Model a Snowman in Cinema 4D, Beginner Course | Pete Maric | Skillshare

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Model a Snowman in Cinema 4D, Beginner Course

teacher avatar Pete Maric, Designer | Cinema 4D Expert | Founder, Triplet 3D

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

11 Lessons (53m)
    • 1. Introduction

      0:50
    • 2. 3D Modeling

      7:48
    • 3. Model the Hat

      6:28
    • 4. Model the Face

      6:38
    • 5. Model the Arms

      7:38
    • 6. Add Landscapes

      3:35
    • 7. Texturing

      5:54
    • 8. Create Variations

      2:16
    • 9. Lighting

      7:24
    • 10. Composition

      3:18
    • 11. Rendering

      1:28
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About This Class

Welcome to this course on Modeling a Snowman in Cinema 4D!

This course was designed with the complete beginner in mind and was recorded using Cinema 4D version R25. The course covers simple concepts like modeling with parametric primitives and the only requirement is that the student should have a basic understanding of Cinema 4D’s user interface. The course is project-based and starts with simple modeling techniques. You will apply your new skills immediately in the 3D environment and upon completion have a fully realized 3D visualization, complete with environment and lighting. 

Here are a few reasons why you would want to learn Cinema 4D with this online tutorial:

  • Cinema 4D is an excellent application which enables you to make high quality models and renderings which can be used for a large variety of applications including character design, architecture, products and more. 
  • Understand the fundamentals of 3D modeling, texturing, lighting and rendering. 
  • Make your own unique 3D artwork. 
  • Gain an understanding of the entire production workflow for 3D visualization. 
  • Gain confidence to create your own project from start to finish. 

With this beginner online tutorial, you will gain a solid understanding of the key concepts used to create 3D artwork. 

In this series of lessons we will cover all the fundamentals of 3D including: 

1. 3D Modeling

  • Use parametric primitives as the basis for the geometry
  • Utilize the ‘make editable’ function to refine the model and add detail
  • Selection tools and attributes
  • Splines + NURBS
  • Use the symmetry object to mirror the face and arms
  • Model the body, hat, face, and arms
  • Grouping related geometry and file organization
  • Populating the scene with Landscapes 

2. Texturing

  • Create default Cinema 4D Materials
  • Adjust material attributes 
  • Add noise to materials for detail
  • Create realistic reflections within the reflectance channel
  • Create bump using noise textures
  • Apply the materials to geometry

3. Modeling Variations

  • Create your own version of a snowman using reference images
  • Easily populate your scene using pre-made models and textures from the asset browser

4. Lighting

  • 3-point light set-up; main light, fill light and rim light
  • Use of physical sky object to create the sky and clouds
  • Brief discussion of lighting tips

5. Composition

  • Overview of the rule of thirds
  • Cameras, composition tab, and protection tag

6. Rendering

  • Set-up final output render settings using the standard renderer in Cinema 4D
  • Size, aspect ratio, save path, anti-aliasing

About the Instructor 

Pete Maric is the instructor for the course. He has been teaching 3D visualization and animation at Tri-C Community College and the Cleveland Institute of Art for over 10 years. In that timeframe, he has helped thousands of students become proficient in the use of 3D applications and gain confidence in their visual communication skills.

Who this course is for:

  • Aspiring artists interested in learning 3D
  • Beginner 3D Artists who want to learn the entire pipeline of 3D visualization with step-by-step instruction

Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

Pete Maric

Designer | Cinema 4D Expert | Founder, Triplet 3D

Teacher

Pete Maric founded Triplet 3D in Cleveland, Ohio in 2013, with the goal of creating a 3D studio that can bring together a wide range of skill sets and experience to deliver inventive, high quality work to clients.

He graduated from The Cleveland Institute of Art before working for three of the top 50 retail design firms in the US. In 2001, he began working independently in the architectural industry and worked with brands such as Adidas, Nintendo, and Everlast. His work has been featured in the Adobe Illustrator WOW! books, Photoshop User Magazine, Architecture in Perspective, Cleveland Magazine and House Trends.

Since 2008, he's been developing his CGI expertise, and teaches modeling and 3D animation at The Cleveland Institute of Art and Tri-C Community College.

