Master Watercolour Techniques: Paint a Watercolour Chrysanthemum Painting onto a Board | Louise De Masi | Skillshare

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Master Watercolour Techniques: Paint a Watercolour Chrysanthemum Painting onto a Board

teacher avatar Louise De Masi, Artist - capturing beauty with watercolour

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

41 Lessons (4h 3m)
    • 1. Trailer

      3:12
    • 2. Supplies & Welcome

      8:33
    • 3. Board Preparation

      5:52
    • 4. Transferring the Drawing onto the Paper

      2:15
    • 5. Initial Wash - Part 1

      6:54
    • 6. Initial Wash - Part 2

      4:53
    • 7. Initial Wash - Part 3 (Progress Photo 1)

      4:00
    • 8. Beginning to Add Detail

      6:21
    • 9. Adding Detail - Part 2

      2:52
    • 10. Beginning the Centre - Negative Painting (Progress Photo 2)

      4:05
    • 11. Adding Detail - Part 3 (with Softening Edges Demo)

      8:22
    • 12. Adding Detail - Part 4 - Top Right Corner -

      4:55
    • 13. More Layering & Adding Detail

      5:05
    • 14. Glazing with Permanent Rose

      5:37
    • 15. Back to the Centre

      6:11
    • 16. Deepening the Colour in the Centre

      6:10
    • 17. Deepening the Colour in the Centre - Part 2 (Progress Photo 3)

      4:47
    • 18. Introducing Opera Rose

      7:30
    • 19. Deepening the Colour Middle Front & Top Right

      6:59
    • 20. Deep, Rich Darks - Beginning to go Darker

      6:45
    • 21. Deep, Rich Darks - Right Side

      7:52
    • 22. Deep, Rich Darks on Two Outer Petals (Right Side)

      5:36
    • 23. Deep, Rich Darks - Tonal/ Colour Gradation on a Larger Petal

      7:30
    • 24. A Closer Look at Tonal/Colour Gradations

      8:15
    • 25. A Third Look at Tonal/Colour Gradations

      5:25
    • 26. Deepening the Colour on the Left Corner (Progress Photo 4)

      7:01
    • 27. Beginning the Large Outer Petals (Progress Photo 5)

      9:16
    • 28. Concave & Convex Ridges on Large Outer Petal #1

      4:45
    • 29. Adding Detail to Large Outer Petal #2

      4:07
    • 30. Adding Detail to Large Outer Petal #3

      7:59
    • 31. Adding Detail to Large Outer Petal #4

      2:48
    • 32. Adding Detail to Large Outer Petal #5

      3:36
    • 33. Adding Detail to Large Outer Petal #6

      4:13
    • 34. Adding Detail to Large Outer Petals #7, #8 and #9

      4:13
    • 35. Adding Detail to Large Outer Petals #10 and #11

      4:54
    • 36. Washing in the Leaves

      3:14
    • 37. Adding Green to the Leaves

      12:17
    • 38. Adding Green to the Leaves - Part 2

      8:00
    • 39. Last Minute Details on the Petals (Progress Photo 7)

      1:46
    • 40. Painting the Background

      14:18
    • 41. Varnishing & Thank you

      4:45
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About This Class

Painting has been my passion for the past 22 years. I painted in acrylic paint and taught classes for over 10 years. However, my love of painting began to wane and it was giving me little enjoyment until I decided to try my hand at watercolour. Watercolour captured my heart 8 years ago and I have been mesmerized by it ever since. 

In this 4 hour class, my focus is to guide you through my painting process, through demonstrations, tips and comments. Watch over my shoulder while I paint this beautiful and detailed Chrysanthemum in watercolour. After I apply the initial pale washes, I keep layering the paint until I achieve the depth of colour that I need. 

This watercolour is painted on a wooden board that I glued some watercolour paper to. So, I'll also demonstrate how I attach the paper to the board and how I varnish the painting when I'm finished. 

This class is recommended for experienced painters.

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Some of the techniques you will learn in this class:

  • how I attached watercolour paper to the board
  • how I interpret a reference photo
  • how I place the paint on my palette
  • how I soften edges
  • how I paint tonal gradations on petals
  • how I preserve white paper
  • how I layer my paint
  • wet on wet painting
  • wet on dry painting
  • painting negatively
  • how I paint the background
  • what granulating paint is
  • how I deliberately create watercolour blooms for interest
  • how I strengthen my painting by using darker colours
  • how I fix simple mistakes
  • how I varnished my watercolour painting to protect it

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Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

Louise De Masi

Artist - capturing beauty with watercolour

Top Teacher

 

 

I am a professional watercolour artist and a qualified school teacher from Australia. 

I have a Bachelor of Education degree and I've worked as a school teacher within Australia. I am co-author of a watercolor painting instruction book by Walter Foster- titled 'The Art of Painting Sea Life in Watercolor'. My work has been featured in Australian Artist's Palette Magazine, Australian Country Craft Magazine and The Sydney Morning Herald. 

My watercolor paintings are a reflection of all of the things I love. I'm drawn to light and shadow and beautiful textures. I love colour, both soft and bold, and I pursues simplicity. All of which I try to convey in my work. My unique... See full profile

