Music Composition - Rhythm & Percussion | Mikael Baggström | Skillshare
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29 Lessons (1h 26m)
    • 1. Your Journey to Master Rhythm

      2:36
    • 2. What is Rhythm?

      1:54
    • 3. The Foundations of Rhythm The Grid

      2:46
    • 4. The Foundations of Rhythm BPM and Tempo

      4:59
    • 5. The Foundations of Rhythm Time Signatures

      2:56
    • 6. Percussive vs Pitched

      3:43
    • 7. Monophonic vs Polyphonic

      2:14
    • 8. Straight vs Triplets

      2:40
    • 9. Main Rhythm vs Syncopation

      2:46
    • 10. Fills & Transitions

      2:37
    • 11. One Beat to Rule them All

      2:28
    • 12. Intro The Role of Rhythm

      0:39
    • 13. Action & Energy

      2:42
    • 14. Drive & Pulse

      2:00
    • 15. Fills & Transitions

      2:37
    • 16. Leadership & Augmentation

      4:25
    • 17. The Power of Silence

      3:35
    • 18. Intro The Sounds of Rhythm

      0:53
    • 19. Balance of Style

      3:20
    • 20. Balance of Range

      2:42
    • 21. Balance of Stereo

      3:20
    • 22. Balance of Depth

      3:21
    • 23. Layering for Impact

      3:21
    • 24. Intro The Performance of Rhythm

      0:46
    • 25. Variation in Intensity

      3:39
    • 26. Variation in Complexity

      2:27
    • 27. Variation in Patterns

      4:24
    • 28. Variation in Timing

      5:13
    • 29. Variation in Tempo

      4:40

About This Class

Rhythm & Percussion in Music Composition

Would you like to Master Rhythm, Percussion and Drive in Your Music? After this course you will be able to lead and drive your music, enhance and spotlight special parts, control the energy and action, generate intensity and power, and forge the foundation of all music you create. Because you will master the core of all music: Rhythm.

You will Learn

  1. The Foundations of Rhythm
  2. The Role of Rhythm
  3. The Sounds of Rhythm
  4. The Performance of Rhythm

You will also get real live demonstrations of various kinds of rhythms, sounds and techniques. And finally you will have the knowledge and insights to create the rhythmic foundation of a new track, with the complete range of drums, percussion and drive.

I recommend you to take action on every single concept, method and technique you learn in this course. 
Because I believe the best way to Learn, is by Doing.

Do you want to Become

  • A Master of Drums
  • A Master of Percussion
  • A Master of Drive
    ...and finally with practice, a Master of Rhythm in Music?

Then Take Action: Enroll Now
Taking action is the only way to move forward on your journey in music. 

