Mantaflow Fluid Simulation Guide in Blender | Stephen Pearson | Skillshare

Mantaflow Fluid Simulation Guide in Blender

Stephen Pearson

Mantaflow Fluid Simulation Guide in Blender

Stephen Pearson

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49 Lessons (3h 47m)
    • 1. Introduction

      1:43
    • 2. Downloading Blender

      0:41
    • 3. Blender Basics Overview

      16:21
    • 4. Saving Your Blender File

      1:24
    • 5. Mantaflow Simulation Basics

      4:48
    • 6. Quick Liquid Effect

      1:30
    • 7. Domain Fluid Settings

      3:47
    • 8. Liquid Particles

      2:58
    • 9. New Viscocity Slider 2

      5:37
    • 10. Domain Mesh

      6:21
    • 11. Spray, Foam & Bubble Particles

      6:12
    • 12. Diffusion & Viscosity

      4:27
    • 13. Guiding Domains

      5:59
    • 14. Guiding Effectors

      3:42
    • 15. Collections

      1:40
    • 16. Baking Cache

      5:31
    • 17. Field Weights

      4:01
    • 18. Flow Objects Geometry

      4:28
    • 19. Inflows & Outflows

      2:30
    • 20. Collision Objects

      2:56
    • 21. Adding Physics to Multiple Objects

      1:38
    • 22. Realistic Fluid Material in Cycles

      5:46
    • 23. The Ocean Modifier

      8:45
    • 24. The Ocean Material

      8:28
    • 25. Obstacle Course P1 Modeling

      4:59
    • 26. Obstacle Course P2 Simulating

      2:54
    • 27. Obstacle Course P3 Everything Else

      5:40
    • 28. Rigid Body Cube Fluid P1 Active Objects

      4:05
    • 29. Rigid Body Cube Fluid P2 Fluid

      5:03
    • 30. Rigid Body Cube Fluid P3 Particles

      2:58
    • 31. Rigid Body Cube Fluid P4 Animation

      4:39
    • 32. Rigid Body Cube Fluid P5 Rendering

      3:34
    • 33. Crashing Collisions P1 Animating

      4:50
    • 34. Crashing Collisions P2 Particles

      4:25
    • 35. Crashing Collisions P3 Materials, Lighting, Eevee

      6:27
    • 36. (2.80) Fluid Simulation Basics

      4:26
    • 37. (2.80) Domain Fluid Settings

      7:05
    • 38. (2.80) Boundary Settings

      3:51
    • 39. (2.80) Creating Particles

      9:00
    • 40. (2.80) World & Viscosity

      6:26
    • 41. (2.80) Fluid Type

      3:25
    • 42. (2.80) Obstacles

      2:35
    • 43. (2.80) Inflow

      4:33
    • 44. (2.80) Outflow

      2:18
    • 45. (2.80) Super Cool Control Type

      7:28
    • 46. (2.80) Crashing Through P1 Adding the Objects

      2:51
    • 47. (2.80) Crashing Through P2 Simulating

      2:12
    • 48. (2.80) Crashing Through P3 Materials and Lighting

      4:25
    • 49. (2.80) Crashing Through P4 Rendering and Compositing

      5:31
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About This Class

Hello everyone and welcome to the Mantaflow Fluid Simulation Guide in Blender. In this course you will learn everything there is to know about the fluid simulation.   In first section I will be showing you the very basics of the fluid simulation and how it works. After that we will be going through the domain and how every single setting and value effects the simulation.  With the introduction of Mantaflow it completely changed how the fluid simulation operates.

That is why  In first section I will be showing you the basics and how it works.  After that we will be going through the domain and learning how every single setting and value effects the simulation.

Section 3 will be about all the different types of objects that can add to your simulation. Such as flow objects obstacles  guides and much more. We will also be covering realistic water material and how to create that in Blender.  The ocean modifier is also something that we will be taking a look at.

One of the best ways to learn something is to follow along and create something yourself. That is why there are 3 full tutorials in this course. The first one is an obstacle course for fluid particles to go through.  In this section we will learn about basic modeling, simulating particles with Mantaflow and rendering using real time render engine Eevee.

The 2nd tutorial we will learn about the rigid body simulation and how you can use it to interact with the fluid simulation.  The end result will be a cube falling with fluid inside it. 

And finally the last tutorial we will learn about animating collision objects crashing through fluid.

If you are wanting to learn step by step on how the Mantaflow fluid simulation works and how to create realistic fluid this course is for you! 

So hit that enroll button and lets get started!

I look forward to seeing what you create!

Thanks

Stephen

Meet Your Teacher

Hello! My name is Stephen!  Thank you for stopping by and reviewing my Blender course.   My goal is to help you become the 3D artist you've always dreamed of becoming AND -  have a blast doing it.   Working with Blender and creating amazing 3D graphics is amazing and anyone can learn it.  

I really enjoy teaching others what I know.  I appreciate each and every one of my students.  Please let me know if I can help you perfect your Blender graphics!   

