Music Publishing: Find Publishing & Licensing Placements | Eve Williams | Skillshare

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Music Publishing: Find Publishing & Licensing Placements

teacher avatar Eve Williams, Music: Information and Inspiration

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

22 Lessons (1h 28m)
    • 1. Introduction

      1:14
    • 2. Joining a Performing Rights Organisation

      2:34
    • 3. Understanding Copyright

      2:33
    • 4. Traditional Publishers

      1:49
    • 5. Music Libraries

      8:29
    • 6. Types of Publishing Deals

      3:55
    • 7. Self Publishing

      2:44
    • 8. When to Find a Publisher

      5:24
    • 9. How to Find a Publisher

      5:56
    • 10. What Is Music Licensing?

      0:55
    • 11. Music Licensing Agencies

      1:55
    • 12. Music Supervisors

      3:00
    • 13. Online Music Libraries

      8:29
    • 14. Pitching Services

      6:16
    • 15. Using LinkedIn to Find Placements

      2:04
    • 16. Other Places to Find Placements

      2:05
    • 17. Broadcast Standard: A Note on Audio Production

      4:35
    • 18. Tips and Stategies

      7:43
    • 19. How and Why These Songs Were Published

      14:01
    • 20. Useful Organisations

      2:01
    • 21. Bonus: Advice from Professional Songwriters

      11:26
    • 22. Conclusion

      0:37
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About This Class

Do you write music but don't know how to get artists to record it or have it placed in film, TV, advertising etc?

If you have been writing and recording songs and you would like to start making money from them, this course is for you. Music publishing can seem hard to break into, but in this course you will find out that it’s possible for songwriters at various stages of their careers to have songs placed with artists and used in film, TV and other media by using online platforms and finding reputable companies in the music industry to work on your behalf. We will also look at self publishing. This is everything you need to know about music publishing in one place.

 

Do you want to be a published songwriter but haven’t been sure how to have your songs published?

I am published songwriter named One to Watch twice by Nashville Songwriters Association International. I have been commissioned to write for reality TV graduates, written for up and coming artists, co-written with multi platinum writers and producers and my music has been used in documentaries and advertising. I would like to help you succeed in the music industry in doing what I do.

 

What We Will Discover

We will learn about the different kinds of music publishers and music publishing deals and their role in the music industry but more importantly we will learn how to apply this information to your goal of monetising your songwriting.

Topics include:

·         Traditional Music Publishers

·         Music Licensing Agencies

·         Online Music Libraries

*        Being paid royalties

·         When to Find a Music

           Publisher (assessing the commercial viability of your songwriting)

·         How to Find a Music Publisher

·         Self Publishing

·         Finding and Building Relationships with Music Supervisors

·         Pitching services and how to use them to maximum benefit

·         Organisations to join who can help advance your songwriting career

 

After the course you will

·         Be able to find the right publisher for you

·         Be able to find sync (TV,film etc) opportunities

·         Be able to efficiently make use of online pitching services

·         Use platforms like YouTube, LinkedIn and Twitter to find placements

·         Understand how to become a published songwriter

 

If you want to start earning money from your music, please enroll now and I’m looking forward to joining you on your musical journey.

Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

Eve Williams

Music: Information and Inspiration

Teacher

I'm Eve Williams MMus, professional singer and songwriter. I've been teaching music and music business topics since 2005.

_______________________________________________________________________________

Eve Williams is a singer and songwriter from Co. Down in Northern Ireland.  Eve’s songs have been played in several countries since 2012, including USA, UK (including BBC airplay), Germany, Ireland and the Philippines. As an artist she has performed at several international festivals including Celtic Connections in Glasgow (broadcast live), YouBloom Dublin and Urbankelt in London. She has completed a successful UK tour in 2016. 

 

 Eve holds a Master of Music in Songwriting from Bath Spa University. In 2015 Nashville Songwriters Associ... See full profile