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Transcripts

1. Trailer: Hi. My name is Louise De Masi, and I'm a professional artist from Australia. Welcome to my studio. I sell my paintings all around the world. I've co-authored a watercolor instruction book and some of my paintings have been licensed to be printed on products. I also have a YouTube channel where I share Wheatley watercolor tutorials. Painting has been my passion for the past 22 years, but no other medium has captured my interest the way watercolor has. Watercolor to me, is the most exciting and satisfying medium to use. I've been using it for eight years now and my enthusiasm for it continually grows. In this class, I'll walk you step by step through my painting process. My subject is this gorgeous chrysanthemum. I've painted it on watercolor paper that I glued to a board. Once this is varnished, it doesn't need to go behind glass. It can hang straight on the wall or you can sit in on a shelf. I'll walk you step by step, petal by petal through my entire painting process, from the initial washes all the way through to the delicate details. I'll also show you how I painted the background. I'll begin by showing you how I attach the watercolor paper to the board and how I transfer my drawing to the paper. Because this painting doesn't need to go behind glass, I'll finish the class by demonstrating how I varnished it to protect it. I'll provide you with the line drawing of the chrysanthemum and the reference photo. To help you even further, I'll also provide you with photos of my painting at various stages of completion. If you're ready to learn some new watercolors skills, then join me while I demonstrate my approach to painting in watercolor. 2. Supplies & Welcome: Hi everyone. Welcome to the class. I painted this chrysanthemum in August last year. I think it took me probably about a week to complete it. So my advice to you is don't try and finish it in one or two days. Take your time with it, and just enjoy the prices. In this video, I'll show you some of the supplies that I use to complete the painting of included are supplies list for you to download as well. Don't think that you've got a girl on Russia and buy all the supplies. Just use what you have that similar to mine. I'll start with the paints first. This is manganese violet, and this is a color by Schmincke. If you don't have these color, you could also use permanent mauve or cobalt violet by Winsor & Newton. Now the rest of the colors that I used for this painting are all by Windsor and Newton. This color is permanent rose, and it's a pink that I use quite a lot when I'm painting flowers. This one here is called permanent magenta. It's a pretty transparent, maroon in color. This one here is called Windsor Violet. It is one of my favorite purples. This color here is called Davy's gray. This is a soft gray color that I use as an underwater on the leaves. This one here is called Permanent Sap Green. This is the green that I use quite often. This dark green here is called Perylene Green. This is another grain that I use a lot of. This one here is called Windsor blue. This is Windsor blue, red shade. This is another color that I use quite a lot of. Now for the brushes, this is a Da Vinci mop brush. It's a series 418 and this is in number three. I use this one for the larger petals. This one is Da Vinci Maestro brush. This is a series 11, and this one is a number three. I like this one because it has a nice little point on it. This little liner brush is a Da Vinci Nova brush. This is a series of 1570, and this is a size 0. I use it for all the fine work. This flat brush here, is a Da Vinci Casaneo Oval Pointed Wash brush. It's a series 898, and this is a size number 16. Now I only use this brush very briefly in the painting on one of the leaves. So any large flat brush that you have should be okay. This one here is a Winsor & Newton Short Flat Bright brush. It's a number six and it's just a stiff bristle brush that I use, basically just to correct mistakes that I've made. I just use it to gently rubbed the paint back of the paper if I need to. This is my favorite palette that I like to use. One of the reasons I like to use it is that it is ceramic, and the paint's don't stain it the way they do plastic palettes. The other reason I like to use it is that it has sloping wells and I like to put the paint at the highest point of the well. I'll talk about this more in the initial wash one video. The paper I used was Arches Hot Press Watercolor paper. This is 300 GSM in weight. You can also use cold press paper and you don't have to use arches. I like to use arches because it's hard wearing, and also because of its absorption rate. It allows plenty of working time and makes applying washes more controllable. You are also going to need a water jar to wash your brushes in. The bigger the better. A water spray just to wet your paints and an old towel to wipe your brushes on. I also have a hair dryer plugged-in nearby, and it's ready for whenever I need to dry the paper quickly. This here is a cosine birch cradled board. This is the type of board that I attached the paper too. It has a frame on the back that helps to make it rigid and this frame is called the cradle. The frame is about three centimeters wide, which is just over an inch. This particular board is smaller than the one that I painted chrysanthemum. I'll show you my chrysanthemum board now. So my board is 40 by 30 centimeters, which is 15.7 inches by 11.8 inches. Now if you want to put your painting onto a board and you can't find a board the same size as mine, you just have to adjust the size of you drawing to feature board. So in this class, I glue the watercolor paper to the board before I start the painting. Now some artists prefer to complete the painting and then attach it to the board. The reason I attached the paper first is because I fear that if I had spent a week of my time painting a beautiful watercolor, and then something went wrong during the paper attachment process, then my watercolor painting would be ruined. So I prefer to glue the paper first and then if something goes wrong, all I've lost is a piece of blank paper. So to get my drawing onto the paper, I use several transfer paper. This just comes on a roll and I just cut it to the size that I need. I just buy this at my local art supply store. The other thing you can use if you don't have several paper is transfer paper, which is just another thing that I buy at my art supply store. It does the same thing. So I also used an eraser, a mechanical pencil, and I used a stylus to get my drawing onto the paper. If you don't have a stylus, you could just use a biro. So just to protect work benches and other surfaces, i used an old towel. I used an old house brush just to apply the glue onto the paper. This is the glue that I used. It's called Golden gel medium, extra-heavy gel, semi gloss. This is the product that I use to apply the paper to the board. The other thing I use to apply the paper is a rubber brayer. Again, I bought this at my art supply store. The other thing I use was a sanding block and this I got from my garage. My hubby is a builder. So I think he can just pick them up at any hardware store. This is the varnish that are used. The brand name is Krylon, and it's a UV Archival varnish. This is a semi gloss and it's supposed to be non yellowing. So I've used this in the past and I've found it to be successful. I have to use the varnish because my painting won't be going behind glass, and I need the varnish just to protect the paper. Now because this varnish is so toxic and I've got a face mask, and also some rubber gloves just to protect my hands, I used a piece of tracing paper just to risk my paper on when I was drawing overnight. I also used a cutting board just to protect the bench when I was cutting the paper. I used a sharp knife and I used a couple of heavy books just to lie the paper down while I drawing. I think that's about it. 3. Board Preparation: Framing watercolor paintings behind glass is an expensive exercise. These paintings here cost about $250 each to get framed. Wouldn't it be great if you could do away with that cost? These two watercolor paintings of mine are not framed behind glass. They're painted on watercolor paper that are mounted or glued to a board. When I finished painting them, I sprayed them with some varnish to protect them. In this video, I'm going to show you how I mounted the watercolor paper to the board. Having said that, there's no need to attach the paper to the board if you don't want to. Instead, you can just use watercolor paper in a conventional way. I just wanted to show you an alternative way to present your paintings that I occasionally use. This is a Casani panel board. It's sometimes referred to as a cradled board. It's made from European birch, and I bought it at my arts supply store in Sydney. I've put a link on the supplies list for you. Now, I've attached some watercolor paper to the board, which, as I mentioned earlier, means when I've finished painting it and I've varnished it, it can then go straight on the wall. Here's a board that doesn't have the paper attached to it. I'm going to show you exactly what I did. The paper I'm going to use is Arches hot pressed watercolor paper. Now, this one is 300GSM in white. You can also use cold pressed paper, it doesn't have to be hot pressed. Now, I've just measured the board against the paper. I want to cut it so that I have a little bit of overhang around the edges of the board. I cut the paper, and then I'll check it against the board again. You can see that this little bit of an overhang all the way around. I've got a piece of tracing paper to rest the paper on to keep it clean. I've got a rubber brayer. I've got an old towel to protect the bench. There's two heavy books for weighing down the board when it's drawing. This is an old house painting brush and this is Golden Gel Medium. This is extra-heavy gel gloss, and I'm going to use this to adhere the paper to the board. Now, this gel medium is really thick and gloggy, and I've got to work fairly quickly so that it doesn't start to dry. What I want is an even coverage of these gel medium all over the front surface of the board. It is painted on every which way just to make sure that the entire surface is covered. Now I get the paper that I cut, and I place it onto the surface carefully so that I've got some overhang of paper around each edge. I just make sure I've got that overhang, and then I take the brayer and I roll it over the paper to smooth it out. I use firm pressure but not too hard because I don't want to squeeze out all the gel medium. I make sure I take the brayer all the way to the edges of the board. I use the brayer until I'm satisfied that the paper is stuck down smoothly onto the board. I usually spend about two or three minutes doing this. Then I get the tracing paper to protect the paper and I place it down on that. I've got another board here that I place over the top to sit the books on to weigh it down. These books are really heavy, and that needs to sit and dry at least overnight or for 24 hours is even better. I let it dry overnight, and this is my board. What I have to do now is trim the excess paper from the sides. Here's my cutting board, and now with a sharp knife, I can trim off the excess paper. Hold the knife, run up against the edge of the board, and I slice it lightly and then I go over it a few times to cut through the paper. I do this all the way around. Sometimes you might end up with some jagged paper edges after you've cut the paper. I just use a sandpaper block, and I just pull it gently down in that direction. I'm just pulling it down like that. I don't pull it up this way. If you're going to do it, just make sure you pull it down. Now I've got a sandpaper block and I'm pulling it down over the edges to sand away any jagged edges that might remain. There's my board ready for me to put my drawing on and start painting. 4. Transferring the Drawing onto the Paper: In this video, I'm going to show you how I get my lawn drawing onto the board. The drawing you see me use in this video might be slightly different to the drawing I've provided for you as a file to download. That's because the drawing that I've provided for you is just a tracing of my completed painting. I want the drawing that you used to have everything included. This is the photograph that I took of the chrysanthemum. Rather than paint the entire flower, I decided to crop the photo to create a more dynamic and modern composition. This is the cropped image that I was most happy with. Here's my drawing of the chrysanthemum. What I've got to do is get the drawing onto the paper. What I'm going to do is use some Saral paper. Now, this is a transfer paper for fine art. It contains no wax or grease and it doesn't smear the way pencil sometimes does. Now, it comes on a roll, and I just cut it to the size that I want. Before I start, I'm going to position my drawing on the board and then I'll tape it in place so that it doesn't move. Then this Saral paper just goes underneath. Then I can use either a stylus or biro to trace the drawing on. I'm pressing heavy enough for it to leave the drawing on the paper, but not too heavy that I indent the paper. Now, you can see the mark on the paper. Finishing off now. There's my drawing on the paper ready for me to start painting. 5. Initial Wash - Part 1: There are a lot of white areas that I want to reserve on the chrysanthemum. Rather than wash the whole flowering, I decided to paint it petal by petal. Now, this is more time consuming, but it means that I can reserve all the white areas of the painting. In this video, I'll put a wash on the first three petals. Now I'll take it nice and slow so that you can get in the swing of things. As you work your way through this class, I just want you to remember that what you're seeing is my approach to painting in watercolor. Take on what you want, toss out what you don't want and use my ideas to produce your own individual style. If you've done some of my other classes, you'll know that I like to use a pellet with sloping wells. I can put the paint on the highest point of the well and then I wet it with water, but the paint is not sitting in water causing it to go all cliche and sticky. Then when I want to paint that is light in value, I can use the watery paint down the bottom of the well. But when I want rich dark pigment I can wet my white brush over the paint that I squirted out at the top of the well. I talk about this a little bit in this video but throughout this class, just to keep things as simple as I can, I'll tell you when I'm using watery paint and I'll tell you when I've washed my brush over the paint at the top of the pellet. The first color I use is called manganese violet by shrinking, it's a granulating color. When you add water to granulating colors, the pigments separates from the binder in the plain and the pigment settles in the valleys of the paper, creating lovely textured effects. I use manganese violet as a soft under wash. As the painting progresses, I slowly build up layers of different color over the top. If you don't have manganese violent, just use a soft, transparent or semi-transparent violet color like Winsor and Newton's permanent mauve or cobalt violet. Enough talking, let's get some paint on the paper. The first color I'm going to use is called manganese violet. This is a schmincke color. It's a similar color to cobalt violet from the Winsor and Newton Range. I've placed the paint on the highest point of my pellet and this color is permanent rose from the Winsor and Newton Range. Again, I'll put it on the highest point of the pellet and then I squirt them with some water. Then I can mix some of the paint into the water. The reason I put the paint at the top of the pellet is because I want it to go hard. It can go hard when it's not sitting in water. Then when I start to paint, I have a choice of either using the watery paint for light color or if I want deep, rich color, I can wipe my wet brush over the hard paint at the top. The other reason I like to use a pellet with sloping wells is that the paint at the top stays clean and over messy stuff falls to the bottom and it helps to keep my colors fresh and vibrant. I'm rubbing over my drawing with an eraser just to lighten the drawing marks. I still want to see the drawing so I paint it okay but I don't want any really dark lines that might show through the paint later. I'm going to start with this petal here. This one on the reference photo. I'll start with my mock brush first, and I'll alternate between the three different brushes as I paint. The mock brush I'll use on the larger petals. The first thing I do is I wet the petal with water. I paint the water on carefully just as I would paint. Here, you can see the water on the paper. I've left the tip of the petal dry with no water on it. The water allows the paint to go on easily and evenly and it stops any hard edge brush strokes from forming. Before I pick up the paint, I'll dev the moisture out of my brush, and then I pick up some of the watery manganese violet. Then [inaudible] onto the damn paper. You can see that the paint is starting to granulate already. Now I only have water on my brush now and I'm softening the edge of the paint at the top. Now I'm going to switch to this smaller Maestro brush because I want be more control of where I put the paint. I'm picking up some of the watery permanent rose and then I drop it in random ready to blend with the violet. We'll do the same thing on this petal here, I wet it first with water and then I brush on some of the watery manganese violet. I'm careful to keep the paint within the boundaries of the petal. Now I switch to my smaller Maestro round brush. It's damped with a little bit of water and I use it to soften the edges of the top of the petal. I'm leaving the white of the paper showing to form the highlight. I can use the smaller brush to tidy up the edges as well. Then I'll just drop in some of the watery permanent rose to create some interest. There's a little highlight on this petal, and you can see it on the reference photo here. I thought I'd try and bring it back by removing some of the paint. My wetting into the paint is a little less wet. I can use the damn brush to absorb some of the paint. I just use it like a mop and I dub the excess paint off onto a towel. Now I've just washed in this third petal in the same way that I washed in the first two. Now I'm just tidying the edges and then I can drop in some of the watery permanent rose. 6. Initial Wash - Part 2: How did you go? It feels good to get some paint on the paper, doesn't it? I continue on in this video, washing in some more vase petals with the two colors. Moving on to these fourth petal now, I'm wetting the right side of it with some water. Now I've switched to my maestro brush so that I can have tighter control over where the paint goes. This is watery manganese violet and I'll take it all the way down to the base of the petal. Then with just water on my brush, I can soften the paint edge at the top. I'll pick up some watery permanent rose and then I can drop that onto the wet paint here and there. Now I wet the left side of the petal. You can see that petal here. I'm trying to bring that region that I see down the side there. This time I'm using some watery permanent rose on the wet paper. Now we've picked up some of the manganese violet and I can paint the top half of this section and the water on the paper blends the area where the two colors meet and it's just water on my brush now. Now I can paint this region. This time I'm using the watery paint on dry paper. Now I've only got water on my brush because there's enough paint there and I can just drag it down where I want it. I want it to be lighter in color value than the other two sides. Later on in this painting, I'll be painting another color over the top. I'm going to work on this petal here now. It has a ridge down it as well. I guess they're not really ridges, they're more sticky out parts that just jot out further than the rest of the petal. I'm drawing in a few lines to guide myself. You should have these lines on the line drawing that you downloaded. Now again, to keep the paint soft and translucent with no hard edges, I wet the paper with water down one side of the line that I've just drawn and then on goes the manganese violet onto the wet paper. Same on this side of the petal. This little area up here I'm painting on dry paper with watery paint and now I'm just softening the edge with water on my brush. This is watering manganese violet. I dried off the petal with a hair dryer and then I wet this middle section. Some water on this petal up here and that's this one here on the reference photo. This is the watery violet again. I take it right up to the top but I leave the tip of the petal with some white paper showing. Now with just water on my brush, I can soften that edge at the top. Now I've just gone ahead and painted these two petals exactly the same way as I've been painting all the other ones. A little bit of water, then the violet, then dropped the pink in and then I soften the edges of the top there with just water on my brush. This petal