Friendly regards,
Mikael "Mike" Baggström
Music Composer | Sound Designer

Transcripts

1. Your Journey to Master Rhythm: welcome to these cores and congratulations for choosing to master rhythm, percussion and drums in music. After this course, you will be able to lead and drive your music, enhance and spotlight special posts, control the energy and action, generate intensity and power and forge thief foundation off all music you create because you will Lester the cool off all music rhythm. In this course, you will learn the foundations of rhythm, the role of rhythm, these sounds of rhythm, the performance of rhythm and he will be able to tie this all together into rhythmic patterns and performance is full of emotion and expression. You will get real live demonstrations of various kinds of rhythm sounds and performances, as you can see here on screen. Right now my name is Mike and I have been composing music since 1998 in all kinds of styles , from E g M and beats to metal and orchestral feel music and I will teach you from all the knowledge and experience I have gained during these years, including my best tips, tricks and practical methods for rhythm in music. So ask yourself right now. Do you want to become a master off drums, a master off percussion, a master of rhythmic drive on. In the end, with practice of all the things you will learn from this course, a master off rhythm in music, I always say that taking action is the only way to move forward on your journey in music. My name is Mike, and I welcome you to enroll now and start your journey to master rhythm in music. 2. What is Rhythm?: What is rhythm? Well, my honest opinion is that rhythm is the absolute foundation off music. Why, Let's face it, you cannot write music without rhythm because all notes must have a length and a timing rhythm is actually present everywhere in music, in the drums and percussion in the courts, harmonies and comping instruments, and even the leading melodies, hooks and motives. This course, however, will focus on the sounds in music that are dedicated to adding rhythmic drive and energy to your music. For example, your drum and percussion ports, your rhythmic Dr Instruments like strumming guitar away, perhaps an ostinato string pattern. My personal definition off rhythm is this. Rhythm is a pattern in time, off sound and silence, and I refer to rhythm as the core off music. To master rhythm. You need to truly understand the concepts and elements it is built on, which are, for example, the grid note lengths, BPM and temple as well as time signatures, and you will learn all these concepts and mawr in this course. So let's continue your learning journey right now to master rhythm in music 3. The Foundations of Rhythm The Grid: the greed. I call this the writing off music, all lords and sounds and music, or written into your DW into what is called the grid. This is basically the divisions off time in your sequencer. It is the modern equivalent off sheet music. He re decide the starting point on the end point off all notes and as a consequence, the length off all notes. However, a little side note percussion works a bit differently because a percussive hit on Lee has a starting point where you decide where the hit will go and not a note length. The greed of your DW and all load values or divided in note lengths. The longest note length is a full note, which is exactly one bore in length. The next one is 1/2 note, which is half off one bore, and then the note length values basically divides in half for each step. Now you should know that it is extremely uncommon to have notes shorter than a 64 note. Those extremely short notes are so uncommon that many D. W's don't even show a value lower than 1 64th As you can see here on the snapping or on the quant ties options. In fact, most music don't even use notes shorter than 1/16 note. Let's listen to a couple of examples off note lengths in the greed so you get familiar with their values. Next, let's listen to a mix of note values as well as some added poses to create a rhythmic pattern. And remember, forces must also have length, which can be any off the values you just learned. Take action now and practice the writing off music, the grid and note values. And always remember, rhythm is simply a pattern in time off sound and silence. So take your time to practice in the greed and I will see you in the next video. 4. The Foundations of Rhythm BPM and Tempo: BPM and temple. The power's off music. In order to create a rhythm, you need to set a temple, and you can think about the tempo as the Powells of your music. Almost like the power's off your heart rate. When you're cool and relaxed, you have a lower pulse, and when you exercise or dance, you have a higher pulse. It is the same with rhythm. In music, a high temple feels more energetic and a slow temple feels relaxing. The temple in music is measured in something called B P M, which stands for beats per minute. And again compare this to your heart rate, which is also measured in beats per minute. So here we have, quite literally, a connection between our heart and music. Perhaps that's why people often say that we have rhythm in our blood. All right, so how do you said the temple of your song? Well, that totally depends on what kind of song you want to make and the energy level you like it to have. But to give you a starting point. Most music have a tempo off somewhere in between 60 bpm and 180 bpm 60 BPM might be a really slow ballad, and 180 bpm might be a driving E g M song or fast paced punk rock song. So 60 to 180 or so. Do you notice something here? Well, this range is actually almost the same as the range off the human heart rate. The average heart rate at complete rest is around 60 BPM, and the P court rate for most people is around 180 bpm or so. So, again, music seems to be an extension off our very existence. I personally find this super fascinating, Don't you now take action and practice by listening to different BPM values so that you will develop a deep sense for various temples in music practice? Routine? One. A metronome. A great practice routine is to use a Metrodome app on your smartphone as you jam on your midi keyboard, piano deter or even hum and beat books musical ideas. You will find that as soon as you turn on the Metrodome and shoes a tempo, your body and mind will respond immediately to that pulse. In fact, it can be pretty hard to resist tapping your foot or nodding your head as you hear the beat . Practice routine to beat in your D. A. W. Another great practice routine is to create a beat in your DW and then adjust between various BPM values afterwards. In your proof, you can't example program a drum and percussion part in right a strumming pattern on a software guitar. Or perhaps compose I'm driving Austin Autumn Strings. The main point is that after you have this rhythm going, you change your project BPM to various values and listen carefully to how the Powells of the music feels to you when you change the BPM. Practice routine. Three. Tap Temple Since your goal is to master rhythm as a music composer, you need to develop an instinct for various temples. So when you feel ready, you can also start practicing tapping temples into your metronome app to aim for a specific BPM. Many is more film. Eternal maps have a tap temple feature, meaning that you tap the beat with your finger on the Metro room, then calculates the BPM for you. When you start off, you should do these vile watching down on the BPM counter on Europe at the same time. But as you improve, I really recommend that you practice tapping the temple blindly and trying to end up with a rough BPM. For example, decide first aim for a tempo of, let's say, 100 BPM, then tap the temple while not looking down on the app, trying to hit that specific BPM. It is not as easy as it sounds, but it truly is a great practice routine to develop your instinct off Temple and Paul's in music. So take action now and practice the pals off Music, BPM and temple have fun and I will see you in the next video. 