Next Level Knitting: Knit a Sweater | Davina Choy | Skillshare

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Next Level Knitting: Knit a Sweater

teacher avatar Davina Choy, Yarn Wrangler at Sheep & Stitch

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

24 Lessons (2h 20m)
    • 1. Introduction

      2:16
    • 2. 2 Welcome: Tips to Get Started

      2:04
    • 3. 3 Gauge: the Key to Good Fit

      3:21
    • 4. 4 Choosing Needles and Yarn

      1:04
    • 5. 5 Knitting a Gauge Swatch

      13:34
    • 6. 6 Measuring the Swatch

      4:00
    • 7. 7 Troubleshooting Gauge

      3:55
    • 8. 8 Materials and Casting On

      2:49
    • 9. 9 Choosing a Size

      6:10
    • 10. 10 Cast On and Rows 1-2

      8:28
    • 11. 11 Rows 3-4 and Staying Organised

      11:21
    • 12. 12 Instructions for Multiple Sizes

      6:40
    • 13. 13 Joining in the Round

      4:35
    • 14. 14a Splitting the Sleeves

      3:34
    • 15. 14b Splitting the Sleeves Cont.

      5:28
    • 16. 15 Knitting the Body

      9:00
    • 17. 16a Shaping the Sleeves

      7:36
    • 18. 16b Shaping the Sleeves Cont.

      4:34
    • 19. 17a Decreasing the Sleeves

      6:47
    • 20. 17b Decreasing the Sleeves Cont.

      4:48
    • 21. 18 Finishing the Sleeves and Underarms

      7:00
    • 22. 19a Knitting a Neat Neckline

      8:38
    • 23. 19b Knitting a Neat Necklline Cont.

      7:14
    • 24. 20 Blocking for a Perfect Fit

      4:41
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About This Class

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Are you a knitter who’s looking to take your knitting to the next level? Maybe you’ve knit a lot of scarves, cowls and hats, and you’re looking for a more challenging project.

Enter the raglan sweater! The raglan sweater is a great first sweater project. It has a classic, easy fit, is seamlessly constructed and even allows you to try it on as you’re knitting!

You might be intimidated by the idea of a sweater - it’s so big after all! - but the truth is that if you can knit comfortably in the round using circular and double pointed needles, then you have all the skills you need to knit a sweater. Really!

In this extensive two hour class, I'll show you step-by-step how to knit your very first sweater. We’ll go over:

  • Knitting gauge (super important!)
  • Choosing needles and yarn
  • Shaping the neckline
  • Dividing the sleeves from the body
  • Customising the body length
  • Knitting and shaping the sleeves
  • Creating a neat and even neckline rib
  • Blocking the sweater for a perfect fit

By the end of the class, you’ll have all the tools you’ll need to knit a classic raglan sweater for yourself or a loved one. This class is for any knitter who wants to move beyond scarves, cowls and hats to the exciting world of sweaters!

Want to explore more knitting classes? Check out these knitting classes on Skillshare:

Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

Davina Choy

Yarn Wrangler at Sheep & Stitch

Teacher

Davina is the founder of Sheep and Stitch, a website that teaches people how to knit through knitting patterns, video tutorials, yarns and kits. Knitting is an incredible act of creation. Think about it: with just sticks, string, and your own two hands, you can make a hat ... or a scarf ... or a sweater! It seems like pure magic! And yet, it's actually pretty easy to do. Davina's goal is to share the magic of knitting so that everyone can experience the joy of making something beautiful and warm with their own two hands.