here is slightly different because it has a white highlighted edge on it so I'm drawing in a line to guide myself. Then I wet the right side of the line with water and I keep the left side dry because I want the paper there to remain white. Then on goes some of the watery violet and some of the watery permanent rose onto the wet paint. Now I've just washed in these three petals off the side and now I'm dropping in some permanent rose onto this lower one. 7. Initial Wash - Part 3 (Progress Photo 1): A wash in the center part of the chrysanthemum in this video. Instead of painting them all individually, I wash them all in at once. I finish washing in the first group of petals in this video. When you get to the end, there's an image that I've included for you to download that corresponds with this stage that I get to in this video. I've included it so that it helps you paint your chrysanthemum. Continuing on with the initial washes and I'm wetting the inner petals of the chrysanthemum here with water. This is the area here that going to wet with water. I use the watery manganese violet to wash them all in at once. I probably could have washed this area in on dry paper, but just in case any hard edges might form, would prefer to paint them in on the wet paper. I can also wash in this area here altogether as well. I'm painting this area on dry paper because I know I can paint it in quicker than the center. I don't have to paint around all the petal edges on this path. I'm just taking off some of the excess paint here with my brush. Now I can drop in some of the watery permanent [inaudible] onto both sections. I've jumped ahead and I've painted in a few more of the petals in the same way that I've done all the others. Now I've included a photograph that you can download of my painting when I've completed these initial washes, I'll tell you more about that at the end of the video. I've washed in this area over here and I've still got to do this area in here now. This petal here is this one here on the reference photo. Note it's the same again, water on the paper, watery manganese violet, leave a little white section at the top, soften the edge with the damp brush and then drop some of the watery permanent [inaudible] Now this petal here has the violet on one side, so we're done with the whole petal. I run the violet down the right side and I let it bleed across. A little bit of paint along the bottom edge and then I can soften the edge of the paint just with a damp brush. Dropping some watery permanent rose. I'm painting on some watery violet on the right side of this one. I painted on dry paper here because it's a small petal and I can paint it fairly quickly. I've just painted the violet onto the side of these two small petals here. I used watery paint on dry paper. I'll do the same thing on these larger petals besides them. So this is watery paint on dry paper. I'm softening the edge of the paint again with a damp brush here. I've washed in all of the petals that I want to wash in at this stage. I've left some areas of white papers showing through here. In order to help you get to the same stages as this on your painting, I've included a scan of my painting at this stage. You can download this image. It's called Initial Washes Completed. 8. Beginning to Add Detail: I start to paint over some of the petals with darker color in this video. I start to formalize lovely ridges and concaved parts of each petal. I'm removing a highlight from this petal, I'm just rubbing it generally with my damp, short, flat, broad brush. Now this is just a stiff bristle brush. I'm going to work on this one here now. Now I've done the same thing with this one. I've gently removed a little bit of paint down the middle, I'm going to wet down the left side of the highlight with some water. You can see the water on the paper here. It's not super wet, it's just damp and it's got nice even coverage. I'm just running that water down the left side of the highlight. Then with my damp brush, I can wipe it over the paint at the top of the palette, just to pick up some rich pigment. Then I just dab the brush on the cloth, just to remove the excess moisture in paint. Then I can use that lovely dark paint on the damp paper. This just deepens the color at the base of the petal. You can see it's a bit darker there on the reference photo. Because the paper is damp, it keeps the edge of the paint along here softer. So, now I'm gonna do the same thing on the other side of the petal. Some water first, and then the rich dark pigment from the top of the palette. Now if you put the paint on a little bit too heavy, which I think I may have done here. Just wash the paint out of your brush, and then use a damp brush just with water on it, just to spread the pigment out and dilute it slightly. That's what I'm doing at the moment. So it's just water on my brush, I'm just pushing the pigment up. The paint is starting to bleed a little bit here onto the highlighted section, because it must have been slightly damp from when I removed the paint before. I'll fix that later if I think I need to. Now I've got some of the watery violet on my brush, and I'm running it up the side of the petal. The paper is dry where I'm working here. Working on the petal next to that one now. I'm going to do the same thing. I'll wet the paper where I see that deep pink color on the reference photo. Just with some water. Then I use the hard paint from the top of the palette just like before. The same thing on the other side of the highlighted section. Now I've got some of the watery violet, and I am just deepening the color above where I just put the permanent rose. The paper is dry where I'm working now. Here I can use some watery permanent rose, because I'm painting on dry paper. I've mixed some more of the painting to the watery mix just to make it a little bit darker. Back to the watery violet now. I'm painting on dry paper here. Now this petal is dry, so I'm just using my damp bristle brushes to gently remove that area, that bled onto the highlight before. So coming back onto this petal now, it needs a little bit of color over the top of the highlight. So this is watery violet, and I'm just painting it on dry paper here. I just feel that the highlighted section is just standing out too much, and this just helps to tone it down. Same here on this one, such as the watery manganese violet on dry paper again. I still want to see the lighter area, I just don't want the color value difference to be so great. So this just tones it down for me. Now I've just put some water on this petal, just underneath where I'm painting. This is the permanent rose that I've picked up from the top of the palette, because it's quite deep of the color. Now i wiped off the excess paint from my brush, because there's enough paint in it now, and I can just move it around and push it where I want it. This keeps the color darker at the base, and it fades to a softer value as it moves up the petal. So it's just water on my brush, just pushing the paint up. Paper is dry here. Now we've done the same thing on this side of the petal. Over the highlighted section here I've used the watery permanent rose on dry paper. Now painting this little darker section of the petal, you can see it on the reference photo. I'm using the hard paint from the top of the palette. I'm painting on dry paper because I want lots of control. As I've moved down the petal though, the paper is still slightly damp from when I wet it before. That's okay because it just keeps the color a little bit softer down here where I am now. I need some more color on the petal here, so I can push down on my brush just to release the paint, which is deep in the lower area. This softens the edge now. 9. Adding Detail - Part 2: There's more of the same thing in this video. I'm just looking at my reference photo as I paint and I'm trying to give the petals more form. Continuing on where we left off in the last video, I'm painting with watery manganese violet here on dry paper. I'm just painting in the darkest shape that I can see on this petal here. Now I can paint this on dry paper because the edges of the shape are hard rather than soft. I'm just keeping an eye on my reference photo as I paint. Moving down onto this petal here, I paint a small amount of water, and then I pick up some of the permanent rows from the top of the palette. Let's paint it onto the damp paper. Then wash the paint out of the brush and I can use the damp brush just to soften that edge away. Just round down the edge of the petal where it touches the other one just to tidy it up. There's a little highlight done along here that I've just remove with the damp bristle brush. Some more for the right side of these petal. There's actually two petals here in the reference photo. But I'm only going to treat it as if there's one petal. This is watery manganese violet, and I'm just softening the edge with a damp brush now. Now I've just painted a small amount of water on this petal here. This is watery permanent rose that I'm using. I'm just looking at my reference photo as I paint. I'm just trying to paint the darker area that I see on that petal. As I move up the petal, this one has a long streak of color, and has more watery permanent rose on this side of the petal, followed by some manganese violet that I've picked up from the top of the palette. Just softening the edge here, add some watery violet over the lightest section. 10. Beginning the Centre - Negative Painting (Progress Photo 2): We get to use a new color now and I start to paint the spaces around the petals. This is called negative painting, which is when you don't paint directly on the subject of your painting, rather you paint around it, and that's what gives the subject form. There's another image I've included of my painting that corresponds with where I get to at the end of this video. A new color for my palette. This is Winsor and Newton's permanent magenta. It's a pretty transparent, pinky maroon color that I'm going to start using in the dark areas of the center of the flower. Now I've zoomed into the center of the flower so you can see, and I'm going to use my Da Vinci Nova brush. This is a size 0 but any small brush will do. I need to use a smaller rush so that I can get into all the knocks and crannies of the center. Start with this shape that I see here. I'm on dry paper with the watery permanent magenta. I'm just painting the spaces around the petals. This is all watery paint on dry paper. I'm just going to speed this area up a little bit just so that we can get through it quicker. So this is the watery permanent magenta, I'm painting it on dry paper, and I'm painting all the little areas around the petals. The petals don't really have any paint on them at this point other than the underwash. You've got a little line just here in this section on your line drawing so when I got further along with the painting, I thought this little area here of two bit strange, so I divided this petal into two. I'm just going to keep an eye on the reference photos as I paint. It's a bit confusing here. Hopefully it will start to make sense as I start to get all these shapes painted. It's important to keep this color fairly light at this stage just in case you make a mistake. I seem to be particularly confused by this little section here. It won't be so difficult for you when you paint yours because you'll have a photograph of mine already painted. I've dried it off with the hair dryer and now I'm just tidying it up with the eraser, just to remove any paint on lines that wants to be visible. Again, watery paint on dry paper here. I'm just continuing to paint the areas around the petals. So I'll speed this area up again just slightly. Still painting on dry paper. That was time consuming, but not really difficult. I've included this photo for you to download, so that you can see the center when you paint your own. It's called Beginning The Center. Now if you look at this when you're painting it might make it easier for you than having to paint while you watch the video. Just remember that it's painted on dry paper with a fine brush using watery permanent magenta. If you can get used to look something like this, then you'd be right to continue on with the rest of the painting. 11. Adding Detail - Part 3 (with Softening Edges Demo): I've got a little bit more to do in the center of the chrysanthemum but instead of painting around those petals like I did in the previous video, I'm painting on them in this video. I keep increasing the color here and there and I wash in some of the intersections of some of the petals. I'm looking right at the top of the painting and now I'm painting on the petals rather than around them like I did in the previous video. I'm on dry paper here and I'm using watery permanent magenta. Just a small amount of water on this one here with my Maestro brush and now some of the watery permanent magenta. I'm just using Milan brush. I'll make sure I get a nice edge on these petal here. There's a tiny little section in here, just painting this on drawing paper and now I'm using the Maestro brush again to wet these petal here. This is permanent rows that I picked up from the top of the palette. Just painting it onto the wet paper. Now I'm softening the edges of the paint with a damp brush. When you soften edges, you need to act quickly or the paint's going to dry on you. Once you put your paint down, wash your brush quickly and dab off the excess moisture on a towel, and then gently pull it across the edge that you want to soften. If it doesn't work, then either the brush is too dry or the paint's too dry. It has to be done almost immediately after the paint has been laid down on the paper. Dabbing the clean brush on the towel is important because if your brush is too wet, then the paint is going to move into the wet part and create another hard edge. I'm just putting some paint down on my paper. Now, I'll wash my brush out and I dab off the excess moisture and then I use that dump brush just to rub along the hard edge that I don't want. Just rubbing among the edge there. I'll do it again. There's my paint, wash my brush, dab my brush off and then use the dump brush to run it along the edge that I want to soften. I keep wiping my brush off onto the cloth. Wiping my brush on the cloth now. I've got a hard edge on this side and now I've got a soft edge on this side. If I do it again but I don't dab the excess moisture off onto my towel, I'll just go straight onto the paper, then am creating another hard edge. You can see there's too much water there. Practice it and before long, you'll be doing it without even thinking. Just taking the paint down a little bit further down the petal now. Then I can tidy up the edges as well. Now I wet this one beside but I'm careful not to touch the pink that I've just painted. I'm using permanent rose from the top of the palate and I'm just painting it onto the dump paper. I'll just let the water on the paper disperse the pigment. Now I painted on both sides of the petal and I let it bleed into the middle. Then I can take the paint that's there and I can push it up into the lighter part of the petal, so that I can get those soft, fuzzy streets of color that are running down the petal there. You can see them here. While that pink paint is still wet, I can use the permanent magenta from the top of the palette just to deepen the color at the base of the petal. I'm just dropping it onto the pink paint. Working on this petal here now. I'm going to deepen the color around the base of the petal. I'll wet the area with water, avoiding the highlighted area down the middle. Then I use some permanent rose from the top of the palate. I've got lots of rich pigment here. I painted onto the base of the petal, where the color's darkest and then I washed the paint out of my brush and I use what's already on the paper to push it up the petal. I want the color to be deepest at the base and then I want it to gradually get lighter as it moves up the petal. If we have a look at the reference photo, the color is darkest at the base and then as it moves up the petal it becomes lighter. The same thing on the other side of this highlighted section, some water first and then the permanent rose from the top of the palette. Now I can wash the paint out of the brush and use the paint that's on the paper to push it up the petal, so that it gradually softens in color value. This small area in here am painting on dry paper, this is watery permanent rose but there's lots of pigment in the watering mix. Now I've dried it off with my hairdryer and now I've got some watery permanent rose. I just want to put some color back over that highlighted area in the middle of this petal. I'm just painting on dry paper here and then just with water on my brush, I can soften away the hard edge of paint before it dries. This is watery permanent rose in this area here, on dry paper, and the same thing in this little space up here, and this one too. Now am wetting this area here on the corner just with a little bit of water and I'm using my Mult brush because it's quicker. Then on goes the permanent rose. I'm using watery permanent rose here with lots of pigment mixed into the water. Just have a little tiny gap there and then some watery permanent rose over here in this space, and again here in this space, just on the dry paper. 12. Adding Detail - Part 4 - Top Right Corner -: There's some more paint layering in this video. I'm working on the top right corner of the painting. I'll just wet this petal here with water and now I'm using watery permanent rose on the wet paper. I've let the water absorb into the paper more. Then I can add those streaks of pink that I see on the reference photo. I've worked my wet brush over the hand paint. The paper is damp but not as wet as when I painted the watery paint a moment ago. There's a little dark edge up here that I can paint on the dry paper. Now I'm painting inside this petal on the edge with watery permanent rose on dry paper. Now I can paint on the dry paper because I can do it fairly quickly. I've just noticed a tiny mistake at the top of the painting. It's not that important, but I'll fix it so that I don't confuse you when you're painting your chrysanthemum. I just seem to have taken the permanent rose a little bit too far over onto that petal. Working on this petal now. I want to draw two lines, just so I don't confused myself. I paint some water on the front of the petal just beside the line that I drew. I've wiped my wet brush over the hard permanent rose from the top of the palette. I'm just painting onto that watery spot. Now just because there's water on my brush, I can soften the edge of the paint. Exactly the same thing here on this side of the petal. Water first, then the permanent rose from the top of the palette. Then softening the edge of the paint with a damp brush. This is watery manganese violet and I'm painting it on dry paper. Softening the edge of the paint again with a damp brush. There's a concave section running up these petal. I'm drawing in some lines to guide myself again. Some water in the concave section and then I wipe my brush over the permanent rose at the top of the palette. I place it carefully along the edge of that petal below. I've washed the paint out of my brush, and I can move that rich pigment further up the petal so that the color gradually fades away again. Now, I've just dried that area with the hairdryer so that I don't disturb it, and now I want some water on the paper again here. This is watery permanent rose this time. Now I wash out my brush, dab it on the towel, and use it to soften the edge of the paint. I'm painting over some watery violet here, just to deepen the color slightly. Now this is watery permanent rose, again. I wash out my brush and then I can use it to soften the edge of the paint again. Don't forget to remove the excess water from your brush before you try to soften the paint edge. Now, I've wet the area down low on this petal where the darkest color is, and I've used the paint from the top of the palette in the darkest area. Now I'm just using the watery permanent rose on the top of the petal. 