5. The Foundations of Rhythm Time Signatures: time signature. The counting system in music rhythm in music is dependent on something called Time Signature. The time Senator is just an indicator to describe how you count the beats in each measure off the piece of music you make and a measure also called Bore, is simply the segments music is divided into. There are many different time signatures a song can be based on, and in some cases, especially in orchestral music, the time signature can change within the song itself. There is one time signature that is used in the vast majority off all music ever created, and it is called 44 It simply means that the underlying count for your music is four beats per measure. One beat in music is the length off 1/4 note. Quarter means 1/4 so 4/4 notes equals one full note. It is like dividing a cake into four equally large slices. In practical terms, this means that you simply count to four in a straight fashion like this. 12341234 and so one. Another fairly common time signature is 34 which sounds like this 123123123 and so on. Amazing. Now you have learned about time signatures in music and how they relate to counting each measure in your composition. To get a better feeling for this, I want you to once again use the Metrodome and listen to various time signatures and temples and practice, making every them staying on beat. I strongly recommend you to install a metronome app for your smartphone. If you haven't already done so and then it's time for you to practice time Signatures. Start by setting the metal home to full four and listen to various be PM's with these time signature, then switch over 234 to get a feel for that kind of time signature. Perhaps you want to try 6/8 as well, since that is fairly common. Try out other time centers, but remember that 44 and 34 or by four the most used time signatures in music. So think about that before he tried to go super crazy with your rhythms and beats in your music. But if you want to go wild, no one is stopping you. So take action now to practice time. Seed enters in music and I will see you in the next video 6. Percussive vs Pitched: rhythm is present in every note in music, every sound and equally important, every silent port in between the notes. It is this, the remix of sound and silence that is the essence of rhythm. There is, however, three distinct kinds off rhythmic elements and music. Pure percussive sounds like drums, for example, tuned rhythmic sounds, which means that you can play different notes on that instrument. But they all percussive in the sense that he cannot alter the length and sustain off each note. For example, a marimba and with Mick Instruments, which basically can be any instrument played in a rhythmic fashion, like a rhythm guitar. So pure percussive sounds. So all percussive sounds have a frequency focal point, depth and range on. They also have a distinct attack and decay. This is what creates the sound character but pure percussive sounds or known pitched, which means that they do not have a clear tonal center. This means that you cannot play notes with them. Basically, the sounds of pure percussive sounds is similar to controlled white noise. In fact, white noise is used a lot to mimic percussion with synthesis or to enhance sounds by sound design using white noise as the starting point tuned percussive sounds tune, percussive sounds or instruments and sounds that have a fundamental pitch plus overtones, meaning that he can play notes with them. A common example for two drums or tomes. And there are in fact, all kinds of rhythmic tuned percussion, which are often used as a layer to enhance other instruments and rhythmic patterns like Brooke and spiel. Tubular bells gained vibraphone instruments. These can basically be any instrument that you play in a rhythmic fashion, but which also gives you control over the length off each note, meaning the sustain. A piano is in fact percussive in the sense that a hem strikes the strings when you press a key. But if you hold down a key, you get a sustained note. There are an incredible number of instruments that were great for rhythmic use, such as electric, acoustic or orchestras. Strings, perhaps a policy ing synthesizer. You will find most freedom in this category off rhythmic cells. Great, you have now learned about the three main sounds of rhythm, pure percussive sounds tuned percussive sounds and rhythmic instruments. This is the foundation of your rhythmic to kit as a composer, so let's continue in the next video 7. Monophonic vs Polyphonic: the next distinction off rhythmic sounds is between model phonic and poorly phonic. In plain terms, Mona Fornek means one sound played at a time, like on a drum, for example, and polyphonic means several sounds played at the same time. Like when you play chords on your piano or strumming on your guitar. Well, technically, the strong strings are not exactly played at the same time, but the sounds are so close that they appear as one single sound when you play a chord all pure percussive sounds or mullah fornek by nature. Yes, you can lay your drums and percussion, but any individual pure percussive instrument can only play one single note at the time. Tuned percussion like marimbas, for example, can play two notes at the same time. Since you have two sticks you can hit the notes with. And then there is the full range of instruments that can be played rhythmically, either mono fornek, like an ostinato patterns or pid you or coping rhythm with the cold progression on, Let's say, a piano. Polyphonic sounds have the ability to add harmony to the rhythms, which, of course, as a whole new dimension to your rhythmic sound kit. However, you should be aware that as soon as he introduced Polyphonic sounds into your composition, the harmonies and overtones take up much room in the mix. Vile Mona Phonic sounds haveem, or distinct focal point and can be used in more numbers due to their minimal use off the canvas off sound that you paint. As a composer, you have now learned about two lane distinctions of sounds in rhythm model phonic sounds versus poorly phonic sounds. So let's continue learning more foundations of rhythm in the next video. 8. Straight vs Triplets: Now you have already learned about the greed in music and that note values go from a full bore to 1/2 bar and then divide by half, all the way down to a 256th of one bore. Those are the standard straight note values. But there is also a thing called triplets, which is very commonly used in many styles of music, from orchestral compositions to modern pop music. In fact, many modern styles of beat based music rely heavily on triplets, for example, in the high hat patterns. So what? Or triplets? This simple explanation is this. 33 played notes in a sequence have the same total length as to straight notes off the same value. So, for example, two straight ache notes or the same length as three triplet eight notes. Basically, this means that a triplet is 2/3 off the straight note value. Let me give you a more practical example. If you feel a full ball off straight 16th notes, you will, of course, get 16. But if you feel a football with 16th triplet notes, you will get more notes since triplets or 2/3 off this great note value. So if you divide by two, then multiply by three, you will get the final amount of notes. In this case, we had 16th notes, so divide by two is eight, then multiply by three and you get 24. So in a full bore, you can fit 24 triplets. 