Music Theory and Instrumental Songwriting for Ableton Live 11 | Tomas George | Skillshare

Music Theory and Instrumental Songwriting for Ableton Live 11

Tomas George, Music + Audio Production Instructor

Music Theory and Instrumental Songwriting for Ableton Live 11

Tomas George, Music + Audio Production Instructor

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25 Lessons (3h 3m)
    • 1. Welcome to this Class

      0:51
    • 2. Before we get Started

      4:45
    • 3. Introduction and Getting Started in this Section

      6:42
    • 4. How to Work out a Major Scale

      9:02
    • 5. How to Work out a Natural Minor Scale

      6:38
    • 6. The Circle of 5ths

      5:14
    • 7. Chords in a Major Scale

      7:43
    • 8. Chords in a Major Scale - 2nd Example

      4:33
    • 9. How to Work out Chord Progressions

      9:53
    • 10. 8RECAP - How to Work out a Natural Minor Scale

      2:51
    • 11. How to Work out the Chords for a Natural Minor Scale

      6:18
    • 12. Writing Chords for our Song - Part 1

      6:53
    • 13. Writing Chords for our Song - Part 2

      10:07
    • 14. Writing a Melody for our Song - Part 1

      12:28
    • 15. Writing a Melody for our Song - Part 2

      14:02
    • 16. Inverting the Chords

      5:59
    • 17. The 3 Different Types of 7th Chords

      7:20
    • 18. Adding 7th Chords and Extended Chords to our Song - Part 1

      9:30
    • 19. Adding 7th Chords and Extended Chords to our Song - Part 2

      10:56
    • 20. Separating the Parts onto a New Instrument

      6:09
    • 21. Writing a Bass Part - Part 1: Getting Started + Bass Sound

      6:45
    • 22. Writing a Bass Part - Part 2 - Writing the Groove - PT 1

      8:32
    • 23. Writing a Bass Part - Part 3 - Writing the Groove - PT 2

      7:01
    • 24. Creating a Drum Part - Basics

      11:53
    • 25. Thanks and Bye + Class Project

      0:37
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About This Class

In this class, you will learn the essentials of music theory to help you create instrumental music in the music production software Ableton Live 11

This class will also improve your Music Theory and Instrumental Songwriting abilities in Ableton Live 11 and all other Digital Audio Workstations!

This course will cover such topics as:

  • How to write a Major Scale
  • How to write a Natural Minor Scale
  • How to use the Circle of 5ths
  • How to write chords in a Major and Natural Minor Scale
  • How to write a Melody
  • How to write 7th Chords
  • The essentials of writing bass and drums parts

So by the end of this class, you should feel more confident at music theory and writing instrumental music in Ableton Live 11

Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

Tomas George

Music + Audio Production Instructor

Teacher

Hi, Tomas here. I'm a UK Music Producer, Audio Engineer and Composer I've been producing and writing music now for over ten years. 

I have a MMus Masters Degree in Music Production and a BA(Hons) in Music Composition.

I really enjoy creating and editing all types of music, but I especially love teaching it online.

 