13. More Layering & Adding Detail: It is more paint layering and painting the inside section of petals. I gave permanent rose a bit of a workout in this video and I'm not working in one specific area. I tend to move around a little bit, when one area dries I'll move on to a different area. I need some color on the inside of this petal. So this has watery permanent rose and I'm painting it on dry paper. Now I've switched to my mop brush because it's bigger and the area that I'm painting is larger. This is also a watery permanent rose on dry paper and I'm painting in the group of petals on the side all at once. There's a little separation between the petals there so I've just painted around it. When that area dries, I can paint this side of this petal. I'm using watery permanent rose on damp paper here. I'm just tidying up the edges here. Now I dry that area off so that I don't disturb it. This is watery manganese violet that I'm painting on dry paper. Just softening the edge now. The side of this petal here is permanent rose. It's watery permanent rose, but I put a lot of pigment in it so it's fairly dark. Same thing here, but I had enough paint on my brush to feel this area in that's a little bit lighter. I'm painting some water down into these narrow space because I want the paint to bleed across. So this is permanent rose from the top of the palate on my brush. So I want to highlight the edge where it touches the petal beside it, and then I want the paint to bleed a little to create a soft edge. This area down here, I can just fill in with paint. Now the same thing on this petal beside the last one, some water, but I'm careful to not let the water touch the area I've just painted. Then I'll repeat the process. It's a little darker now, so I've just reloaded my brush from the top of the palate. Now I'm softening the edge a little more than it was, just with water on my brush. This is watery permanent rose on the other side of the petal. Just painting it on the dry paper here and softening the edge. Now I want some more color up here. So I've wiped my wet brush over the hard paint again. Now just wet this petal here with water and this is watery permanent rose that I'm using. Just brightening up the base of the petal. Now I'm wetting the side of these large petal here with water, and I've wiped my wet brush over the hard paint it in the top of the palate, and this is just permanent rose again. As I moved up the petal, I washed the paint out of the brush. I'll just use what's on the paper to fill in the rest. I've dropped in some of the watery manganese violet just for interest. I can push some of that wet paint onto the dry area of the petal. Now I've just painted water on this petal and this is permanent rose now from the top of the palate. Again, I've washed the paint out of my brush and I've used the water on the brush to help move the paint over so that it stuck on the right side and it fades away on the left. Up to the top of this petal, this is watery permanent rose on dry paper. I'm softening the edge of the paint with the water that's on my brush. Now there's too much paint I'm accumulating down here so I can use my dry brush just to draw it out and soften the color. 14. Glazing with Permanent Rose: I'm working on that top left corner of the Chrysanthemum in this video. I'm mainly glazing permanent rose over the top of the manganese violet under-wash. This little petal on the left side of the Chrysanthemum needs some watery permanent rose on the side of it. I'm painting on dry paper here, and then I can run my damp brush down the edge to soften it slightly. Just a small amount of water on this one. This is manganese violet that I picked up from the top of the palette. I just need to deepen the color on this side of it there. On this petal here I'm using the watery manganese violet, but the paper is dry here. I haven't wet it. Back onto this one here that I just painted, and this is watery permanent rose and I'm painting on a dry paper. A new petal over here, and I'm painting the watery permanent rose again on the dry paper, just like I did on the pedal next to this one. Now I've put a little water in my brush. Then I want a little bit more of the watery permanent rose on this side. Just some water on my brush now to soften the edge. Now, I'm painting some watery permanent rose on the inside of these petal. I've just wet this petal here with some water, and I'm just painting that dark shapes that I see on the side of it. This is watery, permanent rose that I'm using. Now I can wash my brush out and dab it on the towel and then I can use it just to soften the edge of the paint. Some water on the petal next to that one and I just repeat the process. I can soften the top page here again with some water. So all the time I'm just looking at my reference photo as I paint. So moving up the top to this one, I'm going to paint this whole petal with water. It's a large petal. Now I've picked up some of the permanent rose from the top of the palette this time. I'm going to fill it dark. But now I've switched to water repellent roses, I've moved across. We've got that dark pigment on the left and it just softens as it moves across. Now, I've just painted on the inside part of the top of this petal with the permanent rose from the top of the palette, and I've just done the same thing with this other one. Now I'm using watery permanent rose at the very top. it's time to come back onto these petal that I painted earlier. I can put those streaks of coloring. Now this is still damp from before and I've wiped my wet brush over the hard paint at the top of the palette. So watery permanent rose on the inside of this one and also in this one, and both of these are on dry paper. There is a little petal that I've missed painting. This one here. So I'm going to paint that in now. This is the watery manganese violet. Now, I'm just softening the edge of the paint with the damp brush. Onto an outer left petal now and I need some water on this one and some watery permanent rose onto the damp paper. I've just washed my brush and then I can soften the top page again. I'm painting watery, permanent rose on the dry paper on the inside of these petal here, and on the side of this one, and this one here , and also this one in here. 15. Back to the Centre: It's time to return to the center of the flower. Back to the little Nervy brush now and permanent magenta. I paint negatively again around the petals, and I start to deepen all those colors. I'm starting back in the same spot, where I began painting the center of the flower. I want to define this area further by laying over some more paint. I'm using my Nervy brush and I'm painting on dry paper here. I've wiped the wet brush over that paint at the top of the palette. Amazing permanent magenta. I'm painting negatively. Which just means I'm painting the spaces around the petals to make them more visible and defined. This is the permanent magenta from the top of the palette on dry paper. I'm using my little brush so that I can get into all the little spaces. Spade this area up slightly. I'm just looking at the reference photos as I'm painting in the darker shapes that I see. Now, on this little one, I'm using watery magenta and I'm washing it over the top of it to push it back deeper into the flower. Some order on this one. Now, I'm taking some magenta from the top of the palette and append a tiny little bit of on the top of the petal. Now, with just water on my brush, we can use to damp rush to move the paint around where I want to soften the edge. Same thing down the bottom here, and I've just done the same thing on this petal here, and this one too. So a little bit of water, little video pint, and then just use the wip brush to soften the edge. I've just painted some water on this one, and now the magenta from the top of the palate again, or the water on the paper gives me a bit of breathing time with the paint. I'm looking at my reference photo all the time and I'm trying to decide where to put the dark color. Instead of the paint drying too quickly on the paper as if the paper was dry, the water on the paper gives me some more time. Some water on this one, some permanent magenta, semi game here a little bit of water. Some Magenta from the top of the palate. I can soften the edge if I need to with the damp brush. Now, deepening the color in the space here, but on painting and dry paper. Some motor imagery and her over the top of this one, so any small so I didn't need to wet it. Now, run on the top of the painting now and I've painted some water on these petal, and then I use the watery magenta around the edges. To speed up this section, because it's a little bit repetitive. Can see the water first then the paint. The paint blends into the middle and I try to leave a highlighted section on each petal. This just helps to make them look more round. Water, a little bit of paint around the edge. Just try and leave a little highlight in the middle. Water, a little bit of paint, water again, and a little bit of paint, water in a little bit of more paint. I need a little bit more detail in this section as well, just to deepen the color slightly. 16. Deepening the Colour in the Centre: We get to use a new color now. It's time to get some deep rich dye in front of the center part of the flower. Take your time with it, don't rush, and enjoy the process. A new color for my palette, this is Windsor Violet. This is a beautiful transparent purple that I use quite often. I'm going to use it to deepen the color in the center of the flower. Also, use it in the other darker areas on the flower. I'm using my NOVA brush to paint some of the watery Windsor violet over the magenta that I painted earlier. The color of these areas need to be a little darker, so this color should do the trick. I'm painting on dry paper here, with watery paint, skinning in and around the petals with the paint. Just paint this section up just a little bit. Remember it's watery paint on dry paper, and it's Windsor violet that I'm using. Now I've switched to the watery permanent magenta and I'm glazing another layer of the paint over the top of the previous layer just to deepen the color a little. I'm painting on dry paper again here, just going in and around the petals. A bit to the watery Windsor violet now to deepen this area further. Down between the petals here and down between the petals here as well. Then I can soften the edge if I need to with some water on my brush. Now wetting this petal here with water and this is some watery magenta and I'm painting it around the edges of the petal. Now I've watched the paint out of my brush and I can just use it to pull that paint where I need it. Washing my brush now and then I can use it to soften the edge. I've switched back to the moister brush because the petals are getting larger now. I get the same thing that I just did with the fine NOVA brush. This is watering magenta on damp paper. Soften the edges again, just with water from the brush. Some water on these larger pedal here, and this is Windsor violet taken from the top of the palette. Little bit down here as well. Pull some of it up. Just water on my brush my brush now just to soften any edges that I need to. I'm not terribly happy with purple straight that's going up there. I'm just adding a bit more now. This is a watery Windsor violet. I've just dampened the paper where I'm working now, and I'm using the Windsor violet from the top of the palette here to soften in the edge. I'm watering manganese falling now around the top edge of this petal. The paper is drying here. Here, I've put some of the watery permanent rose just over the top. Here, this is watery Windsor violet again, and I'm just deepening the color. Some permanent magenta here on damp paper just from the top of the palette and now I'm deepening the color around the edges using the NOVA brush with paint taken from the top of the palette again and then I just repeat the process here. Do the same thing here, little bit of water first and then the permanent magenta from the top of the palette just around the edges. Turn to leave that highlighted center part. Take your time with this center and have patience with yourself. 17. Deepening the Colour in the Centre - Part 2 (Progress Photo 3): I finished the center of the Chrysanthemum in this video. There's another image of my painting that you can download that corresponds with the end of this video. Use it to help you paint yours. This is wings are valid from the top of the palate, I'm painting on damp paper. Now I've got a little bit of permanent magenta on my brush. Now this just water on my brush, and I soften away the hard edge. I'm using my navel brush because it's a small petal. This time I've got permanent magenta and I'm painting on dry paper. So I worked my wet brush over the paint at the top of the palate, so there's lots of pigment on my brush. Just deepening the color over that under wash. Now I've got water on my brush because I want soft edges along the side here.Then I use the paint from the top of the palate again. It's probably not enough water on my paper, so I'm going to give it a helping hand with my damp brush. Some watery, permanent rise on the back of the petal here. Just blending it all softly with water, I'm more less nice and wet, I can get some more of the permanent rise on the metal page. Then I can soften it again with my damp brush. Have just poured a little bit of that paint under the dry petal beside it. Now I've just painted some wings of Violet down into the crevice between the petals, the paper with damp and the paint I took from the top of the palate. Add some more of the permanent magenta up here just to deepen the color even further. This little petal right up the top needs some more color, so wet it with water, and this is permanent magenta from the top of the pallet, and I paint it around the edge of the petal like I did in the previous video. Just done the same thing with this petal next to it, switching to permanent rise now and this is watery paint on dry paper. Now I'm just softening the edge of the paint. Just with water on my brush. Some watery, permanent magenta now, and I'm painting the inside areas of these petals on dry paper. I've just dried it off with a hair dryer, and I'm going to deepen the color of the spaces in between, with wings of Violet. I'm doing this on dry paper. There is no real detail here on the reference photo, so I'm just doing my own thing. I've just painted another layer of magenta over the top, and now I'm coming back in with some of the wings of Violet. I didn't like the rigidity of the gaps between, so I've softened them now. I'm not happy with this petal here either. I think it looks a bit strange. So I'm going to break it into two petals and your drawing should already have this line on it so you won't have to put it in. So some permanent magenta should fix it for me. Just washing over the top, I'm pushing it over the petal. This sits beside it as well. That's the end of the center. Now I've included this image for you to download, it's called The End of the Center. Now I hope it serves as a useful guide for you when you paint your Chrysanthemum center. 18. Introducing Opera Rose: > It's time for a new color. I use opera rose in this video to brighten up some of their petals. Now, opera rose is really bright so when you're glazing over the other colors, they really pop. I'm painting some motor onto these petal here because I want to separate it from the petal beside it. This is the manganese violet from the top of the palette and now I'm softening the edge of the paint with a damp brush. This is permanent magenta here. I've taken it from the top of the palette and I'm working on drawing paper. I'm just filling in the inner part of the petal that I can see. Then there is some watery manganese violet right up the top here. I'm deepening the color now with some more of the permanent rose, it's glazing over the top. Now, it's time for a new color. This one's called opera rose. It's very bright and I'm going to use it to add a bit of a zing to the petals here and there. With these petal here with some water; then I pick up some of the opera rose from the top of the palette, and on it grows. It's a really, really vibrant color, opera rose. Now you can see it from above. Now I'm picking up some of the water in manganese violet and I paint the violet of the top of the petal. Just up and around, sweep it over. All that are opera rose is still wet, I want to deepen the color further. I have just picked up some more of the opera rose from the top of the palette. I'm going to deep and inside the petal while I'm here, this is permanent rose again. Now, I've just done the same thing with this petal. This is opera rose on the white paper. This time, I've picked up watery permanent rose and I'm painting that in up the top section to softening the edge now, just with water on my brush. Now, I want some permanent magenta from the top of the palette and I use it to deepen the color down low on the petal. The paper is still slightly damp from when I painted it and then I can just use my damn brush just to blend the two colors together. Not just with this petal here I'm working, and this is manganese violet. I just want to increase the color on the side of the petal. I've taken the paint from the top of the palette again. I'm waiting the petal next wet with water, I'm moving close now so that you can see the water. I always take my time when I'm applying water just as our waters if always paint. Now, I've got some opera rose from the top of the palette and I'm just increasing the color on the petal. Just brightening it up. This is watering manganese violet now. The pipe is still damp from when I wet it. Now, I'm deepening the base of the petal again with the permanent magenta from the top of the palette. Softly blending again now just with a damp brush. Some water on this petal beside the last one, and some watery permanent rise over this shop just to deepen the color slightly. Just water on my brush now, just softening away any hard edges that I don't want, and that's to deepen the color further. I'm using some of the permanent magenta from the top of the palette, and the paper is still wet from when I painted it with the permanent rose. You want to work quickly when you're introducing the new color. If it's starting to dry on you, then dry it off with the hair dryer and re-wet it with some water before you put the darker color on. Now I'm just softening the edges with the damp brush. I'm using the magenta now to deepen their color between the two petals. I've dampened the petal with a little bit of water first. Some of the magenta here as well and I'm just painting on dry paper here. But to the upper rows here from the top of the palette, I'm painting this on damp paper. Now, I'm just softening the edges of the paint with a dump brush again and this is the watery manganese violet at the other side, a little bit of water on this petal here. That's how the manganese followed again, but this time from the top of the palette. I'm going to pull some of that paint up the petal as well. I'm washing my brush now, and then I can use the paint that there just to pull up some streaks. Now, a little bit of watery opera rose on this petal. 