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Transcripts

1. Introduction: Hello, everybody, and welcome to the Mansa PLO fluid simulation guide in Blunder 2.8. In this course, you will learn everything there is to know about the fluid simulation with the introduction of Man's of low, it completely changed how the fluid simulation operates. That is why, in the first couple section of this course you will learn the very basics of how it works. After that, we will go into the domain and learn how every single setting and value changes. The simulation Section three is all about the different types of objects that you can add to your simulation, such as flow objects, obstacles, guides and much more. We'll be covering realistic water material and how to create that in blender. The ocean modifier is also something that we take a look at, and you will learn how to create an animation using it. One of the best ways to learn something is to follow along and create something yourself. That is why there are three full tutorials in this course. The 1st 1 is an obstacle course for the fluid particles to go through. In this section, we will learn the very basics of modeling simulating particles with Manson flow and rendering out using the real time render engine TV the second tutorial. We will learn about the rigid body simulation, and how do you can use that to interact with the fluid? The end result will look something like this. And finally, the last tutorial. We will learn about animating collision objects and creating this animation. If you are wanting to learn step by step on how the mantle of fluid simulation works and how to create realistic fluid, this course is for you. So hit that enroll button and let's get started. 2. Downloading Blender: in this video, I'll be showing you how to download Blender 2.8. Now what you need to do is go over to blender dot org's and you should see a big down the button right in the middle of your page. Go ahead and click on that button, and it will take you to a download page. You can come over here and change which version that you need. If you need a Lennix Mac windows, all the different versions go ahead and do that. You can also link your steam account if you want it to go to your steam. Once you figure that out, go ahead and click. Download a blender 2.8 and then we'll take you to this page and there should be a download that happens right here, and we can see it download. Once that is done, just go ahead and install it and you'll be ready to go 3. Blender Basics Overview: Hello everyone. In this video we're gonna go over the basics of Blender. And so if you are completely new, this is the video for you. I'll be going through step-by-step on the different render engines, the shortcuts that we're going to be using, all of that in this video, right? When you open up Blender, this is the default scene. You have a camera, you have a cube in the middle, and then you have a lamp on the right side. If you ever get stuck on what button I press throughout this course, just look on the bottom right corner and you will see what I press. For example, if I left-click, you can see here it says left mouse and it will also highlight the mouse button on this sign right here. Same for the right-click, same for the middle mouse button. All of that will be displayed at this point. So if you ever get stuck, just look down on the bottom right. Let's first talk about the render engines that Blender has to offer. Over on the right side, there is a lot of different panels. And if we select this one right here, this is called the scene panel. We'll see that our render engine is currently on EV. There are three different render engines that we can pick in Blender, EV, workbench, and cycles. Ev is a real time render engine, and this allows you to actually view a scene in real time. It will calculate the lighting, almost instantly. Display it for you in your rendered view. Workbench, on the other hand, is basically just for modelling and sculpting your object. You don't really use this render engine for rendering because it doesn't really display materials that well. And the last one is Cycles. Cycles is blenders, a physically-based rendering engine. And this will provide very realistic results. It will calculate the lighting all that pretty accurately before we get into anything else in Blender. And let's go up to our user preferences and change a couple of settings there. To do this, we can go over to the Edit menu. Down at the bottom, we can go into our preferences. Underneath the key map tab right here. Here is a couple of things that we're going to want to check. First off, we have the selective mouse button right here. You can either select with your left-click or your right-click. In Blender version 2.79 and below, the default was set to right-click. Now with 2.8 and above, it is set to left-click as the default. I recommend staying with left-click because that will help you with a lot of other applications outside of Blender. The Spacebar button down here allows you to pick what the spacebar will do. Currently it is on play and that is what I'm going to leave it on. So what happens is if I hit the space bar over here, it's going to play the timeline down at the bottom. Underneath that we have a couple of view options which I'm just going to leave at the defaults. The other thing that we're going to want to change is extra shading pine many items, make sure that is enabled. This will allow you to actually see the different views. So if I exit out of this window and press Z, we can see here we have a couple of different views. Material view is one of the ones that's added when you select the extra shading pie menu items. This will allow you to see what the material looks like without having to render it. We'll go over that in just a little bit. Next up on our list is selecting objects. To select an object that you can left-click on the object that you want to select. In this case, I selected the camera and you can see it's highlighted in that yellow outline. If I select the cube, It's the same thing. And then the lamp up top, it also highlights it. You can select multiple objects by holding the Shift key on your keyboard and selecting it. You'll notice that once we do this, the other selections have an orange outline and not a yellow one. This means that it's not the active object. The active object will be highlighted in the yellow outline, as you can see here with the camera. And if you want to deselect everything, you can hold Alt and then press a to deselect everything. You can also select everything back by hitting a and double tapping a will do the exact same thing. So a to select Alt, a to deselect, or you can press a and then double-tap a2, de-select. Now let's learn about moving around the 3D view. If I hit the middle mouse button on my mouse, I can move around and rotate the view around the object that I have selected. As you can see here, our view is orientated around this cube. Let's say for example, I wanted to orientate my view to the camera. I can select it and hit the period key on my numpad, not the period key on the keyboard, the period key on the numpad. And it will zoom in on the object that we have selected. And now we are rotating our view around the camera instead of the cube. If we select the cube, hit the period key on my number pan, I can zoom in on the cube, and now our view is back to the original. You can also zoom in by using the scroll wheel. Zoom in and zoom out with the scroll wheel. You can also do like a pan or zoom. So if you hold Control middle mouse button to pen backwards, as you can see here, holding the Shift key and middle mouse button will pan the view to the side. If you don't have a middle mouse button, what you can do is go over to the preferences and emulate it by going over to the preferences. Underneath the input tab, you can turn on emulate three button mouse. What this will allow you to do is hold the Alt key and then left-click to Panda view. You can see here it's displaying I'm using my middle mouse, but I'm not. I'm using the Alt key and the left mouse button to actually rotate the view around. So just in case you don't have a middle mouse button, you can turn that on. Since I do have one though, I'm going to leave that off because I find it's much easier with the middle mouse button. Now let's learn about scaling, rotating and moving objects around. To scale an object up, you can press the Esc key on your keyboard to scale it up. As you can see here, it's scaling up my cube. And if you want to see how much you've scaled it up, look on the top left over here on the top-left corner, you can see I've scaled it up five times. You can also set a manual number n. So let's say I wanted to scale the cube up three times. I can hit three on my keyboard, and that will scale it up by three times. And now I can't scale it up anymore even though I'm moving my mouse because we set in a manual number, it's locked to that scale. I can hit the Backspace twice and that will get rid of that selection. And now I can scale it up or down, as you can see here, to rotate an object, you can hit the R key on your keyboard and that will rotate it around as you can see here. And it's going to rotate it depending on the view that you are looking at it. So let's say I move my view over to this angle and I hit R to rotate. You can see it's rotating at that angle. If we go into the front view by pressing one on my number pad, it will put us into this view. And now if we rotate, It's going to be rotating it along this view. So if we rotate it like this, I can go look at the side. You can see it's perfectly rotated along the y-axis. I'm going to press Control Z to undo that. And now let's learn about moving an object. If I press it G, you can move your object around and you can place it anywhere that you want. You can also lock the movement to a certain axis. So let's say I hit G and then y. And you can see here it's locked to the y-axis and I can't move it outside of that if I wanted to move it up and down along the x, which is the red line. I can't do that because it's a locked to the y-axis. I can also backspace that and then hit the X key and you can see it's going to move it along the x now instead of the y. Just like that. And I can also right-click to cancel the movement. What I just did there is I cancel the movement. So if I press R to rotate, I can right-click to cancel that action and it will snap back to its original position. This works with everything. So if I press S to scale, I can right-click and it will snap it back to that original position. This is very useful in case you want to look at a certain part of your scene. I can just move my object out of the way, view what I want to see, and then right-click and it will snap it back to its original position. Now let's learn about the different views we already discussed front view by pressing one on the number pad, it will bring us into the front view. And if we wanted to view the R object on the right side, which is this side over here, I can press a three on my number pad in. It will move me into the side view. Now we're looking at our cube from the side. Let's say I wanted to look at the top view. I can press seven on my number pad and it will view from the top. And we can see our camera is right there. And now we're looking at our object from the top of it. Control 1 on the number pad will bring us to the back view. Now we're looking at the back. Control three will look on the left side. So you can see here, this is the right side. Now this is the left side and we were looking at it from this angle. If you don't have a number pad, what you can do is also emulated by going over to your user preferences. Underneath the input tab, you can enable emulate a numpad. And this will allow you to use the top row of numbers on your keyboard. So let's say I press 1 on the top of my keyboard. I'm now looking in the front view. Same thing for the side view, the top view and all of that. Since I have a number pad though, I'm going to disable this just like that and then exit out to save it. Now let's talk about edit mode. Edit mode is the mode that you're going to be using to model anything in blunder. To access edit mode. You can press Tab on your keyboard, or you can come up to this menu and select Edit Mode. Once we do this, you can see our object has turned into a orange color, and now we can select the different points on our cube. This point that I have selected right here is called a vertex. Every single mesh is consisted of many vertices. As you can see here, with our cube, we have eight different points, four on top and four on the bottom. You can select multiple vertices by holding the Shift key and then selecting them as you can see here. Once I've selected four of them, you can see the inside of that has turned into an orange color. And this means we have a face, select it. Let's talk about the different selection types. Over in the top left corner you can see we are on vertex select mode, which means that I can select the different points. If I switch it over to the edge select mode, I can select the edges instead of the vertices. And then finally, the face select mode will allow you to select an entire phase, as you can see here. You can also extrude faces outward. If I select this top face and press E to extrude, I can extrude it upwards. Now we have basically two cubes on top of each other. Down on the bottom, you will see all of your scene details. And if you don't see this, you can right-click and then enable the scene that statistics right there. We can see here we have four vertices out of 12 selected. And then if I press a to select everything, we can see here we had 12 out of 12 selected. You can also see the edges, the faces, and the objects in your scene. This is a pretty useful setting in case you want to check how many objects that you have in your seat. There are many different ways to add objects or delete objects in Blender. To add an object, you can press the shortcut Shift and a, and you can add an a mesh and you can see all of the default meshes right here. Or you can come over to the Edit menu, then click on Mesh, and then add in and mesh over here. So let's say I press Shift a and I add in an icon sphere. From here I can move it over to the left side by pressing G and X and dragging it over. If I want to delete this object, I can press the X key and select Delete. Or you can hit the Delete key on your keyboard or go up to object and then down to delete right here. If I want to undo that and bring that object back, I can press Control Z to bring it back. And this will undo the last action. If I want to redo the action, I can press Control Shift and z and that will redo the action. You can also do this by coming over to the Edit menu and selecting undo or redo right here. So once again it to add an object, you can press Shift a and to delete an object, make sure you have it selected the X key or the delete key or any of the other ways to delete objects. And then you can select it and there it's gone. Now let's talk about the different views. If we come up to the top right, you will see there is four different views, solid view, and that's the one that we have selected wireframe. And this will allow you to see inside of your mesh, as you can see here, it's a now a wireframe. Next to that we have in the material view. So let's say we've added in a new material, it will display exactly what it looks like. And then we also have a rendered view. This will be what it looks like in the final render. When we render out an animation or an image, it calculates the lighting and does everything else. As you can see. You can also press the Z key on your keyboard and switch to the different views. Most of the time, this is how I use it because it's very fast. I can just press Z, go into wire-frame, z go into rendered view, and then material view like that. There's also toggle overlays and toggle x-ray. Toggle overlays two, get rid of the grid and the outline around the object. So if I select Toggle overlays, it will just display what the model looks like without any of the extra