Ch... See full profile

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Transcripts

1. Introduction: Welcome to this beginner course on remodelling a snowman in Cinema 4D. If you are an artist interested in learning a 3D application, and once you get started with it, easy to follow step-by-step course on the Fundamentals. This course is for you. We will cover the entire 3D visualization pipeline in a project-based format which will culminate into a completed project. This beginner course will cover 3D modeling with parametric primitives, texturing with default Cinema 4D materials, three-point lighting and physical skies, composition, cameras and render setup on Pete American will be your instructor for this course. Over the past 10 years, I've helped thousands of students become proficient in the use of 3D applications and gain confidence in their visual communication skills. Ready to get started in 3D, enroll today on Skillshare. 2. 3D Modeling: Let's get started with creating the snowman project. So the first thing I'm gonna do is create a new folder for my project and you can decide on the location for this. I'm just going to create this on my desktop. So new folder, I'll name it snowman. And then I'll open up this folder. And I'm going to create two additional folders in here. So I'll right-click and new folder. I'll call the first one scenes, and I'll create another one called renders. Now within Cinema 4D, we can start modeling the snowman. The very first thing we're gonna do is go up to our parametric primitives on the right-hand side. Click and hold this little cube and click the sphere. So that'll give us a sphere within our scene. And first and foremost, I'm gonna go ahead and save this scene. So I'll go File, Save Project, and I'll locate my folder that I just created. And within my scenes, I'll just call this snowman. All right, So we created the sphere. Right now we can't see any lines on the sphere, all of our segments. That's because the default display is at garage shading. So if we want to see our lines, Let's go up to display garage shading lines that will show us all these lines here in segments within our sphere. So if we take a render of this, you'll notice it renders perfect. And for snow, we want to have a little bit of displacement on this. So if I click and hold where there's this little bend icon, these are all the deformers. And I'm going to look for displacer. Okay? So the next thing I'm gonna do is I'll take this displacer and I'll drag until I see that down arrow above the sphere. And what that's doing, it's making this displacer a child of the sphere. So if I take a quick render again, you'll notice it got a little bit jagged on the edges. And what we wanna do within this displacer is go to the shading tab right here where it's a shader. Let's just add a noise to this. Now I can take another quick render and see what that looks like. So now it's, it's displacing our geometry, so it looks a little bit uneven like snow would. At this point, we could probably add a few more segments to smooth this out. So if I go back to my sphere and right here where it says segments, I'm just going to increase this number a little bit. And now that's going to add more segments to the sphere. And there we go. Now it's look, it's still looking a little jagged at certain places, but it's looking way more realistic than this perfect sphere. The next thing we can do is we can go into this displacer and we could play around with this noise. So right here where it says noise, you have this drop-down arrow and you can play with all kinds of different types of noise. So feel free to go through here and check out what some of these other noises look like. Okay, that's looking pretty good. We can also go into this object tab. And if we have, if we have too much displacement on this, we could just go into the strength and just decrease that a little bit, just so we get a little bit of bump in our first mounds of snow. Okay? So once we have that together, we could just fold this. Now I'm just going to create a few additional pieces of geometry for the body. And we could do this by going into the front view. So I'm just going to click here. And now I'll just take this. I can hold down Command and click and drag to duplicate this. Or I could just hit Command C, Command V, and you'll notice that I get a new sphere, my object manager. So I can just grab this by the handle and push it up. So one of the things I wanted to mention, it's really important when you're clicking and dragging certain elements that you don't just click and drag in any area, like an empty area, to click and drag up. Because at that point you really don't know where it's dragging to. Okay. So it's always best when you're moving something to move it by these axes. The green one is the why. The blue is the back to front, which is the depth, and the x is side to side. Okay, so now that I have this second sphere created, Let's go ahead and resize this. So I can just click this node here and just bring this down. Or I can go into this radius tab. And I can just decrease or increase this as needed. Okay, now I can just bring that down and go into my perspective view. And maybe the displacement on this as a little bit too much. I could bring that down a little bit and just bring the sphere down again. And now I'm going to create a third one on top for the head. So I'll hit Command C, Command V. And I'll take this one again in the front view. And I will bring that up right around here and just make that a little bit smaller. And there we go. Now we have the basics of our snowman, the basic geometry. And let's go ahead and rename these. So the, this one's going to be bottom. This one would be middle, and this one will be top. And I can take all three of these. And I can right-click and group objects that I'll put it inside of a folder. Double-click that and I call it body, not vertigo render. We'll see we have the basics of our snowman. At this point. I'm just going to go ahead and line the bottom of, the bottom of this bottom sphere with this red line. That's kind of the floor line right there. So I'll leave that just like this. And now we have a body and we can go through, and we can start playing with some of these I displacements. We can go through the shading tab and maybe we could pick a different noise for this if we don't like the one that's