter a little bit different, then let's have a look and see how we could make the process even simpler. The way that we're going to do that is a combination of those two approaches. Obviously, we need all the letters of the alphabet, but we could build them up in a single file to start off with and we could use these layer styles to actually get the effect that we want. In the next video, let's go and see how exactly we would do that. 7. Pt 6 A Second Reusable Customizable Alphabet: For this new solution, let's start with a brand new new. Again, I'm going to use this 1000 pixel by 1000 pixel document. Make sure it's at 300 pixels per inch and just click Create. Now I'm going to my Type Tool. I'm going to click in the document. I'm going to type the first letter. Again, I am going to make sure that I use lowercase letters because that will give me the flexibility later on of using uppercase letters as well. I'm going to select over this letter and I think I want to make it a little bit bigger. Let's just go and make it 250 pixels tall. Because I have a type layer and because the letter a is typed onto that layer, you'll see that the layer is actually called layer a. That's fine. That's a good start for this process. I'm going to grab this layer and drag it onto the plus icon here, I'm going to turn off the first layer. I'm going to focus on this one with the Type Tool. I'm just going to select over it and type the letter b. As soon as I click away, you'll see that because this layer here has letter b on it, it's automatically being named. We're speeding up the process a little bit. I'm going to drop this onto the plus icon, turn this layer off if this one is still selected. I still have the Type Tool targeted. I didn't need to change tools. I'm going to press the letter c, drag this onto the new icon, turn the old one off, and type the new letter. As we go you'll see that we're just building our upside-down alphabet. Now you can also right-click and choose Duplicate Layer, but it is a little bit more cumbersome to do that. You can just decide which is going to make a better sense to you. I'm going to continue through and make my file of alphabet letters. Now, as I was going through, I did notice that the letter m is pretty close to the edge here. I can select all of these layers and just move everything across a little bit, just to make sure my letter m is fully in the document. I could also make the document a little bit larger. It's really just a matter of personal choice. Now if you want to, you can always reverse these letters of the alphabet. Just go and select all of your layers, go to Layer and then arrange and reverse. That puts the letter a at the top. Right-click this and choose Show or Hide All Other Layers. Let's do that again. You can just see the layer that you're working on. Let's think about the situation where we want to apply a pattern or even perhaps that same photograph to this image. Let's go back to the photograph. I'm going to actually just open it. I'm going to choose File and then Open and we're going to open that image that I downloaded from unsplash.com. The document that I'm working in over here is 1000 pixels by 1000 pixels. I'm going to crop this to a 1000 pixels by 1000 pixels. Let's go to the Crop Tool. I'm going to choose Ratio and I'm going to do a one-to-one ratio. In other words, this is going to be a square. I'll click the check mark. Now, this is not a 1000 by 1000 pixel document, right now is 3024. I don't need it to be so big. Let me just go to Image and then Image Size and we're going to make it 1000 pixels by 1000 pixels. I'll click okay. This is a smaller version of the image, but it's still got all the detail in it. I can make a pattern from this. If I make a pattern out of a photograph, I can use that pattern to fill my letters in just a minute. What I'm going to do is select everything with Select and All and I'm going to edit and I'll choose Define Pattern. I'm just going to call this flowers and click okay. I now have a pattern made up of those flowers. I can just close this file. I don't need it any longer. Let's go and concentrate on our letter a. In the earlier video, we saw that we could add a border around our letter a using a layer style. Well, we can fill the letter a with a pattern using a layer style. Let's see how we'll do that. We'll go to the fx icon and we'll choose Pattern Overlay. Now in this dialogue, I can choose my pattern, so I'll drop this down and let's go and get the pattern that I just created. What's happened and what we're seeing on the screen, is that this letter a is now filled with the pattern. Now if we want to use the pattern at its original scale, we would just use 100 percent. We can rotate the pattern if we want to, so we can angle it around or we can just leave it the way it was designed to be. I'm choosing a 100 percent as my opacity and blend mode as normal. This letter is being filled with this entire image. There's no transparency here, there's no additional color being added to it. It's just getting a pattern overlay. I'll click okay. Now, last time we were able to copy and paste the stroke. Let's just right-click here and choose Show or Hide All Other Layers. Let's go and target this effect. I'll right-click and choose Copy Layer Style. Click on the first layer, I want to paste it onto, shift and click onto the last layer, right-click and choose Paste Layer Style. Now every one of these letters has this exact same layer style applied to it. They've all got this flower applied to the letter. But even better if we're not sure that we want to use this font or if we want another choice. For example, using uppercase, that's easy to do too. I'll right-click here and Show or Hide All Other Layers that's just gone. Show everything. Let's select all of these layers. Now we know that on all of these layers, they're type layer, so they're fully editable. Let's go to the Type Tool. Let's go to the Character panel, and let's click here on uppercase. Now what we've got is every single one of these is an uppercase letter. Now, some of them are slightly over the edge, so let's just bring them back into the document. Let's just target the letter, say here, right-click on the eyeball and choose Show Hide. You can see that we're working in a capital C, here's a capital D. We were able to change every single one of these characters to an uppercase character. But you might be seeing, as I'm seeing, a problem here. There's