19. Deepening the Colour Middle Front & Top Right: I'm working mainly on the center front part of the Chrysanthemum. Although I do move up to the right side of the center. I'm just stapling the colors as I have been. I wanted to even the color on this petal where it touches the petal next to it. I'm painting a little bit of water where I'll be putting the paint. This is winsor violet from the top of the pallet, I just run it down the edge where the two petals touch one another. I'm just taking it out a little further now, just away from the edge. Now, I'm picking up a little bit of the watery permanent magenta and I'm putting that on. Paper is slightly damp here. I'm just skipping this one now because this one is wet, so we're going to work on this one here, and I want to increase the color. Some watery opera rose should work nicely. I'm painting on dry paper here. Now I need some more color along the base. I will paint some more over here because I want the edge of the paint to be soft. I use opera rose from the top of the pallet and I run it along the edge and I can pull it up slightly. This area down in here, needs to be deep green color. I'm going to apply some of the watery winsor violet over the top of the permanent rose. Just make sure the petal next to it is dry before you do this. I want to deepen the color here too, but I want soft edges, so I wet the area with water and I'm careful not to disturb that part that I've just painted beside it. Then I pick out some of the winsor violet from the top of the pallet and I place it with the color where it will be darkest. I try to keep the edges of the petals as tidy as I can. Now, I wash my brush and I pick up some of the permanent magenta from the top of the pallet. Then I paint some of that onto the petal. The water on the paper, blends the edges of the two colors softly. Then I wash the paint out of my brush and I can just push that paint up and it just blends softly with that underlying dry wash of permanent rose. Here it is from above. This area here, that I painted before it dry paler than I wanted to, so paint some more, so I'm going to paint some more violet over the top. Just on the dry paper. I want to deepen the color on this one as well. A little bit of water first. Then I'm using the winsor violet from the top of the pallet. I'll put it down there in the part where it's darkest. Then with a damp brush, I can push the color of the petal a little away. I'm just taking the paint up further onto the petal as well. Just softening again with water here. Over to this side now. Again, a little bit of water because I want the edges to be soft and this time I've got watery permanent magenta. I run it along the edge where it touches the other petal. Then I let it played up softly. Now with some manganese violet on this one up here, now I will wet the paper first. This petal has only one layer of paint on it so far, so I need to deepen the color. I wash out the paint. Now again, I'm just softening the edge with water. This little one here, has been wet with water. Made the shadow on it. This is winsor violet from the top of the pallet. Just a little bit more paint here. This petal up here, needs some paint on it because it's merging with the petal behind it. I'm using watery manganese violet just to give it a touch of color. Some permanent magenta up here on damp paper, just deepening the color. Now, I'm using the manganese violet on damp paper, so I want to separate these two petals from one another as well. I place the color on the petal that's furthest from me. I'm glazing over this one with another wash of the manganese violet just to deepen the color slightly. This wasn't quite dark enough. Now I'm just softening the edge with water. Now, I'm brightening out the base of it with watery opera rose and I'm just painting on dry paper here. A little bit of a watery manganese violet up here now as well. 20. Deep, Rich Darks - Beginning to go Darker : I'm going even darker with some of the colors now, I love using rich dark colors. I find when you start to add all the rich dark, the painting starts to come to life. This area in here needs to be really dark, so that's this area here on the reference photo. I'm using watery permanent magenta, but it's got a fair amount of pigment in it, just want to show you the paint on the paper and the sheen of the water is gone off the surface. I can pick up some more magenta, but this time from the top of the palette, and I can paint it onto the base of that shape, just to deepen it further. I'm also going to put some at the top of the shape, which will just leave a little light spot, which I think is this side of the petal that I can see on the reference photo. Just to turn that little light spot down, I'm just washing some permanent magenta over the top. You can see that area if you look closely on the reference photo, I think it's the side of these petal that I can see. Heading over to this petal here now, and you remember that I painted some opera rose onto it at the end of the last video. I need to deepen the color at the base, so I just painted some water on it, and now I'm using the magenta from the top of the palette again, and now some more of the watery opera rose on top of it. Just doing the same thing on the other side now, and this little space in it too also need some magenta from the top of the palette and back to the opera rose here, just taking it up a bit higher. This is also watery opera rose, I don't want that hard edge there, so water on the brush softens it away. Now I've just picked up some magenta from the top of the palette and I'm deepening the color at the base, the paper is still damp from when I painted it a moment ago. I've dried this area off with the hairdryer, and now I'm just wetting this one here, I want to deepen the color at the base of this one as well. Little bit of water first before I put the paint on, and then I pick up some of the permanent magenta from the top of the palette. I just place it where the color is darkest along the edge where it touches the other petal. Is a little bit more paint on my brush now and I just keep working it up the petal. Now I've washed the paint out of my brush, and I can just pull the paint up further, here it is from above. I want to go darker still, so this is the winsor violet from the top of the palette. Just placing it onto the wet paint. I want to deepen the color at the top of the petal, so I wet it with water first, and this is watering manganese violet and I just layer it over the top of the under wash. I think I need a bit more of the manganese violet here. I'm just going to pick up a little bit more and just place it on the side here. Now this drawing, I can see that it's not drawing as dark as I had hoped it was, so I'm going to pour some more of the watery magenta on before it dries completely. This can be a dangerous time to paint when the paper is nearly dry, so if yours is at that stage where it's nearly dry and you're worried about it, you need to do this, just dry it off and then re-wet it with some water and start again. I want some water in magenta on this shape here, I've divided the shape in two with my pencil, so that I can see the edge of this petal here. This is watery magenta, my brush, and I'm going to paint that on the entire area, just painting on dry paper. I've dried it with the hairdryer, and what I want to do is put some water on the top section of the space, and then I use some of the winsor violet from the top of the palette. I wet the paper first so that I could use the rich dark pigment from the top of the pallet, you can see how dark that is. I want to deepen the color at the base of the inside part of the petal, so I'm carefully wetting the base and make sure that I leave a gap of dry paper between the inside part and the part that I just painted. Then I use the winsor violet from the top of the palette again, and that's left a hard edge. Just to soften it, I just use a little bit of water on my brush. 21. Deep, Rich Darks - Right Side : I'm painting some more beautiful, rich darks on the right side of the painting in this video. I'm wetting this section here with water because I want to brighten it up, and this is watery opera rose and I'm just glazing it over the top of the previous color. I've just painted some watering manganese violet on the top side of this petal. This is watery paint on dry paper, taking it down a bit further, now I'm wetting the inside of this petal run up in the corner with some water, and this is the permanent magenta from the top of the palette, let us take it right to the edge of the board, but I leave a small gap of the under wash showing along the top edge. Now I'm just deepening the color at the base with some more pigment, and some are of the magenta over here as well. Now for some watery opera rose on the section here just to brighten it up slightly, softening the edge. I'm using my pencil to place a few guidelines for myself over here in this section, because I'm going to be painting it soon. Now I need some wet paper inside this one, and this is permanent rose from the top of the palette. My glaze it over the top of the under wash that I painted at the start of the painting. The water keeps the paint transparent, I can take my time with it. Just adding a bit more pigment now just to deepen that color further. So this is the permanent rose from the top of the palette again. Now I dried the petal off with the hair dryer and I re-wet it with water, and now I've got some of the permanent magenta from the top of the palette, pulling it up slightly. Now I've just got water on my brush, just soften away those edges, and now I've got some of the watery permanent rose on the side of the petal now. A little bit of water on this side of the petal now, and this is the permanent magenta from the top of the palette. Now a little bit of the watery permanent rose just to deepen the color. A little bit more of the permanent magenta here, but it's watery this time, and the pipe is dry here, and now we can just soften the edge just with water on my brush. A little bit of the watery manganese violet up the top just to deepen the color, slightly. Moving back to the section on the side where I drew some lines before, I'm wetting the top section with water, and this is a watery, permanent rose, just glazing over the top of the under wash. While that's still wet, I'm using permanent magenta from the top of the palette to paint some streaks of color over the wet paint. I've waited for the paper to dry a little bit, it's still damp but it's not as wet as before and now I can add some more paint just to define a little bit further. So it's not quite so fuzzy. Moving down a little bit further now and I do the same thing with the area, with water first, and then I use the watery permanent rose to glaze over the top. I don't wet this area all at once because it'll dry on maybe before I get to it. So I just wet it in sections as I go. Some more, permanent magenta now onto the wet paint. It's a fair amount of pigment in that watery magenta. Now I've switched down to my Nova brush, sits a bit finer and I can tidy up the edge of the petal in front, and this is magenta from the top of the palette now. Now just done the same thing with this area, and this is watering magenta, painting it onto the wet permanent rose, and now for some winds of violet from the top of the palette. Just painting around that little highlight that's there. Little bit more now. A little bit more over here as well. 22. Deep, Rich Darks on Two Outer Petals (Right Side): I've got a petal in this video that I've got to correct the shape of. It is just not quite right, so I need to fix it. I continue darkening the petals on the center right side of the painting. Looking at this petal here, and I'm thinking that it looks a bit strange. The edge of it isn't on the right angle, so I need to take a bit of it often try and fix it. I'm going to wet the paper just here. That's a bit awkward painting on the edge of the board because there's no way for me to raise my hand. I've got a big book here. The same hard as my board and I'm going to raise my hand on that. That's easier. I'm just wetting that area. This is permanent magenta that I've taken from the top of the palate. Then I can just use my dump brush to soften the edge of the paint. I'm going to start working on this petal here now, because I need to start deepening the color. Now I went to wet the outer part of the petal here. Just a little bit of water first, and this is manganese violet from the top of the palate. Add some more of it over here as well. Then I'll just paint some streaks of it over the surface as well. Done here, I've got some permanent rows and I just want to unwet brush over the top of the palate again. Now just paint on this other side with some manganese violet and now I'm softening the edge with the damp brush. Moving onto these petal now while the other one dries and I'm just wetting that lower area. Now some oprarise from the top of the palate. I'll put most of the paint on the base. Then I'll just pull some streaks develop out of the petal. Following the shape of the petal with my brush. Now I want some permanent rows from the top of the palate. I can deepen the color further with ease. Then I just let the paint bleed on the damp surface. Moving onto the back of the petal on wetting the violet part with some water. Then I pick up some manganese fall it from the top of the palate. I just deepen the color on the back of the petal with that. Then I can use my damp brush to soften the edge of the paint. Just softening the edge again. Now I want to run some more color on the back of this petal. Just wetting it first, I've picked up some of the permanent rise from the top of the palate with my naiver brush this time. I'll run it along the edge where the water is, and then it just bleeds softly up onto the surface of the petal. Now I've just wetted the inside part of this petal behind. I'll switch back to my maestro brush, and I've got some opera rose from the top of the palate. I just want to brighten up the inside part of the petal. Then while the paint's still wet, I can you some of the permanent magenta from the top of the palate, just deepen the lines that I can see inside. If we have a look at the reference photo, you can see there is dark lines or strips of color. Just in here, and that's what I'm painting now. The paper is still slightly damp, but it's not sopping wet, I still have control of where the paint's going. Little bit of magenta over here as well. A little bit more here. Now I'm washing out my brush. And then I can use it just to soften that ledged layer 23. Deep, Rich Darks - Tonal/ Colour Gradation on a Larger Petal: I'm spending quite a bit of time on these two petals here in this video. I'm glazing over the top of them and I'm adding detail as I go. Okay so I want to bring this petal here to life now, and it's got a few different colors on it, so I'm going to paint it with water in sections, so the first section that I will paint is this part here that sticks out, so what I want to do is create a tonal gradation where the color goes from dark to light, as you've seen me doing in some of the other videos, so I want the paint to be really dark at the bottom, I want it just to get gradually larger as it goes up the petal. The best way to do that is to just keep the paper slightly damp, this color here is opera rose, and I took it from the top of the palate, I'm just painting on that part that sticks out. My paper is slightly damp here, now just take it up a little bit further, now I'm just softening the edge with the damp brush. This is watery manganese violet, and I'm just painting it above the opera rose, my paper is still damp here. Now I've just dried that section off with a hairdryer, and now I want to paint the left side of the petal, so this is some water just to dampen the paper, I paint the water on carefully. This is manganese violet again from the top of the palate, just painting it onto the damp paper, because I painted that section that sticks out first, I've created a hard edge along here, and that just helps to show that this section jumps out further than the side that I'm painting on now. Now I can just soften that top edge with a damp brush, you can see it from the top here. Now for some opera rose from the top of the pillar, I'm just blending in over the top of the wet paint, just to brighten it up, and then some magenta here, just want to deepen the color, so this is permanent magenta from the top of the palate, and I want some of that color on this part that sticks out, so a little bit of water first, followed by the permanent magenta, then I soften the edge again, and here it is from above. I want to do the same thing on the other side, so again, some water, I want to deepen the color all around this side of the petal. This is manganese violet from the top of the palate again, and then I can soften the edge at the top, while the paint is wet, I can drop in some of the opera rose like I did before, then a small amount of the magenta on top of that. Now just wet the base of this petal above because I think it needs to be darker here, so this is manganese violet from the top of the palate, then I can take what's left of the paint on my brush, I can paint a little darker section here on the top of these petal, this part here it sticks out, has dried lighter than I wanted to be, so some watery opera rose here brightens it up, softening the edge here. Moving on to this petal here now, and I've just wiped this whole area here with some water, and now I've got some watery manganese violet, and I am just glazing it over the top, I just want to darken the whole area there, and now while the paint's still wet, I'm dropping in some opera rose that I picked up from the top of the palate and just running it along the base here, and just blades up into the wet paint. Now I've got some watery manganese violet on my brush again, and this time I'm painting on dry paper, so it's just a little bit of color up this side here, then I can do the same thing that I did on the other side with the opera rose, just while the paint is still wet. I've dried it off with the hair dryer and I just want to wet some water onto this little section here at the side, and this is a tiny little bit of the permanent magenta from the top of the palate, and now I've done the same thing here in this next little section, so I wet it first with water, and then I use the permanent magenta from the top of the palate just to create the darkness that's there, and then I can use the damp brush just to soften the edge of the paint, sometimes it's not quite enough water on the paper, I need to come back in and soften it further, and then I just repeat the process here on this center part, but the color is not quite as dark, so I've got a little bit more water on my brush and less pigment, I'm just softening the edge again now, so I just want to get this side of this petal in, so this is permanent magenta that I've taken from the top of the palate, and I'm painting on dry paper here, my brush is round-up on its tip so that I can get round-up in the corner there, while that paint's wet, I want to deepen the color further, just with some winds of violet that I've picked up from the top of the palate that makes it nice and dark. I'll leave this section for now and I'll continue on in the next video. 24. A Closer Look at Tonal/Colour Gradations: In this video, I've zoomed in at the end where I'll show you how I get those tonal gradations of color. When the pen is really dark, and it gradually lighten as it moves up the petal. Little bit of water on this side of these petal here, and I want to put some upper rows in down their at the base. So I just picked up some operands from the top of the palate and it's just going onto the dump paper. So a little bit more water across here as well and then I want to take some of the operands over there as well. So operands from the top of the pellet again. Just painting it on the damp paper here and I want to talk a little bit up this side here too, I think. Now I haven't wet these area with water, so I'm just painting on dry paper here. So I'm just thinking that it needs to be slightly darker. So I've got some watery manganese violet now and I'm just painting it over the dry paper. I'm just deepening the color on the petal. I think I need to put a little bit over the highlighted area as well. I think it's a little bit too wide here, this highlight. So I'm just going to push that color over a little bit further. Yeah, I think that's better. So I'm going to work on this one now and I'm just painting the whole petal in with some water. Now I've got some watering manganese violet here. It's fair amount of pigment in it. So it makes it a bit more paint into the watery mix. Now I've got no paint on my brush and I'm just tidying up everything, particularly the edge of that pedals, it's next to it. Then I'm dropping in some operands just to brighten it up. I'm just want to tidy down this area down here. So I'm just washing over some of the manganese violet just because it's a bit bright down there. That just pushes it back a little bit. I just want to fix the tip of this one here where it rests on the one. So I've just wet that area with water and now I've got some Permanent Rose that I just picked up from the top of the palate and I just tides up the edge of that petal. Just rare lists, on the other one. Now I've got to soften that edge because it's a bit hard. So the damp brush just takes that hard edge away. I want to deepen this section down here with a bit more color. Just painting on some water now. Then I'm going to pick up some permanent rows from the top of the palate and I'm going to deepen this area here. So this just goes onto the damp paper. I can get rid of those little white holes that I've got. Then I just tidy up the edges as I go. Make sure they are nice and straight. I'm going to get rid of this little hard edge here so a little bit of moisture on my brush should rub it away.Then I can just pet the paint to fix it there. So while that paints to damp, I've now picked up some of the permanent magenta from the top of the pallet and I'm just deepening the color further in the corner getting a little bit more paint. Another painted onto the damp paper. Just be careful that you don't put it on too heavy like I think I have here. So I'm going to wash the paint out of my brush and then I can just use the damp brush just to dilute this area, just to push the paint out a bit further so it's not so heavy in that one spot. So there's only water on my brush at the moment. There's only a little bit of water on my brush. You can see how that's created that lovely soft tonal gradation there. Now to take it a step further, before that paint dries, I've got some windsor violent now and I'm putting it right in the corner. So the windsor violet I took from the top of the palate again and I'm just pushing it into that way paint gently. Tidy up the edges as I go. Now I use my bristle brush just very gently. Just to label why a hard edge that's formed there. Just to remind you where I'm working now, so I'm working in this section just in here. Now I dried off that section that I was just working on with the hairdryer and now I've just re-weight this little area in here and this is permanent magenta from the top of the pellet and I'm deepening the color. But I made sure that I dry that area well, that's above it that I just worked on because I don't want to disturb it. So I'm just deepening the color here with the permanent magenta. Now I want to put some of the windsor violet, down in here, right down in this little corner section. So the pipe is damp and the paintings from the top of the pellet. Now as it dries, never dries quite as dark as you'd hope. So I'm just putting some permanent rose up here. So this is watery permanent rose I'm painting on dry paper. Now I can just soften the edge there just with some water that's on my brush. So any little bit of water. So this is the area here that I was just working on. Moving out onto a new petal and I want to deepen the color on this one here. So this is some watery manganese violet on dry paper. Now am just softening the edge again with the damp brush. Just wetting this area here with water. Now I've got a little bit of the manganese violet from the top of the palate and I'm just deepening the markings and I see there on the petal. 