See full profile

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Transcripts

2. 2 Welcome: Tips to Get Started: Hi and welcome to the video tutorial for the everyday Ramblin time Divina of sheep ends dish.com. And I'm still excited that we're going to start knitting this pattern together. This is a really fun pattern and it's been a long time coming. So if you haven't already done so, print out your patterns so that we can start working this together. All right, now a little note about the pattern. You should really know six different techniques before you start this pattern because it'll really help you out if you're a total knitting noob, this is going to be a difficult pattern to master it, you're going to have a lot of challenges ahead of you, okay, So it's best that you know the six techniques before you get started. And the six techniques are casting on preferably with the long tail cast on knitting, hurling, knitting in the round, knitting on double pointed needles and casting off. Okay, So these six techniques are really important. Please be familiar with them before you get started with this pattern. And if you are not familiar with them, I have some links on the project page where you can watch some videos, get some scrap yarn and get familiar with these techniques and then come back here and we can omit the pattern together. Okay, so a little housekeeping note, the next video that you're going to watch is all about gauge and gauges super, super important. It's going to affect the size and the fit of your pattern. So it's really important that you get gauged. Now, in the next video on gauge, I refer to the pattern as the classic Ramblin. Now this was the name of the pattern. Before I realized that there is already a pattern called the classic rags when someone alerted me to that. And I don't like to be a plagiarism. So I changed the name of this pattern to the everyday regolith, which is its current name. So don't be phased if in the next video I say classic Franklin instead of everyday rivaling the gauge video was recorded before I realized that I was plagiarizing. Okay. So just bear with me, don't be phased. It is still called the everyday right Lin. Alright, so enough talking from me. Let's move on to the next video, which is all about gauge. 3. 3 Gauge: the Key to Good Fit: Now in this video we're going to talk all about Gauge. Gauge is extremely important. Every pattern that you encounter will include a gauge that you'll need to meet in order to knit up the pattern to its specific size. So if you want to knit a sweater that fits, you're going to need to get gauge because if you don't get gage, gages going to get you. Okay, so what in the world is gauge? Let's talk about why it's necessary. Now to illustrate the importance of gauge, I'm going to bring in two helpers. Now this is Daisy, she's an orange, and this is a Meyer lemon. And let's call him bobbing. Okay, So Daisy and Bobby want to knit a sweater. In fact, they're going to net the same sweater and in the same size, Let's say a medium. Now they're also going to use the same yarn and the same knitting needles. So under these conditions, do you think they'll end up with exactly the same size sweaters? I mean, their raw materials are the same and they're a pattern is the same and the size there knitting is also the same. So what do you think? Is there another variable that we're missing? Now if you said knitting tension, then you'd be right. Good job. Knitting tension is unique to each knitr. So let's say Bobby is a really tight-knit her. He's a nervous neurotic type and he grips his yarn and needles really tightly. Now daisy over here, Let's say she's a really relaxed, laid-back, hippie orange. She's always in the sun shine. She's a vegan. She eats raw, meditate. As a result, she's a really loose knitr because Daisy and Bobby NTID at different tensions there sweater probably won't be the same size even though they're knitting the same sweater pattern with the same sweater size and the same materials because Bobby is a tight-knit or his sweater will probably be smaller than daisies. And because Daisy is a loose knitr, her sweater will probably be bigger than Bobby's. And this will happen even if they're using the same raw materials. So you can imagine how difficult this would be for a pattern designer. How can she or he design a pattern so that both the tightest Knitter and the loosest Knitter and everyone in-between commit this pattern and get the same size garment. Now if you said gauge, then you're right. Good job. Gauges away for a pattern designer to standardize knitting tension so that both be looses and the tightest knitr commit the same garment in the same size and get identically sized garments. We've covered wide gauge matters. Now let's talk about what it actually is. To do this, let's dissect and engaged together. Now every pattern will ask for a gauge made up of stitches and rows. So let's look at the gauge for the classic Franklin, which is a pattern put out by sheep and stitch, the classic rags and asks for a gauge of 16 stitches and 24 rows to equal four inches or 10 centimeters in stock and upstage using your larger needles, which would be six millimeters. Now this means that if you can get 16 stitches and 24 rows in your chosen yarn, needle size and unique knitting tension and have it measure out to four inches or 10 centimeters in stock in it stitch, then you've got gauge. What this means that when you knit your sweater, it will be the same size as the finished measurements on your pattern. Okay, so now you know why gauge matters and what it is. Now we have to put it into practice. Let's keep using the classic rags. And as an example. 4. 4 Choosing Needles and Yarn: So where do we start? The best place to look is to the pattern itself. Most patterns will include a recommended yarn and needles size. Now the classic Greg Lynn recommends six millimeter needles and cascade yarns, ecological wool. Now these are not set in stone, they are just recommendations. But you can get an idea of what type of yarn and needles size you can expect. So I know this yarn is a heavy worsted weight and I know because I googled it. So with this information, I can head to the yarn store and check-out some heavy worsted weight yarn and look at some six millimeter needles. Now that you've got your needles and yarn, we can start testing for gauge. Now once again, the engagement is 16 stitches and 24 rows equals four inches or 10 centimeters in stock in it stitch. Now rather than casting on 16 stitches exactly will cast on 25 stitches. And these extra stitches act as a buffer. Now we do this because stock and hat sich tends to curled inwards. So it'll be really hard to measure those edge stitches. So we want to give extra stitches so we can get a better and more accurate reading of our gauge swatch. 5. 5 Knitting a Gauge Swatch: Okay, So here we go. I'm casting on a 25 stitches, and now we need to knit this up in stock in a stitch for at least 24 rows. Now I'm going to get more than 24 rows. I'm going to knit about 35 rows. Now this will give me a more accurate reading. And it'll also make measuring our little swatch a lot easier. Once I've got 35 rows, I'll just cast off. Okay, So here's the thing. If your pattern requires you to knit on two needles like this, then you should probably met your gauge swatch on two needles as well. And then in one row and purlin be other row if you're doing stock in it stitch. However, if your pattern calls for you to knit in the round, then you should probably know your gauge fought in the round two. And that's because when you're knitting and around, your attention is probably going to be a bit different than when you're knitting on flat needle. Knitting stocking that stitch on two needles means that you're alternating a knit row with a pearl row. However, when you're getting stuck in that stitch on a circular needle, you're only knitting, you never Perl. So purlin or row changes the equation. It changes the tension of your knitting. If you want to be super-duper accurate, you should be knitting your gauge swatch on circular needles if you're knitting your pattern with circular needles. Now if you're knitting the classic wrangling that you should know that the entire sweater is pretty much going to be knit in the round from the body to the sleeves. So if you want to be a type, a perfectionist, super accurate, I would recommend that you also mythic gauged watch in the round. So is this a deal breaker? Will your classic rags and B irreversibly damaged if you knit your gauge swatch on two needles instead of in the round? No, no, not at all. You'll still get a pretty decent idea of what you're knitting tension is going to be like. However, if you want to be super-duper accurate than you should just knit your swatch in the round. It's not that much harder and I'll show you how to do it. So to knit a swatch in the round, you're going to need some circular needles, like the ones I've got here. And with the classic wrangling as our example, we would cast on 25 stitches, which includes our buffer stitches. And we're going to start by knitting the first row. Okay, so when we get to the end of our row, we're not going to turn our work around and Pearl across because that would be knitting, stocking that stitch on to flat needles. We don't want that. We want to simulate what stock in it stitch in the round is going to be like. So when you're knitting stuff and it's stitching around your knitting, all of your stitches and all of your rows at no point will you be purely know pearls allowed. So how are we going to do this? All right, so we've just finished our first knit row. And you can see that our working Uranus here. So what we're going to do in order to keep on meeting all of our stitches and to still get stuck in and stitch is we're actually just going to take our work. I'm going to grab it like this and I'm going to pull it across my whole circular needles. So now I've reached the beginning of my circular needle or the other side of it. And I'm just going to push my work onto this needle. All right, now you can see that our working yarn is now in the back. So what are we gonna do with their working hours? Well, we're just going to use it to continue knitting. Pretty crazy, right? If I blow your mind. So what we're gonna do is we're going to take our working learn and just knit into the first stitch of our on our needle. So we're gonna take our yarn and turn it into it. Pretty cool, right? So now we are just knitting or stitches, right? As if we were knitting in the round crazy. Now, there's one extra thing that you gotta do. So if you look at the back of our work, you can see that we've got our working yarn just hanging out in the back. And it's actually kind of tight against our work. Now we don't want that because we want this gauge swatch to be an accurate measurement of what our knitting is going to be like. And if you keep this yarn in the back, it's going to pull against our gauge swatch. And that's going to make measuring really difficult. So what we're gonna do is we're going to make this working yarn hang out really moves in the back. Were you not gonna make it tight? So I'm going to put these stitches back onto my left needle and I'll show you what I would suggest you to do when you are meeting your row again. So here we go. Alright, so now we're back at the beginning. So here's our working yarn. And rather than just take it and knit right into this first stitch, I'm going to take it and wrap it around my finger twice. Okay. And then I'm going to knit into my first stitch here. Okay. And then I'm going to get into my second stitch. And after my second stitch, I can take my finger off of this yarn. And you can see now that the working yarn is very loose in the back, right? It's not as tight as before. And that's great. You really want your work in your to be hanging out very loosely. And once you've done that, you can just knit across your row just like normal. So this is kind of crazy. I know it's weird. But you know, when you do this, you can simulate what your conditions are going to be like when you're knitting your sweater, right? When you're knitting your sweater new, you're going to be knitting stocking and stitch in the round, which involves knitting all of your stitches and all of your rows. Okay, so we're near the end of our second row here. And here we go. Here's our last stitch. Cool. So what we would do now is exactly what we just did. So we're at this side of our needle and I'm just going to grab my work and pull it, pull it, pull it, pull it. So that now we're back at the beginning of our needle, right? And are working urine is in the back. Cool. So now we're going to wrap our working yarn around my finger. So here's my work, the urine, it was at the end and now I'm going to bring it up to the front and use it to knit into this first stitch. So I'm gonna put my needle in and I'm gonna get my finger ready. And then I'm going to take my work neuron and wrap it around my finger like about 1.5 times, two times and really matter. And then knit into my first stitch. Right here we go. Then my second stitch and after my second stitch I can take my finger off, right? And so now you can see that we've got two strands of our working yarn grant, and we would repeat this. So for this gauge swatch that we're meeting for our classic ride Lynn, I think we would need to knit. What was it like 35 rows that we decided on. So I would keep doing this for 35 rows if you are kind of annoyed about this whole wrapping around your finger, I'll show you what your gauge swatch looks like if you don't wrap the working yarn around your finger. So if you don't wrap your yarn around your finger, your gauge swatch will look something like this, and this is a mini version. The back of your work will have these yarn surrounds at the back, but your work will curl inwards, right? So you can see this is our stock and that stitch. And it's curled inwards towards the back because the yarn is pulling at it because it's so tight. So this makes measuring your gauge swatch kind of difficult because your work is being pulled at the back. No one way that you can get around this is turned in workaround. Get a pair of scissors out and just cut the yarn strands like this. You would just cut them loose. And then your work would lay flat, right? Because you don't have these yarns strands pulling your work. So you could do that and then measure your gauge. However, there's a downside to this against watches. Great, because if you get to the end of your work and you find that you're running out of yarn or you have run out of yarn, you can take your gauge swatch and unravel it and use that yarn to finish your project if you run out of yarn. But if you end up cutting these norms strands here, that renders this gauge swatch practically useless, right? Because you won't have one continuous yarn strand to use. You basically cut off the stitches and you'll just have like a bunch of loose yarn. You won't be able to repurpose this in case you need that extra yarn. So I don't really recommend you doing this right? If you do it my way, which is to hold your yarn in the back and keep it really, really loose. Then, you know, you don't have to worry about your yarn curling inwards, right? It'll just lay flat because all of these yarns brands are so loose that they're not going to be pulling your work. So that's why I recommend that you keep your urine strands really loose in the back so that your work will not Curlin, it will lay flat and you can measure it accurately. And doing this will also allow you to keep your yarn, keep your yarn and not have to cut strands so that you can save your gauge swatch if you need, it should finish up your project. So keep on doing this. If you're knitting the classic Ramblin, knit your gauge swatch in the round and keep the yarn strands in the back very loose and do that for 35 rows. All right, so I've knit 35 rows of stock and that stitch in the round and I ended up with this cool little square. Don't you love this? It's like a mullet, you know, business in the front and party and the bag will, ooh, yeah. So this little square is called a gauge swatch. And we're going to use this to measure or gauge. Now we're almost ready to measure. Yes, I did just say almost, there's still one more step before we can actually measure this thing. And no, I'm not doing this to torture you. Next step is necessary. I'd say it's necessary and it's really not that hard and it's actually kinda cool. So, you know, stick around for that. Okay, So before you measure your swatch, It's a really good idea to wash it. Yeah, I know it sounds crazy and no, I'm not messing with you. Think of your gauge swatch as a mini me of your future sweater, you're probably going to wash your future sweater. And when you do, the urine may change. In fact, if you're knitting your sweater with wool, it will probably expand. So if you want a really accurate measurement of how your sweater will react in the real-world, it's a really good idea to treat your swatch as if it were your sweater, but many of your sweater. Okay, so let's take a look at our yarn label. Now the yarn that I'm using is Cascade Gardens eco plus. And on the yarn label it tells me that I need to hand wash this yarn in water that's 30 degrees Celsius, which is about room temperature. And I need to lay it flat to dry. That's what this