16 triplet eighth notes are probably the most commonly used, and for this note value, you can fit eight straight notes in a full bore, which translates to 12 triplet eighth notes. Great, You have now learned the difference between straight notes and triplets, how they sound and how to practically use them and ride them into the greed of your D eight of you. So go ahead now and practise triplets because it is a great way to add variation and spice up your groove with and I will see you in the next video 9. Main Rhythm vs Syncopation: to compose intriguing and engaging rhythmic patterns in your music, you need to use the power off Syncopation. So what is Syncopation in music? Well, basically, the main rhythm is what drives your music. The anchors don't to speak and Syncopation, or the introduction off contrary patterns that feels unexpected to the listener and act as kind of an interruption off the regular flow. The main rhythm carries. It is basically a counter rhythm to the main rhythm. Syncopation can also be an unexpected accent, where it usually does not occur in the main rhythm. So in plain and easy terms, Syncopation is the unexpected rhythmic patterns that goes against the steady flow off the main rhythm. Now, how do you use these in practice? Well, I personally create the main rhythm first and mark the accents. Then, when I feel the main groove is done, I add those extra unexpected rhythmic Syncopations. Syncopation is most often used in the higher pitched percussion and rhythmic instruments, while the lower rhythmic instruments and sounds will act as the anchor and drive for the main rhythm. Let me give you a quick sound demonstration of using Syncopation to spice up your rhythms. with. So as you can see from the media notes here we have the main flow off the rhythm in the 1st 3 bores. And then here in the fourth bore, we have triplet notes on the string ostinato sounds as well as the clap sounds, but straight eight knows here in the base and so on. So that's what's create these Syncopation in the rhythm. Nice. You have now learned the difference between the main rhythm and Syncopation. Syncopation often require some experimentation to get a pleasing, overruled rhythmic pattern, because essentially you are acting against the main flow. But it is a great way to add interest and spice up your groove with. So take action now and practise single patient when you create your rhythmic patterns in your d aaw on, then continue in the next video. 10. Fills & Transitions: rhythmic elements or great for spicing up your music in certain places in your track. This is especially important in the transitions between two sections. You can do this by adding a fill or otherwise abruptly changing the rhythmic pattern right before the transition. But it is also important to add some variation inside your rhythmic ports by including some extra fills, even during your main sections in your music, it doesn't have to be much just some extra flavor here and there to add some variation. For example, adding a little fill every fourth bore, which is very common for drummers to do so how will use by stop your rhythmic ports and patterns by including fills and transitions that is your creative freedom as a composer. Now let me finish with the quick sound demonstration off using fills and transitions with rhythm in your music. So this is the first section, and this is the second section. I'm going to play from here and listen closely to the transitional feel elements here in the final part off Section one, going into section two. All right, so if we go into the piano roll and check out what happens you can see that we have fewer things going on here and longer block chords, hair. And then in the transition port, we have much more going on, which basically, it's the Phils that goes into the higher energy over Section two. You can do lots of things as feels and transitions in your music. For example, introduce some extra beats on your drums and percussion ports, some extra notes on your other instruments, Cymbals and longer percussive sounds or great for both feels and especially transition ports. And you can even do some sound effects for your transitions, like reverse sounds or Reiser effects. Awesome. Now you have learned the importance off rhythm for fills and transitions in music, and also how you can use them to add excitement and variation in the transitions between your sections. Now let's continue in the next video. 11. One Beat to Rule them All: in rhythm. The different beats and divisions have various degree off power and authority. In fact, there is one beat to rule them all. I am, of course, talking about the wrong off each bore, meaning the very first beat. Here is where you usually put most emphasis in your rhythms, where most off the heavy hits land. Why? Because that is the rhythmic anchor for the listener. Like the middle of a circle, which everything evolves around. I have created a term that I teaching music composition, which I call power notes. These can be super heavy accents on drums and percussion, but also a single note with a long, sustained, on any kind of instrument. For example, a distorted electric guitar or a powerful sound design note like, for example, the Bram. These power notes are basically always on the first beat over a bore, however, not usually on every bar, especially not for the big sustained perhaps every other board, every fourth ball or even every eighth bore. Let me give you a quick demonstration now, off the one beat to rule them all the power off the first beats in every bar and also how we can use power knows for those extra heavy accents. Powerful, indeed. So make sure that he used this knowledge to your advantage as a music composer. The first beat off each bore the one beat to rule them all. And also remember to use power notes when you want to add those extra heavy accents in your music story. Now let's continue in the next video. 12. Intro The Role of Rhythm: rhythm is the cool off music. Even if there are no drums and percussion in your track, you will still have rhythmic patterns everywhere but a port from being the backbone of your music compositions. What all the specific rules rhythm play Well, I have made a list off the essential practical rolls rhythm has in music things that you should truly learn well and always be aware of when you compose your music. And in this module we will go through them one by one. So I will see you in the next video. 13. Action & Energy: rhythm is what defines the amount of energy and action feel of your music. A very simple rhythm with long sustained notes will have less energy and action. It can still be powerful indeed, but the lack of DR will make the overall vibe less action focused and more mood focused. On the other hand, if you have more distinct rhythmic patterns playing and basically more rhythmic notes and beats, it will increase the energy and intensify the action. So one of the main roles of rhythm is to creatively choose how much action and energy you should focus on in any section off your music versus how much the music should be focused on mood and vibe. The choice and power is in your hands as a music composer. Now, let me give you a quick sold illustration of using rhythm to determine the amount off action and energy in music. This example clearly shows the power off rhythm to control the amount of action and energy in your music. You clearly heard the big difference, but you can also see it by simply looking at how much is going on. So if I go into the piano roll for, Let's say, the piano track here playing the courts, you can see that the first port simply has long cord notes on the second part is much busier with a rhythmic pattern. And if we go into the drum track here, you can see that there are way more notes on the second part with a much busier rhythm but also the energy off. This second port is higher due to an increase in intensity as well meaning harder hitting drums and so on. And you can see this by the color off the notes, which represent the velocity values. Higher velocity values means louder and more intensity in the notes. Great. Now you have learned that rhythm plays a major role in designing the action and energy in your music, so let's continue in the next video. 