details. If we go back into solid view, we can press Z and then toggle x-ray. And this will allow us to see inside of our mesh. You can see by looking at this view, we can see the ear right there. And then on the other side we can see the eyes. And you can also select the vertices on the opposite side. If, if toggle or relays is turned off, we can't do that. We can only select the faces that are visible. Finally, let's press the Enter key on our keyboard and look at the properties. Here we can see a couple other details, the location of our object. And you can also change this and you will move the object as you can see, the rotation value, the scale value, and the dimensions. The dimensions currently say two by two by two. And we can change it depending on what we type here. We can make a completely flat, stretch it out a little bit, and you can do all of that. Finally, the last thing that we will talk about in this video is the timeline. Down here we have a timeline and this is the amount of frames in our animation. Currently we have 250 frames. Now the default frame rate in Blender is 24. So that means if we play our animation, it's going to travel 24 frames every single seconds. On the bottom right here we have a skip, a forward, and a play option. If we click this button to play it, you can see our timeline is now moving. So if we had any animation data, it would play once we play the timeline. You can also press the spacebar to play it automatically as you can see there. And that is very useful. You can also press Shift and then left arrow or right arrow to skip to the end or the beginning of the timeline, as you can see on the bottom. And then the spacebar to play it once again. You can also add an keyframes. So let's say I added in a keyframe by hitting the I key on my keyboard. And we can add in a keyframe to any of these different properties. Let's say I added it to the location value. What we can do then is drag this upwards and then skip to a different part of the animation and move the queue. If I skip to frame 80, and then I can press G and then x2 move it along. I can move it to this location. Then I can hit the I key one more time and add an another location keyframe. So over 80 frames, it's going to travel from this position to this position that we just added. So what we have to do now is hold Shift Left Arrow to skip to the beginning. Or you can click the backspace button. And then we can hit the space bar to play. And you can see it moves over to that location over 80 frames. So that is basically how animation works. You can also add keyframes, do almost anything in Blender. If you hover over a certain value and had the icky, it will add in a keyframe to that value. So there you go. That is a full basic overview of Blender. I hope this is useful if you're completely new and now that you have a basic understanding of how blender works, let's jump straight into the course. 4. Saving Your Blender File: to save your blender file, you can go up to file and click on Save As or save. If you've already saved your blender file, you can go ahead and click save. But if you are saving a new blender file, go save and it's If you do this, you can save it to wherever you like. You can click on this option here and name your blender file, so I'm just gonna call it saving. And then I can go over here and click on Save as Blender File. Let's say, for example, you want multiple blender files saved to show the progression of your scene. You can do that by hitting control shift s and then hitting the plus sign, and that will add a one next to saving. So if I do that, it'll saving new blender file. If I do it again, I can hit the blessed sign again and we can see it's now at saving to dot blend. So now let's say you did a couple things. You deleted that cube you press shipped, AU added in a sphere, and now you just want to save that blender file all you have to do is hit control s or command s and you can see down here it's saved That blender file lender will also warn you about closing the program if you've done some changes without saving. So let's say at it in a new object and I hit the exit button, we can see that blender says save or discard changes or cancel. If I had saved, it'll save our project, then we can go ahead and close the program. 5. Mantaflow Simulation Basics: Hello, everybody. And welcome to the first video on the fluid simulation. We're gonna be jumping into man's flow and learning the very basics of how this simulation works, how to enable it and how to render out a animation using man to flow. So to create a fluid simulation, you need two different objects. You need a domain object, which is the bounding box of the fluid simulation. The fluid will not be able to leave that bounding box. And you also need a flow object which will bring fluid into your scene. Or it will be the object itself as the fluid. Let's get started by adding in those two objects, the 1st 1 is going to be the domain, which is going to be this cube. So I'm going to scale up this Cuba pricing s and dragging it up. So it's sitting on the grid floor just like that, and then I'll press s and X and skeletal on the X. So we get sort of a rectangle. Now, let's go ahead and add in our fluid object. In this case, I'm gonna press shift a and go over to mesh and then add in a UV sphere. If we brozi and go into a wire frame, we will be able to see inside our Cube. I'm going to scale up this juvie spear by pressing s and then I'll hit G Z and Dragon upwards. Now let's go over to the physics tap. That tab is located on the right side and it looks like a circle. It's this one right here, and you will see an option for fluid. Let's go ahead and turn that on. Since we have the flow object selected, we need to set the type over to flow. Currently, the flow type is set to smoke. The smoke simulation and the fluid simulation are now combined into one simulation and weaken switch between them by selecting this option here and changing it over to the liquid . The flow behavior is currently set to geometry. What this means is that the UV sphere will just be a ball of fluid and it will fall and crash down. If this is set to inflow, it will constantly add fluid in the shape of Are you be sphere. We also have an option for outflow, which we'll talk about in a later video but this will take away fluid. We're gonna leave it on geometry because I just want the ubi sphere as the fluid. Now let's go ahead and select our domain, which is this cube will select fluid and set the type over to domain. The domain type is currently set to gas. We need to set this over to liquid and here we can see all of the different settings for a man to flow. There are currently a lot of different values and settings that you can tweak will be going through each one of these in a later video. For now, we're just going to stick with the basics. How this works is you need to bake in two different things. You first need to bacon the data, which is the liquid data, and then you can bake in the mess down here, you can also bacon particles. But for this basic tutorial, we're not going to touch those underneath the cast. We have an output folder of where the cash baking data will go to. If you were to bake in the data and close blender and reopen up the project later, you won't see the bake because currently, this folder right here is a temporary folder, which means it will get deleted once you closed blender toe. Actually, save the data. You need to set a custom folder. So if I click on this button here, I can navigate to accustom folder of where I want to save my cash. I'm just gonna cancel that for now, since I don't really want to do that. Now let's go ahead and Bacon a simulation. The resolution divisions controls how good the simulation will look, and we'll just leave it at the default values and then click on baked data you can see down here. It's starting to bake with the introduction to Mantle Flow. If I cancel this bake weaken, see, there's an option to resume the bake. In previous versions of Blender, this was not a thing, and you had to restart the baking. But now, with man to flow, all I have to do is click resume, and we can see here. It's starting to bake all the way up to a value of 50. The reason it's at 50 is because the end frame in the cash settings is set to 50. I can set this to a higher number like 100 and you can see there is now a resume option. I'm just gonna leave it at 50 though Now we have the particles for our fluid and this is looking pretty good, but there's no mesh. The reason for that is because we need to enable the mash down here and bacon the mesh down here. Thea press factor is determining how high rez the uppers will be. Basically, it takes this value of the resolution and multiplies it. Currently it's set to, too, and I'm just gonna bring this down to one so bakes a little bit faster. Then we can click on a bake mesh and we can see down here it's starting to bake. Once it reaches 50 we will be able to president go back into solid view and hit the space bar to player simulation. So there you go. That is the very basics of how the fluid simulation works. In later videos, we will jump into the settings and learn all of the different values and how they affect the simulation 6. Quick Liquid Effect: Hello, everybody. And in this video, I'm going to show you a very quick way to add in a fluid simulation to your seen in blunder we're gonna want to do is select the object that you want to be the inflow object or the fluid object. And then what you need to do is go over to objects. This menu here go down too quick effects and then quick liquid right here. What this will do is it will automatically add a domain around the object that you have selected. And now if we select the objects, we can go over to the physics tab and we can see this automatically added a liquid flow type. The flow behavior is currently on geometry. And then if I select the domain, we can see all the settings are right here. It's a little liquid type. It has the resolution and then weaken. Tweak this how we want. So this is a very quick and easy way to start a basic scene, and then you can go ahead and mess around with the settings, bake it and create something that you like. This saves a lot of time because if you were to do this manually. Let's go ahead and delete everything. I'm gonna press, shift a and add in a cube. This is going to be our flow object. I would have to select fluid, set the type two flow and then we can see it's on smoke. So I'll have to go over to liquid and then I'll have to press shift a at in a queue for the domain, scale it up and do all of this other stuff. Fluid, said the type two domain and then switch it over to liquid. Doing it the other way will save you like 30 seconds. It's just a very quick and easy way to create a fluid simulation. 7. Domain Fluid Settings: Hello, everybody. And welcome to a new section in the section. We're going to be looking at the domain and how it changes how the simulation looks to get started. Let's go ahead and create a small scene. For example, with this cube selected, I'm going to press s to scale and then I'll drag it up. This is going to be our domain for this demonstration. Next, all add in a mesh and then a cube in the crazy and go into wire frame. This is going to be our flow object. So I'm going to move it up along busy access and then also like the domain and go over to the physics tab. If I select fluid, I can see there is a type option here. There are three different types domain flow and effect. Er, In this video, we'll be looking at the domain. So let's go ahead and select that in the domain type. It's currently set to gas, which would be fire and smoke. Since we're dealing with liquid, we need to change it over to the liquid simulation. And as you can see, there is quite a lot of different settings over here. to go through. Don't worry. We'll go through each one and you will learn exactly what they dio. Let's first out out with the top settings up here we have the domain type, which we already looked at gases for fire and smoke and liquid. It's for the fluid simulation. The resolution divisions controls how good this simulation will look. The higher you sent this to, the better it will look. But the longer it will take to bake, you can go lower all the way to a value of 24. And this will look really, really low. Polly, I find that a value of about 2 56 that gives us a really, really nice high rez simulation. For now, though, we will just leave it at 64 the time skill controls how fast this simulation will look. As you can see on screen, there is two different simulations. One is a timescale of 10.5 and one is a timescale of one I've noticed while testing around with the time scale that a value of one the default value looks really fast. For a realistic simulation, I would probably set the time scale to a value of about 10.5 or 0.6. Underneath that, we have the C F L number. This is a little bit confusing, but how this works is it deals with time steps, the harder you set this to the more time steps it will skip. And what this will do is it will speed up your baking time. But the simulation won't look as realistic. The lower you go, the more time steps will be in this simulation, but the longer it will take to bake, use adaptive time steps allows you to set how many times s will be per frame, and it will automatically calculate it. We have a maximum and a minimum value. The higher you sent this to, the better this simulation look. But again, the longer it will take to bake. If you have a simulation where there is a lot of flu that's really jittery, or it just doesn't look as good or it's passing through an object, try turning up the time steps in that will fix your issue, and then underneath that we have the gravity. Currently, it's great out, and that is because we need to jump over to the settings over here in the scene settings and turn off gravity in the world settings. Once we do that, we can jump back over to the simulation and we can see here and now we can set these settings over in the scene panel that Z is at a negative 9.8. And if you wanted to do that same number, you would set that for the Z axis here or if you wanted to play around. You can said the X access to a positive number. And what this will do is it will make the gravity go in the X direction. Same thing goes for the easy access. If I would set this up to a value of 10 instead of falling down, it would go straight up in land on the ceiling. The last thing that we have here is the border collisions. If these air turned on, the fluid will collide with sides of the domain. But you can also turn them off. This will give an illusion of the fluid just disappearing off into the distance of the domain. So there you go. That is the basic settings of the domain. And in the next video, we'll take a look at the liquid particles 8. Liquid Particles: in this video, we're gonna look at the liquid particles in the domain settings. We have a lot of different values and settings that we can tweak here that will change how the simulation looks. Let's go through them one by one, and you will learn exactly what they dio. First up, we have the simulation method. Currently there's only one, and that is the flip method for the fluid simulation. In future builds a blender. They are going to implement more methods, but for now, it's just on flip. Now let's get into the settings. The first setting that we have here is the flip ratio. This controls how big the splashes are and basically, how this works. If you said it to a higher value and the highest you can go is a value of one, you can't go any higher than one. This will make the splashes look really large. This makes your simulation look like a very large simulation. Lower values will result in less splashes, which will make it look like a smaller simulation. The particle radius controls the amount of space between each particle. The higher you said this to the more with the particles will be spread out and the lower you said this to the mawr bunched up, they will be together. The maximum and minimum values controls how maney particles are going to be in a grid cell mantle flow is split up into