a line through this letter. Let's go and have a look on the next letter. It's here again. What is happening is our pattern is not being rendered on these letters correctly. It's an easy solution, but it is one that you're going to want to watch out for. To clean this up, let's go to the top of the alphabet because it's just going to be easier to work on the letter a. Here is the problem through the letter a. We'll double-click the Pattern Overlay. This is the issue. We're going to snap it to the origin and that snaps the pattern to the origin in the document, the zero-zero point. It means that we don't have that line through our letter a. We're going to copy this last style again, right-click and choose Copy Layer Style. We're going to show all of the layers, we're going to target layer b all the way through to layer z. Which are the ones that have the what is now the wrong layer style applied to them. We'll right-click and choose Paste Layer Style. That just realigns the pattern within the letters. If we go to any one of these letters and have a look at these letters in isolation. You can see that they no longer have the pattern in the wrong place. The pattern is fully filling these letters. That was really why I made made pattern that was 1000 pixels by 1000 pixels because the document 1000 pixels by 1000 pixels line up at the origin and at a 100 percent scale, which is what we've got set in this pattern overlay dialogue. We've got a 100 percent scale and snap to the origin. It's going to fill each of these letters exactly perfectly. As long as you don't mind that the letter V has pretty much the same position of this image in it. It's the letter U and every other letter of the alphabet. Then this is a really easy way of filling letters with a pattern or a photograph, provided you make the photograph into a pattern because you can't actually put a photograph in a layer style. But if a photograph is a pattern, then you can use it that way. Of course, we've proven to ourselves already that we can save every one of these layers as a PNG image, even though it's got a layer style associated with it because that worked perfectly when we had the line around the characters. There's no reason to assume it's not going to work perfectly when we have a pattern. I've selected all my layers. If you want to get rid of this pattern overlay, the visual of the pattern overlay, you can just click here, and they do have a pattern overlay still applied but you're only seeing the character layer here in the Layers Palette, not the additional line for the last style. We'll right-click, we're going to choose Quick Export as PNG. We're making an uppercase alphabet this time with a photo fill. Let's go and have a look at the result, I'll just open File Explorer. Here is our uppercase alphabet with photo fill. Every one of these letters is filled with this photo. Because we created the photo as a pattern. You can't put a photo into a layer style fill, but if it's a pattern, you can. This file is going to be really handy. You can use it to apply patterns to your type. You can change your type from uppercase to lowercase just by selecting all the layers and using that feature in the Character Panel. You can also change the layer style for all of these layers really easily. This would be the master file that once you've created it, you would save it because it's reusable very easily, very quickly, anytime you want to do so. 8. Pt 7 A Second Example Alphabet: So assuming now that we've saved those two versions of creating an alphabet, let's just go through step-by-step as to how you would use those in future. We're going to the first example first, I'll choose File and Open, and I've saved this as version 1 alphabet master. In this alphabet master file, add two layers, well, there's a background layer that's white behind everything, but basically there's our top layer here and there is the pattern fill layer. Now the pattern fill layer can easily be replaced by anything. We can replace it with a solid color fill, we can replace it with a different pattern, or we can replace that with a photograph. Anytime that we're going to work on this file, the first thing that we'll do is to make a duplicate of this set of layers and then turn the original off because we don't want to mess around with our original in case we need to come back to it later on. Let's say that we want to make this as an uppercase alphabet, well, we're going to select the Type layer, we're going to select all the text here, we're going to the Character panel and we're going to make it uppercase. Now we have uppercase letters that we're working with. Let's have a look and see how we would fill it with a photograph, where we wanted every one of these letters to be different, in the sense that they would source from different areas of a photograph. Now, I've gone ahead and downloaded a photograph again from unsplash.com. This one is from Sergey Pesterev, I've downloaded it already. Inside Photoshop, I'm going to choose File and then Place. I'm using Place Embedded, and let's go to Downloads folder and go and get that photo. Now, it's coming under my pattern fill layer so I'm just going to turn off my pattern fill layer because that's just confusing absolutely everything. Let's go and size the photo so it covers all of the type. Now again, I'm not really worried about the fact that I'm stretching this a little bit because it's not a recognizable element once it's inside the characters, I do want it to cover up the characters though. So I want it to be big enough to cover up my characters in the document below. I'm going to get rid of this pattern fill layer here because that's just confusing the issue and we don't need it. This one needs to be clipped to the type below, so I'm going to select it and choose Layer, and from the layer menu here we're going to choose Create Clipping Mask. Now every one of these letters has a different element from the photo below. I'd like them to be a little bit more yellow, so I'm not really happy with this area up here. Let's go to this layer, let's go to the Move tool, and let's just stretch it a little bit. I can actually change how the photo underneath is being applied to these letters, so I can get a better effect if that's what I'm looking for. So I'm thinking I want this letter A to be a bit more yellow. Now we need to merge these layers, I'm going to select both layers and right-click. Now Merge Layers