See full profile

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Transcripts

1. Welcome to this Class: Hi there and welcome to this music theory and songwriting essentials class for Ableton Live 11. So in this class I'm going to show the essentials of music theory and also instrumental songwriting in the software Ableton Live 11. So this class is for Ableton Live users who are brand new to music fairy, or songwriting. So we start off this class by teaching you some music very essentials, such as how to write a major scale and natural minor scale will then show you how to use the circle of fifths, as well as working out cooperations. After this, we'll look at the instrumental songwriting section of this course, where we'll show you how to write cause and also inverts and extend. These courts will then teach you how to write a bass part and also the essentials for writing drums in Ableton Live 11. So after taking this course, you should have a clear understanding of music theory, helped me write instrumental music and Ableton Live 11. 2. Before we get Started: Okay, So the next few sections will be useful for you if you are new to music ferry and you want to learn how to write instrumental music in Ableton Live. However, I still recommend watching these sections. If you're an experienced musician, as you still might pick up some new music theory and songwriting tips. So in the next few sections, I'm going to be teaching new music fairy essentials for writing electronic music, which you can apply really to any genre. So I'm not going to be teaching you how to read sheet music or classical music or anything like that. Just music theory that you can apply inside, able to live so you can write electronic music. Also, a lot of the techniques I teach you will be on the grand piano instrument, which is available on Ableton Live 11, standard and sweet. So if you haven't yet downloaded this grand piano instrument, you can download it by going into packs and then available packs. And then from here you can find grand piano and download it inside Ableton Live. Or you can just head over to the official site and then go onto packs and then go onto sounds. And then from here you can find the grand piano instruments. I'm just going to do a search for this on Chrome by pressing Command F on a Mac or Control F on Windows. And then just typing grand. And you can see here grand piano, which is included in Live 10 and live 11, standard and sweet. So you don't have to pay to download this pack if you're using Ableton Live standard or sweet. However, if you're using Ableton Live intro or light, then you won't be able to get this piano sound. So just bear that in mind if you want to follow along. And if you are using intro or light, you may need to follow along with a different sound. Also, you don't need to follow along if you don't want to, but I do recommend following along. Also for the next few sections, we'll be using Ableton Live 11 suite. So if you're not using Ableton Live 11, sweet, then you may not be able to follow along exactly. However you can follow along with different instruments if you're not using suite. Like I said though, for the first part of the next few sections. And we'll just be using this piano sound. Because the piano sound is very clear and it allows you to hear a lot of the high tones and lower tones very easily. Also with the piano sound, you can play chords and melodies and baselines. So it gives you many different options for writing music. So later on, I will be changing the piano sound into something more suitable. And I'm also going to be using the stock instruments and able to live. So the instruments that come with Ableton Live 11, sweet. But I'll try and do most of their say can follow along with Ableton Live standard 11 as well. But you won't be able to follow along exactly. And definitely not with intro or light. So just bear that in mind too. So if you are using light intro or standard, then you may not have as many instruments as I use. So if you're not using Ableton Live sweet, then you may not be able to follow along exactly with what I do. However, the music theory and songwriting principles really apply to any version of Ableton Live or any DAW. Also attached as a resource is the song that I create in this class. You can download this by going to the Project and Resources tab. And from here you can download the zipped Ableton Live 11 set. You will however, need to have Ableton Live 11 to open this project. And it won't open with any earlier versions of Ableton Live. Also, if you want to play back the exact instruments as me, then you'll need to have the grand piano pack and also the Essentials Pack. The grand piano pack is included in Ableton Live standard and sweet. And the synth Essentials Pack is included in Ableton Live suite. So if you have Ableton Live suites, you can download these inside able to live by going into packs, available packs, and I'm finding them from this list. If you don't use Ableton Live, sweet though, don't worry, I do show you an alternative sound later on in this class, we will look at the videos about writing a bass part. Will say you don't have to use the exact sounds as me. This is just if you want to follow along. Also in the next few sections, I'm going to start off quite basic and then gradually get more advanced for our music theory videos. You may wish to skip forward if you're experienced songwriter and able to live. However, I still recommend watching these sections as a refresher course. Okay, so in the next few sections, I'm actually going to break down the different elements of music theory and able to live and actually apply this to writing a song. So like I said, please feel free to follow along with the exact sum I create in your own able to live project. However, you can also use the skills and techniques I teach you and apply them to write music or really any digital audio workstation. Okay, so in the next video, I'll explain overview of what you're going to learn and we start looking at music theory. See you there. 3. Introduction and Getting Started in this Section: Okay, so in the next few sections, I'm actually going to show you how to write sung with music theory. The first part will be about music, very fundamentals such as keys, scales and chords. And then we'll put this into practice and write chords, melodies, baselines, and a drumbeat to create Assange. Also, I'm not going to show you how to play the piano, so just be aware of that. This is not a piano course by any means. I'm actually going to teach you how to write music for electronic compositions. I will also be using the median no editor a lot, and also occasionally my midi keyboard. I do recommend that you use MED keyboard sometimes for writing music. However, for the next few sections, I'm going to try and keep most of this just on the millionaire editor in case you don't want to use a midi keyboard. Also for the next few sections, you don't need any musical knowledge to follow along. And I'll try and explain it in a way. So even if you're brand new to music theory and composing, you should still be able to follow along. However, even musicians who have a lot of experience can still gain you information from the sections. So Still Be sure to check out if you're an experienced musician. Ok, so before we get started, let's open up the grand piano sound. So attached to the previous lecture is a PDF which has a link to this grand piano instrument. So D recommend downloading this if you do want to follow along. But like I said in the previous video, you can only gain access to this grand piano if you have Ableton Live standard or sweet. Okay, so under sounds, That's expand piano and keys. And this is alphabetical. So let's go down to G. And here we have grand piano. Or we can just type in the search bar up here. Grand piano. And here it is. So let's double-click on this to open this up, we can drag this over to an empty midi instruments, and here it will appear as a new presets. Okay, so let me just actually mentioned the piano keyboard in the midi note editor. So I'm just going to double-click on an empty midi slot. And here notice we actually have a piano keyboard flipped on its side. And I'm just going to drag this metadata editor up so we can see a bit more. This piano keyboard. So that piano keyboard has 12 notes. And then after that the notes repeats, but they will be at a different octave. And the octaves are named here. So we have C2, C3, C4. So the higher the number, the higher the octave and the lower the number, the lower the octave. And going from one note to another is called a semitone or half-step. And two notes is called a Tone or step. Let me just enable this medium as a preview of this headphone icon here so we can hear the piano sound back. So going from the C4 here to this C sharp four is known as a semitone. Going from C to a, D, a tone, or a step. You'll also notice on the left when we hover over and note, it tells us the note name. For example here says G4. And if I go down a semitone or a half-step, it says F sharp four. You'll also notice in the status bar at the bottom of Ableton Live. It also tells us the middle note names. So if I hover over to a different note, you'll notice the middle key changes here. So here it says mid-60s. And then the note name, however, is useful to know the note names without the computer telling us. So let me just tell you now how to work out the different notes. So you notice here we have these two black notes. And then above here we have these free black notes. So the note just below the block of two black notes as a C. And then each white note goes up alphabetically. So C, D, E, F, G, And then from G goes to a, a, B, and back to c. And the black notes can either be sharps or flats. So music, if we go up, we're sharpening the note, and if we go down, we're flattening the notes. So wherever there is a sharp or a flat depends on what key we're in. So some keys you sharps, and some keys used flats to describe the black notes that are in their key. But we're going to look at this later on when we looked the circle of fifths, which is in one of the next few videos. Also, every white note on the keyboard has a black note next to it, apart from between E and F, and B and C will soon look at keys and scales. But the key is basically a guideline of notes recommended to use. So you can write melodies, chords, and baselines. You don't always have to stick in key though, but I recommend staying key at first if you're brand new to music theory. And later on when you get more advanced, you can play notes, chords, and scales that I was key. And also in our key we have different scales we can use. And a scale is basically a set of notes in order. So for example, the most common scale is probably C major, which happens to be all of the white notes. So the most common type of scale in Western music is a major scale and natural minor scale. There are a lot more other types of scales than this, but we're just going to be looking at major scales and natural minor scales in the next few sections will also going to be looking at major and minor chords. And a really oversimplified way of knowing the difference between a major and minor chord is a major chord sounds happy. And a minor chord sounds SAP. We're going to be looking at the difference between these chords and scales in a lot more detail later on. But this is just a really simple way of knowing the difference. Also in electronic dance music, minor scales and chords are often used. But in some styles like trans and pop music, there will be a lot of major scales and chords. As major scales and chords are more happy and uplifting sounding. And for these styles music it can be more suitable. Okay, so with the skills knowledge I teach you in the next few sections, you don't need a fancy studio. You can pretty much do all of this just on your laptop within your DAW. And I'll teach you how to make a song in Ableton Live. Like a said, a midi keyboard can't help, but it's not essential. Also, I'll show you how to write the musical ideas in session view. And then after desk were arranged ideas into a sung in the Arrangement view of Ableton Live. But before we write the sum, I'm going to teach you some music theory essentials. So I'll teach you how to work out the different major and natural minor scales and also what chords you can use with them. So with the patterns that I'm going to teach you, you'll be able to write music in any major or natural minor key and also know what caused the play with them. And then teach you some techniques for writing melodies, baselines, and drumbeat. Okay, so in the next video, we're going to start looking at music fairy or teach you how to write a major scale. See you there. 4. How to Work out a Major Scale: Hi there and welcome to this video. I'm going to show you how to work out a major scale. Okay, so there are many different ways of writing the song. However, if you want to write a song, you really need to at some point, right? A melodic instrument or caudal instrument. And if you want to do this, then you'll need to make sure your in key. And the key is a scale on which the song revolves around. And a scale is a set of musical notes arranged by ascending or descending order and pitch. So the most common scales in Western music, major scales and minor scales. And I'm going to start off this section by Teach knew how to work out a major scale. And soon I'll teach you how to work out and natural minor scale. Of course, there are many different types of scales too. But I'm just going to start off with the basics and let's look now at working out a major scale. Of course, there is this scale button over here and the clip view, which is really useful and allows you to choose a number of different keys. And if you have this enabled, the notes in the key that you have selected here will be highlighted in the midi note editor. So this allows you to know which notes you can play for that key. But I still recommend learning how to work out a few basic scales. Learning the skills and techniques of working out scales and keys can improve your music fairy and songwriting abilities. However, that scale feature is there and it can be useful in case you want to use it. Okay, so now let's have a look at the midi note editor. And I'm also going to click and drag up here just to make a bit more space. And you can see here we have a piano keyboard on its side. So you can see here that this keyboard consists of a number of white and black keys. You can also say that we have a group of two black notes and also a group of free black notes. And we can find C just below the group of two black notes here. And let's first look at C major. And this is super simple. It's just a white notes. So say day a, F, j, and back to a, B, and C. And we actually have a major and a minor scale for every one of these white and black notes. And there are 12 of these white and black notes. And there's one simple pattern you need to know to work at any major scale, and that is tone, tone, semitone, tone, tone, tone, semitone. So if you want to work at a scale that isn't C major, for example, then you can use this pattern to work at a major scale for any of these notes. So if you've taken any of my other music theory courses before that, I'm sure you know all about this, but I'll explain this again if you haven't taken any of my music theory courses before. So a tone or a t as I write it here, as 2.5 steps or two semitones, or just two notes on the piano keyboard. And a semitone is a half-step or one note on the piano keyboard. So for example, going from C to C sharp is a semitone, and going from C to D. That is a tone. So all we need to do is count up using this pattern to find out the notes in a major scale. Obviously, C major is just the white notes, but just for this example, let's pretend we don't know that. And then after, we'll use this pattern to figure out a never major scale. So let's start on, say I'm just going to zoom in here. And let's go down to see free. So the octave below. So as we're starting on, say, the pattern we're going to work out is going to be C major. Remember tone, tone, semitone, tone, tone, tone, semitone. So let start with say, and then we need to count up two semitones or atone for 12. It brings us to this note here, which is a day, night from day, we need to count up another tone. So two notes again, one. So this brings us to a. And you can see here, there's no black note between E and F are next. Now Patton is a semitone, so that's just one of these notes. So that brings us to f here. Okay, continuing on from f, we need to count up atone. So two semitones or two notes. One brings us to J. And then from Jay who needs count up another tone, one to a, and then another tone to be. And you can see here, there is no black note between B and C. And the last one When it's counted up as a semitone. And that brings us back to say, so the notes in C major, C, D, E, F, G, a, B, C. And obviously that's just the white notes. But we work that out by using the pattern of tone, tone, semitone, tone, tone, tone semitone. Okay, so in this midi note editor, let's actually draw in these notes. And we can go over to the drill tool up here. Well, we can use a shortcut to bring up the Draw tool. So let's start on c. So remember tone, tone, semitone to F, wanted to J2. Then turn 12 to a. Then turn one semitone back to say, I'm just going to slide the stamp are down. Let's say this back. And you can just click on these notes again to delete them. Okay, so that was an easy one because we already knew the answer. Let us now work out G major. So we know it's going to be G-Major because it starts on J. Let's use this octave down here, G2, okay, using the same pattern, we need to count up atone for two notes. So it brings us to G, then count up another tone, brings us to b, then a semitone, or one note to say, the tone brings us today than another tone brings us to a. And now we need to count up another tone. So actually going to have a black note here. So one to this note here, which is f shop, and then a semitone to the G. So G major has the notes G, a, B, C, D, E, F sharp, G. I remember we can go back to the Draw tool by pressing V. Now let's draw this n for j. So let's start on J. Overtone 12 to a. Want to be a semitone to say overtone 12k today. Overtone 12 to a. Then remember up a turn again, 12 to f shop. Then up a semitone, one back to j. Let's hit this back. Okay, great. I remember we can just click on these notes in the midi editor again to delete them. Okay, let me just show you one more example, and now let's try F major. So let's start on the note F. One to two, j up its own 12 to a semitone to be flat. Says, hey, a shop, but it's actually a B flat, even though A-Sharp B flat Sauron exactly the same, we look at why it's a B flat rather than a shop in the CERCLA fifth lecture later on. But just try remember, F major has a B flat and overtone. Want two to C. Then opens iron 1-2 today. Upper tone one to a, and then a semitone to f. And remember we can just click on these notes again to delete them. And we can switch off the Draw tool by pressing b. Ok. So the main thing I want you to remember from this video is this pattern of tone, tone, semitone, tone, tone, tone semitone. And we have that pattern. You can work at any major scale. I recommend in your own time, try and work out of a major scales by using this platform. And in the next video we'll look at how to work out and natural minor scale. I'll see you there. 