14. Drive & Pulse: Another major role of rhythm is to be used as a driving pulse that pushes your music forward, for example, on the baseline, all perhaps a rhythm guitar or on ostinato string Pattern s a music composer. You can use many ways to add that drive to your music anything from the classic 44 kick drum beat to a straight sequence off eight notes on the baseline. You can also add groove into the drive by varying the note lengths and timings. You can make the drive flew like an or pidio. Or you can choose to have a stare the punchy groove with block chords on stock cattle strings, for example. Or you can choose to have a repeated reef to drive your music. These are all created choices you will make as a composer. How much focus should be on the drive and pals in your music, and you want a repeated Paul's to be like an anchor or focus more on the groove with the reef style drive and very note lengths and timings. Congratulations. You have now learned that rhythm plays the role of designing the drive and pals in your music. Let this knowledge sink in, and then let's continue in the next video 15. Fills & Transitions: rhythmic elements or great for spicing up your music in certain places in your track. This is especially important in the transitions between two sections. You can do this by adding a fill or otherwise abruptly changing the rhythmic pattern right before the transition. But it is also important to add some variation inside your rhythmic ports by including some extra fills, even during your main sections in your music, it doesn't have to be much just some extra flavor here and there to add some variation. For example, adding a little fill every fourth bore, which is very common for drummers to do so how will use by stop your rhythmic ports and patterns by including fills and transitions that is your creative freedom as a composer. Now let me finish with the quick sound demonstration off using fills and transitions with rhythm in your music. So this is the first section, and this is the second section. I'm going to play from here and listen closely to the transitional feel elements here in the final part off Section one, going into section two. All right, so if we go into the piano roll and check out what happens you can see that we have fewer things going on here and longer block chords, hair. And then in the transition port, we have much more going on, which basically, it's the Phils that goes into the higher energy over Section two. You can do lots of things as feels and transitions in your music. For example, introduce some extra beats on your drums and percussion ports, some extra notes on your other instruments, Cymbals and longer percussive sounds or great for both feels and especially transition ports. And you can even do some sound effects for your transitions, like reverse sounds or Reiser effects. Awesome. Now you have learned the importance off rhythm for fills and transitions in music, and also how you can use them to add excitement and variation in the transitions between your sections. Now let's continue in the next video. 16. Leadership & Augmentation: using rhythm for leadership versus augmentation. This is a very important lesson for you. To their own rhythm. Can either take the leadership role in your music, meaning it will drive the track and be the center off focus. This basically means that rhythm is the main driver of your composition. On that, the other elements will follow the leadership of your main rhythmic drive. But rhythm can also be used to augment specific ports in your composition. This basically means it is used to accept certain beats to enhance what the rest of your music does. This is especially true for drums and percussion, which are often used to augment certain parts of your riffs, hooks or other Melo deports. Rhythm can switch from the leadership role to the augmenting role and back again several times during attract. Also, how much rhythm plays the leadership role in attract is dependent on the show Aunger and style of your music. For example, in orchestra music, classical music and Jess really more often place the augmenting role, while popular styles of music like E g. M. And beats rhythm is more often taking the front seat leading and driving the track forward . However, regardless on Sean Ger and style, I strongly recommend you to use rhythm in both fashions in every piece of music you compose , because those augmenting percussion hits can really lift your track to a higher level and a better experience for the listeners. Now let me finish with a quick sound demonstration off, switching the rhythm from a leadership and front seat role into on augmenting roll and then back to leadership again, all in the same track. This is the kind of variation in the Rome of rhythm you should practice as a composer, all right, so I have three different sections in this example. As you can see up here in the first section, the rhythm placed the leadership role, basically driving the fact forward. In the second section, the rhythm takes on augmentation role. Basically, the rhythmic patterns augment each other on certain specific beats in the pattern. And in Section three, the rhythm goes back to playing the leadership role again and basically driving the track until the end here. So let's take a listen. - So if we take a quick look here into the piano roll, if I select all these ports in Section one. First, you can see that there are no distinct accents in the beat, meaning that here the rhythm takes the leadership role, which is the drive and flow off the track. And if we continue to Section two and going to be the piano roll, you can clearly see that these are very distinct accents here in the beat, meaning that they argument each other. That is when rhythm takes the augmentation role in your music, and then it goes back to being a flow dry for the track. I'm Jill the End Super Now you have learned the importance of using rhythm in both a leadership role as well as an augmenting role, and also that he can freely switch between them many times during your music composition. So try it out and make sure to practice these roles every time you make music. No, let's continue in the next video 17. The Power of Silence: the most powerful element in music is silence. Without silence, there would be no music. It is like light and darkness. They both need each other to exist. So I want to challenge you to think differently on your rhythm. Sometimes, instead of what knows you want to add, consider where you would like this silent ports to be. This can be truly mind opening when you realize that silence is off equal importance. So the final and perhaps the most important role of rhythm is to introduce silence in your music. Basically, if you think about it, every rhythmic pattern you compose can be looked at from two different perspectives. Either you see the notes for what they or their timing, their length and their pitch. Or you can look at it from the other side of the coin. You have an inverted pattern in between all your notes in your rhythm, which are the silent parts the ports were. Your music breathes, so you're exercise. Here is next time when you program rhythmic patterns on drums and percussion or driving rhythmic instrument ports. Look at this silence between the notes and you will see that it is indeed a pattern in itself. I truly believe that this is one of the most important elements you need to be aware of as a music composer. Now, let me demonstrate the power off silence in music. I have composed a short little example track here. And if you look closely here at the end, there is lots of space meaning silence before the final ending off the song. So let's listen to the track. So you clearly heard the power off silence here at the end of the song. But it's also very effective in transitions. Right now, I'm using a field type transition, meaning more notes, as you can hear if you listen from here now, but I could instead use the power off silence to create anticipation for the next part of the song. So if I used the selection tool here and take these ports here and then mute them, let's listen to what these dust to the transition as you heard a completely different result. But it works very effective as well, using the power off silence to create some air and breathing room for the music until a new section hits always considers silence as an option and creative artistic choice. All right now let's continue in the next video 18. Intro The Sounds of Rhythm: rhythm is the backbone off music. It flows through a song like a big, powerful pillar that holds everything to get her. So as a composer, you need to make sure that you balance the rhythmic parts of your music in terms off sound , because I'm sure you want your music to sound full and have a powerful emotional impact among your listeners. That is why I have made a list off my top tips off essential things you should focus on when creating your rhythmic sound kit and balance the rhythmic sounds in your music. These are the very things of rhythm I personally focus on as a composer, regardless of musical style or songer. So let's go through them one by one in this module. 