little symbol means. Now if you have different looking symbols, you can google the term laundering symbols or dry cleaning symbols and look up a symbol that's on your yarn label. Alright, so I'm gonna go and wash my swatch in water that's 30 degrees Celsius and lay it flat to dry. All right, so I've got a bowl of water right here, and I've also got my gauge swatch, this crazy little guy. And I'm going to dunk my gauge swatch in this water. Alright, so let's dump this puppy. Here we go. Whoa, yeah, alright, so now my gauge swatch is submerged in this water. Awesome. And it's just going to look like this whet, psyche mass. And he just want to push it down into the water to make sure that the fibers all get submerged. So I'm going to leave it in this water for about five minutes. Okay. I really want the fibers to absorb all the water and you can turn it around a little bit, make sure it's kinda of submerged. Let it hang out for about 50. All right, so now I'm going to gently push out the water from my swatch. Now I want to treat this with care. I don't want to wring it out, so do not bring it out like this as if it were a dish cloth. This is your little baby, you know what, your little mini me of your sweaters. So treat it really gently. If you are too rough with it, it may felt and you do not want that okay. So be really gentle with it. Just sort of press out the water as much as you can. Okay. So I'm pressing it right now. I have not agitating it too much. Okay. So once you've pressed out as much water as you ten, then we can lay this out flat to dry. Alright, so I've just laid out a little towel for my swatch, and I'm going to put my swatch on top of it. And now I'm just going to roll it up and kind of try to press out as much water as I can. And there's quite a bit of water in here. Okay. So again, I'm still be really gentle with it. And now I'm just going to unroll my swatch and this towel is soaking wet, so I've gotten quite a bit of water out of my swatch. And now I'm going to lay this little guy out here. So my urine labeled told me to lay my yarn out to dry, lay it flat, and that's pretty much what I'm doing now and arranging my gauge swatch so that it's, it lies flat. I'm sort of making the corners looking flat. And this is pretty much it. I'm just going to lay this guy out like this. And every once in awhile throughout the day I might flip it over just to let the underside, this sort of crazy hairy side dry out as well. And, you know, the great thing is that we left these yarns strands really loose, right? So it's not constricting or gauge swatch, It's letting it lie really flat and really nice and flat. All right, So let your gauge swatch dry and then we can finally measure it. 6. 6 Measuring the Swatch: All right, So the moment of truth has arrived. It's time to measure. Oh my gosh. Okay, so everything that we've done so far has led up to this moment. Whoa, whoa, whoa. Okay, so no pressure, no pressure. But we're just going to measure right now. All right, so the gauge that we're trying to get for the classic Franklin is 16 stitches and 24 rows. All right, so let's measure it out. Now this thing that I've got here, this little square thing is just a fancy little gauge measured. It basically gives me a little hole that measures four inches by four inches. And it makes it easier to measure. But if you don't have one of these fancy things, you can totally use a tape measure or a ruler. No problem. All right, so let's get started. I'm going to start measuring stitches first. Now stitches, remember, are these little v shapes, okay? Each little V-shape is one stitch. All right. And at the shapes that are stacked on top of each other vertically like this, these are rows, so switches run horizontally and growth run vertically. Okay, so let's measure our stitches. I'm going to start on the left side and we'll move from left to right. So I'm gonna get my ruler in line with one of these rows. And then I'm just going to start counting. So here we go. Here's one V 12345678, 9, 10. And I've my eyes have gone blurry, trying to find where it was. 10, Here we go, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16. So I totally got the gage for my stitches across. This is awesome. Okay. Wow. Okay. All right. All right. So we've got one down, the stitches down. And now we gotta get our row count match up. Alright, who are deep breath, deep breath. Okay, So I'm going to move my ruler to the middle of my gauge swatch. Because if I measure from the edge, you can see that this row kind of curves in here at the bottom. And I just want a nice straight row. I'm going to try and find a really straight row and they're usually hanging out in the center. So here we go. This is a pretty straight row. So let's measure this row right here. Alright, so I'm going to make sure that the edge of my ruler is right at the bottom of a stitch. Okay, don't want to accidentally measure in the middle of a stitch, right? I want to get the whole stitch. I'm going to make sure that I've got a whole stitch right here, right at the bottom and I do, you can see that little V. And now we're just going to measure, alright? And I'm just going to hold my tape measure kind of lightly. I don't want to press too hard. So here we go. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18. Who? I lost count. Okay. 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24. Gauge. We got gage oh my gosh, 24 rows, 16 stitches. And that's what this gauge swatches got. Yeah. That means I got gage. I totally got Gage who lack age. I got Gage. Yeah. All right. This is awesome. So it all paid off. Now I know for sure that the yarn that I've chosen and the needles that I've chosen to work with will give me the right gauge. And that means that I can start knitting this pattern. So excited. Okay, So did you get gauge, digit, digit? If you did then, Great job. Now you know that you can hit the classic ragged and get the sizing that you want. You did good. 7. 7 Troubleshooting Gauge: Okay, Now if you didn't get gauge, don't worry about it. You're still special. I'm still really proud of you. There are two ways to remedy this, and I will show you both ways. Now if you have less stitches than the required gauge, than your gauge is too large. Let's use this watch as an example. On this watch, 11 stitches equals four inches. Now remember the everyday wrangling need 16 stitches to equal four inches. In this case, we have two options to reduce our gauge. The first option is we can switch to a smaller needle size. I recommend going down in half a millimeter to one millimeter increments. So you can decrease the needle size to decrease the gauge. On this watch, I used an eight millimeter needle, so I can try going down to a 7.5 millimetre needle like this and see if I can't decrease my gauge. If my gauge swatch is still too large, I can try using a seven millimeter needle. And if I can get gauged by switching needle sizes, then awesome. Now I know what needle size to use for the everyday wrangling. Now the downside to decreasing your needle size is that your fabric can end up being too tight and stiff. So if we look at this gauge swatch, you can see that the fabric is already pretty tight. There's not a lot of give to it. So if I decrease my needle size, my fabric will become even more stiff and tight. And this brings us to the second option for reducing our gauge. So if switching your needle size gives you fabric that you're not happy with, then your second option is to switch to a lighter weight yarn. Now the yarn for this gauge swatch is a bulky weight yarn like this. So you can see the yarn is really very thick and it's much heavier than the yarn that's recommended for the everyday wrangling. In this case, I would suggest switching to a lighter weight yarn in order to get gauge. Conversely, if you have more stitches in the required gauge than your gauge is too small. Let's use this watch as an example. On this watch, 18 stitches equals four inches when in actual fact, for the everyday wrangling, we need 16 stitches to equal four inches. So in this case we have two options, and they are the exact opposite of the previous example. First, we can try to switch to a larger needle size. And we'll go up in half a millimeter to one millimeter increments. So on this watch, I originally used a 55 millimeter needle to swatch this up. So I can try swatching again using a six millimeter needle. And if my gauge is still too small, I can go up to a 6.5 millimetre needle at a seven millimeter needle and on and on. Now it's using larger needles, get to gauge and you're happy with the fabric then hooray, you've got gage. Now you know what needle size to use. Now the downside to using larger needles is that your fabric can become too loose. So if using a larger needle size produces fabric that's too loose, your second option is to switch to a heavier weight yarn. Now if you're not sure what your weight is, you can refer to this chart which gives the whole yarn weight family. Or you can check out the link from sheep and stitch, which goes into more detail about gauge and yarn weights, links below. So this has been a pretty comprehensive video on Knitting gauge. Not the most fascinating subject, but a really important one. So I hope you've wrapped your head around the concept. And if you're knitting the classic Franklin, Here's a quick and dirty summary to help you get gage. 8. 8 Materials and Casting On: You will need some heavy worsted weight yarn. And the urine that I'm using for this pattern is cascade yarns eco plus. Now I really like this jarring because it has a really generous yardage. There's 478 yards per game. So one of these guys, and it has a lot of different colors and it's really affordable, I think, which makes it great for a first sweater. Now, this is the yarn that is recommended, but of course the best known for you is one in which you can get the right gauge for this pattern. All right, so moving on, The next thing you'll need is a pair of circular needles. Now these needles are six millimeters and they are 32 inches in length. So from here to here, 32 inches. Alright, so the next thing you'll need is a pair of double pointed needles. And the ones I've got here are six millimeters, so it's the same size as my circular needle that I'm going to use to lit up the body of my sweater. Now six millimeters is again the recommended needle size. The best needle for you is one in which you can get your gauge. All right, so next up is another pair of circular needles. Now these are five millimeters and these are just optional but recommended. And the reason we use these is we're going to use this to knit up the ribbing of our sweater. So the area of our sweater that is going to be really stretchy. We want it to be a bit tighter. So that's why we use smaller sized needles to knit up in the ribbon. So these circular needles are five millimeters, so they're basically one millimeter less than the size that we use to knit up our sweater body. All right, so next up is a pair of double pointed needles, and these are also five millimeter needles. And again, this is optional but recommended for the ribbing of your sweater. And we need double pointed needles because we're going to use these to knit up the ribbing on our sleeve and on the color of her sweater. All right, so next up is six stitch markers. Now you want one of these sketch markers to be a different color than the other five. Because the different colored one is going to mark the beginning of your rounds so you don't want to have any confusion about which stitch marker marks the beginning of your round. All right, so next thing that you'll need is some scrap yarn, and I've got this bright pink yarn as my scrap yarn here. The next thing you'll need is a tapestry needle. And a tapestry needle basically looks like a giant needle. It has a really big eye that we can thread or yarn into. And we'll use our tapestry needle to weave in the ends of our yarn. Now the last thing you'll need is a measured. All right, So if you've got these things handy than we are ready to, Nick's the everyday wrangling. 9. 9 Choosing a Size: So now let's choose a size for the everyday Radelet. So the best way to choose a size is to look to the bust measurements. So let's take a look at the fourth page of the pattern. So on the fourth page we have a schematic of the whole RAG limb. You can see all of the measurements. So let's look at the bus measurements here. Now you can see that we have an extra small size, which is a 33 inch bust all the way up to you and a3x, which is a 55 inch bust. Now the way to choose your size is to measure your natural bust. So measure around your bus, but the tape measure mark down that size and then add three inches to that. Now the reason we do that is because the Ramblin has three inches of positive e. That means that it has three inches of extra room for you to move around it and which is what makes it so comfy and kind of casual and boyfriends. So for instance, for me, I have a 34 inch bust. So I would add three inches, 34, which gives me 37 inches. Now if I look at my pattern, we don't have a 37 inch bust here. The closest we have is 35 and 40. So for me, I'm between sizes small and medium. So I can choose whether I want to knit a small or a medium. And for me I think I'm going to round down and knit a size small. So go ahead and measure your bust at three inches to that. And then look to the schematic on the fourth page of your pattern and choose a size that works for you. So now that you've chosen your sides, Let's talk about how to read your pattern. So I'm going to flip over to page two. And you can see when you look at page two, there are a lot of different acronyms, right? You've got a CEO, a KF, be a PM, lot of different acronyms. And if that's freaking you out, don't worry. If you flip over to page 3, you have a bar abbreviations here. So just check out this bar whenever you find an acronym that you don't understand. All right, Now the next thing that I need to talk about is sizing. So if you look at your pattern, the whole pattern includes instructions to knit up all the sizes of the everyday wrangling. But you don't want to get confused because there are a lot of different numbers here, right? So you just want to highlight the numbers that refer to your size. So you'll see on the first line, you'll see it says CO2, that just means cast on 02:00 PM. And then it says CEO 10, open bracket, 10108108, close bracket. Now this little string here, this open bracket and close bracket, all the numbers within this bracket refers to sizes. So all this means is cast on 1010 refers to the extra small size. And it says 10 again, and this refers to the small size. Another 10 refers to medium. 8 refers to a large eight again refers to an 1 x, 10 refers to a T2x, and 8 refers to a three x. So this whole string, D number open bracket followed by a string of numbers and a close bracket just refers to different sizes. So the first number is always going to be the smallest and the last number before the last bracket refers to the largest size. So let's use me for an example. I'm knitting a size small. So this 10 here would refer to me. So when I'm knitting up this everyday wrangling, I would cast on to, let's go back to the very beginning, cast on two PM. And then I would cast on ten. Alright, I wouldn't cast on eight. I would cast on 10 because this is the placement of a size small. And if you look a little bit further down, it says CEO, so cast on 26, 26, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. Okay. So for me I know I'm getting a size small. So the size small is the first number inside the bracket. So I would cast on 26, I wouldn't cast on 28, 32, or 34. I would test on 26 because this is the number that refers to a size small. So if you're not sure where your sides lies, you can just count. Alright, so the first number outside the bracket is the smallest size, so that's an extra small. Then you've got a small, medium or large one X2, X3 x. So what I recommend is to take a highlighter like the one that I've got here and to highlight the numbers that referred to your size. So I'm gonna go ahead and do that. So here it says cast on 10 and then 10. So this is my size. I'm getting a size small, so I'm going to highlight that 10. And here we've got a CEO, 26, 26, and here's my number. Here's my size, small 26. And we're going to see, oh, 10, open bracket ten. So there's my size small and I'm going to highlight a size small. And then CO2, and then we've got a stitch count. So this last bit here is a stitch count so that you can match up the number of stitches that you have on your needle with the number of stitches that you need for your size. So again, here's an extra small size. And the small size is right here. All right, so here 50. So that's me. So I would go through the whole pattern, all four pages and highlight the numbers that refer to my size. Anytime you see an open bracket, you can be pretty sure that that refers to different sizes. So here we go. In the second line, we've got 5858. So this is me. I am a 58. Here we go. And we keep on going down. You can see that. Here we go. Here's another open bracket, 118 stitches. All right, so go through the whole pattern and highlight the sizes that refer to your size. 10. 