5. How to Work out a Natural Minor Scale: Okay, so in this video I'm going to teach you free methods or finding a natural minor scale. So you might want to work in a minor scale rather than a major scale, as it can sound a bit Muda or darker sounding. And we could actually work out and natural minor scale by turning a major scale into a natural minor scale. Let's use a as the example. So if you use the baton tone, tone semitone, tone, tone, tone, semitone, we can find a major. So let's just draw this in there. Let's go over to the Draw tool by using the shortcut b. And let's go to a. And for this example, let's use a2. Ok, so the passing tone, tone semitone, tone, tone, tone, semitone. So I'm just going to use this now to draw a major. Okay? So this gives us the notes a, B, C sharp, D, E, F sharp, G sharp, and a. So we can change this major scale into a natural minor scale by flattening the third, sixth, seventh by a semitone or half-step. So in a major, Let's now flatten this third. So let's find the third one to three. That's this C-Sharp. So let's flatten this to see. So I'm just going to switch off the Draw tool again by pressing b and just drag this down one semitone, or flatten this one semitone to c. And let's do this for the sixth, seventh as well. So we have 456. So let's change this F sharp to an F. And that's flatten this G sharp as well to a j. So this now gives us the nodes a, B, C, D, E, F, G. And so this is now an, a natural minor scale. And we can change this back to a major scale by shopping the fat. The sixth, seventh. Okay, so there are other types of minor scales, including melodic minor and harmonic minor. But I'm only going to be looking at the natural minor scale in these videos right now. Okay, let me just tell you the second method are working out and natural minor scale. And that's by using the pattern tone, semi-tone, tone, tone, semitone tone, tone. So I'm just going to double-click on his notes to delete them. And now let's draw it in a natural minor scale by using this pattern tone, semi-tone, tone, tone, semitone, tone, tone. Let's work on a natural minor scale again. So let's start and let's draw this and again. So let's enable the droll told by pressing b once again. So let's draw in the a. There we need to go overtone, so to debate. And then a semitone to say that a tone. So to date, remember you have to count up to find the tone and one to count up a semitone, and then atone again. So can talk to a, then a semitone to F, then a tone, and then another tone, one to a. Okay, let's actually try and have a pattern. So withdrawal. So I'm just going to click on these notes to delete them. And let's try E natural minor. So that start on a2. That's now type this M. So tone 12 to F-sharp, that semitone to g. Then a tone onto to a, then a tone 12 to b, then a semitone to say so up one to see the tone, one to date, the tone 12 to a. So that is an, a natural minor scale. And the third method is by actually finding the relative minor, because every major scale actually has a relative minor scale. So this means this natural minor scale has the same notes as the major scale, but the root note on the note that the scale focuses around is actually a different note. So for example, C major has all white notes, and its relative minor is actually a minor. So let me just type in C major again. Okay, so here is C Major and its relative minor is actually a minor. So if we look at the scale of C major, the sixth note is this one here, which is the a. So it's relative minor is a natural minor. And a natural minor also only has the white notes because it's the relative minor of C major. So we can just count up six notes in the major scale to find its relative natural minor scale. And we can actually work out the relative major scale of a natural minor scale by counting up three notes, including the first note. So say we're in a natural minor here, 123 will bring us to this note here, which is sc. The relative major and minor scales will make more sense when we look at the circle of fifths in the next video. That is the freeways, you can work out natural minor scale. So you can turn a major scale into a minor scale by flattening the third, sixth, seventh. Or we can use the patent tone, semi-tone, tone tone, semitone tone, tone. Or we can find the relative minor scale from a major scale, which is the sixth note of the major scale. So I hope you found this useful. And the next video we're going to be looking at the circle of fifths, where I'll explain more about relative minor and major scales. Thanks for watching, and I'll see you there. 6. The Circle of 5ths: Hi there and welcome to this video where we're going to be looking at the circle of fifths. So the circle of fifths is this diagram here, and this basically maps out all of the different major and minor keys. And it also tells you what notes they have in the key. So like I said earlier in this section, we're not going to be looking at sheet music, but I explained the different sharps and flats and how they apply to writing electronic music. So we will be writing music soon. I just wanted to go over some core music failure principles such as keys and chords before we write any music. And that's because knowing the core fundamentals of music theory will help you with your music writing ability in any genre and in any digital audio workstation. So this diagram is called the circle of fifths. And you may remember seeing on a wall in the music room at school. But I'm going to explain how this is applicable for writing electronic music in Ableton Live. So this shows all 12 major keys and also shows all 12 natural minor keys. It also shows you how many sharps or flats are in each key, and also which keys are near each other. So this helps you to know the closest key in case you ever want to change key or modulate during the Song. Okay, so let's have a look at C major again. And remember this is just all of the white notes. And black notes can either be sharps or flats, depending on what scale we have and what key we are in. So if we're making the notes higher by a semitone, we will sharpen the notes. And if we're making the notes that lower by a semitone, we will flatten the notes. So if you go to the right of the circle or clockwise, but notice that we have shops. And as we go through the different keys, you'll notice that we will add a sharp each time. So C major has no sharps. G major has one sharp, D major has two sharps, and a major has free shops. And this goes all the way down here to F-sharp major, which has sex shops. And then from here it turns into flats. You also noticed that when we move clockwise to keys will move in fifths. So C to G is a fifth. So five notes up. So c, d, e, f, g is five notes up in that key. And G to D is also a fifth. So five notes up in that key as well. And D to a is also a fifth, so five notes up in that key. So when we move between these keys clockwise, actually moving and fifths, hence the name circle of fifths is also the same for the minor keys down here. So if you move clockwise or to the right, will be moving in fifths. Ok, so now let's talk about moving anticlockwise or left. You'll notice these keys here on the left have Flats rather than sharps. And anticlockwise, we're actually moving a forth. So say two, F is a falloff. So c, d, e, f, four notes in that key. So there's keys here actually the closest one another because there's only one note difference. So C major has no sharps or flats, and F-major has one flat. Go the other way. G major has one sharp, so it's just one note different. And that's the same for all of these. For example, a major has free shops. But if a move to E-major, this has four sharps. Or for go anticlockwise, D major has two sharps. So it's just telling us the closest keys to one another that is apart from the relative major or minor key. You may remember before that C major's relative minor is a minor. And you can see here in the inside of the circle it tells us the relative minor keys. So g major's relative minor key as a minor and D majors as B minor. And it also tells us the relative major. So a minor, It's relative major is C-Major. So that's just another use for the circle of fifths. You can quickly see the relative majors and minors for each of these keys. And if we go directly opposite, it will be the furthest away from this key. So C major has no sharps or flats, and directly opposite, go all the way to G flat major or F sharp major. And this has six sharps or flats. So it has six out of seven notes are sharps or flats. So this will say in very different to C major. So some of the CERCLA fifth diagrams are a little different to this one, but this is a good already because it tells us the key that tells us how many sharps or flats, the raw, this sign by the way, is unnatural, which means no sharps or flats. And it also tells us the relative major and minor keys. You also notice up here we have sheet music. And if he can read sheet music, this can help as well, because it's just telling us where this sharp or flat actually is on this musical score. But if you can't read sheet music is fine. You can just use the patents that I told you earlier to find out the notes in a major key or in a natural minor key. Ok, so that is a circle of fifths, and it just helps you understand relative majors and minors and what keys you can move two or modulate to a bit easier. Okay, so the next video we're going to be looking at what cause we can use in a major scale. Thanks for watching, and I'll see you in the next one. 7. Chords in a Major Scale: Hi there. Welcome to this video. I am going to teach you about writing chords in a major scale. Okay, so if we do want to write a song, really, we need to be able to write chords for it. And in this video, I'll show you what cause you can use with a major scale. So just to keep things simple, I'm going to use the key C major, which I have previously written out here. If you want to use another key, that's fine. Just remember, you can use the pattern of tone, tone, semitone, tone, tone, tone, semitone to work out the notes for a major scale. So every major scale actually has seven chords in Qi can play. Of course you can play cause they're out of key. And you can also play extended caused suspended chords or seventh or ninth chords, for example. But now we're just going to keep things simple and we're just going to use the free note triad. And this consists of the root node or the first note, the third and the fifth note of the court. So let's take c for example. And the root note is C. And the third. So for cancer at 3123, the third here Is this a. And then the fifth, if we count up to more, 45, is this j. So we have c is a root, a, and g is the fifth. Okay, so there's another pattern on one you to learn. And this is major minor, minor, major, major, minor, diminished major. So this pattern that we can work out the different cores that we can use in a major scale. Of course, we can just go through these different notes here and stuck on the third fifth defined the triad. However, I do believe it's useful to know about the different types of chords. For example, major, minor and diminished, as they'll give you a different feeling and sound and we'll help you with your songwriting and composing. Okay, so let's go back to this scale here, which is C major. C major is easy because it's just the white notes. But we can apply this pattern of any of the major scales. But for now, let's just use C major. So the pattern of major minor, minor, major, major minor, diminished major. Let's apply these notes to this pattern. So the first one here, we will have a C Major. And just to let you know, we're going to build these calls and the moments. And the second one, we will have D minor, the third, we will have E minor. The fourth. We will have F-Major. The fifth will be G-Major. The six will be a minor. Seventh will be this one here, be diminished. And then back to C major. So you might be thinking, how do we work out a major, minor or diminished chord? And in this video we're going to say chord. I'm going to be talking about the free now triad, which is the root third, fifth. So these triads are the simplest way to write quads and they are very effective. And they used all the time in all different types of music. Okay, so there's another pattern I want you to learn, and it's the last pattern for this video. And that is 43 major f3 and f4 minor. F3 and F3 diminished. So if these patterns we can work at major, minor and diminished chords. So let's look at the first one for and free for major. So this means from the root note, we need to count up four semitones to find the third. And then from the third, we need to count up a free semitones to find the fifth. So let's look at C major again, for example. So here is the C. Let's now count off four. So 1234, this gives us a. Let me just go back to the draw told by pressing b. And here let's draw it in this node a. I remember it was four and free for major. So now to find the fifth, we need to count up free semitones from the third. So 123, this will give us this G here. So for play this back now, that is a C-Major chord, or display this on my midi keyboard as well. Okay, so that is how you work out a major chord. Let's now have a look at working out a minor chord. But before I do this, I'm just going to zoom in horizontally by clicking and dragging up here with this magnifying glass. Remember the pattern of major minor, minor, major, major minor, diminished major. The second chord here will be a minor chord. In this case, it will be a D minor. So we need to count up, free them for sign from this note d here, we need to count up free semitones to find the third one would be this note here, F. Then we need to count up form or to find the fifth. So 1234. So this will be this note here, a. So this is a D minor chord. And let's work out the rest of these chords. So the next one will be an a, and this will be an E minor chord. So remember for minor, we need to count up, free them for. So starting from the a, let's find the third by counting Godfrey 123. So it's this j. Then count for 1234. This be, okay, great. Next is an F, and this will be an F major chord. So we need to count up for them free for major. So it's f naught here. 1234 gives us this a. And then from a count of 3123, say, this is an F major chord. Next is a G-Major. So remember Major for them free from G here, long form says Bay. And then fray 1-2-3 To this day. Next as a minor chord again. So freedom force, so this is an a minor, 123. And then 1234. This a, remember all these notes or notes in key as well. So here as a D-Sharp, so this is incorrect. But actually be this one here, which is an e, because all of these notes are in key, and in this case just the white notes. So this is an a. Ok. Next is the diminished chord. This one isn't too common Rayleigh, but it can be used for suspense, but it's nowhere near as common as a major or minor chord. So we need to use the patent, free them free. So starting on Bay, 1-2-3 today. And that free again, 123 to the F. And you might not just sounds a bit different to the major or minor chord. And then back to the C major for them fray, so say 1234 to the a. And then three again, 123 to the j. I just play these chords back. Okay, great. So there's two things I want you to remember from this video. The first is this pattern of major minor, minor, major, major, minor, diminished major. And that allows you to know what chords you can play for a major scale. And the next pattern is for them free for major, freedom for, for minor, and freedom free for diminished. And that way you can work out all of the cause it can use for this major key. Ok, so that is how you work out. The basic triads are three note chords for C major. In the next video, we're going to apply these same patterns, workout records in a different key. See you there. 8. Chords in a Major Scale - 2nd Example: Okay, so now let's work out the courts for a never major scale. So let's now use the pattern that we used previously to work at a major scale. And then after this, we'll look at the patent work at the courts to play with this. So let's work out D major scale. Let's start on D2 down here. There, remember the pattern, tone, tone, semitone, tone, tone, tone, semitone to work out the notes for major scale. So let's count up to for atone, 12 to a. And then can, but never turn 12 to F sharp. Then semitone to this one here, a G, Then the tone, so 12 to a, then a tone onto TBI. Then atone, wan to decease shop. Then a semitone again today. That is our D major scale. Okay, so let's work out the first one here, which is a D major chord. So for a major chord from the root note, we need counter for, to find the third. And then from the third, we need to counter a free semitones to find the fifth. So let's do that now. So from the root, let's count off. 41234 brings us to F sharp. And then let's count up three to find the fifth. One. Brings us to AIG. By the way, all of the notes that we are going to be using to build these calls will be notes from the scale here. So if that was an example, that would not be the correct note for a D major chord is an E minor. Say for a minor cold, need counter free semitones from the root to find the third. And then from the third, we need to counter four semitones to find the fifth. Say from E here, let's count off free. Free brings us to G. And now let's count up four. Brings us to be. Next is another minor chord. This is F sharp minor. So from our shop we need to count up free. Brings us to a youth council for, brings us to C-sharp. Next is a G major chord. So again, let's cancel for this b and then cancel free this day. Okay, next is an a major chord, semi gang counter for c sharp. And then count up free to this a. Next a minor chord. This one is B minor. So that's canto three. This day. Encounter four to this F sharp. And then we have the diminished chord. So this will be a C sharp diminished chord. So it needs can talk free and free if you remember for a diminished chord, this a, and then want to free this G. Then back to D major, Sony to count up for free, to the F-sharp. And then free this a. Okay, so these are the chords for the D major scale. Let's say this back now. I'm just going to slow this down second, here it back again. And it's a good idea to listen to the chords. So you know the difference between a major chord, a minor chord, and a diminished chord. So you may notice the diminished chord does sound a bit unusual, and to be honest, is quite rather I use a diminished chord when writing electronic music. However, it still can be used, especially for suspense. Okay, so that is another example. So just remember that the pattern of major minor, minor, major, major minor, diminished major to work at the college you can use for a major scale. And then from there you can work out a major chord with the patent for them free. A minor cold with a patent free them for, and a diminished chord with the pattern freedom free. So thanks for watching this video. And in the next one began to be looking at chord progressions. 