25. A Third Look at Tonal/Colour Gradations: I'm working in the same area of the flower as I did in the previous video, and you'll get to see me paint those tonal gradations again, and I'm working on this petal here. You'll see how the dark Winsor Violet merges into the magenta, then it merges into the Opera Rose, then it softly merges into the manganese violet. It's not easy to do, you've got to have your paper just damp and not a lot of water in your brush, so good luck with it. Just drawing in a line here that I've missed, so this is just the inside of this petal. I want to fill it in with some permanent magenta. This is paint that I've picked up from the top of the palette, I'm just painting on dry paper here. Now a little bit of water on this petal here, just at the base, I just want to deepen the color again and some permanent rose from the top of the palette, and I just glaze it over the top of that under-wash that's here. Then I use my damp brush just to soften white, the hard edge at the top. The same thing here on this petal, so some more permanent rose, just deepening the color. Then again, I soften the edge white at the top. Now while the paint's still wet, I'm just going to deepen down the bottom here with some permanent magenta. I'm just painting it over the top of the damp paint. Now I use my damp brush just to soften the edge, I did the same here on this little one. Then I clean my brush out, wipe it, and then I can soften that edge again. We can have another look at these color gradations here on this one. I'm just putting some water on it at the moment, so it's not sopping wet it's just damp. Then straight away I can put some Opera Rose on there, just at the base of it. This is watery Opera Rose, which is deepening the color at the base of the petal, brightening the color, I guess, rather than deepening it. Now I've got some manganese violet, so its watery manganese violet, and I'm just deepening the color at the top of the petal, just not dark enough as it was, so we're just got to increase the color. Working on that damp paper it still hasn't dried and I've got some magenta now, this time from the top of the pallete, and I just want to get it right in down here at the base. I want to try and get a nice soft gradation so that the colors sort of blend into one another. To do that I've got to take the paint out of my brush and just use a slightly damp brush to rub over the areas where the two colors meet, so just here, I just rub gently with the damp brush, there is only a tiny little bit of water in my brush. I'm just going to turn my board now because I want to get some Winsor Violet right down here in the corner. Again, I put the paint on, but then I've got to take the paint off my brush and use the damp brush, only slightly damp just to soften that edge where the two colors meet. There's hardly any water on it at all, and that gives me that soft gradation between dark to light. I think I need just a little bit of color down in here as well, so just I'm going to put a tiny a little bit of water in there, and then I pick up some of the Winsor Violet from the top of the palette, and I'll just pat a tiny little bit in here. I think that looks pretty good. I'll just turn my board again, and I've got all these lovely darks coming through here. These beautiful darks really start to bring the painting to life. This is the part of the paintings that I enjoy the most. 26. Deepening the Colour on the Left Corner (Progress Photo 4): This area up here Is been a bit neglected, I'll get some more color on there now. There's also an image of my painting that you can download that corresponds with my progress so far and I'll talk about that at the end of the video. Now I've just wet down the side of this one, because again, I want to deepen the color. This is permanent rose, taken from the top of the palate, and the water keeps the edges of the paint soft. Now I want to paint some of the manganese violet at the base, just on the back of the petal. I'm painting on dry paper here, and I can push it up beside the permanent rows there. Then just soften the edge. Just with my wet brush. Moving little up to this one up here. Now this is watery manganese violet, and I'm painting on dry paper here. I'm just glazing over the top of the previous wash just to deepen the color. I think there might actually be two petals here in the reference photo, but because it's so difficult to see I've just turned it into one. I'm just using watery manganese violet on dry paper here. Now while that paint Is still wet, I'm just going to drop in some [inaudible] here just to brighten it up further. Now, I'm going to dry this off with the hair dryer and I've noticed something that I don't particularly like, there's a hard edge In here that I'm not happy with, now that it's dry, I'm just going to use my bristle brush just to gently rub out the paint. Now just moving on to this side of the petal that's poking through here, this is opera rose from the top of the palate, just on dry paper, and then some manganese followed on the top section. I've just painted some watery manganese violet onto the top of this one, and now I'm adding some watery permanent rise onto the rest of it. I'm painting this petal on dry paper because there was no reason for me to wet it because I'm taking the paint right to the edge of the petal. I dry this petal with the hairdryer. Now I want to run a small highlight down the petal, where the pink and the purple meet. My bristle brush is slightly damp and I can just ramp gently to remove the paint. I want to work on this petal beside that one. I'm just going to paint some water over the whole petal. Then I want to wash on some manganese violet just onto the top half, this is watery manganese violet, and then some watery permanent rise on the bottom half, and then a little bit more of the manganese violet at the top, and then some opera rose from the top of the palate to surround the front edge. I've dried it off with my hair dryer and I just want to clean up the top with my bristle brush, add that little highlight down the side, just like I did with the petal next to it. I want to work on this area here now. I'm going to paint on some of the watery manganese violet over this petal just to deepen the color. Paper is dry here, I've also taken it a little bit further across the petals than were I had it before. I'm deepening the color inside this petal here with some of the watery permanent rose. I'm painting some watery manganese violet onto the inside section of this petal just to create that internal [inaudible]. Now put some watery permanent rose inside the rest of it, all of this is just on dry paper. This one that I painted first is dry now and it's still not dark enough, 'm just painting another layer of the permanent rose over the top. Then I drop In some of the watery manganese violet for interest. Now I need to alter the shape of the side of this petal here. I also need to deepen the color. Before I paint I'll put a wash of water on, just to stop the paint from drying too quickly, and this is watery manganese violet just to deepen the color. I dried that one with my hairdryer, so don't disturb it, now I'm running some manganese violet down this side of this one just to bring it back in front of the petal that I just painted, and I leave a whole lot of white paper at the top of the petal. Some of the violet onto this one behind, and I soften the edge with water. I want to brighten up the inside of this petal with some watery opera rose. I've also just painted some of the watery opera rose onto this petal at the back and some more into this one as well. Just to brighten them all up. I'm painting over this petal here with some manganese violet, and a little more of the opera rose on this one just to define the edge of it. Now this is watery manganese violet again, just in the front side edge. This is what the painting looks like now. Now I've included this photo for you to download, It's called the cup of the chrysanthemum. 27. Beginning the Large Outer Petals (Progress Photo 5): Let's get some color on a large outer petals now. We're getting closer to the end of the flower so stay with me. Don't give up yet. I've also got another image of my painting that you can download. Now it corresponds to my progress when I'm about halfway through this video. I get the first wash on all the outer petals then I start to add detail onto one of them in this video. It's time to start on these outer petals. I'm going to use my mop brush because it's bigger and I'll apply some water to the inside of this petal here. So water, all over the inside part. This will stop the paint from drying too quickly and it'll go on a lot easier. I've got some of the watery manganese violet. The mop brush holds lots of water and lots of paint. So guys, I'm fairly quickly. I decided to take the paint right to the edge of this petal and finish it off where it touches the rest of the flower. Now, I'm randomly dropping in some watery permanent rows just to add interest. When that one dries, I'll move on to this petal over here. I'm just softening the lines with my eraser so that they are not too dark before I start. Then I'll get some water all over the inside part of the petal. Just as before, on goes the watery manganese violet onto the white paper and you can see the water on the paper here. Just remember that when you've got water on your paper, you don't need quite so much water in your brush. I'm just dropping in some of the rose as I did before too. I mustn't forget to paint the bottom half of the petal as well. I'll switch to my smaller brush for this and a little bit of rose here to so much as the top. I've gone ahead and I've done the same thing on all of these petals. Here's a photo of this stage and you can download this photo to help you with your painting. It's called 'First Wash on Large Outer Petals'. Now, I'm wetting inside these larger petal here with some water. This time I'm using Permanent Rose as for watering Permanent Rose. This is fairly dark, so I've mixed some more pigment into the watery mix. I've jumped ahead and I've washed in the side of this one here, this one here and this area in here. Now for some water on this petal over here and I probably should be using my mop brush here and some watery Permanent Magenta nail. The color is deeper here. What I've done is, I've my wiped wet brush over the paint at the top of the palate. The wet paint underneath keeps those edges soft. I've dried that area there that I've just painted so that I don't disturb it. So a little bit of water. This is Permanent Magenta from the top of the palate again. I can just soften the edge of the paint with a den brush if I need to. Now I have some watery magenta because I want to bring it up a little bit further. I'm just softening that edge again. I've picked up the small anova brush and I'm using Winsor Violet from the top of the palate. I'm just softening the edge again here with a den brush. Now it's dry again. I need my big book again to rest my hand on. I'm going to run some water off the edge here. Then I'll use the maestro brush to run some Permanent Magenta that I took from the top of the pallet just along that line. The water on the surface makes the paint bleed softly across. A little bit more paint now down at the base. I'm just taking it up, higher up the petal now. It softens as it goes further up. I've just done the same thing here up this line. We depend on the Magenta. Pipe is wet. Just softening the edge now. I've dried the petal with the hairdryer and then I'm wetting the next strip of the petal. This is the Permanent Magenta again. As I move up the petal, I'm only painting along the pencil line, because I want it to be lighter in color along the middle of this strip. Now the same up on this side, but my paper is dried up here, so I need a bit more water and then I can continue up with the paint. I've just done the same thing here on the edge on the right. This line here comes slightly in from the very edge of the petals are. So that I get a lighter edge. I've dried the petal again and now I'm wetting these final strip with some water. Then the same again, some Permanent Magenta from the top of the pallet onto the watery paper. Up the sides, now, I'm going to wet the outside part of the petal. This is watery Permanent Rose just on the outside of the petal. A little bit darker now. I've used a Permanent Rose from the top of the pallet. Just some little lines on the petal that I can see in the reference photo. I'm just softening the paint a little bit more now just with water. If we have a closer look at the reference photo, I've tried to paint in those lines that I see here on the outside of the petal. Now what I want to do is wash in this area here and make it darker than I have at the moment, but I'm going to do that in the next video. 28. Concave & Convex Ridges on Large Outer Petal #1: I've got more work to do on this large pedal at the front. I want to show the way the pedal will fall in and out. It's got these ridges along with some concaved and some convex. So I'll show you how I do that in this video. The first thing I want to do in this video is paint that dark area on this petal. So some water on the area first just to keep the edges of the paint soft. This is watery permanent rows, but it has a fair amount of pigment in it. I'm just teasing that painter with a clean brush now. I have weight over he further and I want to pull up paint over here as well. So some watery permanent rose over here as well. Tidy up the edges, and then I need to soften this edge here just with a damp brush. Now, moving the left side with water and then I can wash some watery or polarized just onto that area. I'll drop some of the watery unpolarized here as well just to broaden this area slightly. Then I can use the paint on my brush to painting that turn back part of the age of the petal, here that's not dark enough. So looking at the reference photo again, these two sections here are convexed, or the curving upward, while this section in between them is concave, or it's curving downward. So if I remove a small amount of paint from the two sections that are curving upwards, I should be able to show that on my painting. So my damp bristle brush, Kynar Jamie remove a small amount of paint from the two convicts reaches. Then I can paint some permanent magenta between the two reaches just to deepen the color. The same on this side of the convexed part, and over here I want some windsor violet. It's just water on my brush now and I can pull the pine top that's already been laid down. Then I can soften the edge just with a damp brush. This side H needs some more color. So this is watering permanent rose. I'm running some water along this edge here because I want to deepen the color slightly. So this is some manganese violet from the top of the palate. Just dampen the paper where I'm painting now, and this is magenta that I'm running up the edge. Now, want to paint a shadow across the bottom here are the base of the petal. So this is windsor violet from the top of the palate, just pushing it up slightly. I'll push it into the corner as well. Then I can soften the edge gently with some water that's on my brush just to keep that edge soft. 29. Adding Detail to Large Outer Petal #2: I'm going to paint this large curved petal here now. There's lots of layering to do on the inside of it. I'm painting this petal here now and I want to wash this area in here with some water. If we have a look at the reference photo, that's this area in here. This is permanent magenta from the top of the palette. You can see that it's quite dark. It's a little bit darker down at the base of the petal. Next I want to paint this section of purple that I see on the outer turned back part of the petal. I'm using watery manganese violet, but I'm painting on dry paper this time. I leave a tiny little white strip of paper along the edge showing. Now, it's just water on my brush here. I can soften the edge of the paint. Some water on this side of the petal and some watery manganese violet again just to deepen the color. Now all the paper is wet. I want a small amount of permanent rising on the outside edge. I can just push it up slightly. A little bit of the rise over here as well. Softening the edge now. Now I've got to do some more work inside this petal. So I'm wetting the whole inside area with water. This is watery permanent magenta that I'm using. I'm just looking at the reference photo as I paint. A little bit dark in there around the base. This time I've wiped my wet brush over the paint at the top of the palette. I can paint in those strips of darker color that I see. The paper is slightly damp. The wetness of the paper keeps the paint soft and fuzzy, which is what I want. I'm painting this fairly quickly so the paper is wet for me. If you find you can't paint this petal quick enough and your paper starts to dry, then dry it off completely with the hair dryer, and then rewet it with water and continue on. Now I've got some winds of violet from the top of the palette. I'm just deepening the base where it touches the other petal. I'm just pulling it apart with the wet magenta. I dried it off with the hair dryer and as always, it's never quite as bright as what I want it to be. This is where the opera rose comes in handy. I can wash it over almost the entire area just to brighten it up. Just some watery opera rose here. I want to turn mine a little bit louder at the top, so I'll wash away the hard edge at the top just with water on my brush. I can do the same thing on this one here just to brighten it up. This is the watery opera rose on dry paper. I'm just softening the edge right again. 30. Adding Detail to Large Outer Petal #3: This entire video is divided to this large petal here, and there's quite a lot of layering going on, on it. I've got a cape glazing colors over the top of one another until I get it dark enough. I'm running some ordinary permanent rise among the edge of this petal, and this is some manganese violet at the tip, and I'm painting on dry paper here, too smoothing it out with a damp brush now. Now, just painting some watery permanent rose onto the sign section, and now I've got some permanent magenta on my brush. I'm just working on top of the web permanent rose paint. Pulling lines up that I see on the reference photo. The paper is slightly dampy from the wash of the rose. Some watery winds evolve on this other side. Then, I'll just use my clean brush to soften the edge of the paint. I've just noticed that the edge of this one that I painted in the previous video needs a bit of color on the edge, so I've just used the paint that was on my paintbrush. Some water along the turned back part of the petal here, and this is wins of violet, from the top of the palate, the water on the paper keeps the paint soft and fuzzy. Now, just got water on my brush and I'm just tidying up those strokes that are just painted. This is soft shadow on the inside of these petals that I want to put in. I'm destroying it in for myself, and I'm going to wait on this side of the line first with some water. I don't want it to be sopping wet. We can see the water on the paper here, it's got a slight chain on it, and now I'm using the watery permanent magenta, just on top of that white paper. Run it up the sides as well. Just run it up both sides, and then I just pull some of that paint up just to form the streaks that I see on the reference photo, just following the shape of the petal. Not making them too stiff and straight. Now, this is some watery permanent rose and we spread it out with my brush, and this watery manganese fall at now at the tip. Deepening the color down at the base of the petal with some of them magenta. This is watery magenta, but it's got a lot of pigment in it. Just pulling it up softly a little bit. Now I'm painting a watery magenta over this area. Because I want to turn down the brightness of the pink if it gets a little bit too bright enough for some water in this section, I'm using my mop brush because it holds lots of water and I can paint the area quicker. This is watering magenta again, and I'll pull it up about halfway up the petal. Now, I've switched back to my moist dry brush because the mop brushes too big for this top part of the petal. Now, I'm just deepening the color at the base of the petal here, and I've went my wet brush over the paint at the top of the palate, and then I can pull that color over onto the dry section of the petal as well. This is just a permanent magenta, and then I just use my damp brush to soften the edge of the paint. I'm just going to type that much interrupt the edge there and also the other edge. Then, I can pull that magenta over this little fine streaks that I painted earlier, just to define them further, and notice some wins evolved from the top of the palate just to deepen the color at the base there. I'm just painting it onto the damp magenta paint. Now, I'm dropping in some more of the magenta, just deepening the calorie even further, and then I can use that wet magenta just to pull a few streaks up into the center of the petal. Just following the shape of the petal again. Now, I've just drawn that section off with the hairdryer, and I'm just painting a little bit of water here. I'm just going to run some offer rise down this middle section just to brighten it up. This is a little bit of watery upper rose on my brush, and now I'm just taking it down a little bit further, just dive at the top of the dry paint. I'll take it up over the side section as well. I've drawn it again with a hair hairdryer, and now I'm just waiting this side section, and this is the wins of violet from the top of the pellet, swing to deepen the side of it. Softening edge with water again now, just fixing up the shape of the tip of the petal. I'm just painting on dry paper here. Just the manganese violet. Now, I'm just using my width bristle brush to lift off a small amount of color off the edge. I think it's a little bit too dark along that edge, and I can also remove a small amount of paint to define those ridges on the side of the petal. Just paints amount more and now I'm just deepening the color on the edge of the petal with some watery manganese violet. 