10 Cast On and Rows 1-2: So now let's start casting on. I'm going to use the long tail cast on. So I'm making my slipknot here and putting my needle through the slipknot. Now if you're not familiar with the long tail cast on, you can check up the tutorial video which is linked below. Check that out and come back and join us. So I'm going to cast on stitches. So my first slipknot counts as my first stitch. So I'm going to cast on a second stitch and now I've got two stitches on my needle. All right, so now the pattern says we need to PM. And that means that we need to place our marker. So here's my stitch marker and I'm just gonna put it onto my needle. So next I'm going to cast on ten stitches. Now again, I'm getting a size small. So for me I'm casting on ten stitches, but depending on what size you're knitting, you'll be casting on either ten stitches or eight stitches. All right, so let's do that. So here we go. 2468, nine, and 10. Perfect. All right, so now we've got another PM. So I'm gonna take my stitch marker and put it onto my needle. And I'm going to cast on 26. Now for your sides, you'll either be casting on 2006, 28, 32, or 34, or 36. So let's cast on those stitches. 25 and 26. Perfect. All right, so I've cast on 26 stitches and now I'm going to take my third marker and we're going to PF place marker. Great. So next we're going to cast on the stitches, or eight stitches depending on your size. And let's see, do I have 10 here, 2 or 6, 8, and 10. Perfect. So now I'm going to place my marker again. Here we go. And I'm going to cast on two stitches. There we go. Two. And that's all. So now we have a stitch count at the end of our pattern. So for me I'm knitting a size small, I need to have 50 stitches on my needle. Depending on your size, you'll need 504852 or 56. Count up your stitches to make sure you have the number of stitches that you need to or six. Forty, eight and fifty. Perfect. So I've got 50 stitches on my needle and that's great. So now let's move on to row one of our pattern. On row one, we're going to do what's called a KF be. Now Ksp means knit into the front and the back. So we're going to knit into our first stitch. So here we go. I've been a knit one, but I'm not going to throw the stitch off of my left needle instead of going to MIT into the back of the stitch. So I'm going to turn my needle around so you can kind of see my left needle. So I've got this first knit stitch here and I'm going to knit into the back of that same stitch, that same first stitch. I'm going to push my needle and I'm going to wrap my yarn around again and pull out a second stitch. So now I've got two stitches on my needle and at this point I can bring that stitch off the left needle. So now I have just increased by one stitch. So a Ksp is an increased stitch. All right, So next we're going to knit one. Here we go. And then our pattern tells us to know SM means slip the marker. So here I'm going to bring my marker from the left needle over to my right needle. So next what we're gonna do is we will do a knit one. So here we go, let's knit one. And then we're going to do another kf be. So here we go, I'm going to knit into my next stitch, but I'm not going to drop it off the needle instead I'm going to knit into the back of that same stitch. So here we go. I'm gonna go into the back of that stitch and it might be a little tight and knit into it. There we go. And then we can drop it off the needle. All right. So next we're going to work to the two stitches before the next marker. So that means we're going to knit all of these stitches until we get to choose dishes before this marker. So let's do that. We're just going to knit. And you'll notice that even though we're knitting on circular needles, we're not joining in the round. We will join in the round, but we're not gonna do that quite yet. So now we're at two stitches before our next marker. And we're going to do a Ksp. Here we go. So knit into the front end. We're going to knit into the back. Here we go off and I'm just going to push that in. Its little tight. There we go. So now we can drop that off of our needle. And then we're going to do a knit one. Here we go. All right, and then we're going to do an SM, which means slip marker over. So now we're going to repeat that section between the asterix three times. So let's do that. We'll go back to the beginning of the instructions between our Asterix. So we're going to knit one. Here we go. And then we're going to do a KF be so front of the stitch. And then then into the back of the stitch. There we go. And then we'll work to two stitches before the next marker. So knit all of these stitches until we get to two stitches before this marker. And then we'll work a CFB and admit one. So now I'm almost near the second to last stitch for a hit my marker and here we go. Now I'm two stitches before my next marker, and I'm going to do a, F, B. So here we'll knit into the front and then we'll move into the back. Now here's a little tip. When you're doing your Kf be. So usually I'll go into the front this and then I'll kind of tug on thought stitch a little bit so that I have a little bit more room to go into the back. So here I'm going to tug it and then I'm gonna go into the back so that it's not so super tight. So here we go. There is my k, f, b, and we're going to knit one. And then I'm going to slip my marker. Here we go. And we wanted to do the same thing between the asterisk. So we're going to knit one and do a Ksp like that. And then we'll knit two stitches before our next stitch marker here. Now we're at two stitches before our marker and we're going to do another Ksp. Oops, there we go. And emit one. And we're going to slip our marker. All right, so we've done the instructions between our asterix three times, and now we're going to do a knit one. Here we go, Here's a knit one and a TASB. There we go. And 12 the front and there we go, one into the back. Perfect, So now we have just completed our row one and we have a stitch count. So for me I'm getting a small I need to have 58 my needle and count up how many stitches you have and make sure it corresponds to the size that you're knitting. So I'm going to count up to make sure that I've bought 58 stitches. And once you have the number of stitches that you need, then we can move on to row two. Now on row two, all we're gonna do is Perl. That's all there is to row two, pearl, all of our stitches. Now make sure that you slip your marker as new Perl. So once you've finished row 2, then we can move on to row three. 11. 11 Rows 3-4 and Staying Organised: Now we're onto row 3. So row 3 is very similar to row one. We're going to start with a KF be. So here we go. We're going to knit into the first stitch and then it into the back of that same stitch. And there we go. Now we've increased by one stitch. All right, so now we're going to MIT to two stitches before the next marker. Now if you notice, we're already at two stitches before our next marker, so we don't actually have to knit anything. So what we're gonna do is do another kf, be. Here we go, Ksp, and then we're going to knit one. Okay, here we go, knit one. And then we're going to slip the marker. All right, so now we've reached the asterix section of this row. And remember, everything in between the asterix is going to be repeated. So what we're gonna do is we're going to knit one and then do a Ksp. So here we go into the front, into the back, and then we're going to knit two stitches before our next marker. And then we're gonna do a KF B and a knit one. Sound familiar? Yeah, it's pretty much identical to row one. So let's do that. We'll get to two stitches before our next marker. And nope, three stitches. And here we go. Now we're at two stitches before our next marker. And we're going to do a KF be so Newton to the front and then knit into the back. And then we're going to knit one. And then slip or marker SM. Alright, so we're gonna do this again. We're gonna do this a total of three times. Okay? So here we go. Net one, kf, be. There we go. There is our TF B, and then knit until we reach two stitches before next marker. All right, so let's do that. Alright, so here I am two stitches before the marker, and I'm going to do a Ksp. Here we go, a knit one and an SM. Here we go. All right, and now we're back to the beginning of our repeat. We're gonna do a knit one and a KF. Be. There we go. And we're going to knit two stitches before our next marker. And here we are two stitches before our next marker. And we're gonna do a KF be whew, that was a tight one and a net one. Add an SM. Alright, so now we've finished the repeat three times and we're going to move on. So our pattern says we're going to do a K1, so a knit one, another kf, be, here we go, kf B, and we're going to do another kf be on our last stitch. So here we go. Okay, perfect. So now on this row we've just increased by ten stitches. All right, so let's move on to row four. Well four is just a pearl row. All right, that's pretty easy. Okay, So if we look at the next part of our pattern, it says that we need to repeat rows three to 45 times for me because I'm getting a size small, or 678 or nine times depending on the size that you're knitting. And it also gives you a stitch count of what you will end up with. So go ahead and repeat roast 3 and growth for the number of times that you need. And next I'm going to show you a little way that I keep track of how many rows I've knitted. So the way that I keep track of my repeats is by using a little post-it note and making a chart. So I'll show you what I do. Usually take my post-it note and put it right below where my repeats are. So in this case right over here. So what we need to do is repeat rows three to 45556789 more times. So for me I need to repeat it five more times. So what I'm gonna do is I'm going to draw a little chart. And I'm going to make two columns here. And one column represents row 3, and I'm going to write R3. And the next column represents row four. Now I need to knit rows three and rows for five more times. So I'm going to draw five rows. So here's one, and that represents one repeat. And here we go, 2345. Perfect. So once I finished row three, I'm going to just mark that down in my chart. And then when I knit row 4, I'm going to mark that down. And once I've done that, I know that I've done one repeat of rows three and rows four. And I would just keep going down and filling out my chart as I complete my rows three and my rows for. And once I filled out my whole chart, then I know that I've done my whole repeat. And that's just one way that I keep track of my repeats. And for this pattern there are a number of repeats. So keeping a chart like this is a good way to keep track volume repeats. If you've got another way, then you can definitely do it your way and feel free to share how you keep track of your repeats. Now this is the repeat for a size small, Let's see, small, extra small, and a medium. If you're knitting a large size, you'll need six repeats. So you would add in an extra row. And for the other sizes, you would also just continue to add the number of repeats that you need. All right, so that's just an easy way to keep track of your repeats. And once I'm done, once I fill up my whole chart, I'll just get rid of that post-it notes and then we can move on in the pattern. And of course we have a stitch count here. Once you've finished your repeat, you'll end up with these number of stitches. So make sure that once you've filled out your chart that you have the number of stitches that you need for your size here. Alright, so let's get cracking on those repeats of rows 34. So after working your repeats, your work is going to look something like this. So you can see that your sweater is starting to take shape. You can see that this is going to be the front of your sweater, and this is going to be the back of your sweater. And these areas here are going to be the shoulders, slashed sleeves of your sweater. Now if you're worried about this area and why is it looking like a V neck? Well, don't worry about that. Later on we're going to cast on more stitches in between these two areas so that the curve is going to be more gentle and less like this. Okay, so don't worry about the neck line. We're going to be casting on extra stitches here. But now you can see what the construction of your sweater really looks like. And I think that helps you as you are knitting. So now we're gonna move on to the next section of our pattern. So for sizes extra small to large, you're going to work to two stitches before the first marker. So you're going to knit to two stitches before your next marker sounds pretty familiar, right? So let's do that. We'll work two stitches before the next marker. And then we're going to do a KF be one. Then we're gonna slip our marker. So it's pretty much exactly what we've been doing, except we're not doing a KF be at the beginning of the row. All right, So here we go. We're at two stitches before the next marker, two stitches. Then we're just gonna do a KF B and a knit one and an SM. So we're gonna slip our marker. And now we hit the asterix portion of our pattern, which is our repeat. So now we're going to do a net one and a k, f, b. And we're going to knit 22 stitches before the next marker. So I am at two stitches before my next marker. And now I'm going to do a calf, be that into the front and then into the back. And we'll do a net one. And we'll slip our marker. So that's the end of our repeat. And we would do this again three more times. So we're going to knit one that through the front and through the back, and to choose stitches before our next marker. Then do a KFDA, k1, and slip that marker. All right, so you're used to this repeat by now, so I'll let you do this on your own until we reach the last repeat. Alright, so now I'm at the last two stitches and I'm gonna do a Ksp. Here we go, and a knit one and slip marker. And there we go. Now I've reached the end of my repeat, my third repeat. So the next part of our pattern says we're going to pay one, that one and do a KF be. And then we're just going to knit to the end of the row. All right, and that's pretty much all there is to this first row. Now if you take a look a few lines down your pattern, you'll see that for sizes one x to a3x, it says to work one right side row as above. So if you are knitting size one x, two x or a3x, then you would work this one right side row that we've just done, and that's it. Okay, so work this one right side row and that's all you're gonna do. So for sizes extra small to large, we have a couple more rows to work and we're gonna do that next. All right, so the next section of our pattern is to pull all of our stitches and this is a wrong side of our row. So go ahead and pull all of your stitches for this row. All right, So now I've just finished my wrong side row and I'm back on my right side. So let's move on in our pattern. Now our problem says that you need to repeat these two rows, 1, 1, 1, 0 times more. Then we're going to work the right side row once more. Now, this refers to size, extra, small, small and medium. So if you have any of these sides is, and you'll need to repeat to the right side row and the wrong side row, the two rows that we just worked one more time. And then you're going to work the right side row again. Now, for size large, you wouldn't do any of this, okay, You're done this section. And again, for sizes one exit a3x, you're only going to work 1, right side row, okay, So the right side row that we worked when we first started this section. All right, So once extra small to medium has done all their repeats, then we're all on the same page. 12. 