9. How to Work out Chord Progressions: Hi there. Welcome to this video where we're going to be looking at chord progressions. So core progression is basically a group of course, together to form a sequence. So for core progressions, it's common to name the numbers of the chords. And then you can apply this core progression to any key. And it's also common to use roman numerals for the core progressions. And also in chord progressions that major cause often in uppercase. And the minor chords are often in lowercase. For example, this core progression, 2645. So the second chord is a minor chord. The sixth chord here is also a minor chord, and the fourth and the fifth are both major chords. Ok, so here I've just written out the chords for the C major scale, but this pattern here as major minor, minor, major, major, minor, diminished major. So let's use this core progression to 6-4 five and work at these chords in C major. So remember core two will be a minor chord, and this in C major will be a D minor chord. And then called six. So let's count up to six. So 123456, this will be an a minor chord. And then 41234, this will be an F major chord. And then five, this will be a G major chord. And just going to delete the records, not going to use two here. Then we're going to use six here and 45. Let me just turn off the Draw tool by pressing b. Okay, and now I'm just going to rearrange this so we can start off with two. So let's move this over. Then we're going to have six, which is this one here. Remember, it's a minor. Then we're going to have four. Then we're going to have five. Let say this BATNA, very common core progression that I'm sure you've had many different times. Okay, so now let's work out and never come a chord progression this time that's worked out in D Major. Let's try the common core progression, 1564. So we have a major one, major five, a minus x, and a major four. So again, we can write out all of the notes for the major scale and then build the courts from here using the pattern of major minor, minor, major, major, minor, diminished major, or we can just work out the major and minor chords for this, let's actually work out the major and minor courts. Let me just go back to the draw told by pressing b, I'm just going to delete these notes here. So the first one is a one. So in D-major, This will be a D major chord. So let's go down to D. And remember, we need to use the pattern for them free to build a major chord. So let's count up 41234 brings us to this F sharp. Then let's count up free. 1-2-3 brings us to this a. The next one is five. So let's actually find the fifth chord of D major. So let's start on day. Remember the pattern of tone, tone, semitone, tone, tone, tone, semitone. So that's counterpart 012 to a, an overtone, 12 to F-sharp, semitone to j than another tone, 12 to a. This will be our fifth chord. So let's type in a here. Remember this is also a major chord, so we need to count up 41234 to this C sharp. Then we need to count 3123 to this E. Next is the six or minus six. So let's use the pattern again. So let's counter pattern 12 to a, an overtone, 12 to F-sharp, semitone to G. And overtone won two to a and then another tone, one to b. So this will be a b minor chord. If you find it easier, you can write out all of the notes in the scale. But just wanted to show you another method. Okay, so minor chords, remember freedom for, so let's count up free 123 to this day. And then for 1234 to this F sharp, okay? And then the last one is four. And this will be a major force. So let's start on D again. Okay, so tone, tone, semitone brings to his fourth. So this is a G major. Sony's counter up 41234 to this B thing cancer free to, free to this D. Okay, so this is our core progression, 15, 6-4 in D-major. Okay, so there's two different ways of working out chord progression. The first one is to write out the major scale and then build the cause on top. And then you can just go through and select the courts from that. And the second way is to actually build the course from scratch. Ok, let's just look at one more example. Let's use a chord progression, 1425. Ok, this time let's try F-major. Okay, so I'm just going to go back to the circle of fifths for a moment. And you can see here we have F major. And F-major actually has a flat rather than a sharp. And it's actually a B-flat on this score here. Okay, so this time you're going to use the first method and write out the notes for F-major. So I'm just going to delete these notes now. And then let's write in F-Major. And f is here. I remember tone, tone, semitone, tone, tone, tone, semitone, tone, tone, one to a semitone to this note here it says a sharp bend. F-major Is actually a B flat. That the tone 12 to see. And the tone one to day, then atone tone one to a, and then a semitones f. Okay, so remember the pattern of major, minor, minor, major, major, minor, diminished major, unless just writing these chords once again, I just go through this really quick just so you remember this, because this is an important pattern to remember. So it needs got for, for major 123. Fourth is a free 123 to C. And then from miner, and he's got freedom for 123 to the b flat, then 1234 to the d. Then the minor freedom for 123 to the sea. And then 41234. This a right next is a major. So 1234. And then 3123 to this F. There never major. 1234 to this, a, 123 to the j. And then minus a, this will be a D minor 123. And then 1234. Then diminished. Remember, freedom, free for diminished. So let's phrase. So this would be an E diminished, 123. And then 123, that's B flat again. Then back to F major, 1234123. Okay, so now let's use the core progression, 1425. So obviously one is this first one here, which is an F major chord. And then 41234, this one here. So this is a B flat major chord. Okay, then we have to this one here, G minor chord, and then 512345. This one here, a C Major chord. So we don't need the third chord here. So I'm going to delete this. Then we don't need the six. Well the seven or the one again. So we can rearrange this. So we have 14. So this is the four here. Let me just turn off the Draw tool again and moved to them before I ever remember. It's 1425. Okay. There we go. You can always check and make sure you've got all the notes in key here. So we need one black dot, which is the B flat door, a sharp as it's written here. And then the rest of them are white note. So you can always just check that. And it was less than back as well. If it doesn't sound quite right, you've probably got a wrong note in there. To San, quite jumpy going between the chords connects us as big gaps between these notes. Later on we will be looking at versions, which is basically ordering the notes around so it sounds a bit smoother. But that's free. Different common chord progressions in three different keys. So the first core progression was 2X 45. The next one was one 5-6. For this one here is 1425. So you can use the techniques of taught you to work out chord progressions in any major key. So you can use common chord progressions or you can write your own. And the chord progression really is just a way of playing together. However, you can really play the chords in any way you wish. I thought I'd just show chord progressions because it's just an easy way to start writing chords, ready for writing a song? Okay, so thanks for watching this video. The next one we're going to be looking at working at the chords in a natural minor key. See you there. 10. 8RECAP - How to Work out a Natural Minor Scale: Hi there. Welcome to this video. I'm going to show you again how to work out the notes for a natural minor scale. Okay, so you might remember this from before, but the major key has a relative minor key. And this type of key is called a natural minor key. And there actually are a few different types of minor scales. So we have natural minor scales, melodic minor scales, and harmonic minor scales. However, we're just going to be looking at the natural minor scale. Okay, so let's go back to the circle of fifths again. And let's look at C major here. And C major's natural minor key is a minor. And this basically means it has the same notes, but there's routed around this a instead of the c. So there's a few different ways we can work out. And natural minor scale. So we can work out the major scale and then just count up six notes. Okay, so I'm just going to draw in C Major and I remember we can use the pattern of tone, tone, semitone, tone, tone, tone, semitone to work out a major scale. And we can just count up six notes in the major scale to find the root note for the natural minor scale. So let's just do that now. 123456 brings us to this a, so are natural minor scale will be a natural minor. So to write out this major scale, we'll just have to rearrange this so it starts on a here. Alternatively, we can turn a major scale, a minor scale. Okay, so now I'm just going to write out a major by using the pattern tone, tone, semitone, tone, tone, tone, semitone. And we can turn this into a natural minor scale by flattening the third, flatten the six, and the seventh note of the major scale. So notice now that all of these notes are white notes, because this is the relative minor scale of C major. Ok. And the third method is to use the patent tone, semi-tone, tone tone, semitone tone tone. Okay, so let's use this pattern here listed on a US counterparts to bring this debate. Cantilever semitone brings us to say, countable tone on two brings us today. Kind of atone, belong to, brings us to a kind of a semitone, brings us to F. Tone, onto brings is the j. And then counter Potomac brings it back to a. 11. How to Work out the Chords for a Natural Minor Scale: Okay, so now we know how to work out and natural minor scale. Let's look at the chords we can use for a natural minor scale. And we're actually using the same pattern to work out the cause for a major scale starting on the sixth note, which is the minor chord just before the diminished chord. Okay, so this is the pattern. It's minor, diminished major, minor, minor, major, major minor. So let's start on a minor here. So remember the pattern for them, free for major, free them for, for minor, and freedom, free for diminished. Okay, so let's work out the first chord, which is a minor. So from the root note, we need to count up free to find the third. And then from the Third we need counter for to find the fifth one. Free brings us to this. Say, let me just go back to the Draw toolbar pressing b. And then count for 1234 brings us to this. Next one is a diminished chord. So this is freedom free. So 123 brings us to this day. And then 123 brings us to this. F. Next is a major chord. So 431234 brings us to this. And then 12 free brings us to this G. Ok. Next is a minor chord, so 123, for instance, to this F. And then 41234 brings us to this a. Next is another minor chord. So 123 brings us to this j. And then 41234 brings us to this b. Ok. Next is this F. So this is an F major chord. So 1234 brings us to this a. And then 123 brings us to this C. Ok. Next is a G major chord. So 1234 to the bay, and then 123 to this d here, and then back to the a minor chord. So 123 to the C. Remember when you hover over the note here, it will tell you the note name on the side. And now let's count up 41234. And it brings us to this a. Let's now hear this back. So that is the cause for the natural minor scale. Okay, and let me just show you an example. Let's use C minor. So I'm just going to click on these notes to delete them. And let's use the pattern tone, semi-tone, tone, tone, semitone tone, tone to work out and natural minor scale. So let's start on C here. So let's go up a tone 12. Let's go up a semitone too, D-Sharp. And if we actually go back to the circle of fifths, you can see here C minor has free flats. So the black notes of flats rather than shops. And you can read the score here. You can see we have a B flat, E flat, and a flat. So the next note will not be a D sharp or actually be an E flat. Okay? Now we go up a tone, one to two, this f. Now we go our pattern 12 to this j. Then we go up a semitone. There's a flat, says G-sharp, but it's in a flat. Then we go for another tone, 12 to this B flat. And then we go up whenever tone 12 back to the C. So this is a C natural minor scale. Okay, now let's stack on the gods. So let's go back to this pattern. Might act diminished major, minor, minor, major, major minor. It's the first one as minor. So remember, freedom for, for minor. So 123, this E-flat. Then let's count up 41234 to this G. Right next is this diminished chord. So this is a di diminished chord. Say freedom, free, 1-2-3, this f. And then 123 to this A-flat says G-sharp but is a flat. Okay, so next is a major chord. So this is an E flat major chord. So 1234 to this j. And then 123 to the b flat says a sharp, but it's a B flat. Okay, next as a minor chord, we have F minor. So while anti-free, there's a flat. And then 1234 to the C. Next is a minor chord, so G minor, 123 to B flat, then 1234 to d. And next is a major chord. So this is an, a flat major chord. So 1234 to the sea, and then 123 to this E-flat. Ok, next one is another major chord, and this is a B flat major chord. Remember in C minor, the black notes or flats, not shops. So let's count off four from the root note to find the third 1234 to this day. And then 123 to this F. And then finally back to C minor. So that's counter free, warranty, free to this E flat. And then cans up 41234 to this G. Okay, so these are the chords for C minor. So we have a C minor chord, we have a d diminished chord. We have an E flat major chord. We have F minor chord. We have a G minor chord, we have an a flat major chord. We have a B flat major chord, and then back to C Minor. All of the notes in all of these chords as well are just the notes from the C natural minor scale. Okay, so in this video, I've showed you how to work out the chords you can use for a natural minor scale. Thanks for watching, and I'll see you in the next one. 12. Writing Chords for our Song - Part 1: Hi there. Welcome to this video where we're going to be looking at writing chords for Assange. Ok, so actually wanted to write this song in a minor key and keep things simple. I'm just going to write this in a minor. So this is the relative minor of C major, so it's just the white notes. So previously we read the quotes here for C minor. Okay, so I'm just going to select all with command in a or Mac law controlling a on Windows. Then just drag this first note down to a. This will actually keep the shape of the major chords and the molecules and also the diminished chord. But I will just change the key to a minor. I'm also just going to turn off this headphone icon here so we don't hear a big cluster sound of chords. I'm just going to turn off withdrawal tool now by pressing Bay. And I'm just going to drag this all down to a. So now here we have the cause for a natural minor. So as useful to write the cold diet like this. And I did tell you how to do this in the previous videos. So if you haven't seen them yet, be sure to check them out if you want to learn how to write out the courts in either a major scale or a natural minor scale. But having a midi keyboard can really help. You can just play the chords then alternatively, you can just do this in the midi editor here. Okay, So as I want this to be an, a minor, I'm going to keep it simple and have the first court to be a miner. I also want to have a cord every bar and I do want to increase the BPM. So let's go up to the BPM here. Currently is on 20, which is way too slow for water wants. But if I just double-click on this and we'll go back to the default of 120. Okay, I'm also going to start off with a four-bar pattern. So I'm just going to hover up here to this ruler and click and drag up to zoom out. And then go over to the loop and an end marker and just drag this back. So it's a four-bar loop. I'm also going to drag on half a bar here. Just so I can place these calls here and use them as a reference. So I'm going to hit Command a on Mac or Control a on Windows to select these chords again. And then just move them over here to bar five. So I can just use this as a reference. Remember, I want to have this first note to be an a, so it's a minor. Ok, let's select this a minor again and hit command and see all control and say on Windows than in the selection area, slug bar one, and then hit Command V to paste on Mac or control V to paste on Windows. So here we have a minor just going to drag this out one-bar long. And let's now hear this back. Okay, that is our a minor. And I actually want to put this open octave. So I'm just going to select the a and just move up to a2. And actually want to have a bass note here as well. So once I add an, a, an octave below, so let's go back to the drawing tool by pressing b, and then just select the octave below. And now let's hit this back. Okay, so when I add a base part later on that necessarily need this bass note. But until I add a separate bass instrument, I do want to hear this bass notes. Okay, so for writing the chord progression like this, you will really need to experiment. I do recommend playing through each of these chords and just testing out and seeing what works. Okay, I don't really want to use this diminished chord, but any of the other courts could work. However, I want to try this F major. So again, I'm going to disable the Draw toolbar pressing Bay, click and drag this up, and then copy this command C or Mac or Control C on Windows than in the selection area B2. And then paste this with command va or Mac or control V on Windows, and then just drag this out. So it's one-bar long. Later on, we will be looking at vetting these chords, which basically means changing the order of the court. So they're a bit smoother and a flow a bit better. But for now we're just going to use root position. So just the older of the chord, root, third, fifth. But again, a, well add an octave below. So I want to f but an octave below. So again, back to the Draw tool by pressing Bay. And then drag this up so it's one-bar long. Okay, let's hit this back now. That's nice, works. And now I want to go to a minor chord again. So obviously I could go through and add in all of these different ones just to see what works. But I know what quarter one, I want to add a D minor. So that's this one here. You can see when I hover over, this note, says d over here. So again, press b, turn off the Draw tool. It commanded and C to copy or control and see on Windows slept bar free in the selection area. Then command via on Mac to paste more Control-V on windows. And again, I want to add octave below. So let's go back to the drawing tool. And let's draw this in here and listen to this back. So like I said, a probably wouldn't use a diminished and just going to add this and for this example. But to be honest, I think diminished weren't really sound suitable for what I want. So I just want to show you what the diminished sounds like here. It could work force suspense, but what I want is not quite suitable. So I'm just going to click on these to delete. And actually want to go up slightly here at the end. So I'm actually going to go up one step. So let's go to an E minor, which is Dischord here. So same again, drag over this chord, command C or control C to copy and then hit the selection area where you want to paste this. And then control V or command V to paste. So this is an E minor. So let's hit this button and add a bit of variation. I could have another sequence, not have this. E might have a different chord there. Feel like if you go down the second time, first-time, go up, second time, go down to add some more variation. And we'll look at this in the next video where we continue building quote for our sung. See that. 13. Writing Chords for our Song - Part 2: Okay, so now let's continue working on this chord progression. So previously we had the chords a minor, F, D minor, and email. And just to make this a bit simpler to understand, let's imagine this is C major, which is their relative nature of a minor. And of course would be minus six major for minor two and minus three. So we could apply this core progression to any key. But let's just leave this in. The key is already in. So next I actually want to add a never section. Okay, so this first part of the core progression is four bars long. And just to make this a little bit more interesting, I'm going to make the second part three bars long. And I just want to do this to add a bit variation so it's not too repetitive. And you may remember previously I said I want to go down at the end of this chord progression. But this time I'm just going to have the first two chords then have this third chord as a different court. So we do have some repetition using the first two chords. But then obviously it's going to be different because it's free by Islam. And then we have a different chord at the end. So I'm actually going to make this progression seven bars long and half a bar here, just so I can move these chords over and use them as a reference for now. Okay, so let's turn off the Draw toolbar, pressing b, and then just drag over these chords here and just can't move them over here. That would go, like I said, I'm going to have the first two chords repeats. So let's drag over these. So drag over these two chords and then press command and say on Mac or Control C on Windows. Then in the selection area, select bar five and paste this with Command V or Mac or Control V on Windows. Okay, so like I said before, I want to go down this time because previously we went up to the E minor, which is OP, one step. Now I want to go down one step. So instead of going up to E minor, going to go down to C major. So let's just find C major over here. So if a, B, C, This one here. Let's drag over this and hit Command and seed copy the lumbar seven, paste this in with command or control V. Okay, so here is the say. Let's add the base note, an octave below. And let's hit this BATNA. Okay, so I'm actually going to add another free bows and the moments. But before then I'm going to add another part just to make this a bit more interesting. So on this beat for here, I'm going to add another court. So let me just drag this back. And I want to step up this