19. Balance of Style: The first thing to consider is the balance off style, tone and character off the rhythmic sounds you choose to include in your rhythmic sound kit . And, of course, this is mainly decided by what shong, ger and style of music you want to compose. For example, if you're going to compose an orchestral cinematic track, the rhythmic sound, it will be very different from a contemporary pop song, this style of drums, percussion and rhythmic dr instruments, the tone and character off each sound. It all has to be consistent with the big picture you are trying to create. However, you should not be afraid of experimenting with interesting and unusual combinations, as long as you're aware that the complete range of sounds you end up using for the rhythmic ports in your track should feel like they blend together in a policing and coherent way. The main point here is that you are designing a rhythmic sound kit that should feel like a kit, not simply a bombs off rhythmic sounds stacked together. Now let me finish with a sound demonstration of a complete rhythmic sound kit, balanced in style, tone and character for a specific vibe. I have chosen as a composer. In this example, I actually dialed down the melodic parts of the track to bring more focus to the rhythms being a drum kit, a percussion drunk, it orchestral percussion and high and low string ostinato patterns. So for all sounds, they need to sound that they belong together in a sound kit. And even though I use a rook kit like this, the drum kit is actually drenched in a big reverb to go together with the orchestral percussion like you can hear Now. If I were to use like an E g m or beat style drunk it, it would not blend well together with the big orchestral percussion. So your mission as a composer is to make sure that all the rhythmic sounds as well as the melodic instruments all blend together into a complete sound. Kicked Congratulations. You have now learned the importance off balancing these style tone and character off your rhythmic sound kit, so let's continue in the next video 20. Balance of Range: As a composer, you are basically like a painter with a canvas. But instead of feeling the canvas with Kohler's, you feel it with sounds. The frame you work within when composing is based on the range of frequencies in music from the lowest base, which is around 20 hertz to the highest trouble, which goes up to 20,000 hertz. Now there is a reason why the traditional acoustic drum kit is set up. The weight is, and that is because of the balance off range meaning frequency ranges. Each drum and percussion element has a different port off the canvas to feel with its color . To make music sound full and complete, you need to feel the entire canvas. So when you create your rhythmic sound kit for your composition, make sure to feel the entire canvas from the lowest bass frequencies to the highest trouble . Balance also means that no part off these range should overtake the others. The main point here is don't place too many sounds in one range. Instead, make the entire rhythmic sound kit be like a balanced floor to carry your entire composition, including the full range of frequencies in music. Let me finish with a quick sound demonstration, or they really make sound kit that fills the entire canvas of music with a balanced use off the complete frequency range. It is actually even more clear if we look here in the piano. Roll on. I have selected all ports in the track. So as you can see, it goes from the lowest base to the highest treble up here. And this is what will give a wide and full sound to your rhythmic sound kit. Amazing. You have now learned that s a composer. You're basically a painter off sound and that your music should balance the full frequency range just as a painter feels his entire canvas with colors. Now, let's continue in the next video. 21. Balance of Stereo: as a music composer. You also have your canvas span in the stereo field from the four left to the four right. You basically have a stage for all your sounds to be placed in. Use this to your advantage when you create your rhythmic sound kit. As a rule of thumb, the deeper sounds and instruments work best in these center off the stereo field like your kick drums. Big percussion, low pulsing since etcetera. This is mainly because they carry more power and sound pressure and thus need the advantage of both speakers. But let's say you have a rhythm guitar playing with a rhythm piano at the same time. Panned them in opposite directions, and you will create a wider and deeper stereo makes in your music. Andi. Achieve more clarity and separation in the process. Your goal is to have your rhythmic sound kit have a balanced stereo field with lots off separation and depth from using the power off panning. Let me give you a quick sound demonstration. All right, so here I have two tracks, one rhythm piano track, which sounds like this, and one acoustic rhythm guitar track, which sounds like this right so on their own. Very sound. Really good. So we have two different rhythmic patterns. So what happens if I play them both together but have both panned in the middle? So no separation in the stereo field? Let's listen. Sounds pretty good, but I can add more separation in the stereo field by panning. Let's say the piano a bit to the left and the guitar to the right like this. Let's overdo it, in fact, to make it really obvious. So let's listen now, and you will hear a clear separation between these two rhythms. This was an example off the to power off stereo. Your job as a composer is to balance all your instruments, including your rhythmic sound kit in the stereo field, your drums, your percussion ports, your rhythmic and comping instruments. They should all be placed and balanced in the wide stereo states you have available when you paint in the canvas off. Sound nice. You have now learned the power off stereo field and separation when creating your rhythmic sound kit, because your canvas as a music composer span from the far left to the four right. All right. Now let's continue in the next video 22. Balance of Depth: now a very important part of your rhythmic sound kit is the balance off depth. This is an extra dimension that can make your music sound mawr three d dimensional, and it is created by balancing the amount and depth off reverb. For all the sounds in your rhythmic sound kit, the less reverb the closer and more up from the sound will be, so you can have some sounds further back by adding Mawr and Big River to them. Use the range of depth to further separate and increase the space separation of your rhythmic sounds. But be aware that too much difference in depth can sound strange. For example, a totally dry drum sound in a mix where the rest of the sounds are in a big orchestral hole will sound misplaced. So here is a rhythmic sound kit that is balanced foran, orchestral cinematic sound. We have low drums, bass drums, all played in the depth off, an orchestral whole reverb and sometimes some extra mediates. Hi, Tom's Snap drums come stick. It's some 10 Marines. Some extra shakers appear, also drenched in a huge hole reverb and then some orchestral symbols. So together they sound like a complete and coherent sound kit inside an orchestra hole. Yes, you can hear. Compare that to this E G M style beats drunk it, which is very tight and dry, which means not much reverb at all, so this will not blend well together with this orchestral sound kit. Here, let me play from here and from the beginning with the orchestral bass drum. It doesn't blend well because there's too much difference in the balance off depth in this entire rhythmic sunk it. Your job as a composer is to make sure that your complete rhythmic sound kit with all your jumps, percussion and rhythmic instruments is balanced in the depth field. This is mainly done with reverb, the amount of reverb use for each track and also how big the space off the river is amazing . You have now learned the power off depth and three D separation when creating your rhythmic socket because your canvas as a composer actually has a three d dimension as well. All right, let's continue in the next video 23. Layering for Impact: rhythmic sounds, driving rhythms and percussion, or all incredibly well suited for layering. Because when you layer two or more sounds that trigger at the same time, the end result will feel