12 Instructions for Multiple Sizes: So for sizes extra small to large, you're going to work to two stitches before the first marker. So you're going to knit to two stitches before your next marker sounds pretty familiar, right? So let's do that. We'll work two stitches before the next marker. And then we're gonna do a KF B and knit one. And we're going to slip our marker. So it's pretty much exactly what we've been doing, except we're not doing a KF be at the beginning of the row. All right, So here we go. We're at two stitches before the next marker, two stitches. Then we're just gonna do a KF B and a knit one and an SM. So we're gonna slip our marker. And now we hit the asterix portion of our pattern, which is our repeat. So now we're gonna do a net one and a KF B. And we're going to knit 22 stitches before the next marker. So I'm at two stitches before my next marker. And now I'm going to do a CASB that into the front and then into the back. And we'll do a net one. And we'll slip our marker. So that's the end of our repeat. And we would do this again three more times. So we're going to knit one that through the front and through the back, and to choose stitches before our next marker. Then do a KFDA, k1, and slip that marker. All right, so you're used to this repeat by now, so I'll let you do this on your own until we reach the last repeat. Alright, so now I'm at the last two stitches and I'm gonna do a Ksp. Here we go, and a knit one and slip marker. And there we go. Now I've reached the end of my repeat, my third repeat. So the next part of our pattern says we're going to pay one, that one and do a KF be. And then we're just going to knit to the end of the row. All right, and that's pretty much all there is to this first row. Now if you take a look few lines down your pattern, you'll see that for sizes one x to a3x, it says to work one right side row as above. So if you are knitting size one x, two x or a3x, then you would work this one right side row that we've just done, and that's it. Okay, so work this one right side row and that's all you're gonna do. So for size is extra small to large. We have a couple more rows to work and we're gonna do that next. All right, so the next section of our pattern is to Pearl all of our stitches. And this is a wrong side of our row. So go ahead and Pearl all of your stitches for this row. All right, So now I've just finished my wrong side row and I'm back on my right side. So let's move on in our pattern. And our product says that you need to repeat these two rows, 1, 1, 1, 0 times more. Then we're going to work the right side row once more. Now, this refers to size, extra, small, small and medium. So if you have any of these sides is, and you'll need to repeat the right side row and the wrong side row, the two rows that we just worked one more time. And then you're going to work the right side row again. Now for size large, you wouldn't do any of this, okay, You're done this section. And again, for sizes one x three x, you're only going to work 1, right side row, okay, So the right side row that we worked when we first started this section. All right, So once extra small to medium has done all their repeats, then we're all on the same page. All right, So now I'm nearing the end of my right side row, the row where I'm increasing by eight stitches. Here's my last stitch, and there we go. All right. Now if you look at your pattern, you'll notice that it says, after we work our right side row, we do not turn. Now what this means is that we're not going to turn our work over like this. And work are wrong side row. Instead we're just going to keep our right side row facing upwards, okay? So we're not turning over. Okay, so let's move on to the next part of our pattern. The next part of our pattern says cast on 10, 10, 10, 10, 12, 12, 12 stitches at the end of the row. So we're not turning over, remember? So we're going to start casting on these stitches right onto our needle right here. So I'm going to show you how to do that. Let's just get that out of the way here. Okay, So what we're gonna do is we will use our left hand and we'll make a gun just like this. Then we're going to go underneath, are working yarn and turn it to the left. Then we'll use our needle and pick up that loop on our finger, just like this, and then drop it onto the needle and pull down. So there we go. Now we've just cast on one stitch onto our needle. Now, depending on your size, you'll be casting on 10 or 12. Let's do that again. Will make a gun with our left-hand, go underneath the working yarn and turn our hand to the left. And now by doing that, we've made a loop on our finger, right? So we're going to use our needle and just pick that loop off of our finger. There we go. And then pull down. Okay, So there's two. And we'll continue doing this until we have the number of cast on stitches that we need. Now this method is called the backward loop cast on, and this is all there is to the backward loop cast on. Now you'll notice that sometimes, whoops, there we go. It's a little bit difficult to pick up that loop, right? You'll be going like this and it's like why didn't catch that loop? So when that happens, you can do a couple things. You can grab your working yarn so as you're turning your hand, you can grab it like that so that it stays in place. And when you pick up that loop, it's not going anywhere and then pull down like that. Okay, so let's show you how to do that again. Go underneath the working yarn, turn it to the left, grab that working yarn, right eye, my fingers are grabbing it so it stays in place. And then picking that loop off and then pulling it down in a nice fluid motion. Now how I do this is I will just grab my yarn like this, turn to the left and then pick up and continue doing this. So really, really quick. 13. 13 Joining in the Round: All right, so once we've cast on our stitches, we're ready to join in the round. So I'm going to configure my stitches so that my cast on stitches are in my right hand. And what we're gonna do is we're going to place our marker. So this is where our different colored marker comes in. I've got a pink marker here. All my other stitch markers are blue. This is my unique marker that's going to mark the beginning of the round. So what I'm gonna do is I'm going to PM, which means place marker. And then we're going to join in the round. Okay, So our pattern says that we are going to work as follows on round one, we're going to knit all of our stitches. So I'm going to use my right-hand needle and go into the stitch on my left hand. Okay. And then I'm just going to knit into it. Whoops, here we go. Then into it and, oops, make sure my marker isn't in the way. And I'm just going to pull tightly. And now I have joined my work in the round where knitting in the round now. Awesome. Okay, so for this row or for this round, excuse me, we're going to be knitting all of our stitches. Plain old knitting. So knit all the stitches on your needle. And then we'll move on to round two together. All right, so now I'm near the end of my first round. Here's my last stitch, and there we go. Cool. So now I've just finished my round one and I'm going to move my stitch marker over to my right needle so that we can start working around two. So on Round 2 we're going to knit 22 stitches before our first marker. And then we're going to do a very familiar kf be knit one increase that we've been doing all along. Almost there. Here we go. Alright, so now we're at two stitches before my next marker. And I'm going to do our familiar kf be, that should be familiar old friend by now. Here's our KF B and a knit one. Then I'm going to do an SM. Here we go. And now we've reached the beginning of our repeat. So we're going to do a net one and a KF B. And we're going to work to choose stitches before our next marker. And we're gonna do a KFC and emit one. And we're going to do that repeats three times. So let's work those three repeats and finish off round two. So I'm near the end of my third repeat on Round 2, and I've just slipped my marker. And I'm going to do knit one. And Kf beam. Here we go. And then we're just going to knit to the end of the round. And we've increased eight stitches on this round. Now our pattern says we need to repeat these two rounds, Rounds 1 and 2, 7, 9, 13, 15, 17, 17, 18 more times depending on your size, of course. So we're gonna go right back to our charts to help us keep track of these repeats. So I've just made charts for each size because I feel like being nice today. So here we go. Here's size extra small. You can make a chart like this to help you keep track of your repeats. Here's round 1 and round 2. So I put a little plus sign beside round to so that you remember that round two is the round when you increase, alright, so you can fill up this chart for your extra small and know that you've done the number of repeats that you need. So here's the chart for size small. And you could always go ahead and just copy this chart for yourself onto your own little post-it note. And here, size medium, you're doing 13 repeats for size medium. And size large, you're doing 15 repeats. And of course here is size X1, 17 repeats, and x2 also has 17 repeats. Here we go. Lastly, size X3, which has 18 repeats. Alright, so continue repeating rounds 12, the number of times that you need for your size. And at the end, makes sure to check that you have the same stitch count for your size as our pattern indicates. All right, so continue to repeat rounds one and browns too. And I'll meet you back here and we'll work the next part of our pattern together. 14. 14a Splitting the Sleeves: So after your repeats, your work will look something like this. You can really start to see the neck line taking shape now, right? You can see that this is the front of the sweater where you have your crew neck. And if it looks really big and a bit to gaping, that's okay because remember we're going to pick up stitches around the neck line. And we're going to knit a ribbing which is going to be about yay high. So don't worry if this looks really big, we're going to make it quite a bit smaller later on with our color ribbon. All right, so once you've finished your repeats and you've counted all of your stitches and they match up with the stitch count for your size, then we're ready to move on. So the next part of our pattern says that we're going to knit and 10, 11, 11, one round even. Now, all that means is that if you're knitting an extra small or a small unit, ten rounds, not increasing or decreasing, just even. And if you're working any of the other sizes, a medium to a a3x, then you'll just knit one round even. All right, so let's do that. Let's work the number of rounds that we need for our size. And then we can finally move on to the body. All right, so now let's move on to the body section of our pattern. Now for this part, you're going to need your scrap yarn and also your tapestry needle. Okay, so let's get started. We're going to mix flips. Here's my last round here. Okay, So we're going to knit to the first stitch marker. So let's do that together will knit over to our first stitch marker. So now I'm at my first stitch marker. Here we go. Alright, so what we're gonna do is take the stitch marker right off of our needle and we're just going to set it down. So now we're going to take our scrap yarn and here's mine right here. And I'm going to thread it up onto my tapestry needle. And then we're going to use this to put all of the stitches between my first stitch marker and my second stitch marker onto this scrap yarn with the help of my tapestry needle. So let's do that. I'm going to take my tapestry needle and go into all of these stitches. And once they're on my scrap yarn, I can just drop them off my needle. So here we go. I've transferred my sketch Marker onto my scrap yarn here. So let's do that. We're going to transfer all of these stitches until we get between our first stitch marker, which was right here, and our second stitch marker, which is right here. So let's go, let's just move all of these guys off of our needle and onto the scrap yard. There we go. Let's see how quickly we can do this. Just sort of pushing all of them off, kind of like a train. They're getting off the needle train and onto the scrap yarn train. Here we go. Oh, and here's our last guy. Can offer needle trade. Okay, so now I'm going to pull my yarn through just to make sure that all the stitches are really on my scrap yarn and they aren't perfect. So now I'm just going to cut my scrap yarn off and I'm going to pull the end of my scrap yarn through so that I can take my needle off. Okay. So now I can take my needle off of my scrap yarn and all of my stitches. So these are my sleeve stitches are often needle. Okay, so let's move on in our pattern. 15. 14b Splitting the Sleeves Cont.: So what we're gonna do next is cast on some stitches. So I'm going to take my second stitch marker off and just place it here. And let's see where my yarn is. Here's my working yarn. And what we're gonna do is cast on some stitches and we're going to use the backward loop cast on it. So for me, I'm going to be casting on four stitches for a size small. And depending on your size, you'll be casting on either 6, 8, 10, or 12 stitches or four stitches. All right, so let's do that. We did this for our neck line, so we're gonna do it again. You can make a gun go underneath your yarn, turn it to the left and pick up that loop on your finger, drop it onto your needle, pull down. So that's the backward cast on. So there's my first cast on stitch and I'm going to cast on three more, 234 stitches. So I need to cast on four stitches. And then I'm going to remove my second stitch marker which I've done, and then we're going to MIT to the third stitch marker. So I'm going to insert my right needle into the first stitch on my left needle and I'm going to knit. Okay. So we're just going to net and make sure when you do your first stitch you're going to pull tightly okay. Because you don't want a big gap in there. And I'm just going to knit over to my third stitch marker, which is all the way to do that. Did it to do all the way over here. Okay. So go ahead and cast on the number of stitches that you need. And these cast on stitches are going to sit on the underarm because when you move around in your sweater, under I'm sleet area gets a lot of movement and that's why we want to cast on some extra stitches. Okay. So cast on your stitches and then over to the third marker and meet me there and we will continue on. Okay, so here is my third stitch marker on. Get up that last stitch, and here we go. Alright, so now we're going to take our third stitch marker, offer needle and just set it aside. And we're going to take up our scrap yarn. And I've already threaded up my needle with my scrap yarn. And we're going to transfer all the stitches between the third stitch marker and the fourth stitch marker over here. All these stitches we're going to put onto our scrap yarn. So let's go, let's move all these stitches from the needle train to the scrap yarn trains that what we called it. We're going to move all these stitches off when to our scrap yards and here we go. They are already morning and there's a bit of congestion, so I'm just going to push these guys, scrunch them up so that I can quickly move them off. Now you don't want to go so quickly that one of yours to just falls off the train if we keep going with this tree metaphor. So just make sure that you've got every sketch on there and I'm quickly, but if you want, you can go one at a time like this, right. Just to make sure that they're all safely on your scrap yard. And that's our last stitch. Perfect. So now I'm just going to take this fourth stitch marker off, lay it down, and I'm going to pull my scrap yarn through so I have a nice long tail. And then I'm going to spread out my stitches evenly on this yarn. And then I'm going to just cut it off, cut off that scrap yarn and unthreaded my tapestry needle. Perfect. So now all of my sleeves stitches are off my needle and on the scrap yard. Okay, Let's keep moving on in our pattern. So the next part of our pattern, we're going to be casting on a number of stitches. Again. Now the number of stitches that you cast on is exactly the same as the number of stitches that you first cast on. So I'm going to look at my pattern and I'm going to be casting on four stitches. So we're going to use the backward loop method again. So here we go. And I'm going to cast on four stitches for myself. Great. And then we are going to join in the round and knit to the very end. So here I'm going to, let's get that out of the way there. I'm going to insert my needle into the first stitch on my left needle. That guy and I'm just going to tell you about it so that there's not a big gap there. And I'm gonna continue knitting until I get to the end of the round. So Doo-doo-doo-doo, all the way over here. Okay. And once we do that, we will count up our stitches to make sure that it matches the stitch count that we need for our size. All right, so once you've separated your sleeves from your body, your work will look like this. Pretty cool, right? It's really starting to look like a sweater. You can see that the stitches that we put on our scrap yarn are our sleeves. Right here. You've got two of them. And the stitches that are still on your circular needle or the stitches for your body. So and take a look at the pattern. We have a stitch count for both the body and the sleeves. So count up the number of cities you have on your body and make sure that corresponds to the size that you're knitting in the pattern. And then count up the stitches and got on your sleeves and make sure that that also corresponds to the sleeves stitches in your counter and you should have the same number of stitches on BOC sleeps. All right, so once your stitch count matches your pattern, then you can move on to the next part of our pattern, which is just plain old stock and that stitch all the way to the hem of your body. 16. 