that's using, take another render and that's looking pretty decent. Maybe we could change the noise of some of these other ones at this point. Experiment that with that noise and see what works for you. Okay, So one additional thing that you could do to smooth out some of these surfaces is to use something called a subdivision surface, which you can find right here, subdivision surface. And now I can drag this in my folder and I'll take this bottom click and drag until I see that down arrow, let go. And that is going to smooth out this entire bottom so that I can see that smooth the rest are jagged up on top. And I can just continue doing that for my middle and my top. So I'll drag my middle into here. Take another render. It's like a nice and smooth. And I'll do the lab. I'll do the same thing for the top, for the head. Alright, now if I take a quick render, I get a lot of smoothness on my on my snow. Soon I could just take some of these. Him bring him down, pull these up. I'm just going to place this is I want and I can always go back into some of these. If I wanted more displacement on this, I could do that. I can go into the shading. I can take the global scale down. So some of those bumps are a little bit smaller. All right, So there we go. Now we got this like clay looking snow. 3. Model the Hat: Now let's create a hat for our snowman. We can start with going to our parametric primitives. And let's create a cylinder. And now we can go into the front view. And we can just drag this by the green handle. So these orange nodes here, these allow us to click and drag and resize this my PI. So I'm just gonna make this a little bit bigger. And as it gets C, we have a lot of segments in this in the height. So if I click my cylinder and go down to the attributes manager right here where it says height segments. We can just bring that down to one. All right? And now we can continue shaping this. If I take this and just make this a little bit thinner. So this is going to be the rim of my hat. And let's see what that looks like in perspective view. Here we go, bring that up. Maybe we want that to be a little bit, little bit smoother because you could see it's a, it's got a lot of jagged edges at this point. You could take a renders, see how, how jagged those look right there. And to smooth that out, what we're gonna do is where it says rotation segments. We can just go ahead and increase that number until we get a nice smooth cylinder. All right, so there's the rim of r hat. What we can do is we could take that command C command V, that's going to create a duplicate. And I'm going to take that and push it up. And I'm going to create the main part of this hat. And I'll just click and drag these little nodes. And let's go to our perspective view. And now we have the basics of R hat, the basic structure. Maybe that's a little bit too big on top. I could just bring that down. If you're more comfortable using these nodes, you can, but you can also click this cylinder and the Attributes Manager, you can play around with the radius here. Bring that down or bring it up. You can play around with the height right here, bring that down and bring it up. So it's up to you what you find more comfortable. Which method that you find more comfortable with modelling? So once we have this together, now we can go ahead and let's go and rename this rim. And we'll call this top. Now let's go ahead and make this feel a little bit more organic so it's not so perfect. So what we could do is take this rim. And right down here you're gonna see this little icon called a make editable. So what that does is right now we have, right now we have access to all these radius, height, height segments, rotation segments in the attribute manager. So once we make this editable, check this out now that all of those disappear and now we have access to these points, lines, and edges of our geometry. So if we go into our points, now we can start going through and just kinda manipulating these so it looks a little bit more organic and real. So the way that we could do that as we have something called a selection tool, right? So this live selection tool will allow us to grab a few of these points. Drag these, make it look a little bit more organic. So the live selection tool, let's click on this again. So right here you have this little, you have this option called the visible only. If you uncheck this, check out what happens if I go to select these points. I could accidentally select points that are on the other side. Okay? So I'm gonna go ahead and leave that checked. And now I can go through and just take some of these points and just kinda pushed them up, push him down just to make this rim look a little bit more organic and we can go through and continue doing this for the entire hat. Okay, because we don't want this thing to be too perfect. There we go. Select some of these. We can grab, grab this one, bring that down. The other thing that we could do is we can come in here and select all of these polygons. Actually, I want to uncheck visible only because I want to select all the way through this to the bottom. And I'm going to create a new layer. Not new layer, but in additional geometry in this. So if I go inset in, I click and drag, that's going to create a few extra points on the inside of that. Okay, so now we can continue going through, we can either use this live selection or rectangular selection up to you. So we can grab some of these, push those down, grab just the edges. So continue going through and creating this. So once you have that rim modeled like you want it, now we can go through and do the same thing to this top. So again, I'll go and make this editable and I can go to my points. And I could start shaping this top just to give it a little bit more organic look. Okay. Just so it doesn't look so perfect. So once you have your hat looking like you want it to look, Let's go ahead and take both of these pieces of geometry and group them together. And we'll name this hat. And now Let's go into our side view. And I'm going to change this axi. And I go to my move tool. And right here you'll find this tool called the enable access tool. And I'm just going to push this down to the bottom of this hat and then de-select that. Okay, so now I can take this, go to my rotation and click and drag by one of these handles. And just rotate this back. And now we can go ahead and position this in the 3D space. So I'll hit E on the keyboard for my move tool. Let's bring that back. This needs to come down a little bit. Maybe it needs to come back a little bit. There we go. Now we have a little hat on our snowman. 