time to step up to the E minor. So we have to say, I'm going to step up atoned above to the day. And then step up again to this E minor. So that's just trim this back slightly further. Then we're going to add these two calls them. So the D minor and the a Minor. Okay, so let's turn off the Draw toolbar pressing Bay, and copy these two codes over. So if we divide this bar up, we have B1, B2, B3, and B4. And in-between each of the beats as well, we have the answer 1234 and so on. Under frey, I'm going to have this chord here, which is a D minor. And the four can have this E minor. Let me just show that now. We have a step-wise motion going up to the a minor. Just add a bit variation. So when you're writing music, do you think about adding intricate parts? Do you think about adding other parts n to make it a bit more exciting and less repetitive. Because if you just repeating the same four chords over and over again, it can get quite dull and boring. And now I'm going to add another free boss M. So divided this up really in two or four bar sequence and then 23 bar sequences. So for add that all up, it's going to be ten bar sequence. So I'm actually going to delete these cause now because I'm going to just use the cause I've already used, say previously, we were playing the a minor than the F sounds playing a minor chord and then a major chord. This time I'm going to play the a and then go to a minor chord, and then go to a major chord. So I'm going to use wander cause I've used before. You could try this E minor here. Let me just copy that. Paste it here. Let's hit this back. Then I wanna go back up to the F, which is what we had before. So it's not too different, but it's different enough to add some variation. Then again, copy over this D minor. E minor is passing cold Tia and pays them at the end here. This time I'm actually going to make this one here half of them. And then have these just unbelief for. Then I want to add another chord here. So staff having two chords can have free courts. So we're going from D minor, E minor. So I actually want to have another court here steps up. So I'm going to have the C major stepping to the D minor, stepping to the E minor. So never step-wise motion. Say if remember for C-major, we can use the pattern for them three. So 1234 to this a, then 123, this j. Okay, let's hit this back now. Okay, great. One more thing I'm going to add, it's just the bass notes for these passing called terror as well. So this one here is a D minor. So I'm going to add a day, and this is an E minor, so I'm going to add a same at the end here. This one is a C major. So let's find the c. This one is d minus, so that's added d. This one is an E minor, so that's add an e. Okay, so that is my ten bar chord progression. Normally you would do it in fours, not freeze, but I just wanted to add some variation. So you don't necessarily always have to have four bars, four bars, and then a free bar sequence and then another free bar sequence. And there is quite a lot of repetition by half mixed up. I have use different chords towards the end here. And I have used this passing chords and add a passing chords again, but change them slightly. And going back to the Roman numerals for our core progression, the first one would be minus six major for minor two, minor free. And then the second part would be minus six major four, major one. And then the passing chords would be minus two, minus three. Then the third part would be minus x minus three major four. And then the passing cause would be major one minor, two minor free. That is, of course, if we're looking at this in C-Major rather than a minor, I thought I'd just mention that in case you want to know the exact chord progressions are used. So do recommend writing out all the chords or playing the chords on your midi keyboard, and then going through and experimenting and selecting different ones. Slay added this quite quick. I did have some ideas in my head already. I do recommend taking your time to Russia and try and find some cause that you think work. Because later on we will be adding a melody, a bass part. I'm also going to be inverting and also adding to these caused later on. But I do believe this is a good foundation, but I'm going to play this back now before we continue building the sung. Okay, so that is our core progression. Like I said later on, I will be inverting these chords and adding other notes to these chords. But this works for now. And in the next video we're going to be looking at adding a melody. See you there. 14. Writing a Melody for our Song - Part 1: Hi there and welcome to this video where we're going to be looking at writing a lead melody. So this could be a synth line or a vocal. Before this section, I'm just going to keep it all instrumental. So I'm going to be using a simple line. And I want to write something that can be remembered and also something that people could sing along to. So sometimes I like to sing melodies in my head or out loud and then work them out and play them on my midi keyboard. However, if you are new to writing melodies, then you might need some patterns and techniques to help you come up with some melody ideas rather than just singing melodies are working them out on a keyboard or in the midi editor. Okay, so I want to write a melody that's catchy and that people could sing along to. And then we also want it repetitive enough so it's memorable, but not too repetitive that it gets too annoying. So an easy place to start when writing melodies is just to use the notes from the chord. So these could be in a different octave, but if you use one of the notes from the cord, you know it's going to fit. It may sound a little predictable at times, but it is a good starting point. You can also add passing notes or notes that aren't from the chord at certain parts, just to make a melody a bit more interesting. Okay, so awesome. When writing melody, It really depends on what you're feeling, what you want to create with your melody. But for now, I'm just going to keep it really simple. I'm also going to keep it in key. So all of the notes I play will be in the key of a natural minor. However, some of the notes I play will not be notes from the chord. Okay, so let's have a look at this first chord here. This is an a minor. Okay, let's just make a bit more space by dragging up this midi editor here. Okay, like I said, this first chord here is an a minor. So just to keep things simple, I'm actually going to have the melody start on one of the notes from the cord. This could be an a, a, C or an a. Also for now, I'm just going to add the melody on top of this piano part. Later on, I will be moving the melody to a separate instrument, to a synthesizer. But for now, I'm just going to keep all on the piano so we can see exactly what's going on. Okay, so let's actually add one of the notes from the chord up here. So let's start with this. Okay, lets now try the C. Now let's try the EE. To be honest, I like the sound of the root note that a, and this gives us a very firm and predictable sound. It's not necessarily the most exciting, but it works and it's safe. Okay. I'm not just going to have one held note for the whole bar as I do think, that is a bit too boring for what I want. So let's actually add some other notes now into this bar. Let me just zoom in by clicking and dragging on this ruler or pear. Ok, so now I feel like I want them to go up and then down. So halfway through this bar on beat three. Let's actually move up to another note that's in the chord. So it can move up to the, say. Let's try this. That works. Or could try moving up to the, a jump is a bit too high for what I want right now. I liked actually moving up to the say, I think that weren't well. Okay, I actually want to go up forever, so I want to continue going up. So I'm going to move the C over to B2. And then let's trim this back as well. Then we're going to go up again. And let's go up to this E. So another note from the chord. That works. Okay, I feel like I can add another now in-between hair as well. So let's trim this back and let's try day because this, is there any note that's in key in-between these two notes? So let's say this. Okay, that seems to work. And then like I said before, I want to go down at the end. So let's trim this back and add another note in here. We could go back down to the sea. That works, or we could even try the day. So this isn't a note from the chord, but there isn't no N-K. So they always want to land on notes in the chord as it can be a bit predictable. And sometimes it can add a bit more suspense. If you use notes that aren't from the chord, then when you land on a note in the chord, it'll create a release that, and that sounds good to me. Okay, there's just one more thing I want to do to this first part of this melody that is not have it come in straight away. It sounds a bit too rigid right now. So I'm just going to pull this back so it comes in on the and of one. So halfway through beat one. Okay, that sounds more interesting to me now, because before it was like this. And now it's like this. Okay, that sounds nice. I'm happy with this first parts. So loved melody writing is about creating suspense and release, and also about creating a question and answer. So you can think of your melody really as a conversation between two people. So there may be arguments or attention, and their argument may stop and they may come down, which could be the release. And with more complex melodies, you can actually think of feeds. Say melodies could be characters in the story, so certain themes or characters appear. And then the move and change for out and then the character or fem can develop. So a lot of musicals and film music does desks with their melodies. They will have different melodies for different characters in the film or musical. Okay, so let's go back to writing this melody. Let's look at this second chord here, which is an F major. Okay, so previously the melody was on this denote here, which gave us a little bit of suspense. Okay, so now I'm actually going to go back to firm ground and land on one of the notes from this chord here. So when this core place, I'm going to land on one of these notes from the chord. So I'm going to choose if f, a or C. So let's try f. This may be a bit too low, but that's where it back. Okay, I think that's a bit too low, so let's actually go up to C. And I'm also going to skip a for now, as that might be a bit too low for Y1 as well. That works. Ok, and now that's try f up here. Not really a fan of that, to be honest, I like the sound of this C. Okay, so you may notice that this first bar here has quite a lot of movement and goes to a few different notes. And for the second bar, just to add a bet variation, I'm not going to have as much movement and go to Les notes. So let's just add another note from the chord on the second half of the bar. So let's try the app. I'm not really a fan of that. Let's try the a. F was a bit too low, jumped too much. That works, that's nice. Could even try to go and back to the sea again. Or we could try the app. That works bachelorette, The Sound of staying on the C. However, I will want to add a note before this, but let's try one of the notes from the court and advice just before there. So on the end of beat two. So let's try the f. Not too keen on that. Let's try that. A k That works. I'm actually going to try this on beat two though, rather than on the island. Okay, I feel like this last bit now can come in a little bit earlier. So let's try this on and off too. Okay, that sounds quite memorable to me now. That sounds like quite catchy melody. Okay, so let's move along to the next chord. This is a D minor. And actually want to repeat this first pattern, but change it slightly just so we add a bit of repetition because they want people to sing along. And repetition can really help people remember melody. So I'm just going to turn off the Draw tool now and drag over these notes here from this first bar. And then let's click the selection area and paste this wave command VR, Mac or control via on Windows. Ok, I'm just going to make sure this is in the right place that drag this over. And let's have a look at some of these notes now. So first of all, we have an a, which is the fifth note from this D minor chord. Then we have a C, Which isn't one of the notes in the chord. But it might still work and it might help us add a bit more attention by using one of the notes that aren't in the chord. Then we have a d, which is obviously the root note. And we have an a, which is not one of the notes in the chord. But again, it might help us build a bit of tension. And then we go back to the day, which is obviously the root note. Let's say this back. I think that works fine. Let's hits back again. So obviously repeating the pattern, but it does sound different because we have a different chord below it. Okay, I'm for bar for, I want to have a similar pattern to B2, and I want to make it go higher. So down here it goes lower. And now I'm going to make it go higher. So we have a similar pattern, but it will sound quite different. So let's select over these and then copy this. And then paste this over two bar four. Okay, so let's actually try dragging this up. So let's have a look at this last chord, which is an E minor. So right now starting on the C. So let's try dragging this up. I want to go a bit higher than this. So let's try going to this G here. So we have the genome, which is the third note of this E minor chord. Then we have the a, which is a root note. So the two notes in this melody on bar for are actually Notes from the chord. So we do have a bit of suspense from bug-free. Then we have the release on bar for say here as well. We have tension and release again. Let's hit us back. Okay, I think that's nice. Also like to hear quite a lot of the melody back. So can hear altogether not just the new section, I want to hear how the new melody works with the rest of the parts. So let's hit his back again. Okay, so I think there's melody is starting to work. You may remember that for this chord progression, we have a four bar sequence and then to free bus sequences. So next video, we're going to continue looking at this melody. I'm going to adapt it and change it and make it fit to these two free bar sequences. So thanks for watching, and I'll see you in the next one. I'm going to continue writing this melody. 15. Writing a Melody for our Song - Part 2: Okay, so now let's continue writing this melody. Previously we wrote the melody for these four bars. And now I'm going to write the melody for these six bars. To the core progression was really divided into a bar of four bars. And then two bars are free bars. So I want to make this melody similar to this melody here, but also add some variation and make sure it fits with his 23 bar pattern. So you can see the shape before the melody for the first four bars. It goes up, then down, then up and up again. So this section here, bars five to seven. I want the melody to go up and then down. And then bars eight to ten. I want the melody to go up and then up. I do want to repeat this first part here though. So once repeat that part and then have this part a bit different. Ok, so I'm actually going to just copy these notes over, just see if they fit with these chords here. And going back to our core progression, that she starts off with an a and the f. And then the next part is a, an F, and third part is a thin e. So repeats in this first part of the melody will definitely fit here in the second part, but mainly to adapt it for this third part because we have an E minor rather than the f. But let me just copy over this first part now. So same as before. Click and drag over and then hit command c to copy and click on the selection area here. Then hit paste. And you notice it's not quite in the right place, so we'll have to click and move it into the right place. So this will be basically the same as here, as the chords are exactly the same, a nine and then f. So let's just hit this back. And you can see previously we go up to this held note here, this c. And in the second part I wanted to add a bit variation here. So let's actually zoom in. Then go over to the dual told by pressing b. So I'm going to go over to the C here. And I want to hear the notes now. So let's turn on this headphone icon here. I'm actually going to try going up to the C and then back down to this a. Let's hear what this sounds like. And let's actually make this shorter and then go up to the sea again. Okay, that kind of works, but I'm not too happy with the rhythm here. So let's just zoom in here and I'm going to change the river. So it sounds a bit more interesting because to be honest, this sounds a bit too boring at the moment. Nonce changed a ribbon around a bit more, so it's not so obvious. So let's turn off the Draw toolbar precent bee. Let's make this note here a bit longer. And obviously I need to move this now over. And let's just delete this node here. That's HEDIS back. Ok, that's better. We have longer help notes and then the shorter notes. And I'm going to make this one a bit longer as well. I actually want the next court and to hear. So rather than waiting to boss seven wanted to come in a little bit earlier. So that's something else we can do. We don't necessarily have to play the chords on the beat. So let me just try dragging these back. Then drag this cold over and some of the root node. And let's say this now. Okay, so when I think about this melody in my head, it seems to flow a lot nicer with this chord just coming in a little bit earlier. And now I want to add a note here as well. And like I said before, I actually wanted to go down at the end of this melody. So I want this pattern to gradually go down. So let's add a note that's a bit lower here, and that's referred back to the chord. So this one here is a C Major and go down to the G. Let's try this now. That works. Or we could even try going down to the sea, but that might be a bit too low. That works. But to be honest, I prefer the GI. And let's just look at the melody before. You can see we have this long-held note, so let's do the same here. Let's add a long-held note all the way over to by eight. So let's zoom out so we can see these different patterns. So the first half is the same. Then we have a big variation here. And really now I've adapted this 2-bar phrase into a free bar phrase. So I've added a long-held notes at the end to add a bit variation, but we do have some repetition at the start. Let's now hear this back from the start. Okay, that works. I think that's a good melody to singing as well. Obviously, this is just a piano part. If this did want to be a vocal part, I think this would work for a vocal part as well as the instrumental part. Okay, now let's look at the last part of the melody, the last free boss. So I'm going to actually repeat the first part, gam. But the two bars here, I'm going to change. I remember I wanted to go up at the end. But first let's copy over this first part and see if this fits. Just drag this over so it's in the right place. On the end of bomb. Okay, so as that's just the first bar that fits fine as this is still a minor. Next, it goes to a different chords. You may remember previously it goes to the F and merit goes to this E minor. So I don't really want to play an F here because it may class because E minor and F i just a semitone apart. So let's choose a different part for this bar here. Like I said, I wanted to go up. So let's choose one of these notes from the chord. So we have an a, and let's go to the a. That works. Or we could try the gee, that's nice. That feels like it wants to go up there. I could even try to be, but this may be too high. He I think that's going to be too high. And if someone was going to sing that may be out of their range as well. So let's try the j. Okay, that's nice. And let's add a bit of rhythm hair as well. So let me just zoom in. So really rhythm is an important part of writing melodies. And do you find it helpful to sing the rhythm in my head and kind of feel that groove. But for now I'm just going to type this into the midi editor by D recommend trying to sing and feel the rhythm for the grief. And that's really all elements of songwriting or music composition. So let's try the offbeat or let's have the note pair on the end of one of these. So let's try the and of two. And let's also try the AMD or free. That seems to work. However, I do want to add another note in here because it is a bit too repetitive At the moment. I think another note could be nice. Let's try it. Another note from the chord. Let's try and E, this note here. That's nice. Could even try low notes. Let's go to the B. That might be too much of a jump. I prefer that a, so let's go back to that. And here we're going to fill up. The court should come in earlier. Philoctetes should come in on the end of four. So let's actually move this back. So let's move this called back. This afterward. Same with the root notes. Okay, let's hit this back. That's nice. And oil to go up. Remember at the end, let's add a higher note here, not too high because someone wants to sing this, it will be out of their range. However, if it's instrumental music, You don't really have to think about singer. I like to imagine someone's singing it as well. And for two reasons. The first one is if I decide to add vocals, and the second part is for people singing along, I want people to sing along to these songs. And if it's too high or too low, that may not be able to sing along exactly. Okay, the last chord, as I just said, there is this f. So let's try one of the notes from F. We've got this a that works. We've got to the C might be a bit too high. That is very high. But do you think that might be a bit too high? And I do want it to go up, so let's try this. A. Okay. I like that. No, I want it held for longer as well as have a all the way to the end. I just zoomed out there so you can see the rhythm here began up and down. Then we are going up and up and up and down and down there we're going up and up. So just by looking at this revenue, you can see we have a lot of repetition, but we do have some variation as well. And we also have tension and release as well. So at the end we have this release. At the start we have this tension. Okay, so really we're creating some tension when we have notes that aren't in the chord and recreate and some release when we London notes that are in the chord. So to start, we have a bit tension. Release. Tension, release, tension, release, tension, release. I think that's quite a memorable melody. I think people could sing along to that because it is repetitive, but we do have variation as well to make it more interesting, such repetitive enough that people can remember it, but hasn't the variation that's not too boring. Okay, so that's the melody. You can write melodies in other ways as well. You can write a melody first and then adapt the cause to the melody. That is another method for composing. But the way I've showed you is just to write the courts first and then adapt the melody to the courts, which I do think is an easier way of writing melodies if you're brand new to songwriting and composition. Ok, so in the next video, we're going to continue working on this sump. Thanks for watching. 