31. Adding Detail to Large Outer Petal #4: In this quick video, I'll tell you how I painted this petal here, and I'll show you how I finished it off. I've gone ahead and painted some detail on this petal here. Now that it's dried, I can see that I need to repeat some of the steps. I thought I was videoing it, but I neglected to hit the record button. To get to this stage, what I did was, I painted some motor on the petal first, except on the tip where it's white, then I painted some watery manganese violet on top, just avoiding the white areas, and while that was deep, I painted some opera rose down around the base. Then I drop some permanent magenta down there as well. Then, I want to wilt brush over the winsor violet at the top of the petal, and I deep in the color riding then at the base of the other petals. Then I dried it off with a hair dryer, and I wet this area in here with water and then I painted some of them manganese violet from the top of the petal. Then while that was wet, I dropped in some of the opera rose. Now, I also pulled up two lines in the manganese violet here. I'm going to turn my board because I find it easier to work by pulling strokes towards myself, and I'm going to wip the area down at the base the petal, just with some water. This is parallel magenta that I've gotten my brush from the top of the pellet. It fairly dark I'm just deepening the color. This is the upper rows as well from the top of the pellet. Now I've just got some of them manganese fall on my brush to some watery manganese violet, and I'm just going to paint over those lines that I painted earlier. Just put a little bit extra here too. This is watering manganese violet and I'm just glazing over the top of the previous wash just to deepen the color slightly, and a little drop of opera rose as well. 32. Adding Detail to Large Outer Petal #5: I work on this petal here. In this video, it's got a highlight down in that I have to put back in. Then I selectively apply some pigment over the top just to deepen the color all over. I turn my board so that the petal is easier for me to work on. I find it easier to pull brushstrokes towards myself rather than away from myself. I neglected to fill in the inside part of this petal earlier, so I'm going to paint some watery permanent rose on now just under the dry paper. So work on this one while that one is wet. Turning my board, because it's always easier to pull strokes toward myself rather than away from myself. There's a highlight, running down this petal in the reference photo that I'd like to include. So I'm just removing some of the fine, roughly where I think the highlight sits on the petal, just with a damp bristle brush. I'm going to dry it off because I want to run some water down this side. I dried it off with a hair dryer, and now I'm wetting down the right side of that highlighted spot. Go all the way up the petal, and then I pick up some of the manganese violet from the top of the pellet. I want the color to be darkest around the base of the petal. So I've put it on darker at the bottom, and then it will feather off towards the side at the top, so it's darker at the bottom. I've just used the brush to run it up along the side of the highlight and along the edge of the petal. Done the same thing on this other side, so it's darker at the bottom, and fades off at the top. Now I'm dropping in some operose from the top of the pellet just for interest. I'm then wetting the inside of the highlight with some water, then I pick up some operose from the top of the pellet. Then that water on the paper keeps all edges of the paint soft. Now I'm just painting on some watery manganese violet. I've drawn the petal off now and I've got some watery manganese violet and I'm just running it down the highlight just to tone it down a little, and some on the right side of the highlight as well. Now I'm just reinforcing the operose at the center, and I've got some watery manganese violet again just to finish off. There it is, the right way round. 33. Adding Detail to Large Outer Petal #6: I've got to fix the inside of this petal here. I've got the internal angle of it looking a bit strange, so I fix that, and then there's more glazing of pigment over the top to finish it. Coming back to this petal now, and I can see that the angle of the inside part of the petal isn't quite right, so I'm just going to fix that now. So this is just the permanent rose. Just painting on dry paper. Lots of pigment in it. This is watering magenta. Now that I'm using at the moment, I'm just glazing over the top of the previous walls just to boost the color slightly, and I've also painted at the base of the petal. Now, I dry it off with my hairdryer and now I'm removing some highlights with my dump bristle brush. Just very gently so that I don't damage the paper. Now, I want to put some water in magenta, over the top of this inside part that I've just taken the highlight off. So this is the petal that I'm working on now, and you can see why I remove that highlight on the base, and on this side. The color is slightly lighter than the surrounding color. So it's dry again now, and I want to darken the side section here. So this is watery magenta again, but this more pigment in it now. Just painting on dry paper here. So I dried it off again with the hairdryer, and now this is watery upper rose that I'm glazing over the top of the under waters. This is watering magenta on the middle section, and some watering magenta here is well, just while the paint is still wet. This is watery permanent rose. I just want to push that top edge back a bit. It seems to be a bit too light. So now for the outside of the petal, I'm just sweeping some watery manganese violet along the lower edge. I'm doing this on dry paper. An effort touch of operands will that violet is still wet. I've let that lower section dry and I'm using watery manganese violet again along the rest of it. It's just not quite as dark as I just had it. I'm just going to turn my board now so that I can do the tip of the outside part. So a little bit of water, and some manganese violet from the top of the petal this time. There is just water on my brush now, just softening the edge. So I've turned it back around the right way and to finish off, just some water on the side there again. This is manganese violet from the top of the petal, and I'm just running it along the dump paper. 34. Adding Detail to Large Outer Petals #7, #8 and #9: I get some more paint on three of the outer petals in this video. There's this one here, this one here and this one here. There's not a lot of work to do on them, so they don't take too long. Just going to turn my board so that I can work on this petal better. The petal I'm going to start with is this one here. It's not a great deal of work that I have to do on it. The first thing I'll do is just paint some water onto the white section. I'm just using my monster brush. I don't need a lot of water. Just want to dampen the paper. Now, this is some manganese violet again, just from the top of the palette. I'm just painting it onto the damp paper. Just pulling it down the petal. Leaving the white of the paper as highlights. This is oprah rose again dropping into the wet paint. Now, I've turned my board back around and you can see at the back of the petal here, I've actually painted some water on it. Then I use the manganese violet from the top of the palette just to pull those strokes in from the edge. The dampness of the paper kept them nice and soft and fuzzy for me. Working on this petal here now, I'm just going to turn my board again. I'm going to draw a guideline for myself, steam pencil. If we have a look at the reference photo again, that's this line here that I've just drawn in. Now, I've wet the inside of the petal with water and now I'm just painting over my pencil line with some manganese violet from the top of the palette. I want the line to be soft and fuzzy. That's why I put the water on it. I take it all the way down on the petal. There's another line on the other side as well. Now I'm just bringing in the outside part of the petal with some watery manganese violet, just painting on the dry paper. This is some manganese violet from the top of the palette. I'm just darkening that outside area. Now, I'm painting some watery magenta onto the dry paper inside the petal nail. Now I'm going to move on to this petal here and there's not a great deal of work that I have to do on it. The first thing I'm just going to do is just put some water on the outside of it. Then some manganese violet from the top of the palette, just putting it onto the damp paper. I just want to give it a second layer of paint at this stage, just to deepen their color. Now I've just picked up some upper rows from the top of the palette and I'm just painting it onto the wet manganese violet paint, just at the base of the petal. Because the paper is damp and the manganese violet is damp, it just blends those colors together softly for me. I'll put a little bit at the back here as well. This one here, I've just put some manganese violet on the inside part of the petal. 35. Adding Detail to Large Outer Petals #10 and #11 : Guess what? With the end of the petals now, pop a Champagne and let's celebrate. There's a couple more petals to go and then we can get working on the leaves. Working inside this petal here, I just want to paint some water on the inside. I'll just use one more brush because it's a fairly large petal. Now, I've switched on to my maestro brush and this is permanent rose that I'm using, [inaudible] white brush over there painted the top of the pellet. I'm just running it down the left side of the petal. It's a little darker now. I've just picked up a little bit more paint. I'm just painting over it again. The paper is damp because I want this edge here to be soft and fuzzy. I'm putting some of the rows over the other side as well. Then I just write a few lines on the damp paper as well. I run it down the edge of the other petal, and I just soften it with my clean damp brush. A little bit more paint now. Tidying up edges. Now, I'm just going over it again, with some more paint just to increase the color. Now some manganese violet on dry paper down the bottom half, and then I drop some of the permanent rose onto the wet violet. Now, I just want to tidy up this edge here where runs along the other petal. I did draw it with the [inaudible] and now I'm just rewriting it with water. This is permanent rose again. I'll just run it along the edge, and then I can pull it up the petal slightly. Now for some water on this petal beside that one and now I have switched back to my maestro brush so that I've got more control, and this is the permanent rose again that I took from the top of the pellet. It's nice and dark. Now, I'm just running some of the streaks of color down the center part of the petal. I'll make sure I've got a nice streak edge along that other petal. I'm just going to wash my brush head now and that I can use the damp brush just to push that paint where I want it to just soften the color. Small rise over the other side of the petal. Here it is from above. Now, I need some water on the lower half of the petal, and this is the permanent rose again from the top of the pellet, does run out along the edge of the petal. Now, I don't think my paper is quite wet enough. I need to put some more water on. Little bit more water, and this is some watery permanent rows now. Now, I'm using the paint from the top of the pellet again, and there is a dark area on the other side of the petal layer as well. Now for some watering manganese violet on the side of this one, just to deepen the color. I've just wet the outside part of this one with water, and this is manganese violet. From the top of the pellet is time. You'll be pleased to know that it's now time to start painting it on the leaves. That's exciting. I've got this image here for you to download. This one's called Chrysanthemum Completed Before the Leaves. I may come back and do a few little more tweaks, but as far as I'm concerned, they're completed. I hope this photo will help you when you paint yours. 36. Washing in the Leaves: I'm so glad all the petals are finished. It's now time to turn our attention to the leaves. Let's get some green or gray rather on our palate. Now, I put an under wash of a light gray on the leaves in this video. If you don't have a gray, you can easily make a nice gray from a blue and a brown. I often use ultramarine blue and burnt sienna to make it gray. This gray under wash will show through the next layer of green that we do in the next video. Let's get some new colors on this palette. The first color is Davy's gray. You could also mix up a gray if you'd rather do that just from my blue and a brown that you might have in your kit. As I mentioned in the introduction, I like to use burnt sienna mixed with ultramarine blue. But for this painting I'm going to use Davy's gray. The second color is Perylene green. Perylene green is a lovely rich, dark green that I often use. I'm moving down to this big leaf at the bottom of the painting. I'm going to wash it in Davy's gray. I'm using my mop brush to paint some water on because this is a big leaf and there's a lot of area to cover, and mop brush holds a lot of water. I'll take the water all the way to the edge of the board. I want the light gray unwashed underneath so that I can leave it showing where the vein is. I also want an unwashed because I'll leave it showing in places. I'm not going to completely cover the leaf with the dark green. I'll mix some water with the Davy's gray and I just wash over the whole leaf with that, taking it right to the edge of the board. Now I'm going to watch in this leaf here, in this one up here. All goes to Davy's gray, and there's a leaf down here as well. Now I haven't put any paint on the turn back part of the leaf here. I've washed in this big one here, this little one here, and this one in here, and the one at the front. But I've left the turned back part, and I haven't done this area in here. When I was drawing this petal here, some of the wet paint shot across the paper and left a small mark on the paper. I hadn't decided whether I was going to paint the background in this stage. I've drawn in another leaf to try and hide the mark. You can see the mark here, just a little purple line. I've washed a leaf in with Davy's gray as well. 37. Adding Green to the Leaves: We're ready to get some green paint onto those leaves. The main thing to remember in this video is that you don't completely cover the gray under wash with green. Let the gray show through in some places. The gray also forms the center vein on those bigger leaves. I'm going to spend most of my time working on this big leaf at the front in this video, and I drop in some water to create some blooms. I'm going to start with this leaf up here. Now I've dried it off with a hairdryer and what I want to do is wet the leaf again with some water. The whole leaf is now wet with water. I dabbed the excess moisture out of my brush and I pick up some of the watery Peralin green paint. Then I painted onto the wet life. I don't want to completely cover the leaf with green, I want some of the gray to show through. My paper is damp and I paint the green on the edges of the leaf so that I get a nice clean edge. Then as I move into the leaf, I'm just dabbing my brush just so that I can make sure that some of that gray paint still shows through. I just drop it in and then I just tap it. You can see that I've left some of the gray under wash showing there. Now I want to pick up some of the green from the top of the palate. This is where there is more pigment. Then I can use that rich dark pigment just to deepen the leaf in places. Now, I won't put these paint everywhere, I'm just going to be selective as to where I put it. I'm just doing the same thing, I'm just dabbing it in and then just patting with my brush. Not only do I want the gray to still show through, but I also want that lighter green layer to show through as well, I don't want to completely cover one color with another. You can see that I've still got the under gray wash showing and also the lighter green wash showing. Now some of the watery paint at the tip of the leaf. I've just done the same thing here with this little leaf. Now moving onto this big leaf down the bottom, I'm not going to try and do these whole leaf all at once. I'm just going to wet section by section. If I wet the whole leaf once, the water will dry too quickly before I get a chance to paint on it, so I've wet up to this area here on the leaf, and now I'm just dropping in the watery Peralin green. I'll make sure I keep the paint away from the edge of that water line so that I don't get any hard edges forming. You can see I've left some of the gray wall showing underneath the green paint. Notice that I've kept the paint away from the edge of the water line. Now I can just add some more water to this side of the leaf. Then I just continue on with the watery Peralin green, and this is how it ends up looking. Now, you can see that this front area's drawing the shin has gone off the surface of the paper an the back area here is still quite wet. What I want to do is drop a few water droplets in to this dry area to see if I can create a few watercolor blooms, just add interest to the leaf. What is a watercolor bloom? If you've done some of my other classes, you'll know that I love my watercolor blooms. I think they add a lot of interest to your painting. Sometimes people call them backruns or cauliflowers. Occasionally, you might create one without meaning to, but I like to create them deliberately to exploit the beautiful qualities of watercolor paint. I'll just show you a few examples of some of the paintings where I've used watercolor blooms. On this rooster here I used some watercolor blooms down on his breast area just to make that soft washy area down there. I have also used some blooms upon his wattle up here, and also on his comb and that helped to create the texture up there. If you've taken my fox class, you'll know that I used watercolor blooms to create some texture on the fur of the fox. There's a lovely bloom here on his leg and there's another one up here on his head. I've also created a few watercolor blooms on this corn cob here. So let me show you how to paint a bloom. Blooms occur when a wash is starting to dry and then you drop in some extra water and it dislodges the drawing pigment creating interesting shapes. So this is Windsor violet that I'm just washing onto the paper. I'll make it fairly dark so that you can see the bloom quite well. Now it's just a waiting game while I wait for the paint to absorb into the paper a little bit more. Sometimes I'm a bit impatient and I do them too quickly and it doesn't work out quite as well as I'd hoped. I'm still waiting, it's just still too wet at the moment. You can see it's got quite a glossy shine on it and the plaint's actually still moving around a little bit in that puddle. I'll wait for a little bit longer, I've waited another minute or two and you can see that the shin isn't quite as shiny as it was, so I think I'm good to go. I just take a clean brush and drop in some water and then you can see that the pigments dispersing there. Straightaway a bloom starts to form. That's just one of the ways that I create a watercolor bloom. Let's get back to the painting. Here I am back on the leaf and this area at the front is a bit drier as I showed you before. I'm just dropping in some clean water and hopefully I'll get some blooms to form. This is how the leaf has dried with the watercolor blooms, adds a bit of a texture to the front of the painting. What I want to do now is wet this area, but I want to leave that little vein dry because I want to try and bring that into the painting. Just carefully paint around it with the water and I'm wetting the whole area with water here on this other side of the leaf. Because I'm thinking then I'll be able to tackle it in one hit, so watery Peralin green again, just dab your brush on a towel if it's too wet. I carefully paint around that little aside vein there, and