cells on bacon assimilation, and this also correlates with the resolution that you set up here. Normally, the default values work perfectly fine, but you can add more particles or less particles if you want to do that. The particle sampling This controls how many samples of particles there will be in a simulation. The higher you set this to the more particles will be in your bake. The lower you set this to. Of course, there will be less particles. The narrow bandwidth is a cool value that you can play around with. This allows you to add more particles into your whole simulation. Normally, when you just bake this demolition, it will have a thin line of particles at the top. But if you were to bring this up to a value of about 10 are so it will fill up the entire domain and you can get some really cool animations doing this. You can see the screen shots that we have here with different values. For the narrow bandwidth, it basically takes the edges of the entire flow object and enables particles to fill up the inside the high. You set this to, the more it will be filled up. The particle randomness does exactly what you would expect it. Randomize is how the particles are placed in the simulation at the start, and it will also give the location a little bit of randomness so it doesn't look so uniform . Fractional obstacles basically controls how the simulation acts with collisions and how the particles will interact with them. It will help smooth out the transition when it moves. For example, if a particle is sliding down an incline of a obstacle, you can see on screen that there's two difference in relations. One has a fractional obstacle turned on with a little bit of threshold, and one has it turned off. You can see the one that has it turned on is a lot more smooth, so this basically smooths out the movement of the particles when it's collided with an obstacle, and you can play with the amount of smoothing using the threshold 9. New Viscocity Slider 2: Hello everyone and welcome to another video. In this one we're going to take a look at the new viscosity setting and blend or 2.9 to if you haven't downloaded the latest version, go ahead and go to Blender.org and download the latest version so you can follow along with the introduction of this new update. There is a new setting over here called viscosity. This slider allows you to easily add thickness to fluid. Beforehand. You would need to use the diffusion over here. And it was a little bit hard to figure out exactly what it does. And it required a little bit of guesswork. With this new slider, it's very easy to add in thickness. Underneath the viscosity tab, we have a strength slider. The higher you set this to, the more thick the fluid will be. You can see on screen the differences in the different settings with a value of 0.1.40 and then there are no viscosity at all. If this is turned on and then the strength is set to 0, it will still add a little bit of viscosity to your scene. So keep that in mind. What you need if you don't want any viscosity is you need to uncheck this. The cool thing about using this method is it can also be animated this and create some really interesting results. For example, if we go over to frame 100, add in a keyframe right here, I'm going to turn that on. Add in a keyframe by hovering my mouse over this, hitting I. I can go to the next frame, frame a 101, uncheck this and then add an another keyframe. So it's going to be thick fluid for a 100 frames and right when it hits a 101, it's going to turn it into a regular fluid. The strength setting can also be animated and this can create some really interesting results as the fluid comes down, it slowly turns into regular fluid. The simulation method also has a little bit to do with how the fluid looks with the viscosity. You can see the differences with the flip and then with the APIC. They are very minimal, but you will see a slight difference between the two. Now that we know how this works, let's create a cool animation. If you want to follow along, you can download this original scene right here with the monkey head, the domain and then the flow object. Or you can just create it yourself because there's only three objects. This monkey had just has a collision effector to it. The inflow is just the basic settings with the flow behavior set to inflow. And then for the domain, everything is exactly the same except for this viscosity down here. I'm going to keep the animation that we've added on brain 100. And I'm also going to be animating the strength value. So let's go ahead and get started by creating a really cool animation. We're going to be animating the strength value. So we're going to set it to 0.4 for the start of the animation. And then I want it to turn into 0.1 by the end. And then right at frame 100, I want it to turn into regular fluid. Since we've already animated this checkbox, we can leave that keyframe in there. I'm going to jump to the beginning of the animation and hit eye while hovering over this strength value. I'm going to go all the way to frame a 100. And I'll set the strength down to, let's go with actually 0.05 and then add in another keyframe. So over a 100 frames, it's gonna go from a strength For all the way down to a strength of 0.05. And I think that will look very cool. I'm also going to turn on mesh that we actually get a mesh in our scene over in the domain settings. I'm also going to set the type over two modular so we don't get that fluid right there and everything will run a little bit smoother to give our scene a little bit more interests. Let's also rotate our info object to spin around. Now we could press I and add in a rotation keyframe and then just animate it that way. Or we can add an a driver and it will automatically do it for us. To do this, select your invalid object and press N underneath the item tab and rotation, we're going to add a driver to the rotation of the z-axis. To add an a driver, you can click in the rotation. And to do this you can press hashtag frame. And then you can go divide by hitting slash and then type in the number that you want. If we divide it around 30 and then press Enter, we'll restart are in play our animation, we can see it's rotating just like this. You can set the speed. You can set the speed of the rotation by going over to the frame and then dividing it by a higher or lower number. A higher number will make it go even slower. So if we go with 50 will restart and play it, you can see it's moving even slower. But if we go a little bit lower, Let's go divided by 20. You can see it is rotating a lot faster. I think a value of around 25 will actually look pretty good. So I'm going to go frame, I'm going to go hashtag frame divided by 25. And that will look pretty good. As you can see there. It's rotating and it's going at a good speed. Now that we have our animation is set up, we are ready to bake. So I'm going to select my domain, go over to the resolution divisions, and I'm going to set this up to 64. Keep in mind, the viscosity will add a little bit of time but to your bake. So I'm not gonna go too high in the resolution. I'm going to scroll down over to the cache setting and set the end frame to 150. I'm going to turn on is resumable and set the type over to all so we can bake everything all at once. I'm going to set the end frame down here to 150 as well. And then I'm going to save my project and bake it out. And after the bakers done, just apply a little bit of materials to your objects, add some lighting, and then you can render this out and create a really nice satisfying animation. So there you go. That is the viscosity slider in Blender 2.92. 10. Domain Mesh: In the last two videos, we took a look at the settings up here and the liquid settings for the particles. In this video, we will take a look at the mesh the mesh check boxes, another way to visualize how the food simulation looks. Currently, with just this simulation, we have the liquid particles and weaken. Turn that off and on by checking that box. Let's go ahead and player simulation to see what this looks like. Now this is pretty cool, but there's no mesh. And so if we were to render this, it would just be particles, or it would just be a solid cube to actually bring in a match. What we need to do is check that box and open up this panel. We have a lot of different options right here. Let's first go ahead and bake this mesh, and you'll be able to see exactly what this does. It basically takes the flow Object adds a mesh around it, and that is going to be your fluid simulation. The bake is now done, and now we can player simulation, and now we have a mash for the fluid simulation, just like that and that looks pretty cool toe actually free the mesh and change some of the settings. What we need to do is so, like that button right there called Free Mesh, and it will change back into a solid cube and then we can mess around with the settings. Let's go through these one by one, and I'll be describing exactly what they do. The first setting that we have here is the, uh, press factor. This is another way to enhance the resolution of the fluid. Basically, it takes the base resolution. Currently it's at 64 then it multiplies it. It's that too. So the resolution is gonna be around 128. You want to be careful with this value because if you set the base resolution to a low number and you said the uprights factor really high, it can look a little bit strange, and it looks kind of choppy. So you want to be careful with this. If you're going for a very high resolution, I recommend turning up the resolution divisions up here to maybe a value of 2 56 and then the uprise, leaving it at two. You can see on screen a lot of different examples of the upper as being high, low and the resolution being up. The particle radius is very similar to the liquid particle radios up here. Basically, it takes a you sell of the fluid simulation and adds a radius to this. The higher you set this to the more blocking the fluid simulation will look. You can see on screen a particle radius of one any particle radius of eight and you can see the differences under me that we have speed vectors. This is for the motion blur in your fluid simulation. Here we are, in a move seen and I've created a basic simulation where there is fluid being emitted into our scene and I turned on the use speed vectors over on the right side. Now, if we were to render this right now, you would not see anything. That is because we need to do a couple more things to get the motion blur to work. The first thing that you need to do is go over to the settings over here and make sure your render engine is in cycles. Evie does not work for the motion blur, so make sure you are in cycles. Next, you need to go over to the scene panel, the render layer seen panel, and then turn on this vector check box. This will enable us to use a vector pass in the render settings. Now we can go ahead and select a frame of which we want to render. I'll just use this one right here and we can go up to render and then click on Render Image and it will just take a second to render. And then we can add in the motion blur in the composite er the render has finished and this is our results. And as you can see, there's no motion blur. And the scene now what we need to do is go ahead and exit out of this render window and jump over to the compositing to have it right here. Let's first ad in a view or no to see what we're doing. So I'm gonna hold control shift and then left. Click on the render layer note to add in a viewer notes so we can see what we're doing. You can press V a couple times or old V to zoom in. You will see that we have a vector passed right here. This is the vector pass that will enable us to add in the motion blur. The first thing that will do is at an a d noise, er so we could just smooth out the image. So underneath filter all at an anti noise and place that here. Then I'll take the image and plug back into the composite, and then we can add in the motion blur. So to do this, you need to brush it day and go underneath filter, and then you can see vector blur down here. So, like that and place that right here in between the dean noise note and the view layer, Then we can plug this into the composite. At the moment, you won't see anything. And that is because we need to take the vector data and plugging that into the speed over here. Once we do that, the motion blur will update and we will be able to see it. As you can see there, this blur value controls. How strong that motion blur is a value of zero will be nothing in the value of one or even higher than that will be a lot of blur, probably around a value of about 0.5 will look pretty good. And then we can wait for a to update. And there you can see this is the motion blur for our scene. So doing this method can add a lot of realism to your fluid simulation. So if you're going for realism and you're using cycles, try using the vector blur to get some realistic results. The next setting that we have here is the mesh generator. Currently, it's set to final, and this is the more realistic result. There is also a preview option, which is faster for baking, but it's a lot lower quality, as you can see there. So for a realistic simulations, you should always use the final mess generator. The smoothing, positive and negative values will give you a cool effect. The higher you set this moving positive, the more smooth out your food will be. And then, of course, the negative will do the opposite. It will make everything a little bit sharper and more crisp. You can see the animations on screen, the different values and how they change the simulation. So if you want very smooth fluid, try turning up the positive value. But if you want more sharp with little more detail, you can turn up the negative value, and that will give you some sharper waves and a little bit more choppiness. The cone cavity, upper and lower values help smooth out the fluid where there is a concave or where there is a dip in the fluid. You want to be careful with the lower value because sometimes it can distort the fluid simulation, and you will get some strange results. Normally, the default values will work perfectly fine for most simulations, but you can tweak them if you want. And then, of course, to get the simulation to work, all you have to do is click on bake Mesh and it will bake in the mess just like this. And now you have a mesh in your fluid simulation. So there you go. Those are the basic settings in of the mesh, and now in the next video, we'll take a look at the particles 11. Spray, Foam & Bubble Particles: and now we move on to the particle tap. Let's open up this tab and you can see all of these different settings. At first glance, this might look a little bit intimidating. Don't worry, I will go through each one and I'll be describing exactly what it does. We have a three check boxes up. Top these air, the different particles that you condone able for your simulation. We have spray foam and bubbles. Spray is for the splashes. Let's say, for example, this cube is comes down here and splashes upwards. There's gonna be some particles on the upper part of the big splashes. Foam is what you might expect. It's going to be the foam on top of the fluid, and then bubbles are going to be the particles that are inside the simulation. Let's go ahead and turn one of these on. I'm gonna go foam, for example, and here we have a combined export. This will combined different particle systems together. Let's go ahead and enable every single one of these and then I'll go over to the particle system tab. Here you can see there's three different particles, foam spray and bubbles. You gonna eat. Set a different object or whatever you want for each one of these. Or you can go back over to the combined export and select all of them. Spray phone plus bubbles, and it will combine every single one of those particles into one particle system. So here you can enable the object to represent every single particle in your simulation. Just like that. Now the uprights factor. This is very similar to the uppers factor and the mesh. It takes the amount of resolution in the settings up top here and then