disappeared here. I can't actually merge the layers from this shortcut menu, but let's go to Layer, and then we'll go to Merge Layers down here because it is available. Now we could go ahead and select each of these letters in turn and copy and paste them to a new document. Once they're copied and pasted to a new document, we would simply go and reverse the layers so that we had A at the top and Z at the bottom. Then we'll double-click to rename the first layer, and then tab through the remainder of the layers until we have them labeled A through Z, at which point we can then select every one of those layers, right-click and choose to quick save them as PNG files. You can, of course, add a solid color fill layer using Layer and then New Fill Layer. There's the Pattern option here that you can fill them with a gradient, you can fill them with a solid color. For my preference here, the only time that I would be tempted to use this, is if I wanted to use a photograph and have every single letter in the alphabet filled with a different element. So every single one of these would be different, there wouldn't be any repetition of elements per se. The other option is that second file that we created, let's see how we'd use that. We'll choose File and then Open and we're going to open our master file, here is the Alphabet Master. This time let's fill it with a gradient. We're going to take all of these letters, in fact, let's make them lowercase, a different font, and let's fill them with a gradient. Well, first of all, we're going to select the topmost layer, shift-click on the last one, and we'll go to the Type tool. If we go to the Character panel, we'll stay that way in uppercase, so at the moment, we'll just swing that across to lowercase. Every one of these has now changed to lowercase, so let's go and choose a different font to use, something that is significantly different. I'm going to choose Broadway here, so let me just click on this Broadway font. You can see here that the letters have all changed, they're all lower case and they're all this new font. Let's open up the effects panel, double-click on the pattern overlay because we need to change this now. I'm going to make this a gradient overlay instead, so I'm turning off the pattern overlay, and I'm going to the gradient overlay. Let's drop this down and let's go and find a gradient to use. I'm going to choose purples for this, let's go and see what we've got in the purples. We can change the style of the gradient, so you could use a radial or an angle gradient. Obviously, if you have an angle gradient, then you can change the angle of the gradient this way. Not really liking that particularly, I think I'm just going to settle for a linear gradient. You can adjust the scale here to change what it is you see in the letter. You can also, of course, adjust the gradient itself, just come in here and you could add more colors to the gradient, for example, we could add a yellow in here, we're adding a yellow color into the middle of the gradient, this is all fully editable. Once you're happy with what you've got here, you can go and copy this layer style of this layer effect to the other layers. But let's add a white border to this one at the same time, I'm just going to double-click here, and let's actually delete that pattern overlay so it's not getting in our way, and let's go and add a stroke. The stroke here is already set to white because that's what we used last time. Let's make it a little bit bigger. Fairly hefty stroke on the outside of this letter, I'm really happy with that, I think that's looking really good. Let's right-click and choose Copy Layer Style, we're going to target all the other layers, click on the topmost one, shift and click on the bottom-most one, right-click and choose Paste Layer Style. Then of course, we'll just check to make sure that we got what we expected to get. Here's the letter, it's got its gradient in it, and it got its white surrounds. Every one of these is a letter of the alphabet that we can use as a file. We're going to select over all of these, I do have a little problem here, I can see that there's a letter over the edge, I'm thinking that that's not going to be something I want to have happened. Let's just click away from this and let's go and make the artboard a little bit bigger. I'm clicking on the Crop tool here, and if I just crop outwards, I can make the document bigger. You have to click the Tool and then click and drag to make it bigger, but now all my letters are fitting in really nicely, so I'm happier about that. Let's go back and select all of them right-click, Quick Export as PNG. We're going to create a folder here, select the folder, and then we'll go back and check because Photoshop will have saved all of our letters to that folder, and here they are. Again, you can see that each of these is using pretty much the same element in that gradient, we've got that yellow bar coming through all of those letters. They're all essentially looking pretty similar and that's just fine, that's the way that this process works when you're using the layer style or the layer effect to get these results. 9. PNG Alphabets in Photoshop Project and Wrapup: We've now completed the video portion of this course, so it's over to you. Your class project will be to create a PNG alphabet in Photoshop. Post an image of one or two of the letters from your alphabet as your class project. As you were watching these videos, you will have seen a prompt asking if you would recommend this class to others. Please, if you enjoy the class and learn things from it, would you do two things for me? Firstly, answer yes, that you would recommend this class to others and secondly, write even in just a few words, why you enjoyed this class. These recommendations help other students to say that this is a class that they might enjoy and learn from. If you see the follow link on the screen, click it and you'll be notified when my new classes are released. If you'd like to leave me a comment or a question, please do so. I read and respond to all of your comments and questions, and I look out and respond to all of your class projects. My name's Helen Bradley and I hope that you've enjoyed this course and that you've learned things about alphabets and PNG files and Photoshop of which you were previously unaware. I'll look forward to seeing you in another graphic design for lunch class here on Skillshare in the future.