16. Inverting the Chords: Hi there and welcome to this video where we're going to be looking at inverting the courts. So let's just have a look at the first court here. So I'm just going to zoom in here. So here we have our triad. So that is the root, the third and the fifth. We also have this bass note down here as well, which is just the root note, an octave lower. So we can actually invert the courts, which is essentially changing the order of the notes in the chord. So when we play between different courts, for example, this a minor and this F, It can sound a little bit jumpy, and we've inversions. We can change the order of the notes so it doesn't jump between the notes as much and sound smoother. So let me just show you now, just going to play this a minor and F, and you'll notice it might sound a bit jumpy. We also have the melody playing that we wrote previously. I'm going to leave that there for now as well. Let me now actually invert the second chord to make it sound less jumpy. So you can see here we have this f2 and we can change this two and F three up here. And now you'll notice in this triad but only moving one semitone between this E and F. So if you are going to invert the course like this, we'll, we'll need a bass note or an instrument playing a bass note. So just bear that in mind as well. So later on when I add a synth bass part, or weren't necessarily need this base part and the piano. But for now, everything is just on the piano. So we are going to leave this bass note here. Okay, so now I'm going to go through these chords and invert some of them, so there's less jumps. And so going between the chord sounds a bit smoother. Later on we're actually going to add more notes to extend some of these chords, which will add more comatose for courts and make them sound a bit more interesting. But first of all, let's just invert some of these courts. So you can see here we have this D minor and we have this big jump going between the F-Major And the D minor. I'm just going to turn off the Draw tool for now. And we can actually use Shift and the up arrow to move these notes open octave. So let's try moving this d. And let's also try moving this f up. So let's select this F. Move this open octave as well. Okay, let's hit this bug. That sounds nice. Okay, moving on to the next chord. I'm just going to deactivate this midi editor preview for now. And let's select this ie, hold Shift and up arrow. And I'm actually going to leave this g down here because I don't want the course to get too high. So let's hear this back. Sounds fine. This one here, this a minor. We can leave this as is, as it's not moving too much. Okay, going along, we have this F-major. So I'm going to put this f open octave. I do want to have this melody higher than the courts, so that want to have the notes too high or clashing with this melody rarely. So I'm not going to have the notes any higher than this G here. Okay, so hold shift and the up arrow. And same again, next chord we have the C major, C up an octave, and also this e of an octave. So you already have a G being played here in the melody. And we don't necessarily need this G in the chord if it's being played in the melody. But I'm going to leave it here for now. Ok, next we have this D minor. I'm going to move this d. Captive animals are going to move this a up an octave for this next chord, which is an E minor. Okay, going along, we have this a minor. I'm going to leave this as it is, as that doesn't move too much. And then we have this E minor that's put this ear productive. And let's put this f up an octave for this next chord, the F major. Then we have these free calls moving upwards. I liked the idea of the cause moving upwards here. So I'm gonna make sure the court still move up even when I invert them. So let's try moving this C and this IAP, and this d, and this f. And then for this E minor last call here, that's moved off as well. Okay? So obviously we do have the bass notes down here, which we will need if we're going to be inverted in a course like this. But let's hit this back now and you should notice it sounds a bit less jumpy. Let's just say Nazi can see them all. Okay, so if you are going to be writing a chord progression and you have added bass notes, that I do recommend inverting the cause because it will sound a lot nicer and a lot smoother. Okay, so in the next video we're going to be adding more notes, these chords. I'll see you there. 17. The 3 Different Types of 7th Chords: Hi there. Welcome to this video where we're going to be looking at adding or extending the cords in our chord progression. So if we add more notes to these chords, we're actually going to be adding more color tones to the chord. So can make the chord sound a little bit more interesting by adding more notes to them. We can't just add any notes them though. There are rules and guidelines that we need to follow and the types of chords we're going to be adding to our core progression are going to be seventh chords and extended courts. So a seventh chord is when you add an extra note to it, the seventh note TO three-note triad, making it now a four-note chord. So let's first talk about seventh chords before we look at extended courts. And there are actually three different types of seventh chords. And seventh chords are really used in many different types of music such as blues, rock, jazz, and you can also use seventh chords in electronic music. Okay, so let me just tell you now the different types of seventh chords. So you have a major seventh, and if you have a major chord apart from the fifth major chord of the major scale, you will have a major seventh. So let me just go back to the chords in a major scale. And you may remember this from the previous Music Theory lessons. But in the major scale, you can use these cause major, minor, minor, major, major, minor, diminished major. So if every major chord apart from the fifth one, you can play a major seventh. And with every minor chord, you can play a minor seventh. And then with a fifth chord, you can play a dominant seventh. And you can also play a diminished seventh chord. However, we're not going to be looking at this at the moment. Okay, so let me go over to a major chord. And this chord progression, we have a major called here. The second chord is an F major chord. And if we zoom in a bit more, we'd be able to see that note names. So I'm actually going to move this back to root position just for this example. So you may remember in the previous video we inverted this chord. So we put the f or productive. So I'm going to select this ethno and hit Shift and the down arrow and move this down an octave just for this example. So it's a bit easier to see. So there are a few ways to actually work out. And Major seventh chord, the way I like to think about it is the major seventh. It's just one note below the root, an octave above. So this f naught here, 0 Octave is this FRA, and OneNote below or one semitone below are bringing us to a. So this will be our major seventh. So let me just draw this. So here will be a major seventh chord. And I'll play this on my midi keyboard as well. So here, this, this is our majors have. Alternatively, you can use the past and the fourth and f3 and f4 to work out a major seventh. So you may remember before to work out and major chord, we need to use the pattern for them free. So let me just show that again. Let's just activate the midi editor preview, but this headphone icon again. So we can work out a major seventh chord, but the pattern for the free them for, let me just show you that. So starting on the F we can't fall onto brings us to this. A cancer-free brings to the safe. We, counsel four again, 1234 are bringing us to this E. So if you already know the triad, you can add a major seventh by just adding one note below the root note with octave above. Or you can use the pattern to work out the entire core for free for a case. And now let's talk about the minor seventh chord. So we'll add this to a minor chord. And this time is two notes below the root note, an octave above. Let's just use this a minor chord as an example. So if you put this a up an octave, it would be this node a here. And two notes below 12, or bringing us to this g. If I just play this on my midi keyboard Now, this is a minor seventh chord. Or alternatively you can work out a minor seventh chord by using the pattern F3 and F4 and F3. So if we start on a here, if we count up free to bring this to the c, then if we count off four again, 1234 brings us to this a. And if we count up free again onto three, brings us to this G. And this is a minor seventh chord. Okay? And those are never seventh was talking about, and that was a dominant seventh. So a dominant seventh is basically a major triad with a minor seventh on top. And in a major scale we have one dominant seventh chord, and that is the fifth chord of the scale. So in C major, if you go back to the pattern of major minor, minor, major, major minor, diminished major. The fifth is this one here. So if we're in saying we count up five. So that's five notes in the scale. It will be the g. And right now we're in a minor, but it's relative major is C major. So if we do use a g in this core progression, and we want to make it a seventh. It will be a G dominant seventh. So we don't actually use a g in this core progression. However, just for this example, I'm going to draw it in a G dominant seventh at the end of this progression. So bar 11, I'm going to add a G dominant seventh. So remember it's a major chord with a minor seventh on top. So let's add this j here. And we can use the pattern for them free and free to create a dominant seventh. So let's count off for now to get our third onto this b. And now let's count or free to get our fifth one to free will bring us to this day. And that's counter free again. To bring us to the seventh chord. 1-2-3 brings us to this F. So essentially a major chord with a minor seventh on top. Let me just play this on my midi keyboard. So we have this major triad with a minor seventh on top. So dominant seventh chords are used all the time in jazz and blues music. And we can use this in our core progression as well. If you want to make the fifth chord of the major scale a seventh chord. But for this progression, we're not going to have a dominant seventh chord. Let me just move that back the way it was. Ok, so that is the three different types of seventh chords. And in the next video, we're actually going to be adding seventh chords and extended caused to our song. I'll see you there. 18. Adding 7th Chords and Extended Chords to our Song - Part 1: Hi there and welcome to this video where we're going to be looking at adding seventh chords and extended chords to our core progression. So we didn't actually have to add a seventh chord or an extended call to every code. You do have to use your ears and listen to hear if you're actually improving the cold or not. And there are other types of cores than seventh courts, such as ninths, elevenths, suspended chords. But for now we're just going to look at seventh chords. And we have a quick look at ninth chords later on. So previously we went over the different types of seventh chords. And we also looked at versions. So you don't necessarily have to play the seventh chord in root position, meaning that we have the root node or the first note Lois down, then the third, then the fifth, and the seventh, we can actually change the order of the notes and invert them so they sound less jumpy between the courts. And let's see if we can improve them by adding a seventh note or not. Also, if you can play chords on a midi keyboard, it can really speed up your process. However, it's not necessary. And I'll try and keep this in the midi editor as much as I can in case you don't want to use a midi keyboard to play colds or notes. Okay, so let's have a look at the first cold over here. So in the previous video, we actually added a minor seventh to this chord, this g or pair. And at the moment is in root position, meaning that we have the first node of the root node, then the third and the fifth, and the seventh. And we also have the bass note, which is the root now in octave below here as well. But it's also important to hear this with the melody because there's no point just add into the chords unless it adds to the song. So what we could do now is actually invert this first chord. So what I'm going to do is actually press shift and a down arrow to move the seventh data. So you can see that the jump between these first two chords isn't too large. And also we have a bit more space now between the chords and the melody, not clashing and frequencies too much. Let's now here this first cool back with the melody. I'm previously it was like this. Gives a different kind of sound. I prefer the seventh down an octave. Okay, so I believe this first quote works, and this is an, a minor seven. And now let's have a look at the second chord here. Just going to zoom in. And if we zoom even more, we can see the note names here. Let's try turning the second cold, which is an F major chord, into a seventh chord. Okay, so in the previous video, we've already turned the second code into a seventh chord. This is now an F major seventh chord because we have this a on top. For member. We know it's a major seventh chord because it's just one note below the root now octave. So this would be an octave, this f. And one that below or one semitone will be this a. I actually like this one being in root position. We could try, for example, putting this f open octave. But I'm not really a fan of playing the semitones next to each other. I think it might clash a bit too much. Still works, but fair it down an octave so you can't hear the semitone al clash. Okay, let's now have a look at the third chord. And you can see this is a triad, This is a three note chord. We haven't added a seventh note to this core jet. And you might remember that this is a D minor chord. So we have a day in the base. Then we've inverted this. So the F, The third is up here. Then we have the a, the fifth, and then we have the root note up here as well. So this core has been inverted. So I'm just going to put the core progression on the screen there. And I do think it's a good idea to actually write down your cord so you can refer back to them. Of course, you can work them out, but can be sometimes just to be easier, just to glance at them. Maybe I'll text document or on a piece of paper so you can quickly see your chord progression. So this is a D minor. And remember we can turn a minor chord into a minor seventh chord by counting two notes below the root note, an octave above. So the root note is D because this is a D minor chord. So we have a d Now here. So tonight's below this one to bring us to this C. And we're actually playing a C before. So I can't just add another C here. And this will be a D minor seventh chord. Let's just play this BATNA. I'm just going to play this chord on my midi keyboard. It works, it sounds nice. And for this, I'm actually going to put the f down an octave. So let's hear this back. The sounds nice to me. And because we have this D playing in the base, we don't necessarily have to have the dino up here as well because it's already been played down here in the base. So what we can do is actually change the D note to a different note if we wish. I still want to have four notes up here. But this time I'm going to try changing the d up to an a. And this will actually make it a D minor ninth chord. And with a minor night, what we are doing is we essentially have a minor seventh and we also add the second note of the scale. So it's a night rather than the second, because if it's called a second, it means we actually replace a note, most likely the faired with the second. And a knife means we just add another note on top of that and we keep the third. So even though we're adding a second, it's not a second chord, it's a ninth chord. So this is just another way of adding notes that accord. And now this chord is known as an extended chord. We can also extend this even more by adding a fourth, and then it will be known as the 11th chord. And then we could also add a six as well, and then it will be known as a 13th chord. But for now I'm just going to add the second note and make this a minor ninth chord. And in D minor, the second note is an E. And you notice we actually have the same notes as this previous chord, this F Major seven. So apart from the base note, this D minor nine has the same notes as this F Major seven. So we should have even less jumping sound and it's just sound even smoother. Let's now hear this F Major seven going into this D minor nine. Okay, that sounds nice. So we have this F Major seven. And all we're moving is this bass note. These four notes up here are the same. So a sound less jumpy when you play between the two chords. And I think it gives a nice sound. Ok, let's continue on. Next is an E minor chord. Let's continue adding four notes up here. So the most obvious one to add would be the seventh. So as this is an E minor chord, we just need to count down to notes from eight, add the seventh. So that's fine. It's here. And countdown to notes 12 will bring us to this day. So let me just draw it in D here. By the way, you can just double-click to add a note. You don't necessarily have to go back to the Draw tool. So we could invert this recovery example, but this D down octave. So let's say this back. I think that's a bit too low there. So I'm going to try the D White was before. Okay, I like the sound of that being a seventh chord. So let's leave it at that and let me just zoom out. Okay, so for the first part of the sequence, the first four chords, we've turned them into a minor seventh, major seventh, minor nine, and minus seven. And in the next video, I'm going to continue freed his core progression and adding to an extending these chords. I'll see you there. 