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Transcripts

1. Introduction: Hello and welcome to this course on music publishing, a music licensing. So if you're a songwriter, if you've been writing for a while and you've really taken your craft seriously. And my, you'd like to start making money out of it. This is the course for you. My name is Eve Williams and as well as being a published songwriter myself, I have worked in A&R, that's artists and repertoire for a music publishing company actually offering deals to sell writers. So I know what sells and what's going to be sustainable. And I'm hoping to pass that information onto you in this course. We're going to look at this course at the different types of music publishers. What they all day at music licensing, which is getting your music placed and TV films, right the way through to YouTube videos. But everywhere it can't be pleased that it will make money. But once you have this understanding, you're going to be able to make money for music publishing. It's not actually the dark art that it can seem. It is totally possible, so long as you're writing is at the right standard that you can make money through music publishing. So I hope you're excited to get started with the course and let's go. 2. Joining a Performing Rights Organisation: So before you go and look for a publishing deal, there's something really essential to do, and that is to sign up with a PRO Performing Rights Organization. And the reason that that's important is PROs are the people who collect royalties. So they are the people that end up getting the money to you. Nine, in the UK, the PRO is called PRS performing rights society. I'm a member of PRS. There's MRO and Ireland, narrow and Norway, and America. The three big ones are BMI, ascap, and CSAC. So you can put some research into the PROs in Europe part of the world. I'm going to attach a PDF to this video that has links to a few of them. And it is important to sign up for one of these before your music is published on by published, I mean, made public if you're outperforming alive, if you've got Psalms on YouTube, if you ever shout tracks and Facebook, if you've got anything that's on Cloud or Spotify, your music is art there anywhere, then you really need to be signed up to our PRO or else you're losing money, not at the rates that you get paid vary. But there are several different things that a PRO We'll pay you for. A PRO We'll pay you every time one of the songs you have written is performed live and that includes by you. So with PRS, you might be paid six to eight ponds if your songs are played at, say, an open mike or in a very small venue. If they're played out a festival or at a major event, then it's worked out by a percentage of ticket sales, radio play, also orangey royalties. And the rate of pay will depend on the type of station, whether it's a small community station or a big national station, which would obviously pay more. You also get royalties when your music is broadcast on TV or in any other way. You can claim royalties for performances of your music on services such as SoundCloud, YouTube, on Spotify. It may not. A lot of cases end up a fortune. I know you got paid by a 150 to 200 pounds for 0.5 million streams on Spotify. But that's still your money on, you're still entitled to. So if your music is art fair and you haven't signed up to a PRO, that is the very first thing that you need to date. 3. Understanding Copyright: So it's very important to have some understanding of copyright, not because you might be ripped off because that's actually exceptionally rare despite some recent high profile cases. But because money and music comes from copyright, and you want to be able to exploit your rights in order to make money. Not you do this through signing up to a PRO. We talked about that in the previous video. They monitor the usage of your music and give you the percentage of the money mix based on the percentage of the copyright that you own. If you're co-writing with people, it's very important to have some share agreements in place onto your grade. Who owns watch? The musician's union will provide templates, song share agreements, but you work out who owns what percentage of the, of the music and then register the track with a PRO. Every time it's performed live, every time someone die loads at every time it's streamed, every time it's played on the radio or on TV, you should be earning royalties. There are two kinds of royalties, two kinds of copyrights. There are performance rights, and these are the rights that are associated with the song itself. In other words, the lyrics and the melody, you can't actually copyright a chord sequence. That's just not possible. Can you imagine if someone called me, write a DJ and a, every country artists would be screwed, sorry for using that word. But the music and the lyrics can be copyrighted. And every time someone uses those music of those lyrics creates a performance solvent, whether that's Libre and recording your paid royalties. The second set of rights are called mechanical rights. And these relate to the recording of the song rather than to the song itself. So there are a specific recording and generally the person who owns the mechanical rights as the person who arranged or paid for the recording of the track. So sometimes one of the writers of the track may not actually own the mechanical rights to recording, but you do get paid performance royalties for its use. So if your truck is Dawn loaded, say that's when mechanical rights, the rights to the physical song come into play. So that's a short introduction to copyright, and it's an index subject. But this is the basic information that you need to know before you can look for a publisher and start making money for music publishing. 4. Traditional Publishers: In this video, we're going to talk about the traditional old skill music publisher. And they will provide several services for you. First of all, they'll help to get your songs placed with artists who are looking to record songs. And that's called getting a cut. And some part of the world, especially in Nashville. So that's the first thing they'll do. They'll also look at getting your music placed and advertising, film, TV, all that kind of thing. They'll set you up with co writes with other successful writers. Sometimes they run song comps, which means that a whole lot of riders, a tabbed for several days on right to briefs, to collaboratively for several days, which is a great service that some publishers provide. I know that I have worked with publishers and London and Norway and Nashville that do this, that it's an amazing experience. They will regularly Sandra lists of briefs. So they'll send these run their whole roster saying, we're looking for tracks that's on like this, this week. Have you got anything? And if you have something, you can pitch it. If you don't, you can write it. They will expect you to keep writing. You know, a professional songwriters should really be writing on recording something every week. So they will charge percentage of your royalties for their services. That's why they make their money. So when you sign your publishing contract, you will be signing over a certain share of the royalties. And when you're signed to a publisher, they collect your royalties for you quite often rather than them just being paid directly to you by the PRO, um, they take a percentage of them. So I hope that explains what a traditional publisher does. And we're going to look at high to find one in a later video. 5. Music Libraries: So why use a music library in the first place? Didn't I say earlier that using a single agency is a better thing to do that actually go out and promote your work. Well, some people actually do quite well art music libraries. So how much can you make out a music library? Well, in the likes of Audio Jungle, which is one of the bigger ones, it's quite high volume of local sales, but $19 a sale. So how much you make is going to be dependent on how much you go out and promote your music. So which services should I use? In this video, we're going to look at some of the more popular online music library services and this sort of pros and cons of each of them and how they work. And you can make up your mind which one suits you best? So this first one is one of the bigger ones. It is called audio sparks. It has nearly 900 thousand tracks on it. So you're going to have to work quite hard to make your tracks standard every kind of track. It's a bit controversial and that they have a pay per-click system where you can pay to drive traffic to your tracks on when people have, are already giving over a percentage of sales to audio sparks. They are not as quite contentious. So you can see here that they have featured artists, featured collection. So if you become a featured artist, you'd like me to do quite well. You need to submit more than 20 trucks to be eligible for that preview. So there's every kind of music on here. Let's listen to a little bit. So it's probably a good place to put your last or use tracks. We'll look at the reasons why letter. We looked at the terms and conditions. So you can put some information about yourself as an artist, as a tracks. If you don't do that, they're unlikely to sell. And it is a little bit time consuming to get all the information up there, but it's really worth doing a little bit in this artist's wreck, very different from the last truck. Incapable, but terrible. Okay, so we're going to look at the sort of terms and conditions of submitting music to audio sparks. You will have to submit some music for them to your preview to use our service. But they're not quite as tight on the quality as some other services that are out there. Yeah. So this is where you submit your music noise. They have just about to show you an agreement whereby for you music to be sold on audio sparks, you have to agree to a perpetual agreement. The music can never be taken down because I don't want someone to find music on their service and go back later and it's disappeared. They feel that would harm their brand. So you should not put anything on to audio sparks that you might want to publish with somebody else. There is a norm perpetual option, but that means it's more limited in use. It's only the radio sparks website and sort of things related to read it with Spark. So not quite as good a deal. So you need to think carefully about what music you would actually put on to audio sparks, should you decide to join that service. So another of the major online music catalogs is Audio Jungle. As you can see here, very, very low price per sales. So it's all about getting bulk sales, which means really having a promotion strategy. So as you can see here, they are featuring some of the music by members of their catalog. A great thing about audio jungle is that you can sell on by music and music that they have on here. So they actually have quite a rigorous quality assurance process on Audio Jungle compared to audio sparks, which is a great thing. So you want to be submitting high-quality tracks to Audio Jungle. So there's a picture of musician of the weight. That's the kind of placement you want. It will really boost your sales. And as you can see, they're wanting to engage in the sort of community spirited way with people who use their service. So looking at their submission process and what they're looking for, quality and originality. And again, it's all about submitting very clear metadata with every track, because with a lot of attention being paid to metadata, you just woke tough sales. Another big service online for music, for actually all kinds of media is Pond 5. I have to be honest, I've never asked to use Pond 5 myself. But people speak very highly, although, as you can see, at royalty-free stock music, that people can buy online, I do know that people speak quite highly about the service. So let's hear a little bit of the kind of thing that you can get on Pond 5. So another service worth considering, it's probably good to sign up to as many of these libraries as you can because they're all non-exclusive. So a place where a lot of people making videos get music as YouTube's audio library, which has tracks like this on it. So there's a number of different tracks on side effects