15 Knitting the Body: So I've counted my body stitches and my sleeve stitches and my stitch count matches the size for my pattern. Now the next part of our pattern says that we need to knit in stock and that stitch until the body in measures 11.5 or 12 inches from the underarm. Now, what this means is that you're going to have a really relaxing time knitting because you're just getting stuck in it. Stitch around and around in the body. Now, the under arm is this portion of your sweaters. So maybe let's look at the other under arm here. Here we go. So the underarm is the area where you cast on your stitches. Okay. So you would measure from this point onwards, That's your starting point for measuring. Alright, so you would work until your body measures 11.5 or 12 inches, or 2.5 inches less than your desired length. Now, the cool thing about this is that as you knit your body, you can actually try on your sweater. So you can actually stick your head through your color right here, put your arms through the sleeves, and just put on the sweater and see how long it is, whether you like the length and you can adjust the length in that way. Of course, if you can't put your bodies through the circular needles, you can always put these stitches on scrap yarn like we did for our sleeves stitches and then try it on. It's a really fun way to see how your sweater is progressing right on your own body. It's really cool. So go ahead and work stuck in it, stitch in the round. All right, so now I've met a lot of stock in it stitch, as you can see from my underarm all the way down. So now I'm going to take out my measuring tape and we're going to start measuring. So I'm going to measure right from where I ended my work down here. And I'll measure all the way up to my underarm, which is right over here. So I have 11.5 inches perfectly. And that's the I need for my size small. So now I can move on to knit the two-by-two routing. So now we're going to knit the two-by-two rib. So I'm going to use my smaller circular needles for this. And this needle here is five millimeters. So for this, I'm going to take off my stitch marker right here. And we'll put that back when we're finished our first round. But right now we're going to transfer the stitches on our larger circular needle onto our smaller circular needle. So let's were our two-by-two ribs. So what I'm gonna do is use my new circular needle and go into the stitch on my left needle. And then I'm going to knit two. So two by two ribbons just knitting two and purlin to. So I've just knit two and it might be a little hard to see because the needle is gray and so as the yarn, but I've got two knit stitches on my needle. Then I'm going to bring my working or enough front and we'll Perl to there we go. So that is all there is to be two-by-two. Rip your knitting two and pearly to that's the repeat. So we're gonna go back and do that too. And a pearl too. So I'm emitting my stitches off of my larger needle onto my smaller needle. That's essentially what I'm doing. Continued knit two and Perl tube. So once you reach the end of your round, so you're going all the way around. And once you have all your stitches onto the smaller needle, then you can put your stitch marker back onto your needle and set your larger needles aside. So now I'm almost at the end of my round, just got a few more stitches. And here we go. My last two stitches. Cool. So now all of my stitches are off of my larger needles and onto my smaller needles here. Great. So now I'm gonna take my stitch marker and put it back onto my needle because this marks the beginning of our route. All right, so go on ahead and continue knitting two-by-two rib, doing a knit two and a pearl two on every round until your work measures 2.5 inches. So once your two-by-two ribbing measures 2.5 inches, then you're ready to cast off. So let's measure my ribbing here. And Yup, it does measure 2.5 inches. Perfect. So I'll set my tape measure aside and now we're going to cast off loosely. Now let me just finish off these last two stitches on my row. Here we go. Great. Now, in order to cast off loosely, you can use a looser hand when you're holding your yarn, which is what I tend to do. Or if you tend to be a really tight-knit or what you can do is re-introduce your six millimeter needle. So right now you're using your smaller needles to knit up your rib. So when you're casting off, you can use a larger needle to force a looser cast-off. So I'll show you how to do that. We're just going to take off our stitch marker and start casting off with our larger needle. Here we go. I'm just going to knit 12 and I'm using my larger needles here. And I'll take my left needle, go underneath that first stitch and pull it over. So we're doing a regular cast-off, but we're going to cast off in pattern. So what this means is that when we get to our two pearl stitches, we're going to pull those. So here we go. I'm going to Perl one. Okay. And then bring my first stitch over, the second stitch just like that. Okay. So we're casting off in pattern. We're keeping the stitch pattern that we've been using, which in our case is a two-by-two grid. So here we go and knitting that stitch, bringing my first stitch over my second. And I'm also keeping that two-by-two ribbed pattern. Here we go. So here's a pearl stage. So I'm going to pull that and then bring my first stitch over my second. Okay. And because I'm using my larger needles, my six millimeter needles to knit. This guy here that will force my cast-off to be looser. So the reason why you want your cast-off edge to be stretchy is because your two-by-two rib is very stretchy as you can see. So if your cast-off edge is not stretchy, then when we stretch the rib, it's going to be kind of constricted, right? It won't allow the rib to stretch. So that's why you want your cast-off edge to be nice and loose so that it can stretch alongside the fabric. So continue casting off in pattern until you get to your last stitch. So I'm almost done casting off here. Here's my last stitch. And let's pearl that guy and move my first stitch over it. Cool. So now I've got one stitch left on my needle. So I'm going to take out my scissors and I'm going to leave about 10 or 12 inches and then snip it off. Great. So I'm going to take this strand of yarn that I just cut off, wrap it around my needle, and then take the stitch that's on my needle and drag it over that strand of yarn and then pull through. So now I've just made a nice tight, not very secure. And my hem is complete. Well, almost complete. We're going to weave in this little end here because we don't want just a strand of yarn hanging out. That's no good. So I'm going to get my needles out of the way here. Let's push that out of the way and take out my tapestry needle. So now I'm going to thread this strand of yarn onto my tapestry needle like this. And then I'm going to go into the stitch right here. Just like that and we'll kind of close up that gap. That looks pretty good, right? So I'm going to turn my work to the inside. So this is the wrong side of the work. And then I'm just going to hide this yarn string inside my work and it's a good idea to hide your yarn strands inside the pearl bumps. Those are nice places to camouflage that yarn strands. Here we go. I'm just going to go in maybe four or five times in these little girl bumps, right? We just want to do it as inconspicuously as possible. And maybe we'll go down this guy. Great. All right, so that looks pretty good to me. It's pretty invisible. So I'm going to take out my scissors and then just cut off that yarn strand. Perfect. So now my hem is complete, looks pretty good, right? 17. 16a Shaping the Sleeves: So now we're ready to work the sleeve of our sweater. So what we're gonna do is take out our double pointed needles and divide all of our sleeves stitches evenly over three needles. Now if you look at the third page of your pattern, you'll have a stitch count for the number of sleep stitches you should have for your size. Now for me, I've got 50 stitches on my sleeve because I'm getting a size small. Now, 50 doesn't divide evenly into three, but roughly, I would have 17 stitches on one needle, 17 stitches on my second needle, and 16 stitches on my third needle, and that equals 50 stitches. So I'm going to start transferring my sleeves stitches onto my double pointer needle. So here I go. I'm going to start transferring some of these sleeves stitches onto my double pointed needles. So here's my first stitch that I've got on and my second stitch, my third stitch, my fourth, fifth. So I'm just going to pick up the stitches off from my scrap yarn. And when I've got 17 stitches, then I'll move on to my second needle. So here we go. I'm not really keeping count right now and just sort of eyeballing it a little bit. So let's see how many we've got 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 13. All right. We've got a couple more to go. 13, 14, 15, 16, and 17. Great. So when I've got 17 stitches on my first needle, so I'm just going to push that needle in. And I'm gonna take my second needle and use not to pick up 17 more stitches. Here we go, 123. So go ahead and pick up your sleeves stitches onto double pointed needle, spreading them evenly or as evenly as you can across your three double pointed needles. And here we go. I think I've got 16 stitches on my second needle. Let's see, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, and 16. And I think I need it Seventeen, right. So let's pick up one more 17. Look, see, there we go. 17, great. Now I'm going to take my third ETL. Here we go and pick up the rest of my stitches that are on my sleeve. Now, I've almost picked up all my stitches, but when I get to the last two stitches, they kind of disappear a little bit. If you look carefully, it's hard to see where those stitches are. Now what you can do is pull really tightly on your scrap yarn. And now you can see that there are two stitches that are still on your strand of yarn. So you can use your double pointed needle and pick out those two stitches. Sometimes the stitches can get a little bit lost in the scrap yarn. So a good way to find them is just to pull upwards a little bit with your scrap yarn. And then you can see your stitch will appear. So here we go. I'm going to get that last stitch. I'm just going to pull on my yarn a bit, scrap yarn and there it is. There it is. And I'm going to just pick that out. Great. So now let's push my double pointed needle through all these stitches so they're securely on and kind of twisting and twisting my double pointer needle on and now all of my stitches are on my double pointed needles. So let's count them just to make sure. To 46, 10, 12, 14, 16, and 18, 20, 22, 24, 26, 28, 30, 32, 34, 36, 38, 40, 40 to forty four, forty six, forty, eight and fifty. Perfect. So those are the exact numbers that I need for my sleep stitches for my size. All right, so now let's move on. What we're gonna do next is pick up some stitches from our cast on edge. So here you go. You can see that in this area right here, this is where we cast on extra stitches, right? For our underarm. So we don't want to just join our stitches in the round right now because if we did that you would get a bit. Let's see if you can't get a good view of that. If we just joined our stitches in the round, you'd have this big gaping hole. You can see that, right? So we don't want that. So instead what we're gonna do is pick up some stitches along the cast on edge. But first let's get rid of this scrap yarn that we've got this pink scrap yarn. Once you've picked up all of your sleeves stitches onto your double pointed needle, then you can get rid of the scrap yarn. So what I'm gonna do is just take my scissors and cut into the scrap yarn where the double pointed needles join and be careful, really careful not to cut your yarn. And here we go. Okay, so now I've just cut off and scrap yard and I can pull it through like that and just get rid of it. There we go. And where's my last one over here? Perfect. So now no more scrap yarn messing up on our double pointed needles. So we're going to re-introduce our yarn at this point. So I've got my yarn right here. And for my size, size small, I need to pick up a knit for stitches. Now, depending on your size, you'll either be picking up admitting 4, 6, 8, 10, or 12. Okay. So I'm going to get started and I'm going to go into one of these cast on stitches. So here I'm going to choose this one stitch here. And you will evenly distributed the stitches across your work. So I'm gonna take my yarn, my working yarn, and just wrap it around my needle. And I'm going to leave a pretty lengthy tail okay. Because I don't want my stitches to get loose and I'm going to knit into that stitch on my cast on edge. So I need to pick up a knit for stitches. So I'm going to pick up my next stitch over here right beside it. And I'm just going to use my working yarn to knit into that. And I'm going to continue across. And I think this one looks like a good looks no, here we go. This is going to be my third stitch. And this one right beside it is going to be my fourth stitch. So I'm going to knit into that cast on edge. Great. So now I've picked up and knit for stitches across my cast on area, my underarm area. All right. Now it says that we're going to mark the beginning of our round. So I'm going to take my stitch marker. And it says that we're going to put our stitch marker in the center of our picked up stitches. So I've got four stitches. And the center of that is right here. So I'm going to have two stitches on each side of my stitch marker. So there we go. Now I've just put on my stitch marker, and this marks the beginning of the round. Now if you have picked up six stitches, then you'll have three stitches on either side of the stitch marker. If you picked up eight, then you'll have four on each side of the stitch marker, 10 and you'll have 512 sketches and you will have six digits on each side of the stitch marker. All right, so now we're going to knit one round even. So what I'm gonna do is take up my working yarn here we go, and just knit. We're going to knit one round even. So we're just going to knit across all the sleeves, stitches. 18. 16b Shaping the Sleeves Cont.: So now let's work some decreases. Now these are unique decreases, meaning that we work them once and then never again. So they're not decreases that we repeat again and again. Now each size has its own decrease round. So let's look at size small together. Now, size small, it says we're going to knit seven and then knit two together. And we're gonna do that six times. And by the end of that round we're going to end up with 48 stitches. Now, I've charted out this round for you so you can visualize what these instructions mean. Now, all it means is that we're going to net seven stitches and then do a knit two together. So I've illustrated a knit two together with this minus sign because when we knit two together we decrease one stitch. So basically one cell represents one knit stitch. Now if you want as unit this round, you can mark off individually every knit stitch as you emit it, but that's a little bit cumbersome. So what I would recommend is that you can mark off every repeat that you do. So after knitting seven stitches and getting two together, you can just kinda cross out that whole repeat. Okay, and then seven that two together and cross out that second repeat. So that's all that size small consists of knitting, knitting two together and repeating that six times. So that's why I've got six little charts here to represent the six repeats that you're going to do. Now. So I small is relatively straightforward. Size medium may look a little bit more complicated. Now, for size medium, you're going to do a knit five and a knit two together two times. Then you're going to do a NIT Four and two together three times. And then you're going to repeat all of the instructions a total of two times. So yes, it sounds a little bit confusing, but I've charted it out for you again just to illustrate this visually. So what you'll do is you'll knit five, okay? And then you're going to knit two together. Then you're going to do that Unit 5 and knit two together. Then you'll move on and do a NIT Four and two together. Another knit for knit two together. You get for knit two together. So you can see you're going to do the first bring pete of knit five, knit two together, two times. And that's illustrated by this little chart that's repeated twice. Then you'll do the knit for knit two together three times. And that's why we have 123 of these repeats here. Now once you've completed this whole chart, you'll go back to the beginning. Then do five, knit two together and it five knit two together, knit for knit two together for knit together for knit two together. Because you're going to do these instructions a total of two types. And once you're done that round, you'll have 54 stitches, right? So that's your size medium decrease. So I hope that charting this out has made it a little bit easier for you to understand what these instructions mean. And again, of course, you don't need to mark off every knit stitch that you do. You can just mark off one repeat and one repeat it. Okay? Now, I'm gonna go over one more size, which is size large. Now for size large, our instructions say that you're going to knit for, then knit two together. And then you're going to knit five and knit two together four times. And do that a total of two times. You'll end up with 58 stitches at the end of your round. Now here I've charted that out. Here. You're going to knit for knit two together, okay, So you just do that once and then you're going to knit five, knit two together, knit five knit today either knit five, knit two together, five knit two together, right? So you're doing that four times and that's why I've got four repeats here. And once you've finished repeating this, then you'll go back to the beginning and do a knit for knit two together. Yet two together, 52 together, five to the other 52 together, right? So you're doing this whole thing a total of two times. Now I'm not going to go through our size extra small or one x2, x2 and x3 x because those are variations on the size large and the size medium. So go through your size and you can chart out your instructions just like this. Or you can repeat to yourself as unit, that's not the most reliable way to go about it. I personally like charting a bit better. But if you feel comfortable just repeating the instructions to yourself as unit, that's fine as well. Just make sure that by the end of your round, you have the number of stitches needed for your site. 19. 