multiplies it for the particles. The higher you set this to, the more particles will be in your scene. And now the next six values that we have here, the wave crashed the trapped air and the kinetic energy. I'm going to split this out a little bit so you can read the full name. We have a maximum and a minimum value for each of these Now. This is the threshold for the amount of particles that will be on these different types of things. The crest of the wave, the trapped air. The trapped air is basically when fluid overlaps each other. Sometimes there's an air pocket that's inside the fluid. And this is for the amount of particles in that air pocket. The kinetic energy takes the speed of the fluid and then determines if particles should be emitted at that point. And you can control that with these values. I've done a lot of testing with all of these different values, and they do very minimal things to the simulation. Higher values with each of these will result in less mark cells, which means the less particles. So to understand this, basically, the higher you set this to the less particles will be in the scene. And the lower you said this to the more particles will be in the scene moving on. From there, we have the potential radius and the particle update radius. We have two different values here that we can change and the potential radius Basically, it smooths out of the particle grids, so it looks just a little bit smoother On top of the fluid, the particle update radius will make the particles move a little bit slower and less chaotic. The higher you set this do, the more smooth it will be. The lower use at this to the less move it will be and the more chaotic the particles will move around the wave crest Particle sampling. This is the maximum number of particles that will be at the crest of the wave in a certain grid cell per frame. As you can see. There the same thing for the trapped here. This is the This is the maximum amount of particles that will be in a trapped air pockets. Whenever you are simulating, you can set those values in right here. The particle life. We have a maximum, any minimum value particles have a certain lifespan, and this determines how long those particles will live before they die out. Normally, the default values were perfectly fine. But if you need to change them, they are there for you. Next, we get onto something a little bit more interesting. The bubble buoyancy and the bubble drag the buoyancy is the amount of force that pushes the bubbles up towards the surface of the fluid you have. The higher you set this to, the more particles would be on the surface. The lower you set this to the particles will just kind of hang out inside the fluid and not really do anything. You can see the different values of how they change it on screen. The drag is similar to the buoyancy, except it deals with the movement of the bubbles. For example, if the fluid is moving a lot and this is set to a lower number, the drag will not really affect too much. But if you were to set the drag higher, the particles will move with the fluid. Keep in mind, though, if you set this too high, it can get some strange results. So I would leave it at a maximum of like three or four. And the last thing that we have here is the particle boundary we have deletes. And then we have pushed out. If particles are inside collision objects or if somehow they exit out of the domain, the particles will get deleted. If you set this on, push out, it will push the particles out of the collisions, or it will bring the particles back inside the domain. Normally, I would just leave this on delete because sometimes you can get some weird issues. If the particles leave the domain toe, actually see this in action. You first need to enable the spray foam or bubbles particles, and then you need to click on a bake. Keep in mind, though, If the combined export is combining every single one of these, you will have to free the bake to unlock these options up here. I'm gonna leave this off because I'm going to demonstrate how you can switch between these . So now we have three different particle systems over here, and I'm going to go ahead and bake the particles in. Now that the particles are done bacon, we can play our simulation, and this is what it looks like. It has all of the combined particles the splashes, the foam and the bubbles. Now, the cool thing about leaving the combined export off is weaken. Turn off with spray and just view the phone or the bubbles. So if I turn off spray and bubbles, I can just look at what the phone particles are doing. Same thing goes with the spray. So if I turn that on and turn off the phone, we could see what the Sprite particles are doing. You can see they are the splashes of the particles that looks pretty cool. And then, of course, we can turn that off and leave the bubbles on, and we can see what the bubble particles are doing as well. And we can see here these or what the bubble particles are doing, they're just chilling inside the fluid. There you go. So that is the particle tab. And in the next video, we will take a look at the diffusion. 12. Diffusion & Viscosity: Hello, everybody. And in this video, we're gonna look at the diffusion in the domain settings. The diffusion allows you to change the thickness of the fluid. You can make it really thick, or you can make it really thin, just like water over in the settings we haven't base and an exponents, and the values control how thick the flu it is. There is also a preset option, and I opened this up. We can see there's three different values, and you can also create your own presets by hitting that plus sign. If we take a look at the default settings. This is currently like water, the basis set to one, and the exponents is set to six. If I select water, you can see it's the exact same thing. If I select honey, we can see it's a little bit different. The base is now set to two, and the exponents is now set to three. This will give us a little bit more thick fluid, and how this works is the base and the exponents. There is a big equation to figure out exactly how to change the fluid. If you're like me and you don't really like doing math too much. You can go ahead and open up the blender manual and look at this. Here we are in the blender manual and you will look on the right side. You can see there is a lot of different presets on the different types of fluid You can see there's also two different panels right here, dynamic viscosity and then commanded viscosity. This one is the one that we need to use in blender. This dynamic viscosity deals with wheel world, but this one over here deals with a blender. So we're gonna take a look at the blender numbers and then import those into the domain. If we look over and melting glass weaken. See, we have a base of one and an exponents of zero. So if we wanted to have a fluid simulation like melting glass, that is what we would put into the diffusion. So you can think of it as this. With a high base and a low exponents, you can get some thick fluid with both low numbers. You will also get something food, but it will look a little bit different with that knowledge in mind. Let's go ahead and jump back over to blender and what I'm gonna do is set the base up to a value of six and the exponents down to a value of one. This will give us a really thick fluid. We also have the real world size, and this deals with the domain size. So you want to think about what you are trying to create. If you're creating a coffee mug, you're gonna want to set this to a low number. This deals with meters. So if I was to set this to one, it would treat the domain like it's one meter long. If you are creating a pool, you're gonna want to set this to a higher number, like four or five meters. So I'm going to set this to a value of four and then the surface tension. This deals with this tension on the surface of the fluid. You can see the differences on the different values of how it changes. Basically, it adds some stiffness to the top of the fluid and makes it look like it has a lot of tension. I'm going to set this up to a value of 12 setting it to a high value, though, will give us some strange results on the fluid. It will make it look really jittery. So to counteract this weaken, turn up the maximum sub steps over in the top settings over here. So the time steps, I'm gonna bring that up to a value of five for the maximum. And then I'm gonna bring this up to a value of three. For the minimum. This will take a little bit longer to bake, but it will minimize that jitteriness that we see in the surface tension. Then if we wanted to save this preset, we can hit that plus sign. But currently I think this is by because if I hit the plus sign and I just give it a name, we can call it thick fluid and hit. OK, we can see we get an error right here. If I was to switch this back over to water and then try to but go back over to the thick fluid, we can see this is not what we put in. So we need to bring this back down to one. And I think currently it's just bugged and the preset saving preset option is not working, so you'll just have to put in the numbers manually. With those settings in place, though, we can go ahead and bacon this simulation to see how it looks. If we scroll up and hit based data, we can see it's starting to bake down here. But since we are using a higher time step, it is taken a little bit longer than usual. The bake has finished, and now if I hit the space bar, we can see how this looks. You will notice that the fluid it looks a lot more thick. It's not just coming down here and splashing up. It's actually slowly moving across so you can use this method of the diffusion to create, like lava or something really thick like that. And if we hit the space bar one more time, we can see that is what it looks like. So there you go. That is the diffusion. And in the next video, we will take a look at the guides 13. Guiding Domains: hello over one. And in this video we're gonna look at the guides in the domain settings. The guides allow you to use an object or another simulation to give some velocity to the fluid. For example, if I turn this on, we can see here are a couple different values. We have the velocity source which can use a domain or can use an effect. Er so for this example will be using a smoke simulation and selecting that domain in this guide parent right here to demonstrate this. Let's first take a look at our fluid simulation right here. We have a flow objects. I'm going to enable fluid and set the type over to flow. And then the flow type is going to be on liquid. Here, we can see we have that. And then this is just a basic simulation. The resolution is at 32 so it just makes in a little bit faster. And these are all just the default settings. What we need to do now is set up a smokes in relation. To do this, I'm going to select the domain press shift D and then right click over in the outline er you can see I named the fluid domain and the flow object. So I'm gonna go ahead and double click on this and call this one smoke and then domain. Just so we're a little bit more organized and what I'll do next is all press shift and added a another cube. This is going to be our flow object for the smoke domain operas s and Z and scale it down just a little bit. And then over in the outline, er, I will also name this so we know exactly what we're doing Smoke and then flow. I'm going to turn on fluid and set the type over to flow, and we're gonna leave it as smoke, and we're gonna set the behavior as inflow. So how this works is the fluid will take the velocity of the smoke, and it will kind of guide it going upwards. So the smoke is actually going to catch some fluid as it flows up and carry it with it all the way to the top of the dome. Eight. I'm going to drag the flow object below the fluid so it actually goes through. And since we did that We also need to select the smoke domain and scale it up just slightly . So the flow object is still inside the domain. Also, skillet up just slightly so we don't get that jittery effect. And there we go. So with the smoke domain selected, I'm going to select the type over here to gas, and the resolution will leave at 32. That's fine. And the time scale. I'm gonna bring up to one now. Let's bake this in. So I'm going to uncheck guys because we do not want guides for this simulation and then over in the cast settings we need to set to custom folders. One is going to be for the smoke domain, and another one is going to be for the fluid. So since we're using the smoke, I'm going to select that button on the bottom and navigate to a folder. And as you can see here, I have two different folders. I'm going to select smoke and then click accept. Then we can bake this it. This should go pretty fast cause it's at a low resolution, and now if we play our simulation, we can see it's working, but it's not showing up because of the domain saw selected and breast h to hide. And this is our simulation. So now let's set up the guides in the fluid. I'm gonna press Ault h to bring back the domain and select it. This is our fluid domain, and I'll go over to the guides panel and open up this first off, we're going to set another custom folder in the cast sitting, So I'm going to select that button on the side and navigate to it. Since we're now dealing with the fluid, I'm going to select the fluid domain on the side and click. Accept the end frame. I will leave that 50 and then here in the guides panel, we need to select the parents. I'm going to select the smoker domain. We have three different values here. The weight, the size and the velocity factor. The weight is basically how strict the fluid will be to the smoke. So if you were to set this to a higher number, the fluid will lag behind the smoke. If you said it to a lower number, this the fluid will be mawr attached to the smoking. It will follow it a lot closely, so I'm going to set that to a lower number so the fluid actually stays close. The size right here is basically the size of the guiding, and if you said this to a bigger number, they'll beam or of the guide. And if you said it to a smaller number, it will be a lot smaller. All set it to a value of four, just so it's a little bit smaller. The velocity factor controls how much velocity the smoke will give to the fluid. So if you were to set this to a higher number, basically what's gonna happen is the fluid will shoot straight up really fast and collide with the top of the domain. If you leave it at a lower number, it will go a little bit more slowly up to the top. I'm going to leave it at a value up to, and I think that would work perfectly fine. And then we can scroll up and click on bake. I've noticed when bacon in the guides. It takes a lot longer than usual, so be careful if you're going for a very high resolution because you're baked can take a lot longer. So now let's restart the simulation and press the play button, and we can see this is how it looks. It's taken the fluid and bringing it upwards just like that. And when you're looking at the domain, if you notice a lot of red, that means you're particles are moving very, very fast. As we can see here, we do have a lot of red, so what we can do to fix that is free the data and maybe set the wait up to a value of two so the fluid does lying behind the smoke just a little bit will bake that in and see how that looks. The bake is done, and now it's player simulation and we can see that does look a lot better. It's a lot slower than it was, and now what we can do is just come over here to the bottom and bacon a lot more frames, but you get the basic idea. You can take a simulation and use it as some velocity for another simulation, and you can get some very interesting results 14. Guiding Effectors: The other cool thing that you can do with guides is you can switch the velocity source over to a defector and use an object instead of a domain. So to demonstrate this, I'm gonna press shift A and added a monkey head of right here. I'll drag it below the domain. And now we're going to animate this on frame one. I'm going to hit I and go location, rotation. Then that frame 30. I'm gonna press G and Z and dragged through the