19. Adding 7th Chords and Extended Chords to our Song - Part 2: Okay, so now let's continue adding notes to these courts in its core progression. So previously we added notes to the first four chords, and now let's add notes to the other chords. So we don't necessarily have to add notes to the chords that we can add more color terms to your cords and can make them sound a bit richer. Ok, so let's zoom in here. And this next chord, if you remember, is an a minor again. So I do have some repetition in this malady, and I'm also going to have some repetition in this core progression. So I'm actually going to have this exactly the same as the first chord, which is an a minor seven, and have this in the same position. Let's add a G or a minor seventh down here. Notice as well, we have the G and the core previously, and it won't jump between these two cause too much. Okay. That sounds nice. Let's now have a look at the next court. And this again is an F chord. So again, I want to add some repetition. So I'm going to have this exactly the same as the second chord here. So you remember this was an F major seventh chord because we have this major seven for the top, this E. So we do actually need to move this f down to an a. And then we need to add on an F down here. That's now here, this back. Okay, that sounds nice. Next chord here is a C. So we haven't used a C yet. I'm, so for this, I'm going to try a C Major seventh. Remember for a major seventh, it's just one note below the first note, or the root node. So we have to say here. And one night below this will bring us to this B. Add on a b. I am not really a fan of this clash here, the semi-colonial clash. So what could do is even move the B or C AAPL down octave. However I want to do is actually change this into a ninth chord. And remember with a knife chord we're adding on the second note. We also have the C down here in the base. So we don't necessarily have to have a say or pair as well. So I'm going to change this say. Into a day. And now this will be a C major knife. And let's hit this back. Okay, that sounds nice and a bit more color to this chord. So we have the root node, which is the C. Then we have the G, which is the fifth. Then we have the major seventh, which is the base. Then we have the ninth, which is this d. Then we have the third, which is this E. I think there's major knife is quite nice, lush sounding chord. Ok. Next we have these two chords here. So you have this D minor and we have this E minor. So he did play a D minor, E minor previously. I'm actually going to copy what I did there for these chords here as well. So if the previous d mind that this was actually a D minor nine, so we have the third, the F, Then we have the fifth, a, then we have the minor seventh to say. Then we have the a, the knife. So here we have the F, then we have the a, then we have the first note. Let's change this to a C. And then that's ad on a top. Which is the knife that say what this sounds like. We can always change this if it doesn't sound right. I do want to have a bit of repetition in my core progression as well. That sounds good, that sounds nice. And then we have, if you remember, previously, we had a minus seven. So we have the j, which is the third. Then we have the b, which is the fifth. And we have the d, which is the minor seventh. And we have the first note that e. So all we need to do here is just add on a day and we can add it in the same place as before. Let's hit this button now. Okay, I think that sounds good. Then we have an a minor again, it's add repetition. That's how this exactly the same as the first two times. We have the a minor. So here and here. So that's add on this G, this minor seventh down here. Okay, next is an, a minor chord. And let's actually have this the same as before as well. So just adding the seventh. And let's here going from this to this E minor seventh night. Okay, that sounds nice, is important as well to listen to the melody, make sure what you're playing doesn't clash too much. We are actually adding more color and more dissonance to the courts when we extend them. But I do think this can sound good. Just make sure the melody isn't clashing too much. And if it doesn't quite sound right, uh, don't recommend adding to the cords are extending the chords. But to be honest, I think this all works fine with the melody so far. Okay, and then this code down here, this is an F major chord. And we had an F major chord previously. So let's have a look at this. So we start with f, the root, then we have the a, then we have the C, then we have the a major 74 pair. So this will be a major seventh chord. So we need to actually put this into root position. So let's actually change the order of this. So right now we have the f at the top. That's hold down shift and the down arrow, and move this down an octave. And now let's add on this major seventh, this IAP here of y's the e and the aft will be next to each other. And we'll get this semitone or classroom, which I don't really want for this. So let's put this F down an octave. And let's hit this back. Okay, that sounds good. Then we have these free cause at the end, the C major, D minor, E minor. Remember previously we have this D minor, E minor. I'm actually going to copy this. So this was a D minor nine and e minus seven. Let's just zoom in. Okay, so let's work on the D minor, E minor first. For the D minor, we have this f down here. Let's add an f here. Then we have this a, which we have here already. Then we have this C, which is the minor seventh. So let's move this day down to a C. Then we didn't play the day because we play it in the bass note. And then we have the a, which is the minor knife. So let's move this f down to an a because we have the F down here. Then we have the email at the end. Let's turn us into an E minor seventh and copy what we had before. So we have this j, which is the third. Then we have this b, which is the fifth, which is already there. And we have this d, which is the minor seventh. That's just draw. Listen. Okay, then we have this a, which is the root node pair. And that's get rid of this G because we play it down here already. And let's just change the say. And remember previously we didn't have a C as well. This was actually a C Major nine because we have the a and the B. So let's change this one into a C Major nine as well. So we have the E here, which we had before. Then we have this day, which is the major knife. Then we don't need the C here because we playing it in the bass. So let's move this to a B. Then we have this G, which we had before as well. So let's hit this back. Okay, so what I did is I started off turning this into seventh chords. And for a few calls actually turn them into ninth chords as well. So like I said, you don't necessarily have to add to the call to extend the chords. But it can sound nice and concern richer and can add more color tones to your chords. That's how this back. Okay, I think that works. I think it makes it called sound a bit more rich. It bit more full and a bit more interesting. So in the next video, we're going to continue working on their sung. I'll see you there. 20. Separating the Parts onto a New Instrument: Hi there. Welcome to this video where we're going to be looking at separating the parts onto new instruments. So previously we wrote for chords and the melody all on this piano part. And now I actually want to have the melody on the separate instruments as I want this to be a synth parts rather than a piano parts. Like I said earlier, is useful to write the parts on the piano as it's a very clear way of hearing the notes. And it also allows you to have the melody and the chords on the same clip. However, in this video, I'm going to move the melody onto a new clip. So first of all, I'm going to rename this clip that we're currently working on. So I'm going to right-click and go down to rename. We can use the key command, command on Mac or Control on Windows to rename this. And I'm just going to call this. All I want to do now is just copy and paste this. So I have a copy of this. So it can always refer back to this. So you can see the chords and the melody at the same time. So I'm going to right-click and go down to copy or use the key command, command C or Mac or control-C on Windows. Then I'm just going to scroll down here and right-click and go and paste, or use the key command, command v or Mac or Control V on Windows. And paste this down here out of the way. So I can just scroll down to access this later if I wish. Okay, so now let's create a new instrument. So instead of going into instruments and the categories, I'm actually going to go down to packs, which is under places here. I'm also going to use this simple instrument as this is available on all additions of Ableton Live 11. And I'm going to access one of these presets now. So let's do this by going over to packs down here. And I actually want to use one of the core libraries sounds. So these are the sounds that are included with Ableton Live. I will be using patents later on, see mainly to download additional content, but I'll make sure it's free packs for Ableton Live suite uses. Or if you're using light to intro or standard. And I'll show you alternative Sam's or instruments that you can use as well. Okay, so I'm just going to scroll through my packs and she's cool library. If you do want to download more back, scroll down to the bottom here and tell you what packs are available and where to get them from. For this, let's just find the core library. Then we're going to hit this disclosure triangle here. And now let's go down to devices, the disclosure arrow here. And then go down to instruments. And then go down to simpler here. And from here let's have a listen to lead and symph keys. So let's go onto symph lead. And we have a few different sounds. Hey, we can use. So let's click on the first one. I don't think that's quite suitable for what I want. So let's try the other ones. And I don't think these ones are suitable, Eva, let's now have a look at sinth keys. And I don't think that one suitable. However, I think this one here called reverberant could be suitable. So I'm just going to double-click to load this. Or alternatively, we can click and drag this over to an empty midi track. Now what I'm going to do is copy this piano clip from before. So right-click on this and go and copy, and then right-click and paste on this new midi track. Ok, I'm just good to make sure the midi editor Preview button is turned off. So I'm just going to click and drag over the middle colds and also over these base notes here. And delete this. So now we just have this lead pot. Let's have a listen to this bottom of the piano part. It's just going to stop the clip button for the piano parts and just listen back to this lead pot. Okay, I think that's good. So I'm just going to actually right-click on this flip, rename this lead. Let's actually give us a color as well. So right-click on this. I'm going to give this the same color as the track and also going to click on the track and rename this as well. Lead on the piano part here I'm going to delete this lead pot. So same again, click and drag over these notes and then just hit delete. Now we have the colds among clip. And then the lead part on and level clap. I can play them both back with this scene trigger button over here. Okay, so I'm just going to rename the clip for the piano instruments or right-click on this and go rename and call this court's. I'm just going to rename this to piano as well. Ok, so now, now that I've got the course clip here and then the league clip here. We also have independent control of the codes on another day. So we can change the volume, the pan position, or we could add effects this. Okay, so now we've separated these parts. The next video we're going to be looking at writing a bass part c, u, that 21. Writing a Bass Part - Part 1: Getting Started + Bass Sound: Okay, so now we've written the chords and the melody. Let's write a bass part. So actually want to have a base part. We have quite a lot of movement and something that has a bit of a funky vibe to it. It won't necessarily be flanked by any means. I just wanted to groove and have some movements. So before we actually type in the bass part, I'm going to find a bass sound because the base tone or bass sound is very important. So I'm going to be using the simpler instrument again, as this is available on all versions of Ableton Live. And let's go up to instruments. And I'm also going to be using the pack synth essentials. And you can find this pact by going to the official able to insight and then select impacts and scrolling down to find this one called sinth essentials. So this pack is included in Ableton Live 1011 suite. So if you're using suite, there's no additional cost to download this pack. However, if you're using another edition of Ableton Live, so light intro or standard, and you want to follow along, then you won't be able to download this pack. However, in a few minutes, I'll show you another baseline that you can use if you wish. Ok, so let's go back to Ableton Live. And let's hit the disclosure triangle next assembler, and then hit the disclosure triangle and next the base. And the base sound I want to use is this one here called 101 essential base. Okay, so now let's actually insert new midi track. So let's go up to create and then select, insert midi track, or use the key command Shift Command T on Mac, or Shift Control T on Windows. And now let's double-click on one-to-one essential base to load this into this track. I'm just going to play some notes on my midi keyboard, so we know this is working. So if you don't have Ableton Live suite and you want to follow along. So if you're using light intro or standard, that the recommend using the core library pack, which is available for all additions of Ableton Live. So we can go down to packs again. And then under core library devices, instruments, simpler. You can go down to base here. And you can use one of these, this one here, BBA should be fine. Or you can use one of the other ones if you prefer. However, I think be base should be fun. Also, you don't need to use this simple instrument. You can use another instrument if you prefer. I'm just using simpler and it's available for all versions of Ableton Live save using suite. You can use one of these other instruments if you prefer. Okay, so now let's write the bass parts. So to make things easier, let's actually copy over the midi notes from records and from the melody. So you may remember from before that we copied over the clip that had the chords and the melody. So let's just click on there so you can see here the chords and the melody. So now let's right-click on this and go to copy, and then paste this into this bass track. I'm also going to rename this track here. So right-click on this and go rename or use the key command, command on Mac, or control, or windows. And let's call this base. Now if we scroll down, we can see this midi information. I'm just going to use this as a visual guide ready, so you can see the notes from the chord. I might want to use some of the notes from the melody as well. So I'm just going to select all these notes by pressing command and a. And then I'm going to deactivate all these notes by pressing Zero on my computer keyboard. So now we can see these notes where if you play it back, we won't be able to hear it. We can delete these notes after, if you wish, just a tidy things up. Law. Do you think it's useful to see the notes in the chord and also the melody and writing a base. But we don't necessarily need to see the melody here. But it might be useful if you want to play the melody at the lower octave. Also, if there's midi information was not deactivated, then it won't sound great as it's monophonic, which means only one note can be played at a time. So we wouldn't actually be able to hear these chords. But like I said, we'll just use this as a visual reference. You can also write the bass part on the piano if you like. But do you think the tone and sound of the bass is important? So I'm going to write it on this bass sound. Okay, so let's actually scroll down in this midi editor. And you may recall that we have these base notes in the piano. So when we write the bass part, we don't necessarily need them for the piano, but let's just leave them here for now as a visual reference. I'm also going to use the same octave because for the base, we obviously want it played at a low octave. To start off by typing in the root notes in this midi editor. So what I'm going to do just to keep things simple, is just click and drag over these base notes and then activate these again by pressing Zero. And let's have a listen back with the piano chords and a lead, but OK, it works. It's just very boring right now. And this particular bass sound dies off quite quickly as well. So for long-held notes like this, this base aren't, isn't quite suitable, but I am going to add more notes than this. And we're going to add some movement data run. So don't worry about that. Okay? And another thing to know is that I actually turned down the levels of the base and the lead part than when the play that back, as we were actually exceeding 0 dB on our master fader, which can cause clipping or unwanted distortion. So just make sure you don't go into the red or go above 0 db. Ok, so you don't necessarily have to write music in this order. You can write music starting with any instrument. Even write your song starting off with the drumbeat. You could also start your sung off by writing the melody and then advocates. Or you can start your song off by writing a baseline. But do you think it's good for beginners to start off with chords and then the melody, and then add the base Android part. But like I said, you can really write music and any audio ones. But this is just what I recommend. So now let's talk about the rhythm section of your song. So you really need to think about what your songs as for, as this dance song, to want people to dance to your music? Or was this a song for people to relax to? So for this song, I want more of a groovy, funky Baseline, and we start to write these midi notes. In the next video, I'll see you there. 