there. A few years ago they were taking submissions for their library. They're not at the moment, but it's worth keeping an eye out for it in the future. Because people have made thousands and thousands of pounds or dollars and royalties three, having their tracks used and you chip videos. So this is one to share film or out, which is the program I'm currently using to make this video. It actually has its own music catalog. It's a little bit limited. But the point is that these kinds of softwares do like to be able to offer music. So it's definitely something for musicians to think about researching and seeing if you can offer these companies your music. So you can see the kind of titles that are within the program here. Sort of suggested that the kind of signs that people want to use when they're making their own family videos or maybe they're making work-related that ears that are going to be associated with branding. So let's listen to another example, scientia, the kind of things that these programs can Tim musically. So just to recap, the platforms you suggested looking at hair, audio sparks, Audio Jungle, pawn five, the YouTube music catalog and Filmer and other video editing platforms that include a music catalog. So why not try accessing some of these libraries on? I wish you every success with it. 6. Types of Publishing Deals: So let's talk about different kinds of publishing deals. There's two phrases to look out for at any contract, exclusive and non-exclusive. Pretty self-explanatory. If something's exclusive, you are exclusively assigned to that company and you can only work with them if it's non-exclusive. You can work with other companies. While you work with this company, if these words pretend to a song, if it's exclusive, only that company can exploit the rights to that song. If it's not exclusive, you can do whatever you want with it. You can put it in as many music libraries as you want. You can share it with as many linkage is it sees as you want. So exclusive signs a little better. But if you sign something exclusive, you need to be very, very sure that the company that you side with are going to make you more money than you could make if it was not exclusive, unsigned up with a lot of companies. So that's something to think about. Now there's two terms that also in writers need to be aware of when it comes to signing publishing contracts. And that is the term ESI and the term SSI, exclusive songwriting agreement and single song agreement. Knife, the way that I'm working at the moment that I find a great way to work is that I'm working on NSSA single song agreements with a whole lot of publishers. So I wrote a Norway out a song cap recently. I've been working with the publisher in London. I've been working with a publisher and Belfast and I've been working with one and Nashville. But the goal that a lot of songwriters have is to become what's known as a staff writer. And that means you are exclusively assigned to one publisher. They find you work on, hopefully they find you a lot of that. It really depends on the publisher whether it's worth signing and ESI though, because it will close the doors to working with other companies. On the other hand, if it's a really reputable publisher, bed, It's an amazing thing worth doing. And it takes the stress off of constantly promoting yourself and trying to find different people to work with a thing to do if you're offered a contract for any publisher, and I highly recommend this. And the UK you go onto service called company's highest and your own part of the world. They'll be similar services where you can look basically at the apex of this company, makes sure they're financially solvent. And another part of your GI diligence, and it's really important to do this is to contact artists and writers who were already signed to this company and ask them if they are happy with the day and if they're happy with the services. But don't just ask one person because you could randomly just get a grumpy person or someone who's overenthusiastic, you need to ask a couple of people and get a general picture of what it's like to work for this company. I know that there was a company that had offered me a contract. And when I contacted one of the artists who were assigned to them, this was back in the earlier days of my career. She said, Oh yes, they've offered me some grit briefs and I sat, but have you actually how to solve accepted yet through these briefs, have you made much money? And she said no, she was happy with the brave she'd been offered, but she'd never actually made any money on. It's like alarm bells. They're not making money. So I think in the earlier days of your career, you're just so excited to be offered any kind of contracts like Wow, I've been offered a call track. But you really do have to think carefully before you sign on the dotted line. And it's always, always a good idea to get some legal advice. You can do that, usually via your national Musicians Union will offer legal advice much, much cheaper than paying a media lawyer. But if you're at the right point on you're being offered are really significant, Dale, then it's essential to get a media lawyer to look over it. So I hope that has helped you to understand the different kinds of publishing deals. As always, any questions, comments, queries, feel free to post them in the Q and a or dissent me a message. 7. Self Publishing: So in this video, I'd like to talk about self-publishing. And it is totally possible to be self-published on find placements for your own work, both getting artists to record your work and in getting placements on film, TV documentaries. I know I got some work during the music to a documentary about the abrupt so area of Italy via mutual friends on Facebook. And I've also got some work via LinkedIn. So it's really all about forming networks if you're aiming to do that. So you can use services like LinkedIn, you can use pitching services and we're going to talk about pitching services about later. But services like taxi music, gateway song, twitter, tracks and fields that are looking for tracks and just pitch them yourself. Along these services charge a monthly subscription for you to be able to do that. So you need to think whether or not you would like to spend the money to do that. So whether your music is at the point where that's something that you might think a day. Going to music industry events, networking events. If you live in the UK, there are some major networking event on the last Thursday of every month at the tile yard complex and King's Cross in London, which is run by not inhale me, is that care and amazing publisher. There's likely to be similar events in your part of the world. But actually turning up out events. Networking with people going to conferences. Finding out who needs help is a great way of being able to get placements for your music. Also, approaching artists who are up and coming here right on gigging a lot. Because remember if they sing your song and public key will be paid royalties. So you want to have your music placed with artists you're performing live quite a lot on here, maybe starting to get that of airplane. And you can contact the artist or their management directly. I like to follow YouTube to see who's doing well and you chickpeas getting views on YouTube. And then from there, I find the artist's website to see if they've got a food gig and calendar. And I've got writing with some great artists through doing that. And that begets bit of money in there. I have to say the majority of artists who I've written for and with have come to me through Bing, signed to a traditional publisher. But definitely self publishing is completely possible. But it does rely on you're creating a really visible professional profile, people knowing who you are. And it takes a lot of work. But if it's something you'd like to think of day, the advantage of it is that you're not paying a share of your royalties to anybody else. She will be keeping 100% of the money that is owed to you from your PRO 8. When to Find a Publisher: So when to find a publisher and that is a big question. I would say if you've only been riding for a year, perhaps noise is not the time to look for a publisher. You need to be looking for a publisher when feedback from industry professionals who know what they're talking about, successful writers, people who work in INR, maybe music educators, suggests that you're in the point, at the point today. So also when you listen to your music beside currently commercial music, it should stack up. It should be as strong. And that goes without saying, It's also good if you have some co-writing behind jake. Her writing is a very effective way of growing your own craft and also growing your industry networks. You might want to work with artists other than yourself. Though, if you've only ever written for yourself and you've performed your own work successfully. It's fine to contact a publisher, but just a publisher will expect you to be working for other artists. So it's good if you have some experience of doing that in each writes, be writing in a way that sounds not just like the current industry trends, but that you have some awareness of watts, a bite to trapped and following things like the billboard 100 on Spotify, playlist, new genre are important in that because if you're wanting to write for a very successful artist, you have to write something that sounds like that next album, not like their last album. So this requires a combination of knowing what's current, following trends, writing music that's commercially, but also being fresh and new, I'm bringing something different and to the roster of the publisher. So if you're at the point where you can do that, you're the perfect point to find a publisher. It's also good if you have a solid network of contacts. If you have some press behind you and if you have some people in the industry are unsaved, abide your work. Here as a commercial viability checklist. It's also attached to this video as a PDF. And it was compiled with help from Carl Henrik file truck music, who are a great publisher based in Norway. So basically for your music to be commercially viable, you must meet all of these. Your songs are always written in the appropriate song form to the genres. So that would be aba bcb 4 verse chorus verse chorus, bridge chorus for pauper, country. Pop. Aia for folk, AABA for jazz. In other words, you've got to know about song forms and you've got to know about your craft. You've got to know, for example, that in a pop song you right to the chorus and n, electronic dance. So you write to the drop, that kind of thing. So your songs must contain really strong Hicks. And that's a lot of cooks, lyrical hooks and secondary hex. So I've written here, this is the big Avis is really important. If your songs don't have strong hooks, they're not likely to be signed. So lyrics, the phrasing has to be there. It has to scan properly, no cliche. We want to avoid cliche. There needs to be a progression and the story of your song. Usually the use of wireframing will help with this. You need to have strong use of image metaphor or a conversational style. Some publishers don't like an a, a, b, b rhyme scheme. I've used it myself and songs that I have had published, but just that something to be aware of. So both the lyrical and the musical content should be aimed at the target audience you are writing to an audience, not just to yourself. So that a song that it's personal to you but nobody else can understand it isn't really likely to sail. I once heard it said that good writing, lattes and audience feel the songwriter story, but grant writing makes an audience fail. But the sole writer is telling their story something to think about. If you want to write for specific artists, are you familiar with their style? And as we said earlier, the song should sound like their next album, not there last one. So you should have a catalog to pets have at least 20 well produced songs, including a high proportion of uptempo, upbeat songs. It's much easier to get a publishing deal with an upbeat song. And it's much, much easier to get a sink with an upbeat song. I know we can all think of quite Don beat songs that were used in films, etc. But a lot of sync as work in advertising