domain hit I and go location rotation once again. Now, if we go over to the physics have we can enable fluid set the type over to effect er and then for the effect or type weaken Select guide. Here we have a couple different settings is plantar. We've talked about this before. If you're using a plane, you are gonna want to turn this Ellen the surface thickness. This is the amount of thickness around the object that will be considered as a guide. And for this example, I'm gonna bring this up to a value of 0.5. So instead of just being at the monkey head, the amount the service around it will also affect the guiding as well, so it will probably be around here and then the velocity factor. This also is a velocity factor that will move the fluid a lot quicker. So if you want slower moving velocities, you will turn this down the guide mode. It takes the velocity of your monkey head and the velocity that you set here and then does a little bit of math to figure out exactly what it should do. So, for example, if this is set to override its going to override the velocity of this monkey head and just to use this value here, if this is set to average, is going to average out the velocity of the monkey head and the velocity that you put here and just use an average for this example, I'm going to set it to average. And now back over in the domain settings. Aiken, scroll down to the guides. Here we have a new button called bait guides. We did not have that when when we were using the domain. But now, since we're using a defector, we do need to bake the guides before we bacon the liquid up here keep in mind before you bake in the guides. You also need to set the resolution because once you bacon the guides, this will be great out and he won't be able to change it. I'm going to leave the default settings and I'm going to select bacon guides. You can see it went very fast down there, and now we can go over to the settings up top and we can see the resolution is great out. We need to select baked data right here for this to work. Since I am using a resolution of 32 this is going pretty fast. So now it's resource dissimulation and play. We can see this is what happened. So since the monkey head is moving pretty slow and the resolution for the guide is also set to one and it's averaging it out, it's not doing a lot of motion as you can see there. So if we wanted this to be a lot faster, what we can do is scroll down here, free the guide so we can change some of the settings. I'm gonna set the velocity factor up a little bit. Let's go with a value of six and we'll see how that looks will bake the data. We'll scroll up to the settings and baked the data up here as well. With that done bacon, we will restart and play this and we can see there is a lot more velocity now since we set the velocity factor up down here. So if you want faster moving fluid, you will set the velocity factor here. And you will also set the velocity factor over here as well. We'll restart this. You can view that one more time, and that's basically what it does. It just add some velocity using an object, you can create some very interesting results using this. 15. Collections: Hello, everyone. And in this video, we're going to take a look at collections. The collection panel right here allows you to choose collections that will interact with the fluid. So, for example, if I have multiple follow objects in different collections, I can select one of those collections, and that will only be the flow object. Same thing goes with the effect er's down here. So if I was to select one of these collections, it will only use those collisions in that collection. So let's go ahead and test that out. I'm going to select this object here which has a collision affect. Er, I'm gonna press the M key and move it to layer to our collection, too. Now, if I select my domain and scroll down, I'm going to select the effect er, and I'm going to limit the vector to collection one. This effect, er is in collection to So now this won't affect the simulation. Now I can bake this data and we can see down here it's starting to bake. And now if I posit right about there and restart the animation and play this, we can see it goes right through the collision, even though this does have a collision modifier applied to it. It's going right through because we limited the collections down here. Now, if I free this data in select collection too, which has the collision, I can go ahead and bake this data one more time. And then I can pause right about there. And you can see already that it is interacting with the collision object because we apply to that collection to the effect er a restart and play this and we can see it's working correctly just like that. This works for both collisions and flow objects, as you can see right here. 16. Baking Cache: however, one. And in this video we're gonna look at the cash settings and how the bacon cashed works in Man's of Low. The first thing that we need to talk about is the file of where your data goes to when you bake. You can see right here. This is where it goes to and this is a temporary file. If you were to bacon assimilation and then close blender and open it back up later, you would lose the simulation. So if you want to save this, you need to set a custom baked folder. To do that, you need to click on this button here and then navigates where you want to save your file. Once you have found the folder, all you have to do is click accept. And now all of that day and it will go into that folder that you specified right here. Let's go ahead and test that out by hitting based data up here. We can see here. It's starting to bake. Once it reaches a value of 50 it will stop and we can go ahead and take a look at that data . If we take a look at that folder Weaken. See two different folders right here. Colin Fig and data. If I open up these, we can see a lot of different files in this data. Is all of the animation and fluid simulation data for the particles right here. If I play this, we can see this is what it looks like. All of those files are storing this data. If we were to enable the mess down here and bake this in, that would create a new folder with the mesh data, as you can see right here. So if I opened up this, we can see all of the mesh data is coming in just like that. And it's going through the different frames down here. Same thing goes with the particles. So if you were to bacon the particles, it would create another folder. You want to be careful with baking large simulations because right now you can see this is already 287 megabytes, and creating a really high res simulation will take up a lot of space. I've had fire simulations where it takes almost 40 gigs to store the data. So you want to be careful about saving caches or you might fill up your hard drive pretty quickly. Now let's go ahead and move on to the settings down here that we can change. I'm going to go ahead and free this data so we can see how this works. And the first thing that we have here is the type modular modular deals with the different modules for baking. We can see there is a module here. We need to bacon the settings. Then we need to bake in the mesh. And then we also need to bake in the particles if we enable these. If I change this over to replay, this will give us a real time setting of how our simulation looks. But as you can see, this is really slow, and sometimes it even breaks, as you can see there. For him, about frame nine just breaks and it doesn't really look good. So this is a real time simulation recon. See how this looks, But it's extremely slow, as you can see right here. If we change this over to final. What this does is it allows us to bake everything at once. You can see there is no button down here for the mesh and there is no button up here for the settings. So instead of going through each of these, I can just go ahead and bake all and it will bacon everything all at once without having to go through each one. So if you know exactly what you're trying to great, you can go ahead and switch to this over to final and bake everything all at once. I like keeping this on modular because this allows me to look at the particles and seeing how those look before I bake in the mesh are the other particles down here? Next up, we have the frame start and the frame, and this controls how long this simulation is. So if I was to change the end frame, I could go ahead and put that in here. I can go like to 50 and now this simulation will last for 250 frames. I can also change the start frame right here by switching this up to maybe like, 15. So nothing's gonna happen for 15 frames. Once it reaches frame 15 it will start the simulation since we did the replay option down here it automatically baked in a little bit of frames. So I'm just gonna go ahead and bake data, Stop that and then free that data, so it just doesn't display it. The next thing that we have to talk about is the data file format. There's three options here. We have unique hash, which is the blender way of compressing the files in making the cash file a little bit smaller. We also have the open VTB will talk about that in just a second and then we have the raw cash. This is the raw file format. Without any compression, this will be a lot larger than the unique cash. So I recommend you stay on this file format here, open VTB is pretty cool, and this allows you to export the information from your simulation as a VTB, which you can then import into different programs such as you, Deanie or unity or something like that. We will talk about this any later video and we will actually be importing it into unity. So stay tuned for that. Underneath the data, we also have that the particle fire for men and there's currently only one which is just the unit cast, we just leave it right there. And then we also have the mesh file format. There is binary object files and then object found right here. Binary has a little bit of compression which will save space on your hard drive. And then object files has no compression, so it will be a little bit of a larger file. I'm just going to leave it on a binary. And that's basically all of the settings in the cash. So keep in mind if you don't set a custom cast folder right here, it will. So keep in mind if you don't set a custom cash holder, you will lose the simulation once you close the program. So if you're wanting to render like half of it or keep working on it, make sure you set a custom folder by clicking this button on the side. 17. Field Weights: we have one more panel to go through in the domain settings we have, the field waits. This allows us to change how the simulation reacts to force fields and also gravity. In this simulation, I've added in a force field right here. And to do this, you can press shift a and go underneath force field, and you will see a lot of different force fields that you can add. The wind force field will just give a constant wind along the side that you pointed to and you can also give it a strength. I set mine to 25 then the flow is set to one. Now, if we go back over to our domain settings, we can take a look at what these do. If I player my assimilation, we can see the wind is pushing the simulation along this side until it crashes into the side of the domain. Now, currently it's at 100% and I can tweak how strong this force field is by changing the wind force field down here. So if I was to set this all the way down to zero and bacon this simulation, this wind force field will no longer affect this immolation because we set it to zero down here. We also have an all option here. So if we have multiple force fields, this controls everything. And if we turn that all the way down, no force fields will affect the simulation. Now, we also have the gravity option right here. Now, this does not affect the simulation. If I turn this all the way down and we bake in the data, let's go ahead and free that bake and then click on Big Data will pause it right about there. We can see this does not affect the gravity. The fluid is still flowing down. Now, if we wanted to affect the gravity, what we would need to do is go over to this panel right here. The scene panel and then in the gravity section, turn the Z value down to zero. Now, this will affect the gravity. So now if we bake this in, we can see it's starting to work down there will pause it right there and you can see the fluid is staying in mid air because there is no gravity in the scene. So this gravity value does not do anything. If you want to change the gravity, you're going to need to do that in this gravity panel right here. I'm going to go ahead and set that back to negative 9.8. That is the default setting. And now it can keep going in this field waits panel. Now, the last thing that will talk about is the effect, er, collections. This allows you to select collections with force field and limit those. So, for example, if you were to have multiple force fields and you only want some of those force fields to affect the simulation, you will put that in right here. So, for example, I'm going to select this force field and move it down to collection, too. Then I'm gonna press shift day and add in a another wind force field. I'll rotate it up like this. I'll place it on the side and give it a strength of 15. So now we have one force field in collection one and another force field in collection, too. I'm going to select my domain, and I only want the force field in collection one to affect the simulation. So what? I'm gonna do is select Collection one over here. So now this force field will no longer affect this immolation. The only one that will be affecting it is this Force field. Now, if I select my domain, free the data and bake it one more time. And now if we play our simulation, this is not working. And I think the reason for that is because I forgot to turn up the all option right here. So we're gonna go ahead and turn that back all the way up to one and the wind all the way up to 1 to 1 actually affects the simulation. And we'll also turned up gravity. And we will free this data and bake it back in because I am dumb and forgot to change that . And now that we have all of our settings correct, we go ahead and player simulation and you can see this is working properly. This force field no longer has an effect on the simulation. The only one that has an effect is this one right here? Because it is in collection one. And we set up that collection in the field waits affect her collection. So there you go. That is all of the settings in the domain. Thank you for watching. And in the next video, we will take a look at flow objects, inflows and outflows in all of that. 18. Flow Objects Geometry: Hello, everybody. And welcome to a new section in this section. We're going to take a look at flow objects, outflows, materials and more. In this video, we will take a look at the flow object and learn exactly what these settings over on the right do and how they change the simulation. So first off, we have the flow type. This is currently set to liquid. We have fire, smoke, fire and then the liquid just like that. Since you are learning about the fluid simulation, we're going to stick with liquid underneath that we have the flow behavior. There are three different types that we can choose from. Inflow will constantly add fluid to your scene. The outflow will take away fluid, and geometry will just be the shape of the mess that you have applied the flow object to. In this case, it's just going to be a cube underneath that we have sampling sub steps. If your fluid is moving at very high speeds, sometimes it can skip a location and there will be a gap in between where the fluid is. In that case, you're gonna want to turn up the sampling sub steps. This will sample more steps, every single frame and give you a more smooth fluid. The flow source is currently set to mesh, and that is the only option in the fire simulation. You can see underneath that there is a particle system tab, but in the fluids English and there is only master. That is the only option that you have selected. So it's just going to emit from the mesh itself. The option here, called is Plain, are this check box