4. Model the Face: All right, Let's go ahead and create the face for the snowman. So we'll go to these parametric primitives and we'll choose a platonic object. And on our front view, I can just make this smaller. So this is going to be the coal that we use for the face. So let's go into this front view. And I can push this up, and that's probably a little bit too big. So right now, this platonic is buried somewhere inside of this head. So what we're gonna do is we'll take this blue handle and just kinda push it out till we see this on the face. So this is going to be our eyeball. And I'm just going to push this in a little bit. There we go. So now I'm just going to create a half the face. Then I'm going to mirror it over with a symmetry object. So let's take this platonic. And to see this a little bit better, maybe here we can just go garage shading. There we go. I'm going to take this platonic Command C command V. And I'll just push this down, push that over. So now it's again, getting buried in that face. So we'll have to come into this perspective view and grab this blue handle and just kinda push that out to what penetrates that surface. There we go. Bring that down a little bit. And I'm just going to duplicate this again. I'm holding down Command on the keyboard to duplicate that, and I'll duplicate it one more time. So here's what happens since that's a round form the head, we're going to have to go back into this perspective view and just make sure that these are going inside of that snow. So they're not sticking out too far. These are too big. You can just hold down. You can hit T on the keyboard for scale and scale. Some of these, you can rotate some of these so they're not all looking like they're the same in the same position. I'll take this last one and then just kind of scale that one down as well. And now I'm going to duplicate this to the other side. All of these, I'll just rename this one I. So before I create the symmetry object, what I'm going to want to do is I'm going to want to take it all of these right-click and group them together. And I'll just call this face. And now I'll go to here. Go to my symmetry object. Click and drag this face until I see this down arrow and let go. And now you'll see that we have everything duplicated on the other side. So here we're going to have to kinda tweak a few things. So we'll go back into some of these. And maybe I can bring these down a little bit. Maybe I could bring this one in. And maybe this one comes in a little bit. Maybe we have to push it out. There we go. Something like that. And maybe I could take the eyeballs and maybe push them inside the head a little bit more. And now we have a face for the snowman. Next thing we're gonna do is we're going to create a nose. So the way that I'm going to do that is first and foremost, I'll come into these parametric primitives and I create a cone. And now at this cone, I can go ahead and alter the orientation. So if I do a plus z or minus z, now it's kind of in the, in the right spot. I'm going to push this up where the head is. And let's go over here on the side view, I'll go to display guard Gouraud shading again. And I can just push this out. And I can take this bottom radius, bring that in, something like this. I can take the height, bring that down. So we're essentially creating some sort of carrot right now for this nose. And I could push it here. And let's see what that looks like. Maybe that's a little bit too big. So we could do is we can go in here and resize this. I can bring this in a little bit more. Maybe that tip isn't exactly 100% pointing. So I'll go to this top radius and maybe I'll put in 0.125. And there we go. Now I'm going to want more height segments in this. So I'll just increase that. Number 2, we see more segments. And then I can probably just rotate this into place. So if I hit R on the keyboard, rotate that. And then I'll just bring this up until I'm happy with the placement. That looks pretty good. And now we're gonna go ahead and make this carrot feel a little bit more organic. So I'm going to go and enable this Make editable function. Now that'll give me access to these points. Now we can go through in this side, side view. And I'll choose my rectangular selection. And I'll select all of these. So let me just demonstrate what this visible only means real quick. So if I click this visible only and I go in, select this role points. So check this out in the perspective view. It only selected one side of those points, okay, so by unchecking visible only, it'll allow you to select all the way through the model. Okay, so I'll do that again. And now if I go to my perspective view, I selected all the way through those points on both sides. So now I can go through and just kinda make this a little bit more organic. Select these points, bring those. And you can tweak this however you want. It's your model. Whenever you're happy with this, is when you should stop tweaking it. And we can reference this in the perspective view. I think that's looking pretty good. And I'll take this last line of points, maybe bring those down a little bit, bring this down. And that's looking pretty decent for this nose. And there we go. Now we have a face. And let's go ahead and rename this. And I'll take this nose and the symmetry right-click group objects. And I'll call this face. 5. Model the Arms: Let's go ahead and create the arms for our snowman. So we're going to start this off by going to the Spline Pen. And then I'll go into the top view. And I'll click once. For the second one, I'll click and drag to make a nice curve. Click one more time, click and drag. And we'll close it off right there. Hit Enter on the keyboard. Now go to my move tool. And you'll notice we have the spline on the ground. So if I take a render, you'll notice that spline doesn't show up. That's because splines need to be used in conjunction with sweep nerves or some sort of a NURBS object in order to render. So next thing we're gonna do is we're going to come up to these splines and we're going to create a circle. And alright, so right now the circle is way too big. So