and bronze don't want their brand associated with people failing Miserables, so happy, high-energy as more likely to get you there. Your song should obviously have some originality, some spark about them, which is uniquely year. But on the other hand, they should be on trend. And I have the trend and we talked a little bit earlier about high. You can start trying to achieve that. You should have, as we mentioned earlier, positive feedback from credible industry fingers. If your friends and your family love your songs, that's great. But you need to know that someone in the industry will block them in order to be sure that your song is commercially viable. And as I said earlier, you can find this commercial viability checklist attached to this lecture as a PDF if you want to print it off. 9. How to Find a Publisher: So hi, do you find a music publisher? And the answer is not by googling one. And a little bit more involved than that, though, it is completely possible. So there are several services online that help in the UK, there's an organization called the MPA, online Music Publishers Association. They have a search to where you can search by genre and by type of publisher. And the really, really useful function that they have is that they show you which publishers are currently accepting submissions because a lot of publishers don't accept unsolicited material. There is a link and the downloadable material attached to this lecture that will take you to the MPA online. You can also find publishers three pitching services such as music gateway on taxi, who are currently looking for submissions. A great thing to do is to find writers that you admire and that are an influence on you that you think maybe you saw I'm slightly like and find light who publishes them. And also maybe to chat to them if you can, and ask them whether or not they're happy with that. Publisher services. There is a grip grip organization called Nashville Songwriters Association International. It's about twenty-five dollars a month to join, but they have a pitch to publish her twice a year where you can actually get your music to a publisher in Nashville if you live there or online. So it doesn't matter where in the world that your best. They also have a song evaluation service where you can submit songs for feedback. There's a certain amount you are allowed to submit every month. And the best of those songs are submitted to a publisher for consideration. So that's another way of finding a publisher. You can actually make to publishers and person and talk to them about your career and your requirement at networking events. The networking event in the UK that's really worth going to is the last Thursday of every month at the Italian art complex and King's Cross in London. It's run by nodding Hill music here, an amazing publisher. Music industry conferences. I've had some success with output Belfast, the biggest music industry called births in the UK as The Great Escape. And your own part of the world. There will be numerous music industry conferences at it's very much worth attending those. You can also find some music publishers via joining grapes on Linkedin. So, as he mentioned in a previous video, if you are submitting music to a publisher, it depends on the type of publisher for sank, if you what platelets it absolutely has to be broadcast standard. If you're looking for cuts from artists, you just want to produce the absolute best you can get it because sometimes people make the mistake of thinking. The publisher can hear my pure piano or guitar track and imagine what it sounds like. But if you're getting maybe a 100 tracks today to listen to you, asking someone to sit there and imagine what it would sound like if it was produced differently, as quite frankly, a bit of a stretch. So if you've got a track that's really strong, It's worth investing the money to have it recorded. Well, we need to ask if you're contacting a publisher, what is it that you would be able to add to their roster? Be aware of the people who are on their roster and what they're writing style is what GAAP are you filling and high? Are you complimenting that business and be sure that you let them know that and your initial contact e-mail and never ever, ever, ever, ever sand like just generic emails via mail chimp to a whole list of publishers. You need to show that you have some knowledge of their business, on some interests and their work. People want to deal with a real human being, not a bot. So never said anything that might be considered a bit spammy out again, you need to do your due diligence by asking artists and writers on the roster if they're happy with the services of this company, hi there, finding them. And by checking with companies ice that they are a solvent company. Um, unless you're fortunate enough to find a company that is really, really reputable. So hopefully, this has been of some use to you. I'm going to do a little video knowledge of how to use the MPA online. If you've got any questions, comments, queries, feel free to post to the Q&A or to send me a message. So here as promised as a little look at the Music Publishers Association. Now if you're not based in the UK, it's quite likely that there is a Music Publishers Association and you're part of the world. So great organizations to find IT bytes. So here I've gone to membership and we're gonna go to member direct rate. Okay. So we want to definitely check the box that says accept unsolicited materials. So let's say I'm going to go with the genre of music here. So I'm going to search for country. Just going to do short such a type of publisher. So I'm going to go here with publishers and library music. Both of those would be of interest to me. So as you can see, it's bringing me up a list of publishers, bucks, That's a very, very reputable publisher. So this will take me through to their website and I can find out about their submissions policy from their own website. So go to click on the official site. So in brief, this is high to use the MBA online search facility. And again, make sure that you follow the guidelines of submission on the individual publishers websites when you get there. So I hope this has been useful to you. 10. What Is Music Licensing?: So welcome to this section of music licensing. We talked a little bit before about what music licensing is. It's basically the placement of your music and other forms of media, such as films, TV, gaming, YouTube videos, anywhere that it might make money. So what used to be called selling ICT back in the day when you have commercial artists have their songs used on advertising and commercials. It's referred to just as selling because sales of CDs negligible die loads, people are streaming. So music licensing is becoming a form of income that more and more musicians wanted to capitalize on. It's a growing field. It's a very exciting field. And I hope you're looking forward to finding out a little bit more about it in this section of the course. 11. Music Licensing Agencies: So a little bit more about music licensing companies. I know we talked about music licensing companies and the sections of music publishers, and I extend them. But the difference between a licensing agency and music catalog is that they actually go out and they find placements for your music. So from that point of view, if you're thinking of signing up to one, I think one that had thousands and thousands of musicians signed up would be Alaska bet than one that was really looking for a small catalog of really good quality that they were gonna go and plug. Really hard night. They tried to exploit your music and everywhere they can't. So it's not just a byte huge placements with the likes of, of my gate. It's also about placements and corporate videos when companies are doing training for their staff. And a one project, the agency that I worked for dead was play lists for restaurants and shops because they are owners of those businesses want to control the atmosphere within their buildings. And a more precise way that might happen if they just played a radio station. You may want to be in control of a vibe, and so they want certain kinds of music. So you want to look for a music licensing agency, but as hard, solid success in the past, the first thing you want to do when you get on their website as to see their past work and what placements they've had. You want to work for an agency that has some really good artists and writers science them. If you play the music, that's all men, you hear anything that doesn't sound great quality, then avoid, avoid, avoid. And you want to know that they're going to be out there actively promoting your work, do a good job for you. And the way to find that IS to talk to other artists who are already signed to them. So that is my advice on sync agencies. 12. Music Supervisors: So the people who are looking for music to place and films, TV are people called music supervisors. And you should never sign up with a single agency. You who doesn't have good relationships with a list of music supervisors. Not you can make relationships with music supervisors independently on your own, but you'll find that their contact details are very, very hard to come by because they don't want to receive advice and tracks today that they've got to weird throat, understandably. Like the thing that you need to understand about music supervisors. If they have two things that they're very, very worried about, one, timescales, they often work to very tight deadlines if there's going to be any issues with Claire and your music quickly, that would be a nightmare for them. So if you suddenly had a co-writer go no, I didn't give permission for this. That would probably wreck your chances of working with that person again. So all the rights have to be there unsorted light so that things can clear quickly. They're also very, very concerned with budgets. They have a certain amount of money that they're given to span to the production and they can't really accept that. So often there would be a lot of negotiation of the budget, but you have to remember you're paid a fee for the use of your music, but you also make royalties whenever this film is shown, this TV show was shown. So you will make more than just the initial faith. I mentioned that it's very, very difficult to contact music supervisors, but you can get your music to them through a sink age and say through pitching services. And we're going to talk about that in this section. Through LinkedIn, I have actually a couple of music supervisors on LinkdIn, what's been helpful and getting work. If you go on to IMDB, the Internet Movie Database, you can look up and see who is the music supervisor on projects that are in production. And see if you can then find some contact details for them if you want to contact them individually. And be sure that you know as much about the project as you possibly can before you offer your music and that your music is in keeping with what they're looking for it because that's the way to create good relationships with people. There's a couple of amazing music supervisors on Twitter. One is Tracy night, the other is Madonna, weird rage. He has a fascinating video on YouTube about her work on the Netflix show ran. And she actually really helped promote the artists whose music she used in that show. She blasted it all over Twitter. So I can't play the video here for copyright reasons, but I will definitely attach a PDF with the link to it so that you can have a watch of it on YouTube because it really explains brilliantly well who music supervisors are, what they're looking for, their relationships with artists really worth spending some time watching that video. 