will tell blender that the object that you've applied of the flow to is a plane or something that's really thin with regular fluid simulations. Using a plane does not work very well. So you're gonna want to turn up. Is plain are if you're using a plane for the flow object. Thes surface emission value controls how far away the fluid is going to be from the object that you've applied the flow to since it's at zero. It's just going to be the exact size of this cube, but for this example, let's go ahead and bring this up to a value of one. So when we bake in the simulation, it's going to have a little bit of fluid along the outside edges of this cube. And underneath that we have initial velocity. This is where we get into some interesting stuff. If we turn this on, we can give the fluid some initial velocity right at the start of the simulation, we have the source right here and this deals with the movement of the flow object. For example, if we were to animate this object here, let's say it starts here at frame one and moves across. What this will do is it will move the fluid with the flow object. If we turn up this source value underneath the source, we have the normal value and this will enable the fluid to emit along the normals. Now, if you don't know what normals are, they're basically the way the faces on your mesh are pointed. And to actually see this we can attorneys on in the three D V ports. If we go into edit mode and then go over to this menu here, we can enable the normals it down here. So if we turn on the faces and bring the size up, these are what the normals look like. And you can see which way they're pointing. So if we were to turn up the normal value here, Italy Mitt fluid in that direction, I'm just gonna leave it at zero for now. And finally, underneath the normal, we have the initial X and Y and Z location. These values will enable us to give the fluid some initial velocity along the access that we choose. So, for example, along the X axis what I want for this simulation is for the fluid to fly off in this direction and hit this wall. So I'm going to set the initial velocity along the X to a value of two. So when we bake in the simulation, it will shoot the fluid out along this side. Now let's go ahead and bacon our simulation. So I'm going to select the domain and then just click on bake data down here. We can see the progress far, and once it reaches 50 weaken player assimilation. And now if we restart and hit the space bar, we can see the initial velocity is working. It shoots the fluid out and it hits the wall. Let's go ahead and restart and play. It just like that, and that is pretty cool. And another thing to note is the fluid is along the outside edges of our cube. Since we set up the emission surface to a value of one, you can see it's along this edge, and then if we go to the side, it's along this edge. It's outside the borders because we set the surface submission up. So there we have it, that is the flow behavior geometry, and in the next video, we will take a look at inflows and outflows. 19. Inflows & Outflows: in this video. We're taking a look at the inflow objects in the fluid simulation here. I've created a basic scene where we have an outflow down here and we have an inflow up here . The outflow takes away fluid from the simulation. So what we can do to demonstrate this is all? Select the inflow and we can see here there is another check box called the use inflow. What this allows you to do is animate when this object is admitting fluid into your scene. So what I want is for this scene to emit fluid for about 30 frames. And then I wanted to turn off. So what I'm gonna do is place my cursor right here at frame 30 and then I can hit this little button on the side to add in a key frame to this use inflow. Note. Then I can go to the next frame by hitting the right arrow and then uncheck in this and adding and another key frame by hitting that little box on the side. So it's going to admit fluid for 30 frames and then turn off at frame 31. Now if we were to bake this right now. There's not gonna be that much fluid in the scene. That is because we need to turn up the initial velocity. If we turn this on, we can enable this to emit fluid at a constant rate. I wanted to emit fluid going down, so I'm going to set the negative Z direction up to about negative 1.5. Once we do that, we can now bake it. And this will constantly emit fluid going in the negative direction. If we take a look at the outflow object, we have all of the basic settings here. Once again, we have the sample sub steps. We have the emission surface. So if we were to turn this up, the outflow will affect a bigger area. I'm just gonna leave it and zero for now. Now, if we select our domain, we can go ahead and bake in the simulation we can see down here, it's baking, and once it reaches frame 50 we can see it. Now. If we restart and play this, we can see it's constantly adding food, and it's constantly taken away the fluid because this is the outflow. Look at that. One more time. The higher you set the initial velocity values, the faster food will be emitted into your scene. So here you can see I set this value to negative four. And now if we player a simulation, we can see fluid is being emitted a lot faster. So if you want more fluid more quickly, you can turn these values up down here. So there you go. Those are the settings in the inflow and the outflow. And in the next video, we'll take a look at collisions. 20. Collision Objects: hell over one. And in this video, we're going to take a look at collisions in the fluid simulation to enable collision. You need to select an object and go over to the flu tab. Select it and underneath type you need to set this over to affect er we can see here. The effect or type is currently set to collisions. Weaken C collision and then we can see guides. Guides is a little bit more complicated, and we'll get into that in a later video. For now, we're gonna look at collisions. There are only two options for collision Objects we can see is plain are. And once again, if you are using a plane or something that is completely thin, you're gonna want to turn this value on. Since this is an enclosed mesh that has some thickness, I'm gonna leave this value off. We also have surface thickness, and this will give a invisible border around the mesh. And if I was to turn this value up, the collision box would probably be around here instead of right on the mesh. Since I want it to be right on the mesh, I'm going to set the surface thickness to a value of zero. Now let's go ahead and bacon this immolation to see what this looks like. So I'm going to click baked data in the domain settings, and since we are using a collision, we can see it's baking a lot slower. Now the bake has finished, and now we can player simulation and we can see this is working properly. It's colliding with the monkey head. Go ahead and play that one more time, just like that, and it's going all the way around now, before this video ends, I do want to take a look at the is plain our value right here a little bit closer. And how this works is it deals with objects that are non manifold, and what that means is objects that don't really exist or can't exist in the real world. This plane right here cannot exist in the real world because it is completely flat. So what we need to do with objects like this is we need to turn this value on now. If we turn this on, it's not gonna work. What we need to do is also turn up the surface thickness so if we were to set this to a value of about 0.1, we can now bacon our simulation, and this should work properly once it makes 200 frames Weaken player simulation and we can see it's still going to through the mess. In that case, we need to turn up the surface that this even higher. So let's go with a value of about 0.4. Now. If we select our domain, free this data and bake it again, this should work. If it doesn't, we're gonna need to go even higher. So now if we play a simulation, we can see it is working, and it's colliding with the surface of the plane. So if you're fluid objects are going through, you do need to turn up this surface thickness. This will help tell blender where the service is, and it will accurately display the fluid simulation 21. Adding Physics to Multiple Objects: in this video, I'll be showing you a very quick and easy way to add in physics to a lot of different objects all at once. Let's say, for example, you have a scene where there is a bunch of collision objects that you want to interact with the fluid instead of going through one by one and going over to the physics tab, enabling fluid and selecting the effect. Er, you can do this very easily by doing one. Then select everything but hidden. Be yuk unbox, select everything I'll do you select the domain and make sure your active object the object that has the yellow outline is the object that has the effect or modifier to it. Then if you press control l or command L on a Mac and you select modifiers now, every single object will have that exact modifier. There's also works for the different settings. So let's say, for example, I set the surface thickness to a value of 0.7. Now, if I do that exact same thing, all de select the domain all hit control l and apply the modifiers. Now every single object will have that exact setting right there This also works for domains, flow objects, smoke simulations, all that using this method hit control L you comply the modifiers. This also works for material. So if I select one of these objects and create a new material, let me just exit out of this one. Create a new material and I'll just give it like a blue color. Then if I box select everything to select the domain control l I can select materials. Now, every single one of these objects will have that exact material. So there you go a very easy and quick way to add in a bunch of fluid settings to a lot of different objects. 22. Realistic Fluid Material in Cycles: hello grown. And in this video we're going to learn about index of refraction and the fluid material. So in TV and cycles, there are multiple ways to render fluid, and in this video will focus on cycles. In a later section, we will jump into evey and learn how to render the water and a V and make it look realistic . For this video, though, we'll stick with cycles. So what we're gonna do here is render out this simulation that we have, and basically this is a inflow object. This object has a velocity of nine along the X, so it's shooting water across and hitting the domain in the domain settings. I've set the resolution to 1 28 and I've also set the boundary options to a subdivision of two with a 20.1 particle generate value. Here, the animation is 100 frames long, but I want to render this frame here, which is frame 30. And what we're gonna do is look into the material to add a material to your domain. All you have to do is have it selected. Go over to the material tab and if you use the default you. You should already have a material in place. If not, all you have to do is just click that new button. Any new material will pop up. You can if you want to change this to a glass shader right here. And this is basically what you want to use for fluid. Or you can keep the principal Chatur. The principal Chatur has basically everything that you'll need for creating materials, so I'll just leave it as this. The first thing that will do is change the color all the way to White so that the value is at one. And then another thing that'll do is scroll down to the transmission value here. If you turn this all the way up to one, it'll act like glass. Currently, though, the roughness is at 0.5. And if we take a look at the preview, you can see this is what it looks like. We need to turn the roughness down so it actually looks like water suffer turned that down all the way to zero. Now you can see through the glass. Now let's talk about the Iowa are and this stands for index of refraction. This is basically how light passes through the glass. The light will go through it and bounce a certain number of times and it will distort the way it looks. And here is where you set that value. Now, if we take a look at this cheat sheet, we can see that there are a lot of index of refraction values. So, for example, ice is 1.31 Then if we look at water weaken, seawater is 1.33 So what we would do is take a look at this sheet right here, then go back over to blunder and we would set the index of refraction to that number. Since I'm going for water, I'm gonna be set in this to 1.333 And there we go. So now if we take a look at the preview, we can see the water is a little distorted, and that's what we want. Now let's do a quick render with this scene to see how our water looks like. We need to add some lighting. So I'm gonna be using an HDR to light up our scene. And if you're following along, you can go download this HDR and it's in the article previous to this video. So I'm gonna go to environment texture. I'm going to cook open and the navigate to where? My HDR czar, the HDR that I want to use is this one right here. Dry field, four K. So once you have it selected, just click open and it will open up into your scene. I'm gonna delete the lamp since we already have some lighting with the HDR and then all power shift A and add in a plane to just be the ground and I'll skillet up for the camera. I'm just gonna position it right about here and then hit control Ault and then zero on my number pad to snap the camera to view. Then with its elected, I'll just press G Middle mouse button and dragged backwards. Now, currently, the plane that we use for our inflow is still in the scene. And if we render this, you'll see a small plane just hanging out right there, floating in the air. I don't want that. So what I'm gonna do is hide it in the rendered view. You can do that by clicking on this camera icon right here. And if you don't see these icons, just click on this menu and have the camera icon enabled. Now, with that done, let's go over to the previous settings. Here is where you set the samples for your render and the high you set this suit, the better the image will look, but the longer it will take the render in the light paths, we can see that these are the max bounces. Sometimes these values will slow down or speed up the render, depending on what your rendering and these options here, reflective college sticks and refractive cost. Six. These air basically the white dots that appear sometimes when you render glass or smoke or anything that has volume or transparency or glossy nous. Those are what we call fire flights. With these two options, these will help get rid of those. Now that that's out of the way, let's go ahead and render out this image to render and blender. What you need to do is come up to render and then click render image. You can also see the shortcut is F 12 So if I press F 12 it'll public a new window and it will start to render. Once this is done, we'll take a look at it. All right. Here is our result, and as you can see, it does look pretty nice. The water is nice and clear. There's a lot of reflections on the side, and that is how you create realistic water. In the next video, we'll take a look at the ocean modifier. 