like a single sound to the listener. But with a new kind of color, layering sounds will make them richer and more powerful, and it's a great way to get mawr impact. It works especially great for accents in music, for example, it is very common to layer a snare drum with a clap to get an even more powerful accent or layering several sounds together to make your kick drum bigger. We're having a Big Tom hit on the same beat as an orchestral bass drum and perhaps a Cymbal crash. Layering in rhythm is, in fact, one of the most fundamental ways to accept beats in your music and also well of the best ways to create new, interesting and unique sound colors. Because not only does the layers themselves matter but also how you choose to mix and blend them together. For example, if you blend a snare and a clap, you can choose how you blend the levels as well as the e cues and filters, compression and any special effect unit per layer. I personally find layering to be one of the most fun and creative ports off, creating your rhythmic sound kit for your music. Now let me give you a quick sound demonstration of using the power off layering both in the rhythmic sound kid creation on the arrangement of notes in the sequencer to create new colors, more prominent accents and a unique sound. So I have composed this example here with low percussion on orchestral bass, drums low, Tom's high, Tom's shakers, symbols and so on. And if we play each on their own, the orchestral bass drum, the low Tom's and so on, they can sound pretty good on their own. But it is when you layer them together. And if we go into the piano roll and Butch, if I select all these parts, you can see this If I sue me now that the accents from the bass drum hits here on the low note here, or ex entered with layering on lots off the other percussion ports, that is what creates more impact on the specific beats. So if we listen to everything together now, it sounds like this awesome. You have now learned the power off layering to create new and unique colors and also to enhance the accents in your music. So let's continue in the next video. 24. Intro The Performance of Rhythm: many composers focus a lot on creative, expressive melodies, powerful motives and colorful chord progressions. But what about rhythm? The rhythmic performances in your music is incredibly important, as it is the very cool off music. And like everything in music, rhythm also needs variation in the performance, motion movement and dynamics. To make it interesting to the listener, I have made a list off my best things to focus on for creating a great performance with your rhythmic sound kit. Let's go through them one by one in this model. 25. Variation in Intensity: one of the most important aspect off any rhythmic sound is the intensity off each note how hard the drum is hit, how intense the strings of the guitar or strummed and so on. The variation in dynamics the highest intensity marks an accent and the lowest intensity or often used as grace notes, meaning they are barely heard but still add some spice to the performance in your D. W. It is all about velocity values from 0 to 127 the softest of soft to the loudest of loud. So here are two piano notes. The 1st 1 has the velocity value of one, and the 2nd 1 has 127. As you can see, that is the Mex, and these is the lowest you can play a note with. So if I play this now, you will really have to listen very carefully to actually even hear the sound off. This first note here and then this is will be blasting at full volume. So get ready for that right now. Of course, this was an extreme example. So let me go back into the sequencer and then you this piano track and I have prepared a drum track as well as a bass track. And the reason that this sport is more in red is because I went into the piano roll editor and increased the velocity values for these notes. The average value here in this port is much more higher than the average velocity value here, and you can see these from the colors here, which is more green and bluish here and in this part, more yellows and reds, which is the colors, at least logic uses to indicate the velocity values for each note. So if we take a listen to this now, you will hear that it is much higher intensity in this second part from the first part. So let's listen, and variation in intensity is not only important for an individual sound, it also matters a great deal for the entire rhythmic section as a whole, for example. Usually the chorus off his own has an average higher intensity, especially for the rhythmic parts, since they are the core that drives the music forward. Your goal is to use the range off intensity as a dynamic performance to in order to make your rhythms Mawr engaging and interesting and, as a result, even more powerful, since the accents will feel stronger if they are surrounded by less intense cells. Great. Now you have learned the importance of variation in intensity and to focus on those dynamics and velocity values off each note in your performance. So let's continue in the next video. 26. Variation in Complexity: you can have looks going on in the rhythms, meaning many notes in each bar on many different instruments, which you can see here in this section, which has lots going on in the rhythmic patterns. Or you can have a very simple beat, which you can see an example over here. But you need variation in all sections of your music and for all individual rhythmic elements. For example, the inter port of a composition usually have a very simple rhythm to guide the listener into the groove off the song. And then it can get more complex in other ports off the composition, the most complex and BC rhythmic patterns, or things like Phil's transitions between sections and, of course, the classic drum and percussion souls. Your goal is to create more dynamic interest and variation in the action and drive off your music by using the range off complexity in your rhythmic parts from simple and sports too complex and dense. Now let me give you a quick sound demonstration off, building the complexity, going from simple and sports to a much more complex and interesting rhythm. So I have two tracks playing a rhythm here, a drum track and a base, and I have marked the first section dark blue and these one red. So these system or simple rhythmic patterns and then this section is much hiring complexity , which you can see if I go into the piano roll editor. There's much more notes going on in this partier. Both parts share the same temple and chord structure. The only difference here is the complexity off the rhythmic patterns. So let's take a listen. Amazing. Now we have learned the importance off variation in complexity off your rhythms and to focus on both the various sections of your song as well as the individual rhythms for each instrument. All right, let's continue in the next video. 27. Variation in Patterns: variation in Villa Mick patterns, since rhythm is the very core and anchor off music. This is one of the more difficult aspects to balance in a composition, because the listener needs a rhythm to hold on to something that feels familiar and predictable. But at the same time, he desires variation. As a composer, you need to balance these things repetition versus variation In the very rhythmic patterns you create in your composition. You need repetition to set the anchor off the route Big Foundation. But he also needs some variation to creating more interesting piece of music. The best way to introduce variation is, of course, in the different sections off your music and also in the transitions between them. But you also need some variation in the rhythms inside the individual sections. A natural poor to add some spies in the drums and percussion is, for example, every fourth ball with a little fill. You can also introduce variation by adding another layer off sound or even a symbol as dropping a sound in the middle of rhythm because in music, silence is as important as sounds. Your goal as a music composer is to create a good balance off repetition versus variation in your rhythmic patterns throughout your composition. Many aspiring composers or greater melodies, chords and harmonies, but sometimes forget to spend time and energy to air those very important