13. Online Music Libraries: So why use a music library in the first place? Didn't I say earlier that using a single agency is a better thing to do that actually go out and promote your work. Well, some people actually do quite well art of music libraries. So how much can you make on a music library? Well, I'm the likes of Audio Jungle, which is one of the bigger ones. It's quite high volume of local sales by $19 a sale. So how much you make is going to be dependent on how much white and promote your music. So which services should I use? In this video, we're going to look at some of the more popular online music library services and this sort of pros and cons of each of them and how they work. And you can make up your mind which one suits you best? So this first one is one of the bigger ones. It is called audio sparks. It has nearly 900 thousand tracks on it. So you're going to have to work quite hard to make your tracks standard every kind of track. It's a bit controversial in that they have a pay per click system where you can pay to drive traffic to your tracks on when people have, are already giving over a percentage of sales to audio sparks. They are not as quite contentious. So you can see here that they have featured artists, featured collection. So if you become a featured artist, you're likely to do quite well. You need to submit more than 20 trucks to be eligible. Preview. So there's every kind of music on here. Let's listen to a little bit. So it's probably a good place to put your last reuse tracks. We'll look at the reasons why later we look to the terms and conditions so you can put some information about yourself as an artist, as on the bite your tracks. If you don't do that, they're unlikely to sell. And it is a little bit time consuming to get all the information up there, but it's really worth doing. This artist's work very different from the last truck. Okay, so we're going to look at the sort of terms and conditions of submitting music to audio sparks. You will have to submit some music for them to your preview to use our service. But they're not quite as tight on the quality as some other services that are out there. Yeah, so this is where you submit your music noise. They have just about to show you an agreement whereby for you music to be sold on audio sparks, you have to agree to a perpetual agreement. The music can never be taken down because I don't want someone to find musical nurse service and go back later and it's disappeared. They feel that would harm their brand. So you should not put anything on to audio sparks that you might want to publish with somebody else. There is a norm perpetual option, but that means it's more limited. New sits only the radio sparks website and sort of things related to radio Sparks is not quite as good a deal. So you need to think carefully about what music you would actually put on to audio sparks, should you decide to join that service. So another of the major online music catalogs is Audio Jungle. As you can see here, very, very low price per sales. So it's all about getting bulk sales, which means really having a promotion strategy. So as you can see here, they are featuring some of the music by members of their catalog. A great thing about audio jungle is that you can sell on by music and music that they have on here. So they actually have quite a rigorous quality assurance process on Audio Jungle compared to audio sparks, which is a great thing. So you want to be submitting high-quality tracks to Audio Jungle. So there's a picture of musician of the weight. That's the kind of placement you want. It will really boost your sales. And as you can see, they're wanting to engage in community spirited way with people who use their service. So looking at their submission process and what they're looking for, quality and originality. And again, it's all about submitting very clear metadata with every track. Because with a lot of attention being paid to metadata, you just wrote have sales. Another big service online for music, for actually all kinds of media is Pond 5. I have to be honest, I've never asked to use Pond 5 myself. But people speak very highly, although as you can see, at royalty-free stock music, that people can buy online, I do know that people speak quite highly about the service. So let's hear a little bit of the kind of thing that you can get on Pond 5. So another service worth considering, it's probably good to sign up to as many of these libraries as you can because they're all non-exclusive. So a place where a lot of people making videos get music is YouTube's audio library, which has tracks like this on it. So there's a number of different tracks on side effects there. A few years ago they were taking submissions for the library. They're not at the moment, but it's worth keeping an eye out for it in the future. Because people have made thousands and thousands of pounds or dollars in royalties, three, having their tracks used and you chip videos. So this is one to share film or out, which is the program I'm currently using to make this video. It actually has its own music catalog. It's a little bit limited. But the point is that these kinds of softwares do like to be able to offer music. So it's definitely something for musicians to think about researching and seeing if you can offer these companies your music. So you can see the kind of titles that are within the program here. Sort of suggested that the kind of science that people want to use when they're making their own family videos or maybe they're making work-related that ears that are going to be associated with branding. So let's listen to another example, scientia, the kind of things that these programs can tan musically. So just to recap, the platforms you suggested looking at Hara audio sparks, Audio Jungle pawn five, the YouTube music catalog. And so Morocco and other video editing platforms that include a music catalog. So why not try accessing some of these libraries on? I wish you every success with it. 14. Pitching Services: In this video, we're going to talk about some of the major pitching services that are out there online on these are services normally that you pay to use. And you can submit your music to opportunities and on the side, so I'm going to show you these are real genuine opportunities, are people who are looking for music. The only thing is that because there is a price to use these services, you have to weigh that against the likelihood of you're getting a place, but against huge competition on these sites. So that's something to be aware of. So this is taxanes, which is one of the biggest sites online for pitching your music. And I have to say, I have heard of people who've done quite well through taxi. But as far as I'm aware, it does have a fairly high joining favorite. You pay annually, I think a couple of $100 and there is no way Ryan this you have to pay the joining fee to be able to join. This, the kind of music that they're looking for. So there's an example opportunity for you looking for a top 40 style pop song with male vocal opportunities. So opportunities can be emailed to you. Okay? I'm not finding it easy to find the price, but I do think it is the region of two or $300. But lot of benefits so that they send opportunities straight to your inbox and they do have a lot of opportunities. Now I'm going to look at a UK based service that you can join from anywhere in the world. Which is another quite popular service online on that is music gateway. So here we aren't music gateway. And you know, chelsea, big TV show here, Netflix Universal. They've worked with some great people. They do have a sink agency attached to their service. So you get Clyde storage and you can upload tracks and then you can submit them to different opportunities that people are posting. Now that costs about ten pounds a month night, they have got a blog, online success telling you if success stories. But I have to be honest with you, there is a lot of competition. Armies at Gateway. You would be paying over a 100 times a year to join. And you need to be aware that not everybody who uses music Gateway House success from it. So you have to use it creatively, use it to network, to meet people. Because there are, as well as sort of very high profile opportunities to submit for grade sync placements. There's also people looking to co-writer and to collaborate, even looking for vocalists. So if you use it as a way of networking, I think that's the way possibly of getting the most out of music gateway. So here's another service that's quite popular online and this is somehow better. So with sole trader, you submit music to sync opportunities. How it works is you have a certain amount of free credits a month. And if you go over those spray quest credits, then you can buy more or you can take a Pro membership. They also do distribution as well. Something else useful so you can see the kind of opportunities there up at the moments looking for alternatives to various well-known songs. Oh, yes. So it's wanting me to take out. So I'm Taylor Pro is $49 a year. So considerably cheaper than music Gateway. Although it doesn't do all of the same things. So you can see here the kind of looking for J pop songs by driving. So that is high sole trader where they've got a great way of telling you how far your song got a music Gateway. If you submit a track, you don't really find like what happened to it unless it's accepted. Whereas you can tell with some Twitter, high far yourself actually got in the process. So the next service is one that was recently recommended to me by a publisher actually. And she had got placements for the artists on her roster using this service and it's called tracks. I'm fails. So it's European service. I think it's best and I'm imagining it's Germany. Don't quote me on that. So you can upload tracks, as you can see I've done here and request or pass for music. So let's go to rise and you can see the kind of thing. So, but at the moment, hip positive and upbeat songs for a product film, okay, catchy, energetic music appealing to women. So this is the kind of thing that is up on tracks and field. Again, there is a charge for using tracks and fails. There's different levels of membership. And basically, the more you pay per month, the more opportunities you can submit to you. And that tends to be generally high, they work. So I'll show you one other site online. It's actually in the PDF attached to the music supervisors section of this course, but this is missing Kapor who is quite a coup. Music supervisor, has a call on his website which is called song, song runner when he's looking for music. And it gives you very clear instructions on how to submit music. At the moment, they're looking for blues. So R&B, Hip-Hop all related to Chicago and is even telling you what to put in the subject line. If you email him the format that he wants to be sent, all this kind of thing. So it's worth checking his website every NADH that. So that's a look at some online places to picture music. I hope it's been useful for you. 15. Using LinkedIn to Find Placements: So using LinkedIn to find music placements. So the first thing that you could do towards this end as to search for music supervisors on linkedin and see what they're posting. Are they posting that they have any current needs? Not I would be careful about sand and contact requests to people that you don't know and have never match. If you are thinking of doing this santa polite message with it, with a bit of biographical information. How you feel that you might be able to benefit bam, and then wait and see if they respond. And other great thing to do on LinkedIn as to join groups. And so there are several songwriting and music publishing grapes, music industry grapes on Linkedin. I want you to join, check them every now and then and see what's going on because there's no point in just sanding a join request. Them never going back or even worse, just using it to promote your own music and never reading what anyone else posts. Actually be engaged to these grapes and you can get quite a lot of them. Don't be offended if music supervisors and other professionals don't get back to you on LinkedIn because just remember that they've got a lot of people who want to contact them and think about your own feed on like den high professional does that lek, how often are you posting music? I often. Are you posting articles? Are you looking like an active professional because people are more likely to walk to work with you. If it looks like you're white, they're achieving things. So it's good to him to have at least a poster month and not have a profile that looks on cared for it. Make sure you put as much detail into your history on LinkedIn as you possibly can, and a lot of details about your current projects and try and get people to give you endorsements. So if you have, have successful players, but it's even get the company to write you a recommendation on LinkedIn because that really does help you and getting future placements. 