22. Writing a Bass Part - Part 2 - Writing the Groove - PT 1: Hi there. Welcome to this video where we're going to start writing our bass part. So previously we added the root notes for every chord. And now we're going to build on this to create our base part. So in this video, I'm just going to focus on the first four bars. And then in the next video, I'm going to look at the next six bars. So let me just zoom in on these first four bars here. And let's have a look at this first chord. So I do want to add a bit of movements because right now it's just long-held notes. So the first thing I'm going to do is draw it in a note every quarter beat. So I'm going to go back to the Draw toolbar pressing b, and then just draw in a note every quarter beat. And let's just say this back narrow. Okay, this works, is effective and it does add a bit of movement to our groove. However, I do think this may be too simple for what I want. Okay, so for this base part now, I am going to add some more notes from the cord and also some passing notes to make it a bit more interesting. And then going to adjust the timing and rhythm of this part so it grooves a bit more. So obviously for this first quote, this a minus seven, if you remember, just the root notes on every beat tour, every quarter note. So I'm actually going to add another note in here. And let's try on the and of two. So when I say the AND of two, and is the second half of the beat. So the beat is divided into two. So 1234 and to the end of two is here. So I'm going to draw it in a note now. So let's actually try the third. So an E minor, The third 123 will bring us to this C. So let's draw an a C on the and of two. And let's hit us back now. I'm just going to start at the base part for now. It's a good idea to hear the bass part, so load, but also in the mix with other instruments. If you make a great base part, but it doesn't fit with that of instruments, and therefore it's not really a great base part. The bass part has to fit with the other instruments really, if you want to make a great base part, okay, I actually want to add and never be here on the end of four. And I'm going to add the seventh note this time. So if you go back to the chords, you might remember the seventh note is actually this G. So it's a good idea as well to refer to the courts. And you may remember from before we actually have these cause in this midi editor, which can be useful to refer to. So I'm going to add this G, which is the seventh. Okay, let's hire this back now. Let me solo this. Okay, that start to groove now and it fits well with the piano part and the lead part. Let's now have a look at the next chord. So Sam, again, I'm just going to add quarter notes. And now let's add these and change these to make something that groups a bit more. So let's actually try using the same pattern from the previous court. Let's go up to the third. So the third of F, it's gonna bring this to the a. And you notice here we have this a and the cord. So in the end of two, let's go to this a i let's hear this back. Okay, I think that could be better. So I actually want to have this little lower selects try going to the G, which is the second note. This isn't in the cord, but this really is a passing note, so it doesn't necessarily have to be in the chord. Let's hit this back now. Okay, I think that works. And for the second half of the court, I want to add a bit of variation now. So I want to actually create a descending pattern down to this day. So on the, and are free, Let's try adding an a. Because this is a note in key in-between the AF and a day. And we also have this in the cord. This is the major seventh of the chord. And like I said, I want to continue going down. So for beat four, let's try going down to the day. We do have the D here as well obviously, but this should work fine. Let's listen to this BATNA. Okay, that seems to sound good. That's here, this in the next. Okay, I think that works well and it's quite interesting. Let's now have a look at the next chord, which is this one here. Numeric member is a D minor nine. So actually want to have the opposite of this one. I want to go up at the end. The same again, let's start off with the root notes. And again, let's add another note on the end of beat two. And for this I wanted to go to the a, which were actually playing in the court. So that's the ninth note of the chord. So let's go to this a. I like a saddle ones go up at the end of this code. So I'm actually going to try changing this d two and f. So this is a semitone apart and may clash slightly. But this now is in the cord, and it is really just a passing notes. So it should say I'm fine. Okay, let's try actually having the F on before as well. And now let's go up at the end. And now let's try going into g. Okay, let's hit this back. Okay, I think that sounds good. And now let's have a look at this last chord in his first four bar phrase. So you may remember that this is an E minor seven. So again, let's write in the root note that e on every beat or on every quarter note. And actually once go up here. So we go up to this next chord, the a. And I want to copy this pattern from the previous cooled slightly. So you notice the second half of the court, we go up to a different note. So I'm not going to go up to the ask because that may clash with this a. So let's try going up to the G. So this is the third of the chord. And again for repetition and also the ADA movement. Let's add a note on the end of beat two. And I want to have a no in-between E and G. So this is going to be f because this is a note in key in between E and G. And like I said, I wanna go up towards the end. So let's go up to another note before we go down again. And I'm actually going to get up to this, a note here on the end of beat free. So we do have a bit of variation as well. Because the previous course, we had a note on the under beat four, and now we have a note on the end of beat free. Let say this about now. Okay, I think that works well. So this bass part so far has a similar pattern for each one of these chords, but there is also some variation in that. So I'm adding more notes, this base part that isn't just a root notes. And I'm also adding some notes on the end of the beat. We're getting a bit more of a groove and it's starting to sound a bit more interesting. So in the next video, we're going to continue writing the space. But what I'm going to write the next six bars of this loop, I'll see you there. 23. Writing a Bass Part - Part 3 - Writing the Groove - PT 2: Okay, so now let's continue writing this base part. So previously we wrote the bass part for these four chords. And now let's write the bass part for these next six chords. So the next chords we're going to write the bass part four, Is this a minus seven and F Major seven. And these are actually exactly the same chords as b1 and b2. So to keep things simple, I'm going to do is just copy over bar one, bar two over two bar 56. So let's just turn off the Draw tool now by pressing b. And then just click and drag over bar b1 and b2. And make sure we've selected all of these notes. And then hit command c or Mac to copy or control-C on Windows copy. And then click and drag over bar five and bar six. Delete these root notes here, and then just paste this end with command or control V. The next chord going along is the C Major nine. And in this pattern so far we haven't played a C yet. You'll also notice that this cord enters on the and of before from the previous block. So I'm going to add a quarter note here on the Android beat. For. Now, let's select the Draw tool again and add a quarter note on beat one and our B2. And also on B3. You may remember as well that we actually have a D minor nine and an E minor seven on the end of beat three and on beat four. So I'm going to leave these hair as well. Okay, so now let's add some notes on the offbeat. So I'm actually going to add a D on and of two. And I think this jump between the a and this a is a bit too much as well. So I'm going to add a G in between here as well. So we do gradually go up at the end of this bar. Okay, let's hit this back. And now let's hear the piano, bass, and lead from the start. Okay, I think that works fine. Now going along we have another A-Minor. And again, to keep this simple, I'm actually going to copy over the a minor. We use arm bar one and on bar five. So that's copied over this same pattern as before. So let me delete this root node here and then paste this in. And then going along, we don't have the f This time. We actually have an e minus seven. So this is a bit different and let me just zoom in so we can have a look at this. And we actually do play an E minor seven previously as well. So let's find this, it's here. And just to keep things simple and repetitive, I'm actually going to copy over this as well. So let's copy this with command C or Mac or Control C on Windows. And then delete this E minor root notes and then paste in here. And the next chord is this F Major seven. And this actually enters on Android before from the previous bar as well. And that's just trim this back as well. So you have this F on the agenda before. Then we also have the C Major nine, D minor nine, and e minus seven at the end of this bar. So we have the F major seven formed before going to copy over the pattern for this first part. So let's copy this over with command S0 and then paste this in on Barton. Okay, and then obviously the second part we have the C, D, and E. And I'm going to leave this on the root notes. So there is quite a lot of repetition and here now, but there is a lot of movement and there is still variation in-between these quotes. Okay, so have copied over a lot of the courts from previously, but I do want to add some repetition into our bass part. Okay, let's listen to all of this back now. Okay, so we do actually have to chords that coming a bit early in the sequence. This chord here that enters on an end of beat for, for bar six. And this code here that enters on the end of beat 44 bar nine. And I think when we add the drums, these calls that enter on the end of the previous bar might not work quite as well. So what I'm actually going to do now is just move these chords slightly forward. So the end on beat one rather than on the and of before. So let me just zoom out slightly here and just click and drag and move this back. And the same for this call here. So I really want to add the drums. I want this to be quite a simple part and to groove Well, and I do think these cords not entering exactly on beat May 1 cause some issues. However, I'm still going to leave these parts on the base and also on the melody. So I want this to really groove when other drum part, and when I added the bass part that I could hear, it wasn't quite grieving as a 1-10, but now hopefully, uh, well, let's play it back. And then in the next video we're going to add a drum part. And you should be able to hear how all these parts have come together. But let's hit this back now. Okay, I think that works. We can always adjust the sound of the bass instruments or even adjust the bass part depending on what the drum part it's dubbing because the drums and bass do have to work together. And sometimes it can be useful to actually write the drums and bass at the same time. But I think for now this part is fine. So I hope I've given you some tips and techniques for writing bass parts. And I'll see you in the next one where we are going to be looking at writing a drum part. Thanks for watching. 24. Creating a Drum Part - Basics: Okay, so now let's talk about adding a basic drum part. So for electronic music, the accent on the drums is usually on beat two and on beat four. And the part useful accenting is usually the snap clap or both. Also for a lot of electronic music, he may want people to actually dance to it. And if so, you may wish to have a fall to the floor pattern, which means the kick drum or play on every beats. You will also usually want to have high hats in there as well. You could also get halftime so the track wouldn't go half-time. For example, if we're in 120 beats per minute, we won't play the song at 60 beats per minute. Just program the drumbeat So it sounds like the drums are at 60 beats per minute. So instead of having this now on beats two and beats for, well half the snout on beat three. With this halftime feel, you could also put the kid on every other beat rather than every beat. And you could also use this halftime feel for maybe a breakdown section of the song. You could also add a double time beats, which is often used in rock and metal music, but is a bit less common in electronic music. So if there's double time feel this now will be on every beats and the kick in this case will be on every upbeat and downbeat. So two kicks per beat. You could also try things for build-ups and breakdowns, including playing the snare if it was the kick. And you can also add fills field drumbeat. So you can use fills on your snacks or Tom drums if you wish. But for this video, we're just going to keep it simple and just use the kick snare hi-hat. So right now, I'm just going to go over the basics of creating a beat. But I do recommend arranging your clips in the Session View and then further arranging them in the Arrangement view. We're also going to build a basic drum kit in the drum rack. Okay, so let's go over to create and then select, insert midi track. And now under instruments, that's good to drum Mac. And if we hit this disclosure triangle here, it may have some presets. But for this, I'm just going to drag over the default blank drum rack. And we can actually add samples to these pads here. And these pads also link up with your midi keyboard. But for this video, we're actually going to type in the drum beats in the midi editor. So to keep things simple, I'm going to use a sample from the core library, so you should be able to follow along no matter what addition of Ableton Live you have. So to access the core library, let's go up to packs. And then call library, hit the disclosure triangle here, and then go down two samples. And then I'm going to choose one shots. And then from here I'm going to choose drums. And let's start off with the kick. And there's loads of different kicks to choose from. And to. Probably quite a few in here that could be suitable for the song. And you can just click release to preview them. Or just use the up and down arrow on your computer keyboard to scroll through these quickly. However, the one I like the sound off for their song is called KYC, black hole one. So let me just find that now. This one here. Like I said, many of these samples are probably suitable as well. But I like the sound of this one. So let's click and drag this over to C1 on the drum pad. You can place your samples anywhere on one of these paths in the drum rack. But I like to have the kick on C1, this now on D1, and the closed hi-hat on F sharp and G sharp. And then the open high hat on a sharp one. But this is just because many of a drum samplers are laid out like this. But really you can put the samples wherever you wish, but this is just what I like to put my samples. We can also click to preview the sample on the pad here in the drum rack. And now let's double-click on an empty clip slot here and draw a kick drum pattern. So like I said, just to keep things simple, I'm going to have a kick drum on every beat, so on every quarter note. So I'm just going to double-click on today's or we can use a draw tool if you wish. Ok, let's play this back now. Simple, but it works. I'm also going to add another kick here on the end of beat for just add a bit more variation. We worked clipping on our master channel there. So we will need to just turn down some of these tracks here so we don't clip because we don't want to exceed 0 dB, or we may get some unwanted distortion. Okay, great. That's now add the snap. So let's go back to the drum rack care. And now in the core library packs under one shots drums. Let's find snap. So let's click on this disclosure triangle here. And you can see we've got loads of snares. So this Now I like for this is called snappy funk MPC too. So let's find that now. And same as the other samples. We can click through these to preview them or use the up and down arrow on our computer keyboard to quickly scroll through these. But like I said, I like the sound of this one, snappy funk MPC too. But I'm sure a lot of these other samples could be suitable as well. So let's click and drag this to the pad d1. And again we can click to preview this. And now let's open up the drum clip and draw in our snap hot. So just to keep this simple, I'm going to have this on beat two and beat four. So like I said earlier, for a lot of electronic music, that accent is usually on beat 24. And the part you often use for accenting is often the snap clap. So let's hit us but now. Okay, so now let's add some hi-hats. So let's go back to the drum rack down here. And again in the core library under Samples, one-shot drums. Let's find high hat. So here we have hi hat. Okay, so let's now add the close high hats. And I'm actually going to use two different clothes. Hi-hat sounds just add a bit of variation. And I also like to add samples from the same kits or very similar kit. So it sounds quite similar but still has variation. And the first one I want to add as cold close stick, tip medium. So let's scroll down and find this. And again, I'm sure many of these hi-hat sounds could be suitable. So it's this one here. And let's click and drag this to F sharp. And the other one I want to use is called closed stick, tip hard one, which is this one here just above. So the very similar but do have a slight bit of variation. So let's click and drag this to G-sharp one. And I'll also want to add an open high hat. And the open high hats I wanted to use, it's from the same kit. And this is called OpenStack tip hard too. So let's find that now. And it's this one here. So let's drag this to a sharp one. And again, we can click to preview these in the drum rack. So let's open up the drum clips again. And now let's add to hi-hats every Bates. So on the upbeat and downbeats, an alternate between the two different hi-hat sounds. And then on the N2O4, that's either open hi-hats, that's now here, this back. One thing that I've noticed is open hi-hat does bring out quite a lot. So what I want to do now is actually choke this. So this means when the closed hi-hat plays, open high hat will stop playing and weren't ring out as long. Because if you imagine a hi hat when it's open and then close, the sound of the open high hat will stop when the closed hi-hat place. So let me just quickly show you how to choke this now. So let's go back to the drum rack. And then we need to select this chain List button here. And then we need to select this button down here, which will show and hide the input and output section. You'll notice here we have choke and under choke. Let's just select the same group for the high hats. So for the close hi-hats, let's select one. And for the open high hat, let's select one. Because we want to sound like this is someone actually blend the high hat. So when the close hi-hat plays, the open hi-hat won't play. Okay, let's hit this button now. And let me just solo the drum sake and here the choking of the open high hat. So if I just change the group to none, let's hit us back now and you'll be able to hear the open hi-hat ring doubt, which doesn't sound very natural for drums. So remember if you're going to use open hi-hat, two actually grew pets or choke it. Okay, great. And also in this area here, we can adjust the chain volume, which allows us to adjust the levels for the individual drums. So say for example, we want the snare bit quieter. You can adjust the level here. And we can also adjust a level for the individual drums by hitting this small disclosure triangle next to the track name. And he can see we have kick, snare, hi-hat closed, hi-hat closed, open. And these levels here actually link up with these chain levels here. So we can quickly level these drums in the track or in a chain area here. Okay, let's now hear this in the next. So it just went for that antenna level of the drums down slightly and also the level of the snap down. Okay, so when you're starting out, I just recommend keeping the drumbeat simple and use a few good samples. You can always download more packs from the official Ableton site if you want more drum sounds. But to be honest, there's quite a lot just in the core library and there's plenty of suitable wants to choose from. You can't use a preset from the drum rack, bypass and the like, building my own drum kits so can customize it and find the exact samples for my drum kit that I have in mind. Ok, so that is the basics of adding the drum part and also the essentials of songwriting. So in the last few videos, we've credit cards and melody base part and now a drumbeat. So I hope you found these videos useful and I'll see you in the next one. 25. Thanks and Bye + Class Project: Okay, we're now at the end of this class. Thank you so much for watching, and I hope I taught you a few things about music theory and instrumental songwriting. So if your class project, I want you to use the skills and techniques or taught you from this class and write your own song. I want their song to have a core progression, melody, a bass part, and a drumbeat. I then want you to take a screenshot of your Ableton Live Set and post this as your class project. So this can either be the Session view or the arrangement view. And I also want you to write a short paragraph about how the different parts to create your sung. So thanks again for watching and goodbye for now.