I'll just take this down to, let's say two inches and it'll disappear. It's probably buried inside of this body of the snowman. If I go back to this garage shape, if I go to lines, you'll see my spline is right here at the bottom of our scene. So right now what I'm gonna do is I'm gonna take this circle spline, the spline that we drew out and put those both inside of a sweep NURBS object. So if I click this sweep, now I need to click the circle, click the spline, drag until I see this down arrow above the sweep and Lego. So what that does is it creates this sort of pipe. So that circle is swept across that profile that we created, swept across that spline that we created. So now if I take a render, you'll notice now we have some geometry in here. So what we could do is we can go to the sweep and where it says N scale. I'll zoom in so you can see this where it says N scale. I'll just take this down and that's going to create some sort of taper for this. Okay, so now I'll take the sweep and I'm going to want to change this pivot to right here where this thing starts. Okay, so with our Move Tool selected, this model mode selected, I'm going to go to this Enable Axis tool, and I'll just click and drag until this axis is somewhere around the start of our, of our arm. And then I'll deselect this enable access tool. Okay? Now what we could do is we can take this sweep and we can duplicate it several times to make our arm. So if I take the sweep Command C Command V, Now I can go to my top view. And I could just start moving this into different places. So I'll hit T on the keyboard for scale, and I'll click and drag in an empty area, bring that down, I'll hit R and I'll rotate this out like this. And now I'll hit command to duplicate it again. I'll hit rotate, make another one over here. And I could scale this down as well, something like this. And you can continue doing this for as many little branches as you want on this arm. So I'll continue making duplicates. And maybe I'll scale this one up a little bit. Make another duplicate by holding down Command, clicking and dragging. Maybe I want a little one over here. I'll rotate this into place and scale that down a little bit. And what we could do is we can go ahead and we can change the shape of some of these so they don't look all the same. So if I go back to my spline, my point mode, grab some of these points. I could start changing the shape of this one. So it looks a little bit different from the other ones. And we could do that for some of these as well. So if I go to this spline, I could just move that over, move that down a little bit, and move this over. So now they're all starting to look a little bit different, which is what we bought. So how does this look in? That's pretty good. What if we create a few more of these? Just go to my motto, Move, model mode, Move tool. And I'll Command click to move this over. It's best to do this in an orthographic view. And how about I put one right here and I can just rotate this into place. So it's kinda sticking up a little bit. So if I go and rotate, and you'll have to use multiple views on this, I can just rotate this up just slightly. So now it gives it a little bit more organic look to this. And I can go ahead and duplicate one more. For this one, I'll rotate it a little bit. Scale this out. And again, I can go into the spline, my points mode. And if you're not, if it's hard to see these points, you can go ahead and disable the spline for a second, right? And then you can go to these points. Move these. I'm just using my selection tool for this is moving these points and then I could turn my spine back on again. And now it's looking a little bit different from the rest of those. Okay, I can take rotation, rotate that up a little bit. And now it looks pretty nice. Okay, so now let's take all of these, will group these together, and I'll call this arm. Now what I'm going to do wanna do is move this axis tool one more time. So I'm going to move this to the base of this arm. For this null object. There we go. Let's get out of this enable axis. And now in my front view, I'll just go ahead and push this up. Push this over. And if this is looking a little bit too big, we can always scale this down. Okay? So that's looking way too big for this snowman. That over and I'll hit T on the keyboard. And I'll just click and drag in an empty area and just scale that down a little bit. I can hit R for rotation more. I could find the rotation right here. Rotate that up a little bit. Maybe I can rotate it forward. And I'm going to go back to garage shading just so it's easier to see this. And that's looking pretty decent right there. I'll leave that as it is, and I'll go to my symmetry object. So I create symmetry, take this arm, make it a child of that symmetry. And now we have arms for our snowman. Now I can continue tweaking this. If I go to this arm, maybe I need to bring it in a little bit. Maybe it needs to come down and maybe forward. I can rotate it a little bit more. It's completely up to you how you do this. So you want to play around with this until you get it looking like you want it. And I'll rename this arm symmetry. And just fold this up and saved my project. 6. Add Landscapes: Let's go ahead and create an environment for our snowman. But before we do that, we're going to go ahead and group all these together. Right-click group. And I'll just rename this snowman. And now I can go into my parametric primitives again. And I can create some landscapes. So here's my first landscape. I can hit T on the keyboard or go here, scale that up a little bit. I can take these nodes, push that over this back. So now I have this little mound that this thing is sitting on, push it down. So at this point I could duplicate a lot of these landscapes, change some of the parameters to make an environment for this snowman. So hit Command C, Command V to duplicate that. And now I can make this one bigger. Push that over. I could take this node, creates some sort of a hill and the background. There we go. I can come down to this where it says seed and I can play with this parameter until I get the hill that I, I find visually appealing. And then I'll just move that over. And now again I'll hit Command C, Command V. Create another landscape. Push this one over there. Yeah, oh, I'll make this a little bit taller by grabbing this node. Pushing out over