16. Other Places to Find Placements: So other places online and offline that you can go to get placements following music supervisors on Twitter talked about that a little bit in the past. That's something that I highly recommend just to see what projects they're working on. And then you can go and look those projects up on IMDB and find out a bit more, bite them before you would pitch, track networking events, such as the one that I mentioned at nodding hill and conferences. I'm really big into music conferences because I believe, yes, you could achieve a certain amount online in the modern world. But when people have actually met you, they know who you are, they have a sense of your personality. They're more likely to walk to open your emails and under what you're doing. And I want to work with you following publications like music Wake, which actually has sync awards, so that you can keep up to date with trends in the industry and know who the major players are, which publishers are currently accepting submissions. That kinda thing that's really actually very important. Youtube is a great place to find what could turn out to be well-paying placements. If you contact really major YouTubers and ask them what they like to use your music in one of their videos. Well worth doing. Don't just spam their comments though and go, hey, I noticed you've got a 100000 views of this video. I bought 20 million views in this video. I'm it music, I'd like to work with you, but it's better to Google them and find some kind of private way of contacting them because nobody like spammy comments on their videos. Another thing that you could do is to contact added agencies and film production agencies independently. The Association of Independent Music and the UK has a publication on film and music and it includes production companies as well as sick agencies. So I will attach that as a PDF. So I hope that this section as giving you some more thoughts and other ways that you can find placements. 17. Broadcast Standard: A Note on Audio Production: So in this video, we're going to talk about the concept of broadcast standard production. So if you want your track to sink, you've got to imagine what it would sound like coming out of sight. I mock speakers. Everything's got to be incredibly clear, incredibly tight. And for this reason, tracks submitted for sank must be mastered. Know It could think that you're quite a good producer yourself on your more than capable of mixing and mastering your own music to broadcast standard. If you're not, there are services that will help you. Cd Baby will master albums and singles for a set price. And there's a service called lambda.com LA and DR.com for a monthly fee. Well, master your music for you. So what I'm gonna do now is I'm going to play you a couple of tracks of mine, one of which has been used and sink that was used to advertise a series of American fantasy novels online. And it has been mastered. Then I'm going to play a second track which has not been mastered. I have sent it to a publisher and got positive feedback all that. But I was submitting it for an artist kept for another artist to record. And I was able to send a demo because I had a very good ongoing relationship with his publisher. They've made a publisher. I didn't know at all. I would not have sent a demo. I would have paid to have things properly produced. So just to add there, that song is available to all my song collide. But that's an exceptional circumstance because normally, if you're submitting a track for another artist, you don't publish it anywhere online, not even on your own private Facebook. Because a lot of management companies, when they're looking for material for the artist, will specify that it not have been published anywhere else. They didn't want people to giggle at and find someone else singing it. So first of all, let's listen to the master track. Knows her, you know, I, you know, so this side here, Glasgow and then has done. Okay, so now let's compare that to the master track and you'll definitely hear a difference. It's a similar kind of a song. It's a piano ballot where boo, boo, boo happens through the bad. So what's left? Now? We spoke, we good and grays. And for sure. But no. So the first track is much sharper, much clearer. The vocal rings like a lot more. And the second track, the vocal as muddy, the signals are a bit confused, So the whole thing just sides a little bit last tidy a little bit last plane. So the first track has saint, the second track, unless I rerecorded it or got someone to master it properly, probably wouldn't. So just to really hit it home, you won't tracks to sink. They must be broadcast standard. And if you're not sure about the quality of your production for any reason, ask someone really qualified in the field of audio production on their opinion of your track. And it's important to get that kind of feedback before you start submitting to publishers on sync agencies. 18. Tips and Stategies: Hi guys. In this video, we're going to talk about some strategies that can be really useful and your music publishing JRD knowledge. I know that you would like some Hux and tips on how to get your music published. It's actually a fairly simple process. If you remember the PRO, if you know how to find the right publisher for your genre and if you're writing the best music you can write, That's pretty much what you need to be doing. So there are no sort of magic shortcuts are magic tricks. But I am going to share with you some strategies that have worked for me and that have worked for people that I've known who have done really well. So the first strategy I'm going to talk about as song helps noise. It's unusual for a hit songs be written by only one writer. In fact, one of the early Golding's most recent albums, Hot 15 writers, I believe it was all about 13, 15, something like that. So what happens at a song camp is a publisher hosts account, but riders travel to the count. They stay for three days. You get up in the morning, you have your breakfast, you write from maybe ten AM right away through to 10 o'clock at night and the song is recorded to broadcast downward. Within that time, most of those songs are pitched on, some of them do really well. I've been part of writing songs that have ended up with girl bands and the Far East with X-factor graduates, with newly signed artists. It's been actually really great. And also you write with really professional writers on, you'd learn from the way that they write. So, so it expands your skill set and it builds your relationship with those publishers. So the 37 cups that I would really recommend, our first one is I took the woods, which happens in Norway, very, very professional setup. Some of the best producers in Europe very much focuses on called Bunny electrophilic F. But if you're strong songwriter it, it doesn't really matter what genre you write n. You need to apply to either sending samples of your work and you have to be accepted. They have several song camps during the year. There's many you can attend and they have specific song camps like one on k called, they have one on company recently. They have ones that are aimed at Eurovision, which have gone really well for them. They've had a couple of your revision and Fraser got three to national level. So that would be one that I would really recommend. Another one is tidy art music and loves a Northern Song comes can be quite expensive. Bear in mind there is a cost for Tampa song cups, which you will have to make an account be quite expensive. Other you can't apply to the Arts Council on to the PRS Foundation and those kind of organizations for fungi. So the tidal art song count, We'll get you writing a very professional writers. They have had placements on an album by Kylie Minogue, some really high profile placements that are very well-respected publisher. So that takes place in King's Cross in London. The tiny 4D complex is the big studio recording complex in the UK. Another really great one is less Negros, which is run by a publisher called DWB. They've been behind a couple of Eurovision winners. They've had platinum sales and the Far East. Again, a very well-respected publisher. It is for professional songwriters. So you need to pitch music that proves that you are to that standard. It goes without saying so I'll include the links to all those song counts with this video. Another great strategy that was shared with me by a publisher that I worked with. He's also a friend and he got up very, very high profile, very well-paid place, but it was actually ikea car ad. And he advised me to do this. Pick five music supervisors after doing some research and discovering which music supervisors are looking for your kind of music. What shows on Netflix actually set on watch ads on YouTube, it on the TV. See who's using music that sounds a bit like yours. Which brands, which TV shows, and find out who the music supervisors are. Research those people, learn something up there, working history, and only at that point called tuck them. Knowing it can be difficult to contact music supervisors. They don't want to get a 100 emails a day. But what we could do is take a premium membership of LinkedIn, which is expensive, it's about 50 points above, but you get a free 30 day trial. So if you can call and talk those people during the 30 day trial, that's a good start. No, I don't send them unsolicited material. They don't like that email. Introduce yourself, say that you have an interest in their work. Show that you have a knowledge of their work. And only at that point, ask, what are your current requirements? What are you looking for at the moment? And then pitch, because music publishing is all about building relationships, the music industry generally is all about building relationships. So now I would like to say something about the actual music you're pitching. And I keep hammering at home. It must be broadcast standard, it must be mastered. And I hope you've looked at the commercial viability checklist to make sure that your music matches that. Also, if you look at music that is sink kd and say TV shows, it very rarely has one dynamic the whole way through it failed. Say for example, Nashville. You have scenes where there are several story arcs going on at once. It's moving from character to character was playing one song. Well, Psalm doesn't stay ones I now like the whole way through that would be doubled for the audience, it fails. So you want to make sure if you're pitching songs, especially for sync, that there is a belt and the production. Another thing that I had to call mental and someone's work recently is if you have a very strong regional accent and the vocal, that could work rates for some placements, but it might live at other. So just think a little bit about the vocal and at whether or not that suits the particular opportunity you're pitching to you or the music supervisors and trusts who you're pitching take. It might be good to get involved with sons better. So I'd better is linked to Spotify. And it's a place where you can offer your musical services and also find really top notch producers, lyricists, whatever kind of co, writers or industry professionals you might need to work with. And that will ensure that you get the highest standard of product possible before you start pitching for publishing, you really need to get feedback about the standard of the production of your work and the quality of the writing. I absolutely love being said so August by students. Please do feel free to send links to me for feedback after all, that's what I'm here for. So I'm going to move on in the next video and look at a couple of songs of mine that have been published and talk about why that wall is why they fed at those placements. I'm actually really loved to be able to show you a commercial or a clip from a TV show with a saint song and explain why that works. But I just can't because of copyright, I can't place somebody else's copyright material into this course, which is a little bit sad. But if you wanted to do that, research yourself, like say today, lookup five different car ads on YouTube lookup, say Volkswagen CLEA for Toyota, Nissan. And look at the music in their ads. What's similar about the production was different. What kind of vibe is coming across? Like really analyze what you're saying and why it might work. Because the real key to music publishing is research is number one on relationships is number 2, right? So let's move on and look at a couple of salts. 