17a Decreasing the Sleeves: So now I'm on my last repeat of knit 7. Let two together are my size small? So here's my knit seven. And now I'm going to move over, whoop, C, move over to do my last knit two together. So here we go. Now, this is true for all knitting with double pointed needles. When you move on to a new needle, you want to be sure to pull really tightly. So here I am, I'm doing my last knit two together. And here's my join between my two needles. So I just want to pull tight so that there isn't a big gap that appears. Alright, so now I've finished my decrease round. Alright, so now we can move on to the next section of our pattern. Now, before we do, I just want to talk a little bit about the stitches on your needle. It doesn't really matter how many stitches you have on each needle. You just need to make sure that the stitches stay on your needle and that you're comfortable working with them. So I don't really like that. This stitch marker is just on its own over here. So what I'm gonna do is I'm just going to take my stitch marker off. It's going to have to remember that the beginning of my round is right here. It's right where these two needles separate. Okay. So I also noticed that on this needle there are a lot of extra stitches and that's because this needle is holding some of our key on stitches or the stitches that we picked up and knit on our cast on edge. So I'm going to distribute some of these stitches onto this needle up here which has less stitches. So again, it doesn't matter how many stitches you have on each needle. It matters that your stitches are secure. So you can have as many stitches as you want on your needle as long as they're on your needle. Okay, so now this feels a little bit more balanced to me. And anytime you feel like there's a lot of stitches crowding your needle, you can just redistribute your stitches on your needles until you feel comfortable. All right, so now that we've finished our decrease round, we can move on to the next section of our pattern, which is more decreases. Alright, so now we're on to the next section of our pattern. We're going to be decreasing at a steady rate on our sleeve. Now this section looks a little bit confusing, so I'm going to go through each size and showing the chart that I've made for each size. So that you could decrease in a way that's really organize. Alright, so let's go through this section together for an extra small, what you need to do is you're going to be knitting two stitches together on each side of the marker every 12th round six times. And by the end of all of these decreases, you'll end up with 32 stitches. So basically what you would do for an extra small is to knit 11 rounds even. Okay, so just net 11 rounds and stock enough stitch at on your 12th round. You would start off that round by knitting two together. Knitting your whole round until you get to two stitches before your marker and getting those two stitches together. And that would be your decreased round. And he would do that six times. Net 11 rounds even. Start off your 12th round by knitting two together, that your whole round to the last two stitches and knit those two stitches together. Okay, so you would do that repeat six times. Alright, so that's quite a lot of knitting as you can see. And each cell represents one round. And by the end of that you should have 32 stitches. All right, so that's size extra small. Let's move on to size small. So for size small, you're going to knit two together on each side of the marker every 13th round, 6 times for a total of 36 stitches. So what that means is that you'll knit 12 rounds even knitting in stock and have stitch. And on your 13th round, you'll start off that round by knitting two together. Knitting your whole round until you get to the last two stitches of that round and knitting those two stitches together. So in that way you can see that you've got tomb that two together is on either side of your marker. You're starting and ending your round within that two together. And you'll do that again six times. So you'll get 12 rounds, even on your 13th round, knit two together and that the whole round until you get to the last two stitches, knit those two stitches together. Okay, So this is a way for you to chart out that decrease for size small. And of course, feel free to cribbed these charts for yourself. Alright, so size, medium, you're going to knit two together on each side of the marker every eighth round, 6 times. Then you're going to do that every ninth round three times. Okay? So what that means is that you will be knitting seven rounds even. And then on your eighth round, you're going to knit two together. Your whole round, last two stitches, knit those two switches together. Okay, so that's going to be your decrease round. And I've represented the decrease round with a subtraction sign. Okay, so you'll do that six times seven rounds, even eighth round is your decrease round, okay, You'll do that six times. And then you're going to do your decrease every ninth round three times. So here we go. I've got that down here. The second part, down here, you're going to knit eight realms even. And on your ninth round you're gonna do your decrease. So you're gonna start your round by knitting two together and getting that whole round when you get to the last two stitches and then letting those two stitches together. Okay. And they'll do that again. You'll go eight rounds. Even on the ninth round, you'll do your decrease. You'll do that three times eight rounds, even ninth round decrease. And by the end of that you should have 36 stitches for your size medium. Okay, So let's go on to size large. So on size large, you'll need a two together on each side of your marker every eighth round 6 times, then every sixth round, five times, okay, so you'll net seven rounds. Even on your eighth round, you'll do your decrease. And the decrease is the same for every size. You'll start that round knitting two together, that your whole round until you get to the last Tuesday. And those two stitches together. And that will complete your decrease round. Okay? So you'll get seven rounds, even eighth round is decreased round seven rounds, even a frown is decreased round. And you'll do that a total of six times. And then you'll move on to do your decrease round every sixth round. So you'll knit five rounds even on your sixth round, you'll do a decrease. Five rounds, even six round is decrease. And you'll do that 12345 times. And by the end of that you'll have 36 digits. 20. 17b Decreasing the Sleeves Cont.: All right, so let's breeze through the unsized 1 x. You're going to knit two together on each side of the marker every sixth round, 13 times. So that's pretty straightforward. Net five rounds, even on your sixth round, you'll do your decreased round, starting around by knitting two together, getting your whole round till you get to the last two stitches and knitting those two stitches together. That's her decrease round. So net 5, 6 round is a decrease round and you'll do the same thing 13 times, okay? So two x, you'll work your decreased round every fifth round ten times, then every sixth round five times. So here we go. You're going to knit for rounds even. And on your fifth round, you're gonna do your decrease round, right? So you'll start off that round knitting 2D other knitting all the way around until you get to the last two stitches and meeting those two stitches together, That's her decrease round. So four rounds, even the fifth round is a decreased round. And you will do that ten times, right? And then you'll do your decrease round every sixth round, five times. So you'll knit five rounds even. And then you'll do your decrease round on the sixth round, five rows, even six round is a decrease round. And you'll do that 12345 times for a total of 40 stitches. All right, our last size here is our a3x. So on are three exile. You're going to knit two together on each side of the marker every fourth round ten times, then every fifth round eight times. So that means you're going to knit three rounds even. And on your fourth round, you'll do your decrease. Three rounds even fourth round is your decrease. And you'll do that ten times, okay? And then you'll do your decrease every fifth round eight times. So that means you'll knit four rounds even. And then on your fifth round, you'll do your decrease round. Okay, four rounds, even fifth round is the decrease. And you'll do that a total of eight times and by the end of that, 40 stitches. All right, so I hope you have a better understanding of how to work out the sleeve decreases and I'll show you how to work that decrease round next. So how you knit two together on either side of your marker is basically, you're going to start your round by knitting two together. So here I've got two stitches and I'm just going to knit them together like this. I'm going to pull tightly every time I start a new stitch on a needle. So I don't want a gap forming. And then I'm just going to knit all the way across my whole round until I get to two stitches before my stitch marker or before the end of my round. And then I'm going to knit those last two stitches together. Alright, so now I'm near the end of my round. I'm two stitches before the end of my Round 12. And now I'm going to knit these last two stitches together. And so that is how you knit two together on each side of your marker. So again, I don't have my marker here, but I know that this is the beginning and end of my round between these two needles. So basically I have a knit two together here and a net two together here. So knit two togethers are bracketing the beginning and end round. Alright, so that is how you work that decrease round. All right, So now I've just finished my sleeve decreases and you can see that my sleeve goes from really wide up here, then narrower and narrower down, tapers inwards right up to the wrist. And you can see that that's made by the decreases at our underarm. So once you've finished your decreased repeats, then you'll knit in plain old stock and add stitch until your sleeve measures 14.51514 or 15.5 inches or 2.5 inches less than your total desired length. So let's see right now my sleeve measures and measure this out about 13.513 inches. So I can knit for about one inch more. But I actually recommend that you try on your sweater at this point. So just pop your head into the sweater, put your arms through the sleeve and see where the sleeve hits and whether you like it. That's the best way to determine the best length for your sleeve is to try it on. Alright, so go ahead and knit in plain old stock in it. Stitch until your sleeve measures the length that you need for your size or 2.5 inches less than your total desired length. 21. 18 Finishing the Sleeves and Underarms: So now I've knit up my sleeve to 15 inches in length from the top of my sleeve all the way to the underarm. And even though I'm getting a size small, I've decided to knit a 15 inch leave because my arms tend to be a bit longer and when I tried it on my sweater, I liked the longer length. Okay, So now we're ready to switch our stitches onto our smaller double pointed needles. So we are two-by-two rib. So I'm at the beginning of my round here. And I'm going to knit in 2-by-2 rib using my smaller double pointed needles. So this is my smaller double pointed needle. And I'm just going to knit these stitches off of my larger needles onto my smaller double pointed needles. That's how I'm going to transfer them. So transfer all of your stitches off of your larger double pointed needles onto your smaller ones. And continue knitting two-by-two rib until your rib measures 2.5 inches. So once you are read measures 2.5 inches, then we're ready to cast off. Now, you want to cast off in pattern and you also want to cast off loosely. So you can use your larger double pointed needles to help you cast off loosely. So these are my six millimeter needles and I'm going to use these to cast off. Now we want to cast off in pattern. So I'm going to knit two and bring my first stitch over my second and then Perl one. So I'm keeping the two-by-two rib pattern as I cast off, I'm curling my second stitch here. And there we go. So continue casting off all your stitches for your rhythm. Here. Last stitch, here we go. So now I've got one stitch left and I'm going to take out my scissors and leave a nice long tale, about 10 inches or so. Here we go. And I'm going to take my tail end and go over my needle like this. And then I'm gonna take my stitch and go over that strand of yarn and then pull it through. Okay, cool. So now my sleeve is off the needles. Pretty awesome right? Now if you're worried about this ribbing, maybe being a little bit too bunched up. Don't worry, when we block our sweater, you can make your rib lay nice and flat, however flat you want it. Okay, so now we've got this yarn strand hanging out here. So we're going to take our tapestry needle and thread it up with this parent strand. Here we go. And then we're just going to weave in this end. So I'm going to weave it in, into the back of the work. So you can see there's a bit of a gap here, right? So I'm just going to go into the other side of that gap so I can close it up. Now it looks nice and neat, right? And we're gonna do the same thing that we did with the rib on our body. So I'm going to hide this yarn strand in the perl stitches. Curls are great places to weave in your ends. And then you'll go into maybe five or six stitches is probably good. And that looks nice. Pretty good. All right. Pretty camouflaged. You just want to make sure this is secure. Alright, so now I'm going to take my scissors and just snip that write-off. Great. So now you've just completed one sleeves. Awesome. I can't wait to wear the sweater. I'm just going to pretend see what my sleeve looks like with my hand in it. Okay, So now you're gonna do the exact same thing on your other sleeves. So you've completed one sleeve and we're going to move on to this sleep the second sleeves. Alright, so you'll go back, transfer all of these stitches onto your double pointed needles, pickup stitches at the under arm and then another sleeves. So after you've knit your two sleeves than you are almost done your sweater or can you believe it? Next, we're going to cover how to seem up the arm hole area. So after knitting your sleeve, you might notice that there's a little hole that appears in the underarm area and that's totally normal. It's likely to happen and there's a pretty easy fix to it. Now if you look at the inside of your sweater, you'll see that there is a strand of yarn, right? And this is the strand of yarn that we used when we joined a new ball of yarn to work the sleeve. So we're going to thread up this little strand of yarn with our tapestry needle. And we're going to weave in the strand of yarn into our underarm area in a way that closes up that little hole. So my yarn is threaded up and I'm just going to go and pull it a little bit and to see where that thread leaves. So that's right here. I can see my whole is kind of adjacent to where my thread is. So I'm going to pop my thread of yarn through. And I'm going to thread it through the stitches here to try and close up that little gap. I don't want to pull too tightly or else the stitches will kind of bunch up. But I just want to keep the same tension that my sweaters minute at. So here I'm going to go into this stitch here. There we go. And then I'm going to go into this stitch here. There we go. So now you can see that I've kind of closed up that gap a little bit, right? There's still a little bit of a hole, but I can continue to weave in this strand of yarn strategically so that I can close up that hole. And because our whole is in our underarm, not a lot of people are going to see it, right? So it's okay if it's a little bit sloppy or a little bit, you know, it doesn't look too neat because it isn't the under arm. Okay. So I think I'm pretty happy with the way that my whole has closed up here. It's looking pretty good. So now I'm going to push my needle into the wrong side of my work. So I'm going to pull that needle through. There we go looking pretty good. And I'm going to turn my work inside out. And now I'm going to weave this strand of yarn into the pearl side or into the wrong side of my work. Then it's made up entirely of Perl stitches, which is great. So I can camouflage this strand of yarn into these pearl stitches. All right, so I've woven in my yarn thread and now I'm going to use my pair of scissors and just snip that off. Perfect. So now I've closed up that hole in my underarm and I can do the same thing on the other underarm if there is a hole. So go ahead and do that weave in the ends in your underarm area. And next we're going to work on the color of our sweater. 22. 