here. Maybe I can make this little wider play with the seed. Let's look in pretty nice right there. Let's just go ahead and continue making more landscapes Command C, Command V. I'll push this one back here. And again, I'll just play around with the size. Play around with this height, go to the seed. Until I'm happy with the amount of snow. I think that's looking pretty good right there. I'll create another one. Command, click and drag to create a duplicate. I'll make a big hill in the background. Something like this. Play around with the seat again. Let's look in pretty decent. I can bring this back over and maybe it's too tall. Use your eye hero discretion for how you want this to look. Right here we go. I'll create another one in the background here. Maybe push that over, play with the seed, and just continue going through until you're populating this environment with some hills and that kinda stuff. So i'll, I'll create another one in the foreground. And this one can be just this little amount of snow and the foreground. That's looking pretty good. That up a little bit. Again, play with the seed a little bit. There we go. Let's look in decent and just continue going through and creating the mounds of snow that you want. We can go back, tweak some of these. Let's look in the center right there. All right. And now I'll take all these landscapes right-click group. And I'll just rename this landscapes. 7. Texturing: Let's go ahead and create textures for our scene. So right here is our material manager. So if we click this, it will expand the material manager. And to create a new material, we can either go to create new default material or we can just double-click in this area to create a new material. I'll double-click, create that material. And then to open up the attributes of this material, Double-click that. Then I'll bring up our material editor. So I'll go ahead and rename this snow. And for this color, what I'm going to do, instead of leaving it at the default, I'm going to add a little bit of texture to this. So I'll go to texture and right where this down arrow is. Add noise. Okay, that's going to give me this noise. And then I can go into here and I can take this global scale. And let's say I'll bring it down to like 20, something like that. And I click this dark color and I'll just make it like a gray, something like this, just to give it a little bit of texture here. And I can even bring down this relative scale, 20, 2020. And will have to play around with this until we get it looking like we want it. But that's a good starting point right there. So now if I go to this reflectance, I can take this default specular layers, right, right-click this default specular and click Remove. And I'm going to add a little bit of reflectance to this. So if I go to add, I'll just add a reflection legacy. And that's going to make this look like a chrome, very reflective material. So what I could do is I can grow this brightness and take that way down. So I can take it down to, let's say, 10 to 12 percent just to get a little bit of reflection in this. Okay? So you can take it up higher if you want. It's going to look more like ice. I think right around. I don't know, right here. I think it looks pretty good by 14 percent. So that's good. So now what we're gonna do is we're gonna take that and we're going to apply it to our body. So now we get this and I can click this material and it said a projection uvw mapping. I could change that to a cubic. And let's take a quick render and let's see what that looks like. So now we have this snow looking material. We can also put some bump into here as well. So if I double-click this right here where it says bump, I can enable that. And then for the texture, again, I could choose some sort of like noise. And what that's gonna do, it's going to add some additional bump to this. Okay, so let's take a quick render. So that's a little bit too much right there. So what we can do is we can increase the size of this bump. So go to this, click this texture, and I'll just take the global scale and bring it up a little bit. Now, we get this. So here was our original. And now we just have a little bit more bump to this. I think this is looking a little bit too reflective. So I'll go back into this reflectance and I can take this roughness up. And you can notice right here, It's getting a little bit rougher as far as those reflections go. So this is pretty good right here. Let's leave that like that. Let's go ahead and create some more materials. Next thing I'm gonna do is I'm just going to create another material for the hat. And we can just go into the color. And I'll just create another noise material. And for this, I'm just going to choose like a black and a dark gray, just to give it a little bit of variation, I could just leave that at the default. Rename it hat not hot. And now for this, I'll just drag and drop this on the hat. And again, I'll choose for the projection, a cubic projection. There we go. Now we have this hat. Now for this face, I could even reuse this hat material for this col. So I'll just take that, drop that on the symmetry. Put that on a cubic projection. And for this nose, Let's go ahead and duplicate the snow Command C Command V. I'll open this up, I'll call this nose. And for the color. If I change this color, it doesn't do anything because we have this texture on top of it. So we'll have to change the color within this texture. So go to here. I'll choose some sort of orange color. Maybe a dark orange, something like this. And then for this, I'll choose another orangey type of color just to give it a little bit of texture. And now I can drop this on the nose. And now for these arms, we could find a texture and the asset browser. So if we go up here, click this. And then if we go to materials, we could choose, we could search for wood right here and find a wood that works for us. Let's go through here, find the wood that you want to use for your, for your arms and go ahead and download this. So double-click to download. Okay, that'll end up in the material manager. So now I can take that and I can drop that on the arms. And I can take my snow and just drop it on the landscapes. And use a cubic projection for this as well. And now are seen as textured. 