I take the paint right to the edge of the painting. I've dried the leaf off with the hairdryer now and what I want to do is deepen the color just section by section over the leaf. I'm just going to wet down to that little side vein here with water and then I pick up some of the Peralin green, but this time from the top of the pallet so I've got lots of pigment on my brush. Then I just carefully place it right next to the petals. I'm very careful up here that I don't get the paint onto the petal. You can see I'm taking my time, just painting it carefully around the edges. Then I can relax a bit as I move away from the petal. Just reloading my brush again now, take it carefully along that side vein, you can see that there's lots of pigment there. My paper is just starting to dry and I so I'm just adding some more water now, taking it down a bit further. In fact, I'll think I'll take it all the way down now. This is the Peralin green from the top of the pallet again now. As I move down the paint's a little bit more watery, doesn't need to be quite as dark down the bottom. Now in deepening the color on the other side of the leaf, I've wet this area under where I'm painting now. I'm just adding some more pigment, just to deepen the color using that rich pigment from the top of the pallet again here. Just using my brush to wet the leaf again with some water, a little bit more pigment there and now I'm just wetting this area again with water. I just want to keep this area bit lighter at the bottom. I don't want to lose those lovely blooms if I can help it. I'll see if I can get another bloom happening in the corner here. I've dried it off with my hairdryer, and what I want to do now is deepen the area up at the top of the leaf. I've wet that area at the top with water and I'm now just dropping in some more of the pigment from the top of the pallet. Now I've got some Windsor violet on my brush. This is water repaint, but I've mixed a lot of pigment into it to make it fairly dark. It just adds a bit of interest at the top of the leaf, here in the dark area. Now I've just run some dark paint down the left side of the vein, just to deepen the color down there. Now I'm just repeating the process on the other side of the leaf up the top here. Some more of the Windsor violet again here. I've also just coming under that little side vein, just with some more of the dark pigment. I've dried it off again with the hairdryer, and now I just want to turn down this vein down the center of the leaf where it gets a bit bright. I'm going to use my Da Vinci Casaneo over pointed wash brush to do this. I've just got some clean water on my brush and I'm just gently painting over the leaf. This just leave some of the pigment and moves it around on the leaf. I'm just doing it very gently so that I don't disturb those under washes too much. Doing these deposits a little bit of paint over that vein for me so that at times the color down, it's not quite as bright. I've dried it off with the hair dryer, but I think I need to deepen the purple up at the top there. I'm just re-wetting that area with some water and now I'm dropping in some more of the Windsor violet. Just think it needed a bit more color there. There it is, in the next video, I'll start working on this leaf here. 38. Adding Green to the Leaves - Part 2: I'm going to finish off the leaves down. We're so close to finishing, I can smell it. In this video, I'm painting some more leaves with sand grain and I finish off some details on the other leaves. Just like the large leaf in the last video, we are just painting some water onto the leaf. Not going to do the whole leaf all at once. This is the paralleling green again, now this is watery paralleling green. I'll leave a little bit of the gray showing. You can see how I've left the gray under wash showing there, just as I did in the other video. So careful along the edges and then I just paint the pipe. Get a straight line along the vein. I'll try too anyway. Now,, I'm just dropping in some of the watery winds of violet. This just adds interest to the leaf and makes the color a little bit more interesting. To bring some more winds of violet over here as well, then I do the same thing on the other side of the leaf, leaving the vine showing down the center, and then I can just drop some water back in just to create some blooms again. Now, I've painted the leaf that's at the bottom of the painting the same way. Just with the watery paralleling green, little bit more green now. Another color for the pallet, this is permanent sap green. Then I use that watery sap grain just to paint the tone back part of the leaf there, and this area over here. I am painting on dry paper here, just with the watery paint. Then I can come back in with a little bit more pigment just to deepen the color. So the under-wash is still wet. I've just picked up this pigment from the top of the pallet. I'm doing the same thing back over here. So the paper is still damp from when I first put that wash on it. It's just slightly damp. Now,, I've picked up some paralleling green this time. I'm just working on the wet paint, steepening the color in places. Now, I'm going to use the flat wash brush just to wash over the leaf, just like I did that other large leaf in the previous video, I just want to push that vine back a bit. Just make sure that your papers really dry if you do this, just use the hair dryer on it just to heat set it before you do it, because you don't want to disturb the paint too much. Now, I'm painting some watery sap green onto this part of the leaf. I've got a little problem down here again with the paint has played off onto the background, so I'm just disguising it with some permanent sap green and I'll just make it look like it's part of the leaf. Now, I've got some paralleling green on my brush from the top of the pallet and I'm just painting it onto the damp paint. Just softly blending with that under wash. I think I'll put a little bit more sap green in the middle here, just to deepen the color. Now, just put a little bit of water on this area here we're on painting. Now, I'm painting some watery paralleling green. I just want to deepen the color here. Now, I've got some from the top of the pallet. You can see that it's darker. I'm just painting over the top of the sap green. Now, I have just wet this other side, but I've left a little gap of dry paper down the center there. I'm just going to leave a little gap of dry paper there and the sap green will show through. So this is watery paralleling green that am painting on the onto the damp paper. Now, I've got some paralleling green from the top of the pallet and I'm just deepening the color. It's just water on my brush now and I'm just blending with the green paint. It's a little bit more of the sap green now. Just deepening the color. Now, I've got some watery sap green here that I've painted I bet, this is larger in color, so I've added more water to the mix. Now, I've got some watery paralleling green. Just re-wetting the edge of this one with some water. This is the paralleling green again from the top of the pallet. I just want to deepen the color along the edge and here as well. You can see it bleeding into the leaf, because of the water. A little bit of the parallel green down the bottom just to deepen the color. Now, some of the winds of violet, I am just dropping in, just increasing the color. I'm just dubbing it here in there. I've just moved back to this big leaf and I've re-wet this area with water, and now I'm dubbing in some of the winds of violet just to deepen the color here in it. I just felt that it wasn't quite dark enough. I'm just going to take my flat wash brush and I'm just going to soften just any edges that might need softening to suit the damp brush. I think that should do this leaf now. Just going to turn my board and just go back to this leaf here. I'm just not happy with the vine, I think it's just a little bit too thick up here, so I'm just closing the gap with some paralleling green. I'm painting on damp paper with the paint from the top of the pallet and a little bit more down here as well, just on the damp paper. I'll turn the painting back round the other way now, and I'm just deepening this little section here with some more of the paralleling green. 39. Last Minute Details on the Petals (Progress Photo 7): There's a couple of petals that needed tiny little bit more tweaking and then we can get on with the background. Just coming back to a few of these petals that are not happy with, I'm just not happy with the expensive pink that I see inside. I've just put some water on these and I'm now painting some watery manganese filet just inside on top of the pink. Same on this one, just too much plain pink in there. This is the watery manganese filet. Same thing in here, just breaking up the pink. On this little one out here, again, just a watery manganese filet. That should do it. Wow, that was a lot of work. That took me about a week to paint this. Now you've got to decide whether or not you want to leave the background white or whether you want to paint the background dim. I was originally going to leave mine white, but a few months after I painted it, I decided that I was going to actually paint the background. In the next video, I'll show you how I did it. This is a scan that I took of my painting. I've included it for you to download. It's called chrysanthemum completed with leaves. 40. Painting the Background: It's time to paint the dreaded background. Let me just say that you don't have to paint the background if you don't want to. I've left my background fairly light with just one layer of paint. You can do yours a lot darker if you want and you can try different colors. Although I tried to stick with the colors that you've used in the painting though. I used two colors, but you can use one if you prefer. If you haven't painted in background before, it's not a bad idea to practice on a piece of paper before you paint yours. I use windsor blue and windsor violet to paint the background. Now we've already used windsor violet, so that should be on your palate but you just need some windsor blue. It's time to paint the background. Now I'm going to paint the background in sections, like I did that really large leaf at the front. I'm just going to turn my board and I'll start up in this left corner of the painting. I've got my mult brush, it's loaded with clean water, and I just carefully run it up against the edge of one of the petals. Just like the large leaf, I have to paint the background in sections. I wet a small area, and I just work in that area where I have wet. I'm using a fair amount of water. To get water on your petal, Just take it off with a tissue. Just run it very carefully up against the edges of the petals. You don't want to get any water on the petals because then the paint will go up onto the petals. I've wet this section here with water. You can see the water on the paper there, it's quite damp. Now I've gone ahead and I've painted this section. Stupidly, I thought I was filming this section, but I neglected to turn the camera on. It doesn't matter though, because the rest of the background I managed to film and I'm going to take you step-by-step through it. Before we move on, I just wanted to show you the amount of water on the paper. This is the area that I neglected to film, and you can see that there's quite a lot of water on the paper. It's quite shiny, but there's not huge puddles everywhere. You want it to be evenly wet without great puddles of water. Now I can show you what I did, so I'm just wetting the neck section with water being careful around the petals and that area that I've just painted in the corner is still wet, it hasn't dried yet. I painted my background while it was wet. I did the top section and then I moved straight on to the next section, and then the next section and the whole time the washers was still drying, I didn't wait until that first section had dried until I started the next section. In other words, I'm working fairly fast as I'm painting. I've wet down to about here, now when I put the paint on, I want to make sure that I don't go near the edge of the water. The water line finishes here, but I don't want to put my paint any further than around here. Otherwise, I'll end up with a hard edge where the water line finishes. Now I've got some watery windsor violet here and I just damp it on to the wet surface and I am very careful around the edge of the petals. Just going to turn my board because it's easier. Now where the two washes meet one another just here, I'm just going to use a clean brush just to blend the paint into the other wash. Now that other wash is still damp, it hasn't dried yet. I turned my board again and I've switched again to my monster brush. I'm putting some windsor blue on, but I don't think the monster brush is big enough, so I'm going back to my mult brush. I've got some more violet now petting it onto the wet surface. Now I've got my liner brush here and I just want to take it right up, higher against the edge of the petal. Whenever I see that the white paper is still showing I can use my liner brush just to push the paint closer to the petal. I'm using a Da Vinci Cosmotop spin brush for this work, but you don't have to swap liner brushes, you can keep using the same one that you've been using for the rest of the painting. I filmed the background a few months after I'd finished the flower and I just had the Cosmotop spin liner brush out on my painting table. Don't worry that the brush that I'm using is different to the one that I started with. Back to the mult brush now and I'm just painting on some more water. As I get closer in between the petals here, I need my smaller brush just to get in so that I don't get water on the petals. I'm using some watery windsor violet now and you can just alternate between the two colors. You don't have to do it exactly like I'm doing it. Just try to be creative and do your own thing with the background. Now I've got some more pigment on my brush I'm drawing a bit darker here. I've picked up the paint from the top of the palate. Just be careful if you do this yourself because you want to be able to paint fairly quickly. Now I've switched back to the liner brush, and I can push that painting between those two petals. Now I just want to push some of that pigment out just to soften it slightly and just keep an eye on your waterline. My waterline is here and I'm just making sure that my paint doesn't get too close to it. I've went down a little bit further now. Now, I've got some watery winds of blue here. Switching brushes again, I'm back to my mop brush and I can push that paint out and then pick up some more water if I need it. Painting the background is like having a baby in the bath to me, you don't want to get distracted while you're doing it. I'm just dabbing having the paint and making sure everything is staying nice and wet. Back to the liner brush now and I'm using it to getting hard against the edges of the petal and the leaf. This just gets rid of any whitepaper that might still be showing. Now, the background up here is still damp from when I first painted it. It's a perfect time for me to drop some clean water in and try and create some watercolor blooms up here. You can't do them too early, otherwise nothing will really happen. I'll pop one in there as well. I'm just turning my board again and I need some more water. So just waiting in the next section and I just make sure I'm very careful up against the edge of the petals. Here I can see the amount of water that I have on my paper. I'm always aware of where the edge of the water is, and I make sure I don't take my pen right up to that edge. A little bit of the watery violet. Just dabbing it wherever I like. Now I've gone into the blue. You can see that waterline there, I make sure that my pain doesn't go any closer than that to the edge of the water line. Now, I can come in with the liner brush and just take it right up hard against the petal there. You can leave little sections of whitepaper showing, you don't have to completely cover the white paper. But I do want to ride up hard against the edges of the petals and the leaves. You can see a nice bloom happening at the top there. I'll just put a few more in, just dropping in the freshwater. Now, I'm re-wetting this section down here. Watery winds are violet. Some more water now, I'm using my small brush to paint the water because it's getting a bit tight for the big brush. Some more violet. Then I can use my liner brush to tidy up the edges again. I have to do this before the paint dries. It's usually just enough paint on the paper, you don't really need to pick anymore paint up to do this. I've wet this area and I'm putting some more violet on. I'm wetting here, some more watery violet again. Switch to my liner brush so I can get the edges. You can leave little bit of whitepaper showing, when it a little bit darker in here so I've picked up paint from the top of the palate this time. This is the winds of violet. Background still wet. Just pushing it down a bit with the other brush. Wetting into this little area here, some winds of violet in there as well. Same thing over here. Now, I'm just going to put a few more blooms in while it's still damp because you know I love my blooms. So just dropping the watering. Now, I just have to baby sit it as it dries just to make sure that no hard edges are forming in the wash. I've got a bit of purple paint on this leaf here. What I'm going to do is just disguise it with some green paint. I'll just put some water along the edge and the background is dry now, so there's no risk of me disturbing the background. Is a little bit of water on that leaf, and then I'm going to pick up some parallel green from the top of the pellet. I'll just run it along that edge of the leaf just to disguise where the purple paint went on it. There's my finished painting. Now, what I have to do is sign it and vanish it. Now I'm not going to do another layer on the background, I'm just going to leave it as it is. If I wanted the background to be darker, I just have to wait until it was dry and then I'll just have to do all of that again a second time just to deepen all the colors. But I'm happy with it the way it is and I'm just going to leave it like that. I took this photo of my final painting and I've included it for you to download. It's called Final Chrysanthemum Painting. 41. Varnishing & Thank you: All that's left for me to do now, is to sign my name and vanish the painting. I'm just going to use this book to rest my hand on. I'm just going to use my mechanical pencil to sign my name. I find the pencil is best because it's very discreet and if I make a mistake, I can always rub it out and do it again. I'm almost ready to vanish now. I have to vanish it to protect it because be going behind glass. I'm going to use Krylon UV Archival Varnish. Now, I'm no expert on vanishing, but I have used this a few times now, and so far it's worked well for me. This is 1376 Semi-Gloss varnish. It says it's non-yellowing. It gives protection against fading, dirt, moisture, and discoloration. It protects acrylic, watercolor, oil, pastel, colored pencil, and more. I've got my personal protective equipment ready, I've got some gloves, and I've got a mask, because it says on the back that the vapor is harmful. I'm going to and spray my painting outside. It's a beautiful and sunny clear day and it's just perfect for varnishing. I'm outside on the deck here, and I'm just going to throw a couple of old towels down just to protect the deck from the varnish over spray. I use these two tissue boxes to lift the board off the towel. I'm just going to place the board on top of the tissue boxes. Then that just gives me a little bit of clearance underneath. It just lifts the board off the towels. I'm just using my hake brush just to rub off any dust or hair that might be on the surface. Got my rubber gloves on and I've got my mask. Now, I have to shake this for two minutes, it says on the back of the can. I got a ruler here, it says on the back of the cane that I've got to hold my hand 10-12 inches away from the surface that I'm spraying. I make sure I start off the board. When I start to spray, I'm not actually spraying on the board on spring just beside it. Then I do left to right across the surface and beyond the edge, and I overlap each stroke as I go. Just a continual spray 10-12 inches from the surface. It says 10-15 minutes drying time. I'm going to let that dry before I give it a second coat. The 10-15 minutes has gone past, and I'm giving it a second coat now. Start off the surface, and then the sweeping strokes, left to right, overlapping, 10-12 inches from the board. I'll give it three coats of varnish, just letting it dry in between each coat. It's a three coats of varnish in its well-protected now. Now that my painting's protected with varnish, I can hang it on the wall. Thank you so much for staying the journey with me. This was a long painting, I know, and you needed a lot of patients to get it finished, but it's worth it in the end. I'm looking forward to seeing your finished paintings. I'll be publishing a new class for you, not as long as this one, very soon. Thanks guys.