details and variations in the rhythmic ports. Now let me give you a quick demonstration or variation in the rhythmic patterns. So I have two tracks here, a drum track and a bass track, and I have actually marked with coolers the small little fills I have added to add variation in the patrons off the rhythms. So it's common for every fourth bore 1234 here, here in the end before the next board starts to have a little fill, especially for the drums and percussion. But I have also included some variation in the baseline here as well. And at the end of track, I have a little longer variation in the patterns for the base and the end off the fourth bore here and for this section before the end of the track, and I even added a little minor variation in the pattern in the final port off every second bore here. So here on here, let's take a listen to have these sounds and in fact, let's watch it in the piano roll editors so you can see everything for yourself much more clearly. All right, so we have the first little variation here at the end of bore, too, as you can see here. Ah, the end off bar four, which is going into the next section here, the end of the second bar of section two. You can see the little fill here, and of course, the end of the track has much more variation in the rhythmic patterns. So now let's take a listen to all of this. Fascinating, isn't it? Now you have learned the importance of variation in your rhythms, but you need to be aware off the balance between repetition and variation. Too little variation and the rhythms will sound static, dull, solar's and not inspiring at all. And too much variation will sound like a drummer doing a crazy soul and refuses to stop. It is your job as a composer to find these balance for each piece of music you create. All right now, let's continue in the next video 28. Variation in Timing: music is more than simply notes on paper or in the grid of your d aaw. It is a human connection to your artistic soul on the very thing that makes us human. Our imperfections is also what feels more natural and emotional in music. This means that s a composer who produces music in a DEA W. You need to focus on having variation in the very timing off all instruments, sounds and tracks in your project, both the overall timing as well as the timing for individual notes. For example, in musical terms, when the music is played slightly before the beat, it is called rushing because it creates a more energetic and well Russia vibe. And when the new signals are played slightly after the beat, it is called dragging, which feels like the music is lagging and this makes you on edge with anticipation. For each new note, you can have various sections off your music. Either rush or drag to introduce variation in the very group off your song, and you will be surprised how even very tiny changes in timing off the groove can make a huge difference for the vibe on energy off your composition. For example, having your music dragging a bit right before the chorus can create great anticipation and tension before the chorus hits and having in Section Russia bit can make it feel more energetic. For example, in the chorus, another very important aspect of timing in a D. W. Is for monetization. If you call ties everything 100% to the grid, you have basically removed all the tiny imperfections in timing that make music sound alive and human. I recommend you to use less Qantas ation strength and instead manually adjust the most out of time notes in your performances. And when talking about timing differences, not only the starting point of each note matters, you should also have a variation in the timing off the note lengths. For example, let's say you have a baseline with eighth notes. Well, to make it sound more musical, human and alive, you should not have all modes be exactly eight nodes in length in the grade. Some can be slightly shorter and some slightly longer. Your goal as a composer is to use all timing elements in music like rushing and dragging timing off starting points for each note, as well as note lengths to give your P same or lively, organic expressive on emotional result. Now let me give you a quick sound demonstration of a static robotic rhythm with no timing variation versus a rhythmic performance with all these essential human and organic timing imperfections that truly makes music come alive. All right, so I have to ports here. The first Greenport is straight Quoteit, ized, static and Solis. And the second part, I have added variation in timing on both note starts and note lengths. As you can see, if we go into the piano role for the first part and take a look here, everything is very straight and kwon tightest. For example, here the PM report straight eighth notes with no variation in neither length nor starting point. The baseline as well there is static, and if we go over to the second part, let's check the piano Here. Here you will see lots of variation in note, lengths and timings, and here is the base for the second part. As you can see variation in note length and timings, especially the first beat off. Every newborn is longer, and I have also aligned the whole base port slightly to the left, as you can see from the notes, starting points compared to the grid. So let's listen to the difference between the first more static and robotic port. Compared to the second, more lively and human feel Great. You have now learned the importance of variation in timing in all aspects of music composition, so let's continue in the next video. 29. Variation in Tempo: variation in tempo. This is an aspect of music that is extremely powerful for the emotional response. But it is also something that many composers and producers today don't take full advantage off. If you listen to film, music and orchestral music, you will hear and mawr importantly feel lots or variation in the temple during the composition. Basically, this means that instead of having a static BPM for the entire song, you automate temple changes throughout your composition. For pop music like Brooke E G. M beats etcetera. You can also use the power off temple variation to achieving more powerful and engaging experience. For example, having the verse be slightly lower bpm at the chorus, slightly higher to ADM or energy or having the end of the song Gold Down in BPM, which is very common for live bands and orchestral pieces. Another great technique is to go down in Temple just before the chorus because it will extend the pre chorus sport an increased tension and anticipation. This will make the introduction of the chorus feel like it hits even harder, and the listener will be in heaven, so make sure you don't fall into the trap off simply choosing a BPM for your song and then have it static throughout the whole composition. Always remember the golden rule off music, variation, movement, motion and dynamics. These are all the very essence of what makes music expressive, emotional and engaging for the listener. Now let me finish with a quick sound demonstration off how we can use variation in temple to give your music and rhythms and much richer and deeper dimension in order to craft your music story any more powerful way. So here in this example, you can see that I have added Temple Automation to the track. I start out at 100 BPM in the first part and then before the course hits, which is here, I have added tempo automation to go down in BPM, which increases detention and anticipation for the listener. And then the cores hits and I go up to 103 bpm, which is slightly higher than I started out with. So this corresponds will have more energy, and then at the end of the track, I go down drastically in BPM, as you can see here, which creates lots of anticipation for that final hit off the song, So let's take a listen. Here is a fantasy style fact that I composed for a trailer on one of my YouTube channels. And as you can see, I have heavy temple automation here in the end off the piece to bring it to a more relaxing ending. - Amazing . You have now learned how and why tempo variations in your music or so incredibly powerful to add motion and movement into your music story, so make sure you take advantage of the power off temple variation in your music right now. Let's continue in the next video.