8. Create Variations: So once you have your scene created, the next step is to make it your own. So I encourage you at this point to experiment and try to come up with some variations on your snowman theme. How can you make your snowman a little bit different? Can you add a scarf? Can you figure that out within Cinema 4D using parametric primitives? There's textures that you could find in the asset browser for different types of fabrics. Maybe you can change those out for your hat. Can you duplicate the snowman and make a little family of snowmen with some presence under a tree. Do you want glasses on the Snowman? What about these buttons on the body? Do you want the snowman holding some sort of stick? You could change the hat of your snowman to make it a little bit more streamlined or a little bit stylized. You could change the hair of your snowman, but maybe you couldn't change out the parametric primitives that we used for the eyes and change them into buttons or something like that. So I encourage you to take a few minutes, maybe an hour or something, and add a few things to your snowman That's going to make it unique. And within Cinema 4D, there are certain things that you can use to help make this a little bit easier. So if you go to that asset browser, if you come to objects, There's all kinds of different objects in here, from houses to fences, to trees, to bushes. So if you go down here to plants, you'll notice there's this snow-covered tree that might be a nice one to add inside of your into your scene. Okay? If you go to Materials, you'll notice there's a bunch of fabrics in here. The, any of these fabrics work for your hat. Can you reuse any of these fabrics for a scarf, that kind of thing. Okay, so feel free to go through here, check out this objects tab. If there's anything that makes sense in here for you use a you need to do is double-click the elements and import it into your scene materials. The same thing you can go through here. Pick out different materials, apply them to your hat, to your scarf, whatever you wanna do. But just make it, make it your own, make it a little bit unique. 9. Lighting: Let's go ahead and create a light setup for our snowman scene. So we're going to start this off by creating a three-point light setup. So first and foremost, we're going to create a main light than a fill light and a rim light. So for the main light, we're gonna go ahead and choose this infinite light source. And then I'll take this, just push it up a little bit, push it over. And I can see this is pointing straight back. So what I'm gonna do is I'm going to hit R on the keyboard and rotate this towards the snowman. And then I'm going to rotate it down. Something like this. So we can go into this light. So if we go into this general tab, I'm going to pick a bluish color for our light source. And then what I'm gonna do is I'm going to go into the shadow tab and choose area shadow. And then for this color of the shadow, again, I'm going to choose some sort of like bluish type of color. And I'll take the density down, Let's say to 90 percent. Now we can take a test render and see what this is looking like. So if I go up here, I'll render to the picture viewer. And now we have a light source, it's casting a shadow. And that's looking pretty decent. One of the things that we wanna do is as you'll notice on the right side of the snowman, it's looking super dark. So we're going to want to add a fill light to add an to fill in some of this area of the body. So the way that we're going to do that is I'll come back down to this light source and I'll choose an omni light. And I go ahead and I'll rename this fill light. And with this light, I'll take this and I'll push it up. And I'll push it over. And I want this to kind of be in front of the snowman a little bit, something like this, and push it over. So let's take another quick render and see what that looks like. So right now that fill light is way too intense. So here was our first render. Here's our second render. So we just want this to be able to fill in some of his body. So I'm gonna take this fill light. I'll go to General and this intensity, I'll bring down to about 50 percent. And for this, I can maybe choose some sort of yellowy type of light just so it's contrasting with that blue light. So let's see what that looks like. It looks a lot better. So now instead of having this total black on the right side of the snowman, now we have a little bit of fill back there. Okay. And now we're going to create a rim light so I could duplicate this fill Command C, command V. And I'll rename this rim light. And what I'm going to do with this is push it behind the snowman. So I'll take this, push it all the way back here. And let's just go to one of the side views. And let's take a render real quick. And right now we're having a hard time seeing any rim light back here. So what I'm gonna do is I'm going to change the color of this. So let's just, I don't know, maybe there's some some sort of street lamp or something or some sort of like Christmas lights back here that are, are casting a light source on the back of this snowman, this intensity up a little bit. And let's take another quick render. So now you can see this rim light is adding just a little bit of light on the on the edges of our snowman. I don't think I want this light to affect our landscapes. So what I'm gonna do is I'm going to exclude it from the landscape. So if I click this rim light, go to project. And now I'm just going to drag my landscapes down into this field. And now when I take a render, you'll notice this rim light is only affecting our snowman. All right. So let's see if we need to adjust anything at this point. Let's take a couple other renders from some different areas. So let's see what this is looking like. You can see a little bit of that rim light in the back here. And I think that's looking pretty good. So the last thing I'm gonna do is I'm going to use a physical sky for some clouds in the background. So if I go up to our asset browser and then we go to all, there's this folder called presets sky, presets skies. So you can go through and kind of experiment with different types of skies. And here, I'll double-click that and that'll import into our scene. Let's go ahead and take another render of this and see what that's looking like. So one of the things that I want to mention is if you're if you're if the color of your main light is too yellow, your snow could tend to look like sand