19a Knitting a Neat Neckline: So now we can work the neck band, also known as the color of our sweater. So if you look at your pattern, it says we're going to pick up a niche, a bunch of stitches in certain areas of our color. So it's a good idea to get your stitch markers out to help you mark off these areas. So let's start with the beginning. It says that we're going to start at the left back Rag Linde seen. Now that means that we're going to start from this area right here. So when it says a seam, I know that we haven't actually sewn up a seam. But the pattern basically refers to these areas here, right? These places where you increased creates a kind of seem that extends all the way down to the armpit. So this would be a front seem. And in the back you can see that here. You also have a seam that extends down to the armpit. Okay. So when it says that we're going to begin at the left back Rimland seem we're referring to this area right here. So from the beginning of the scene to the end of the seam right here. So you're going to pick up a knit, either 10 or eight stitches along this back regal and theme. So I'm gonna take my stitch marker and just mark off that area. So my stitch marker is called a split ring marker. That means that I can slip it into my knitting. So here we go. There we are. All right, so this area, we're going to be picking up either 10 or eight stitches depending on your size. And then we are going to pick up 10, 12, or 13 stitches along the left front side neck. So that would be this area right here where the curve is. So I'm gonna take my stitch marker and just mark off that curve right here. And then we're going to pick up either 10 or 12 stitches along the cast on edge. So right here, this area that's kind of a straight line. This is where we cast on our stitches. So from here to here, we're going to be picking up either 10, 12, or 13 stitches. And maybe I should move this marker a little bit lower. I think that's right. Yeah, that's the cast on edge. All right. And then we're going to pick up and met either 10, 12, or 13 stitches along the bright front side neck. So that would be this curve right here. Alright, so let's mark that off. And I'm going to mark it right where that seam begins right here. Ok. And then we're going to pick up 10 or eight stitches along the right sleeve edge. So that would be where this scene begins and where this seam at the back ends. So I'm going to mark that off. Here we go. And then you're going to pick up either 20 to 28 or 30 stitches along the back neck line. Okay, So now we have all of our sections marked off so we know how many stitches we're going to pick up and MIT in each section. And that makes things a lot easier. Now if you don't have a split ring marker like these guys, you can always use some scrap yarn, just thread it through your work and just tie a little not around it. Okay, that's one way that you can mark off your neck line. Alright, so let's get out or double pointed needles and start working this neck band. So we're going to start at the left back Ramblin scene, which is right here. And I'm going to take my smaller a double pointed needle and just insert it into the edge of my neck line right here. So I'm going to choose a spot right here, right on the edge of my neck line. And then I'm going to join a new ball of yarn. I'm going to take my strand of yarn and loop it onto my double pointed needle. And I'm going to leave the nice tail, you know, about seven or eight inches. And then I'm going to pull that I made through. So now I have one stitch on my needle. So I know that I need ten stitches between this stitch marker here and this one here. So I'm going to evenly pick up ten stitches across this area, which is the left vaccine. So here we go. I'm going to eyeball my way across this area. So I've chosen this next area here to make my second stitch. And I'm wrapping my yarn as you can see around my needle and pulling that yarn through. And by doing that, I've made a second stitch. So I'm gonna do that across this whole section until I reach my stitch marker. So when you're going through the neck line, there are two strands of yarn and you want to go through both of them. I don't know if you can see that, but there's two strands of yarn that I'm pushing my needle through and wrapping my yarn around my needle and pulling that strand of yarn through. So if you only go through one strand of yarn, let's see here. So this is just one strand of yarn. It won't be as secure. So it's much better idea to go through two strands of yarn. So now I'm going to look for, here's one strand and two strands of yarn here and pull that through. Alright, so now I've got four stitches that I've picked up. And I'm going to work my way across. I need ten stitches. So I'm going to sort of eyeball it as I go along. That looks pretty even. Let's see, 2, 4, 6, and we need to do an 8, 9. Let's do this here. And ten I'm going to go right into, right into this. Let's see this two strands of yarn here and Pepsi pull out whole lot of Stitch, perfect. So now let's see how many I've got 246, eight and 10. Perfect. So that's the number of stitches I need to pick up between my two markers on the left back. So at this point I can take off this stitch marker that was marking my neck line and I'm going to put it onto my needle. Okay. And this will help us to count up our stitches. When we've picked up all of our neck line stitches. All right. So we're going to move on. So now we're on to the left front. And for my size I need to pick up 10 stitches across this left front. So this is the curved area along the front of our neck line. So I need to pick up 10 stitches. So I'm going to do that. I'm going to go into these, this edge right here and pick out one stitch. All right? And there is really no hard science to picking up stitches. Your best bet is really to pick up a couple of stitches and look at your neck line and go, Okay, I've got this much fabric left and I need to pick up seven more stitches. So does that rate look pretty good or arc the stitches kind of bunched up. You know, when you're picking up stitches, you can always unpick them. Okay. So let's say I feel like maybe I need to pick up more stitches within this fabric area. So what I can do is take my needle off and just make that stitch disappear. And maybe I'll pick up more stitches more quickly. You can kind of play around with that. Once you pick up stitches, they are not set in stone. You can always redo your stitches. All right, so I'm gonna pick up ten stitches along this area. 8, 9, and here's my stitch marker and here's 10. So you might notice that the double pointed needle is filling up with stitches and you might feel that they're sitting on needle very precariously. So whenever a needle is filled to the brim looks stitches, you can use a rubber band to stop your stitches from falling off. So I'm going to wrap a regular rubber band around the needle end and it will act as a stopper. We my stitches won't fall off the needle if I push on them by accident. Now I'm going to take the stitch marker off and place it onto my needle. And now we'll pick up stitches on the cast on edge. So I'll pick up ten stitches along the edge here. At this point I'm going to introduce a new needle. So I'll take off the stitch marker and set it aside. And here is my new double pointed needle. I'm going to start picking up stitches with this needle. So here we go. Let's pick up ten stitches along this neck line, edge. 23. 19b Knitting a Neat Necklline Cont.: So I've gone into ten stitches along my cast on edge. And now I'm going to use my second rubber band and tie off that first needle here so I don't want the stitches to fall off. I don't want to take any chances here. So I'm gonna take my rubber band and graph it around my needle like this. Okay, So now we're gonna go back to my second needle. So I've just picked up ten stitches along the cast on edge. And I'm going to take off my stitch marker and place that right on the needle. And now I'm going to work ten stitches across the right front edge right here. All right. So I'm picking up my last stitch, my tenth stitch on my right front edge. So I'm gonna take my stitch marker off to pick up this last stitch. And let's find a good place that looks pretty good to me. And there we go. There's my tenth stitch. So now I'm going to put my stitch marker back on and my second needle is pretty full, so I'm going to use my rubber band again and tie off that needle so that my stitches don't fall off. You can see that it's pretty full needle. So I'll tie off my other end as well just in case. Okay. So there we go. Pretty cool. So now I can rest assured my stitches will not fall off my needle. All right. So let's move on to our third needle. So we're working our right sleeve right now. So for me I need to pick up 10 stitches across this fabric. So right up to this stitch marker. So I'm going to insert my needle into the edge and pick up ten stitches. Here we go. And you'll either need 10 or eight stitches depending on your size. And I'm almost near my stitch marker. Let's see here. I've done 2, 4, 6, 8, 9. And here's my last stitch, 10. So now I'm gonna take my stitch marker off. Let's take my stitch marker off my neck line, place it on my double pointed needles. And now we're going to work the last section of our neck line, which would be the back right here. And I'm going to be picking up 22 stitches for my size across the back. You'll either be doing 20 to 28 or 30. Now you can see that the needle is not very long, okay. And you have a lot of stitches to pick up. So this is really where the plastics come in to help you as stoppers so that your stitches don't fall off the needle. All right. So let's go ahead and pick up 20 to 28 or 30 stitches across the neck line. I've got two more stitches to pick up across my back neck line. And here we go. Here's my last stitch. Perfect. So now I've picked up all of my stitches across my back neck line, 22 stitches. And we are finished picking up our stitches from the neck line. So now we're going to join in the round and we're going to knit two-by-two rib across our whole neck line. And you can see I've got all my rubber bands here working in stoppers because we really do have quite a lot of stitches on our double pointed needles. So now make sure you have the right number of stitches on all of your needles. Make sure that you either have seventy two, sixty eight, seventy six or 84 stitches across all three needles. And once you do, then we can start to join in the round Nipah two-by-two rib. So once you have all the stitches that you need for your neck line, then you can start taking off these stitch markers. The only stitch marker you'll need to keep is the one that marks the beginning of the round which is at your back left neck line. I'm just going to take my stitch markers off as I knit to them. So here is what's, here's the marker that marks the beginning of my round. And I'm going to clip it on here so that I remember that this is where it begins. And I'm going to place this onto my needle after I knit my first stitch and transfer it over and I'll show you what that means. So let's take my stopper off of this needle so that I can actually needed to it. And we're knitting in 2-by-2 rib, meaning that we're going to do a knit one and in Perl to. So here we go. There's my first stitch. I'm going to knit one. And now I want you to bring my stitch marker back onto this needle so that it can mark the beginning of my round. So here I'm going to put it back on this needle and then I'm going to transfer these two stitches that I just knit onto my right needle. And remember it doesn't matter where your stitches are as long as they are securely on the needle. So there we go. So now I've just knit two. And the reason why I transferred those stitches over was because I need some stitches to kind of border the stitch marker so it doesn't fall off my needle. All right, So I've just done a knit two and now I'm going to do a pearl two. So we're just working a two-by-two rib, which you are very familiar with now, you've been doing that already on both your sleeves and on your hem. So here we go. That two and a pearl two. Alright, so work across your whole color in the niche you approach you rib. And when you finish a needle, you can always take your rubber band and place it back on to your needle so that your stitches don't fall off. So I'm going to do that now just to make sure my first needle is secure. Okay, so continue knitting two-by-two rib 45 rounds. All right, so now I've finished five rounds of two-by-two rib, and now we're ready to cast off. So I'm going to take out my larger double pointed needles and here. So it's really important when you cast off to cast off loosely because you want to retain the stretching of your neck line. And that's why I'm using my larger a double pointed needle to cast off. And we're going to cast off in pattern as we've been doing for all of our other cast offs. So once you've cast off your color stitches and they look really nice and even then you are basically done. Awesome. Um, uh, so cool. So what you should do is try on your sweater, makes sure that your head actually fits into the color. Okay, make sure that it's actually stretchy enough. And once you do that and you're happy with your sweater, then we can move on to block this guy. Now you've already done this when you knit up your gauge swatch. And we'll do this on a much larger scale by actually blocking the entire sweater. So we're gonna do that next. But first try on your sweater, plants around a little bit, make sure your head fits inside the neck line. And then we can block our sweater. And this is the last step of the entire journey. 24. 20 Blocking for a Perfect Fit: So now we're ready to block our sweater. So I filled up my sink right here with some room temperature water. And now we're just going to dunk are sweater right into the water. Whoa, There we go. So you can see that when I put my sweater in, it's just kind of floating, right? It's like floating like a boat. And we don't want that. We want the whole sweater to be submerged. So you can see it's just kind of fighting against that. It wants to float up. So you really want to push your sweater down into the water so it's fully submerged. And the reason we're blocking this sweater is that once you block your sweater and it dries, you'll notice that the fibers really relax. The fabric looks a lot nicer and less kind of lumpy. And when it's wet, we can also shape our sweater into the dimensions that we want. So I'm going to let my sweater submerging this water for about 15 minutes every now and then I'll just come by and kind of push down. So after about 15 minutes, you'll take your sweater out, push out the water as much as you can, and then we're going to lay out our sweater. So now I've pushed out the water from my wrangling and I've laid it out to dry here. It's got some towels laid out so that it can absorb the water from my sweater. And now I've just laid it out here for it to dry. What we can do now is really quite exciting. We can mold our sweater into whatever shape and dimension we want. And that's really exciting because it means that any mistakes we made during the knitting process, we can kind of smooth it out during this time. So I'm going to put down my last page of my sweater here, and I'm going to look at the schematics, the finished measurements. Now, I want my sweater to be the exact finished measurements on my pattern. So I'm going to take my tape measure out here and start measuring across the bottom and from the under arm down to the Him to make sure that it is actually the same measurements as my finished measurements. So let's take a look here. My bus should be 35 around. So that would be 17.5 from here to here, from underarm to underarm. And that's about right. Okay, so that's great. And now I'm going to measure for my under arm up to the top of my shoulder. And that should be 8 inches for my size. And I can see that it's a little bit big here, it's about nine inches. So what I can do is I can literally just move my sweater. I'm pushing this underarm area up and I'm moving this shoulder portion down a little bit. And then he can see there's some wrinkly areas here, right? So what I'm gonna do is literally just pad it and push the fibers are pushed the yarn a little bit closer together here so that I can get the eight inches that I want and not nine inches. So this is really how you can kind of shape your sweater. There's a bit of irregularity here, so I'm just going to push the fabric inwards and then pat it so that it's flat. So there isn't any bubbling. Alright, so let's take my tape measure and perfect. So now you can see that it measures eight inches from my underarm to the top of my shoulder. And I did that just by pushing the fabric inwards and then padding it down. Okay. See over here I feel like my callers looking a bit too Angular on this edge. So what I'll do is I'll just push it down here. Okay, I want a more gentle curve like that, but you can see there's a bit of bubbling. So I'm just going to pad it down. Okay, so it's really quite simple. You're just shaping your stitches and you can do this when it's wet because it's much more pliable, right? And once it dries, it will dry in this shape. So the other thing you want to measure is from your underarm all the way down to your sleeve to make sure that it matches. So you want to measure both sleeves, make sure that they are the same length on both sides. And measure any other areas that are important to you. And once your sweater is the shape and the size that you like, then you just leave it alone and you just let it dry, let it hang out here. And that's it. Once your sweater is dried, then you can wear this out. Well, congratulations on completing your everyday wrangling. I hope you're happy with it and that you wear it out with pride. Now if you have any questions, leave them in the comments below and I'll try to get back to you as soon as possible. Okay, that's it for me. I'm Divina of sheep ancestry.com. Thanks for watching and happy knitting.