19. How and Why These Songs Were Published: So let me explain to you why I've chosen these particular songs to talk about. It's very, very important. Then please remember this. If you want to pitch a song to another artist or to a publisher, it should not have pain released online. If it's for sank, that's fine. But if it's for a cut of its to be recorded by another artist, that's not a good idea. So I've chosen to talk by a couple of songs that I recorded as an artist, not so much to plug my own Wacker, though I'm sure you are thinking that. But because I own the copyright off them, that's something I could do. So I'm going to talk about these songs high. They came to the attention off music supervisors on publishers, the actual processes. I used to get the songs into the hands off those people. And you know what resulted on? It's not all a good news story. There's some difficulties in some rejection along the way. Okay, so the first song I'm going to talk about is a little song called Illumination and I'm gonna play your snippet off at night. My world was lit by candles they didn't give my child back and only see one you can should change. So at the time that I wrote this song, I have Bean working in A and R on rights administration for Resident Music Licensing, which is a music licensing company. So I have no idea of the kind of songs that sink on. This song had a really simple, lyrical theme. The idea of illumination. Life was dark. This person comes long. Life is light. It was a very simple concept, and it's a kind of concept that can work to moving image. But I obviously still needed to get feedback. Oma. So I sent it to Nashville Songwriter's Association International. They suggested several changes to it. It was rewritten quite a few times. It ended up being named one to watch twice. Or I ended up being named one to watch twice on the back of this song, which was nice, but not at the first draft that needed the rewrites. And so once I got the professional feedback on, I'd run it past a couple of other people who you knew their stuff. When it came to sink, it came time to pitch it night up that stage. I wasn't signed to any particular publishers. It wasn't working even on essays, little essays. So I used a service called Music Get Way to Pitch It, and I pitched it for an opportunity where they were looking for a sort of country gospel song for a placement, which maybe it didn't completely fit the brief. But it was almost there, and I actually have a second recording of it with a male vocal which may be fitted that a little bit better. Anyway, the music supervisor got back to me and said, like I don't think this is right for this brief. But I love the song on. I'm going to keep it all file and use it when the right opportunity comes up for it, which was just lovely. And I was so excited by that which, you know, just shows it's worth having a go Meiji. If I'd send him something that was totally inappropriate to the brake, it just would have been bend on. That would not have happened. So don't send things that are appropriate to the brief. I don't mean to give you that impression, So that was high. I have formed the relationship with that particular music supervisor. He construed the songs being very summary, and so he was waiting for a project to come along where he needed a song that conveyed some light on was on the theme off Summer. So that was basically the process involved in pitching that so. And of course, when one music supervisor is interested, you don't really want to leave it there. So I continued pitching it rind other people, and it so happened that there was one publisher. He wasn't really understand publishing it, but thought the writing behind it showed promise and asked me to submit another track in different track, which has ended up being published. So, you know, that was that was nice as well. So there were both successes are not backs with this track, and that is what is quite likely to happen. So what I would say is tick feedback on board Mick changes where the changes makes sense on just keep trucking. Although sometimes when you just can't keep everybody happy and you might have just have to save yourself Well, this supervisor hasn't liked this song. I'll try somebody else, you know Sometimes it's fine to do that. And sometimes there really are changes that do need to be made. And that's really your judgment. When you get a communication as to you know what you're going to dio with Song following on from there, I'll match in the production of the song I know you Can't hear the whole song. You can obviously look it up on my YouTube if you want, but I don't want to shamelessly plug my own tracks here. It starts as you'll notice from this clip. It's just guitar on voice, and then it becomes guitar voice, percussion. This second guitar line vocal harmony it builds on as I mentioned in the last video build is very important in sync. You can always get way, way just track what around right? Just tread water. And so that song was called I walk through Fire again. You're looking for a very visual image. If you're hoping to have a song sink especially, and I did a few really silly things with this song, I might as well be almost divide it. So I'll tell you the story behind publishing this song. I wrote it. I have the sort of man melody over going through my head like commercial music is pick based music so you can hear and not kept that I played you, that there are hooks in the chorus melody, but also there's a oh secondary going on that that's quite important in publishing. So I crafted it the best that I could again running it past people who speak back. I really respect. And then I did something really silly that I recorded it, unproduced it myself because I wanted to save money. No, no, no, no, no. I am not a producer. If you are grit, projects your own songs, and that's amazing on. It's a very good thing to learn production, but it's not that I'm terrible, but I can really only do things to demo standards. So I recorded a demo of it, submitted it to a publisher with him. I have a great and long standing relationship. You know, you're actually considered to be a friend on his response walls. The song is good, but the production is really letting it die. And I couldn't pitch this and I should not have done that. I should have waited if I really thought it was a song I could pitch. I should have gone and had a produced earlier on, then pitched it when it was stronger and good to go. So in the and I ended up getting the great guys Bigly music and Farum in England to produce that they did a great job whether and after that, it picked up more interest. Nine. I have been aiming Teoh, submit this song for consideration to an artist. Okay, I've written for before and you know, I've had some success and writing with her, but she is a great deal younger than me on really? The sign of the song probably wasn't her generation. I have put the song and a key that I thought would suit her voice. You know, if I had realized that I was gonna be the artist and I probably would have put it a tone higher, but that's this molding. In the end, I decided not to pitch this song for another artist on to pitch it were sink and to release it under my Onan. So I released it on YouTube. I promoted it via my mailing list. I didn't really have a publisher's intervention at that point because it wasn't signed to you and he s a I was working on s essays on. So in the end, you know, I'd worked with several publishers, sent it round all of them. Another one on this is after it was recorded properly, who I have quite a good relationship with. He added that really here, that it got very, very strong negative feedback about it on That is something that can happen. Rejection is a huge part of working in music, and you just can't get upset about it. But again, he said, You know, I think the song is too linear. Um, but please continue to keep sounding May songs. So you know, the important thing in that kind of situation is not to get upset, not to wrap Maria. Just think. Is there anything in this advice that is helpful that I can take a board on make a change on In the case of the last song I did in the case of this song, I thought, No, I've got a lot of feedback on this. I think this is the best I can get it. I'm just going to have to keep shopping it around on DSO. That's what I decided to dio. That was what paid off in the end. No, the writing on production of the soul just to repeat again. Hooks are very important. Commercial music is put based. Music. That's a sweeping generalization. But it is true. You want tohave back. He image that people can look onto that encapsulates what the song is. Bite on this kids. I walk through fire and there has to be some lyrical progression. You know, you can't have every verse of the song say exactly the same thing. That's really quite dull. There has to be some kind of movement again. There has to be billed, and production in this soul certainly has that. You know that Chris Words, who played bass with spice covers, are based on that. Its really kicking. I love it, and again it has that repetitive hook at the end just trapped water on rise, just tread water and rise. Just tread water wise, which turned out to actually be strangely appropriate to the whole Corona virus situation. So at that point when that happened, it started to take off on YouTube and people were sharing it, which was absolutely great. No one better feedback I got was if I wanted to pitch it to other artists, that it has quite a difficulty vocal line A. No, every artist would want to take own saying I get some That was something that I had to really thank you, but that at the moment at this point in time, I released it on Spotify under my own net rather than it being one of my tracks and ended up with someone else. And I'm kind of happy about that because I think it's a very me song like it. It sort of relates to my life, So I'm gonna pitch it for sake. That's kind of in the pipeline for something at the moment. But again, I just wanted to talk to you about that journey of crafting and then hitching a song and how the world works, deciding whether you're gonna pitch something to another artist or what you're going to release under your own arse. Nam. I mean, there's just judgment calls all the time, but the most important thing I would say it's gapped feedback. Run it past a few people because I ran it past a couple of people here that on a couple of people who loved it. And if I don't take of the opinion of one person who headed that, it might have just land, right, my computer forever. Actually, At the moment it's It's kind of doing okay for me on Spotify. Am you cheap? So I hope that this discussion of my songs was helpful. I'm gonna include on exercise with this video, where you'll look at some songs that are on YouTube that are being used in commercials and various things and break down what it is that's making them successful. I really would have liked to have done that as part of this course, but as I say for copyright reasons, I just can't do that on. I want to say once again, if you want to send me any of yourselves, I actually really do love hearing them because people sometimes sent me messages that say things like, Oh, I hope I'm not bothering you. If you don't mind, would you have the time? I love doing this stuff. This is my job. This is what I like to do to please do send me some tracks 20. Useful Organisations: So there is a PDF attached this section which looks at useful organizations that can help you write and your journey to making money through music publishing, music licensing. And that includes the Musicians Union who offer careers advice. You offer tablet contracts, who offer a whole lot of useful services. They also offer a contract review service with the media lawyer, which is a really amazing service because that would cost a fortune with ME membership. So there's a link to performing rights organizations who are the people who collect your rotates, as discussed before. There's a link to Nashville Songwriters Association International. There's all kinds of things that you can do with MSI. There's a song evaluation service, a pitch to publish, a service. You can find co writers on NSA II. They have in-person meetups. They have regional chapters all over the world where you can meet up with other songwriters. And it's a great way of refining your craft and breaking into the business. I've also included some information on this PDF on music education. So when you are a student, your fellow students of the day are your network of the features of studying refines your craft, which is very important, but it also creates a network. So the organizations that I have mentioned are chiefly based in the UK because that's where I'm best, some of them. Do you accept international students and have an online learning program? Of course, I offer teaching on music and the music industry via my website, which is also all that. But if you do some research into successful writers and your area and find out where they studied. That's going to be something really helpful to do. So I hope you find this PDF you saw as ever, if you have any questions or comments, please feel free to post in the Q&A or it's sent me a message I love to hear from you to be students. 