inside a snow, so you want to be careful with how yellow and orange your main light sources. I think this is looking pretty good. And the one thing that I'm going to do in here is I'll go into the sky. And then where it says shadow, since we already have a shadow being cast from our main light source, I'm just going to turn the shadow off. Okay? If we take another quick render, see what that looks like. Compare that to the previous one. I think that looks pretty good. And there's a few other things that you can play with in the sky. So if you go to time and location, you can actually make this look like it's a nighttime scene. Now when you take a render, it's going to look like a nighttime scene with some stars up in the sky, which looks pretty decent. Or you can just take it back down to where it was. That's going to be completely up to you. So go up, go ahead and start playing around with some of these timing location settings over here. And the other thing that you want to make sure is that this light, the main light source, is hitting approximately where your main light sources hitting. So you can take this sky and you can rotate this. And as you rotate this, you see how that light is changing where it's hitting that snowman. I want it to be right where this main light sources, something like this. Okay. So just play around with that until you get it looking like you want it. And I think that's pretty good. Let's take another view from this side and see what that's looking like. So that's pretty good. One of the things you want to watch out for when you're doing your lighting are blown out areas. So if you go to the sky and you make it a little bit earlier in the day, That's going to make the lighting way intense. So if I take a render of this, you'll notice a lot of this white kinda loses some detail, and that's really not what we want here. So you want to really pay attention to not, not have to intense of a main light. So we can play with this time and location until we get this light source looking good and looking like it's not too blown out. We want some detail in this snow. We don't, we don't want it to be rendered as pure white. So I think this is looking pretty decent right here. So just be aware of that. You don't want the main light source to be too intense. 10. Composition: Now we're going to set up some cameras. First scene. Before we do that, I just wanted to review one compositional technique called the rule of thirds. So basically what this technique does is it breaks up your, your image into three equal parts, both vertically and horizontally. And wherever these lines intersect is where you want to put the main focus of your image. So here's another example. So this tree is right in that rule of thirds. Here's another good one. So the rule of thirds is a really basic compositional technique where you can create more interesting images just by placing the main focal within one of these intersecting points. All right, so how did we do that in cinema 4D? Let's go ahead and create a new camera. And to look through this camera, we're just going to click right here. So now we're looking through this camera. Now we can go to this composition tab and an able, this grid. And you'll notice we get these lines here, okay? So that just broke up our composition into the rule of thirds. So all we need to do is place our snowman right where those things intersect. So that can be our first composition right there. And one of the things I'm gonna do is tweak some of these landscapes. Okay? So I'm going to take this landscape back here and I'll just push that over. Maybe something like this. And I want to try and cover up this horizon line over here. So now what this is doing, it's kind of leading our eye from over here right towards this snowman. Okay, same thing with this one here. So if I take this one, I can maybe push this up a little bit, something like that. And you'll notice how these background landscapes are framing this really nice snowman right here. Okay? So they're framing it and additionally, they're kinda leading your eye right towards this snowman. It's the weight by the way, that it's composed. So here's our first view. So I'll select this camera. I'll right-click and go to rigging tags and select protection. So now when I try to move around, that camera is locked. Okay, so that's going to be our first view. We can create as many views as we want for this. You could do in an additional second view. So let's create another camera. Will look through this camera again. Maybe this time we focus in on the, on the snow man's face. And just zoom it in here. Something like that. Maybe we can look up and this is going to be completely up to you how you want to compose these additional views. So this might be a decent composition right here we have this landscape in the background kinda leading our eye towards the face. This little arm is again, sort of leading the eye towards the snowman. So this is a pretty decent composition. Again, I'm going to right-click this camera, go to rigging tags and choose protection. Now, I can't move that camera, but wanted to look through the second camera. I just click this again and now back to the first view. Here's the second view. Setup as many compositions as you want, I would recommend at least two. 11. Rendering: So now we're going to render out our final views. So if I come into my render settings right here, that'll pop up this dialogue. And now for the output, I wanted to do at least 1280. You can go bigger if you'd like. And we'll lock this aspect ratio. So this is a 16 by nine aspect ratio and that looks pretty good. For the save. I'm just going to go ahead and choose a JPEG. So right here where it says file, we'll click these three dots and locate our renders folder. Let's name our file. So I'll just do my first initial last name, underscore snowman and view numbers 0, 1, hit Save. Let's go to anti-aliasing tab. And from geometry will changes the best. And now we can go ahead and render to the picture viewer. Once that's done rendering, you'll notice in your renders folder, you'll have this image. Okay, so now you can go back to Cinema 4D. Look through your second camera, and then come back to your render settings. And now where it says Save, choose that same folder. But change this to 0 too. And then hit Render. And that's going to render your second view.