21. Bonus: Advice from Professional Songwriters: Hi, students and anybody else who happens to be watching this video? Here I am in one of the nicest recording studios ever whacked him. I've been writing in here for the past two days. So we're just going to spin right, so you can see it really comfy. Air-conditioned all the kit. So this is the words Norway, and I'm here on a songwriting camp to write songs for your vision 2020. There are professional songwriters here from all over the world, all assigned to different publishers. So I thought that it would be useful for you while I was here if I interviewed them and how they became professional songwriters, what they did to get there. So I hope this video is going to be useful for you. Hi students. Here I am with the lovely Katie sky, who was actually signed to universal as a songwriter, which is pretty cool. Where are the moments of either of the words in Norway writing for your revision 2020, which is really, Hi, I'm Katie and I didn't attract today. So I'm going to ask you about what her slow reading, so what made you decide to become a song writer? For many years, all I did was like saying when I was a kid, I was simply School production stuff, you know, the usual stuff. For me. The turning point was when I wanted to be able to put my message and my own songs. And you can't do that as an artist unless you write your own songs. And to write your own songs, you need to get good at somewhere, I think. And that's what really pushed me out because I felt like I had a message, is an artist and you want to get that message out in the form of a song. So what are some of the things that you did that got you to the point where you could be signed to a major labels publishing division. I had a lot of learning to do. Lots of songs had to be written in a lot of songs that we were in the meeting. You hire my skill and my craft than land. While I was good at, I would say personally, even though I'm a much better melodies and lyrics on getting better at lyrical. And yes, some of the things where collaboration, writing with other writers who are better than he was well, making yourself feel a little bit uncomfortable and challenged is really good. It's really positive is actually the only way you can grow as a sum where it's at, yeah, to be challenged them to be pushed out of your comfort zone. To write with different people who are, who have different perspectives than you on melody and lyrics. So collaboration was a big one. I would save ME and new experiences. I would say traveling brings a lot of inspiration to be able to write some she made lots of good subject message looks a little bit subjects to write about. And if you are going to places and experiencing new things, then you will feel inspired. As one short question I wanted to ask, was it really co-writing that brought you to the attention of universal because she'd been writing with writers that they were familiar with. Is that kind of business-wise? Business-wise, yeah. It makes a lot more sense because you can only have a send it to the people in your little contact, Paul? Yeah. Whereas if you write with other writers, then they will have a little contact pool. And then that song that you were in, in that one day could go wrong and full of different contact. And they sent to eventually to the right person who will then either your voice or listen to how you write and they think she's got something. And so it goes further than you can get it yourself, caliber Anya B, you have other pools of contacts as it was. Absolutely. So yeah, she definitely does have something by the way. So I check check our kidney. Hi, students. I'm here with Luis. Do you want to print out it's just R and M has my German is oh yeah. And recipe Sheila and Luisa is going to be releasing your first single. So and she signed as a songwriter just to go and get yet now person's going to get a second. So she writes some grid stuff. We're here at the moment that out of the way that's in Norway writing for your revision 2020, which is being real fun. So I've got asked Elisa, Elisa what made you decide to become a musician? Well, for me, I was always a singer and as a kind of a relief and a therapy to write songs and to sing all day. And I had the feeling I have to tell my own stories and this is fine. And that's okay. You So you wrote and stories and I get your message I by R. That's something that a lot of songwriters say. So what will you say? It was that you did fat got you signed basically like Hi, Did you get where you are and on well, basically, I would say I just did everything I could to be recognized in some way as a singer as applied to whatever. I met so many people, I went everywhere, like I went to a flute, violin from Cologne, which is not so close. In Germany and just met random people. Done. One day, I met a guy cool to be us and he sent me to my first professional networking and getting yourself ISR and yeah, important message. That's it. Just like work, work, right? Do what you love and let people know what to do. Like, especially like through social media, through so everything that entity, YouTube, I did live stuff. I did writing, I did everything I could to be print him in his book. I'm going to hit some links through raises social media with this video so people can like follow your example of what you did in shifts. Thank you so much, Liz, That's really helpful. We're we're just having lunch at the moment when my studio. Thank you. I'm here with a lovely group ID no, Connor, who is an Irish song writer like myself. He's had all my sturdy songs associated with your vision, which is quite amazing. So I'm going to ask you, what made you decide to get hold of music? I think what made me decide to get involved in music is speaking my truth and speaking what I want to get across to people. And it's very unusual in a very rare for songwriters to have that opportunity, like all of us want to tell our story book to be involved in songs and to say This is what I feel, whether it's good or bad, just get out there and say, don't be afraid. I think this is the avenues that I wanted to go down and don't listen to other people will join us and to other influences, those things. What is your view and what do you want to tell her? How do you want to express an idea, story, that song, and just don't be afraid. Well, it also, it takes a dark side, but it takes a phone side of thing. Now every song has a bit of Qin Yang and enlightened shape, but also don't be afraid to kind of go. I'm going to tell a story called son comes home at night story and wanted to tell everything about Britain. This I think when people start writing think tanks or it's fair happiness that you see that get made cheesy on that letter. They tend to start with very depressing songs. Yeah, I'm, nobody wants to sign someone who only has great brands. Because otherwise you're going to be stuck in this form like type of song. And I've seen people who are somewhere in the center, so we're already seeing one genre. And that is really bad for your career because you'll be typecast and you cannot do that on every life has different dimensions of it. Like none of us from the sand mood every day or even like all the way through the day? Yeah. So is it you think has gotten you to the point that your apps where they belong and where it quickly. And artists are like messenger here, ask them all their songs like watching things. Got you. That I think a lot of people who said networking foot for me, a lot of it is personality. I think, yeah. You don't have a first appears similar to join them. Do student. If you don't have personality, if you can't connect with people, and if you kind of mixed with a group of people who you've never met before as he's kinda counts or elsewhere. And that's a drawback. You have to try yourself and you might be scared, but you have to just try stuff and go. I'm going to do my best. You might be full of anxiety going in there kinda go. I don't know what's going to happen, but the best thing is just face the fear and do it anyway. And I think the best thing, it's a great message. Don't be afraid and be able to get on with people AdSense Sandra has turned up. Yeah. That's not said No, I'm doing that here for my songwriting students. And I'm asking, are off no matter what Manchu want to work in music at, what is it that you did? That brought me to this point. For me personally, I downloaded mixing, hand Producing Program, a DAW called the Ableton Live. Because I was I wanted to convince my front that this was an easy thing to do. It's not. But I felt so at that point in time, there is a whole lot more. If I'm making a good song, then what you would first think and challenge is really what made me makes returns her. Yeah, What made me really slates, yeah, go for it Thus. And really wanna, really want to make this a life rather than just a student. But yeah, it started, I felt serious. And other living your group is you're at your co-owner here. So that's quite nice. So what got you to the point they co-owner other words like, I have to say, I'm skipped by caval syndrome has a dedication to excellence. He doesn't have pass anything, which I think is a big part of this success actually. Books and other boat. Yeah, I don't know. I actually, a lot of luck. But in Hong crypto-currencies at the right time, it's embarrassing. I feel like I kinda had too much luck thrown my way at the right time. Herbs. I decided I would use that to, to invest in something that I wanted to do. And that is, that is music, because music is really hard and I actually need to prove that. I'm more lucky as poet who made some money on cryptocurrencies. That, and that people do need to have a day job until the point they can support themselves. Like it's important to be financially says about investing and other things and making sure those Colombia has music in a way it's not stable. And Islam light-like, you could come here and you could write a song. And it might be picked up and you might make grit loyalties format or you could actually spend money getting here and headache and some off the next 12 to also had actually been you can some good practical advice that so thanks so much to sit. And all three are toy your dreams. Thank you so much. I'm on we are going ahead and show the part a. 22. Conclusion: So we've come to the end of the course. I'm, I hope that you find that useful. Please feel free to contact me if you have adequate questions, queries, comments. Just let me know what happened because it's really lovely to hear what happened to people after they did your course and how they were able to get the information and to action. If there's anything else that you would like to see in this course, anything else that you would like information a bite, please feel free to contact me and it would be really, really great at this point if you could leave a review. So I hope to see you again on your musical journey.