23. The Ocean Modifier: Hello, everyone. And welcome to a new video. In this one, we're going to be taking a look at the ocean modifier. The ocean modifier allows you to create realistic oceans pretty easily. To get to it, you have to have an object selected. Go over to the modifier tab, click add modifier and then ocean. Once you do that, whatever mess that you have selected will be turned into an ocean. For this example, I used to Cuba and you can see the Cuba is gone and replaced with a plane over on the right . We have a lot of different options. This might look a little bit intimidating, but don't worry. It's actually pretty simple to understand. Let's go through a couple of these. The 1st 1 we have here is the geometry. So right now it's set to generate, so it's basically taking the Cube, getting rid of it and generating a plane. If I set this to displace, it will try to displace the original mess, which is in this case, a cube. Since there's only eight Vergis is on this cube, it's not gonna work properly, so most of the time I would set this to generate underneath that we have a couple options. Here we have repeat X. This will just repeat the ocean along the X access. So if I turn this up to two, you can see it's repeating. And if I said that, why to two as well that you can see it goes back. I'm going to set both of these back to one. Underneath that we have time. This is the time of the ocean. So if we turn this up, you can see the ocean is starting to move in. Just a little bit will be animating this time value and so the ocean will be moving in The animation that you saw at the beginning of the video, the next one will talk about is death. So this basically is three depth of the ocean. So if this is set to a high number, there's going to be bigger waves. If it's set to a lower number, it's gonna have smaller waves. So basically, since this is set to 200 blender things, that this ocean has a depth of 200 meters, which is quite large, so there's going to be bigger waves. We also have the random seed. So if you currently don't like how the waves look, you can set the random seat up a little bit and change it to whatever you want until you find something that you like. Now we get into the waves before I talk about the choppiness. I want to first talk about this scale so the scale changes how big the waves are. So you can see if I turn this up, the waves become a lot bigger. And now for the choppiness. Basically, this makes the waves sharper. So if I zoom in on this wave right here and I turned up the choppiness, you can see it kind of pushes the waves together a little bit and makes the edge a little bit sharper. Sometimes, though, if you do it too much, the waves will start to clip through each other. So you want to be careful with this value. Also, if you set the scale to a higher number as well, the waves will start to clip through, and it will look a little bit weird. So I'm going to set this back down to a reasonable number, probably around there. The smallest wave here. This is basically the smallest way that can be in our scene. So currently it said 2.1 So there's going to be a lot of different waves in our in our ocean. But if this is set to a higher number, it's gonna get rid of most of waves. And so now the smallest wave is 6.5 meters big. Normally, I would set this to a really low number so you can get as much detail in different sizes in the waves, the wind speed. This will also create bigger waves if you're using the time value. So if I turn it up really big, I set the time value up. You can see the ocean is moving quite a bit because there's a lot of wind in the scene. I'm going to send that back to 30 and now we get into the resolution. This is pretty easy to understand. If I turn this up, the ocean will look better. But as you can see, the Verdecia count also go up. Currently we're at 6700 if I bring this up to, let's say 15 we can now see that we're at 51,000 Vergis ease. And if I could press Z and go into wire frame, we can see what our ocean looks like for a final render. I would usually bring this up to a value of 32 let's just take a look at that to see how it looks. So 32 and you can see there is a lot of geometry. There's over one million Vergis is now, and there's a lot of detail in our ocean. I'm going to set this back to 15 just so it runs a little bit faster, and underneath that we have two different options size and spatial size. The size right here just basically scales up the ocean. It's just like pressing s on a object. It just skills it up accordingly. Just like that, the difference between size and spatial size If I turn up the spatial size, this is calculating the size in meters, and it's giving us a more accurate results, and you can see if I turn this up. It's also changing the way the waves look, so it's accurately bringing up the size of our ocean and also making sure the waves stay accordingly. I'm going to set that back to 50. And now the alignment. This is the alignment of the waves. So if I turn this all the way up to 10 and then I turn up the time value, you can see the ocean waves are going in one direction. We can also set that direction down here. So if I wanted to go at a 45 degree angle, I could go 45 and then move up the time value and you can see they're going at a 45 degree angle. If I slowly bring the alignment down, it's gonna still go in that direction. But it's gonna be a little bit more loose. And if I bring up the time value, you can still see they're going in that direction. But it's not as strict, this dampening value. Basically what this does is it will help all of the waves go in a certain direction. So if the alignment is all the way up to 10 so it's going every way was going in that direction, and the dampening is set to zero. The waves are gonna like bounce off each other, and there's not gonna be that much alignment. As you can see there, they're not going in that direction. They're just kind of hitting each other and flowing every which way. If the dampening is all the way up to one, every single wave will go in that direction, as you can see here. So the waves are not bouncing off each other. They're just flowing in that direction so you can control the strength of the alignment with this damping to value. And you can get some interesting results before we get into the generate normals and foam and all that stuff. Let's go ahead and set a animation key frame on our time value. So what I'm gonna do is set this value to one and then make sure I'm on frame one that I'm gonna hover over the time value and hit I on my keyboard. Next, let's go to frame 100 let's try setting this to a value of five. So once I said it to five, I'm gonna hit I one more time while hovering over it. And now if we go back to the start of our animation and hit the space bar, do you play weaken, see what this looks like. Now you might notice that it starts out slow and then speeds up and then slows down again. This is because the default for blender animation is set to a B zier curve. This looks quite weird with an ocean modifier. So to fix this, what we're gonna do is open up a new window. So drag this out, click on this menu here and go over to the graph editor. Then select your ocean modifier. Here. We can see that this is the curve we have for our animation. So it starts out slow, it speeds up at this angle, and then it slows down right at the start to fix this, we're gonna hit tea and then set it to linear. And as you can see here, it's now a constant rate. So now if we play the animation again, we can see this is what it looks like, and it looks a lot better. So I'm gonna go ahead and close this off, and then I'm going to set the end frame down here to 100. We can also see that right here. We have a little bit of clipping in our ocean. So what I'm gonna do is bring this scale down just a little bit, So that wave doesn't look like that. Now, if we restart the animation and play it, this looks pretty good. Now that we've done that, let's go ahead and talk about the generate normals and generate phone. 24. The Ocean Material: we have two different check boxes right here. Generate normals and generate phone. Generate normals will enable us to generate the normal maps for this plane here and then use those in the material editor for this example though we aren't going to use that. We will turn on generate foam, though, and I'll show you exactly how that works. So if we turn on generate foam weaken, set the coverage right here. This determines how much foam is in our scene. So if I said this to a value of 0.2, that's a pretty decent amount of foam. And that will look pretty good if you set this to hire like, let's say, one. Your ocean will be completely filled with foam and it will just look white. So you want to be careful with this value, and I'm just gonna go with 8.2. Next to that, we have foamed at a layer name. This is where we set a name for our foam, which we can then import into the material for this case. I'm gonna be typing in foam. And so now when we go into the note, editor will use that name to bring in the phone. We also have the option to bake in our ocean and weaken. Set the foam fade when the phone fades out, the end frame right here and the cash path. You don't have to bake in this ocean modifier, but it has its advantages. For example, it's faster when you use store data rather than recalculating every time you play it. It also allows for external renders. So, for example, if you send this to a render farm, you might want to bake in the ocean, and then it also enables you to have more advanced foam maps. So basically that means if we click a bake, it will take our phone data and convert it into a bunch of images and place it into the folder that we specify right here. So what I did for a test, I set a custom baked folder right here, and we can see all of the files that it exported. It's currently going up to a value of 40 and we can see the displacement map. It's dot e x r. And then we also have the foam dot e x r. Now, if you have a program like photo shop. You can open up these files and see what they look like. So if I go over to photo shop, we can see this is what our foam layer looks like. You can see there is a lot of foam in our scene, and then this is what the displacement map looks like. So with this data, you can go ahead and put those into the note editor and have some more complex. You can animate this. There's a lot more things that you can do with bacon your ocean rather than just setting it to generate phone for the sitar. Although we will only use generate foam and we're not gonna be setting in a cast folder. Now that we've clicked on generate phone, let's go ahead and set up the material. So first off for the lighting because I want to be able to see what this looks like. I'm gonna be using an HDR now. There is a link to this HDR in the project files or in the article previous to this video. So once you have it, go over to the world settings, click on this button here and click on environment texture. The environment texture allows you to import 3 60 degree images into your scene. Then click open navigates where your HD ours are. Mine are right here. Then click on the three k and then go open image. Once we do that, we comprised Z and go into runner view. And currently I'm using cycles and we can see that are HDR is working now. I don't want to see the HDR. So what I'm gonna do is go over to the world settings underneath, Phil underneath film. I'm gonna turn on transparent so we only see the ocean next. Let's set of the material. So with the ocean selected, I'm gonna open up a new window, click on this button here and go to the Shader editor. Then I'm gonna hit end to close off that panel for this ocean modifier. I'm going to select my principal shader and set the transmission value all the way up to one. This will enable it to look like glass. Then we need to set the roughness down to zero and we can see this is the effect. And then the Iowa, which we talked about in a previous video. We're gonna be setting this to 1.333 for the base color. I'm gonna be setting this to a blue color and then I'm also gonna dark in this up, so somewhere around there will look pretty good. And as you can see here is starting to look like an ocean. The next thing I'll do is I'll import that foam layer. So to do this, we're gonna give ourselves a little bit of room all press shift, a adding a shader and then add Shader place that right here, then, Oprah shit day. Go to input and then attribute. Now here is where we type in that name. So if we take a look at our name here we have foam. So let's go ahead and type in the word foam. And now if we add in a let's just move this a little bit over here. If we add in another principle, Chatur will go. Shader Principled! Right here We take the color, plug it into the base and then take this output and plug it into the ad Shader. We can see we have some foam in our scene. So what I'm gonna do is bring up the transmission just a little bit. And I'm also going to set the Iowa are 21.333 and the roughness all turned down to a value of 0.1. Now that looks pretty good right now, but you can't really see the phone too well. So to fix that, let's go ahead and press shift A and added a color and then hue, saturation node and place that in between the attributes and the principal Chatur. Now, if we turn up this value to, let's say, four, we can see the foam a lot better. Another thing I'll do is all, said the resolution to a higher number. So let's go with 32. And once you do that, we conceive. Blender is starting to slow down, and there we could see a lot more detail in our phone, and that is looking pretty sweet. Now, if you want more control over where the phone is, what we can do is press ship day and add in a converter and then color around. I'll place that in between the hue, saturation and the principal Chatur. If I drag this Colorado closer of the black value closer to the white. It'll clamp down on that foam, and as you can see, there's, ah, lot less and are seen. If I drag the white over, it'll ADM. Or color or more foam to are seen just like this and we can get some interesting results. I'm gonna go with a little bit black because I think it's a little too much from at the moment. So I'll drag it up just a tiny bet somewhere around there. And that looks pretty neat. Now that we've done that, I think we're ready to render. So I'm gonna go ahead and select that lamp and press X and delete it. Then I'll just close out this window right here. The next thing we'll do is operas eat and go into solid view and find. Find a frame that I like, so I'll just scroll through here a little bit and maybe I'll try 60. So frame a 77 is the one that I like. So this is the one that I will render. So next I'll just position the camera somewhere around here. All hit control Ault and Numb Pad zero to snap the camera to view command option zero on a Mac, then all select my camera G Middle mouse button and drag it back until we can see the full ocean. Now you might get this clipping right here, and that is because blenders default setting and the camera setting the end is set to 100 meters. So currently, that's longer than 100 meters away. So we need this at the end value to, let's say, 500 in the camera settings right here. And there we go. We can see the entire ocean now, so this frame looks pretty good. Then I'll go over to the sampling. I'll leave it at 128 and everything else is perfectly fine. Then what we'll do is I'll go up to render and click on render image. All right, so here is our result. That looks pretty good. You can see the phone looks really nice. So now you can go ahead and render this into an animation are just a regular image and send it to me. I would love to see what you create. Thank you for watching, and I'll see you guys in the next section 25. Obstacle Course P1 Modeling: Hello, everybody. And welcome to a new section in this section We're going to be creating the animation that you see on screen right now will be jumping into men's flow and learning how to use fluid particles and creating a really cool simulation. Let's go ahead and get started. The first thing that will do in this video is just set up the obstacle course for the fluid to go through this is going to be pretty simple. We're gonna be modeling some stairs, adding in a couple of different cubes on the side. And it's gonna be pretty easy for this cube right here. I'm going to go into edit mode and we're going to create some stairs. A very easy way to create stairs and blender is with the new bevel function. If I selected both of these edges by holding shift, selecting them and hitting control be, I can drag this down just a little bit and then left. Click. If I opened up this bevel panel and click on custom profile Weaken set the preset over here . If we select stairs, we concede this is what the Bevel will look like. Now all we have to do is turn up the segments and we can see here it's starting to work, so keep turning up the segments until it fills out the entire thing. The offset controls how big the stairs are going to be. So I'm gonna drag this down to about there and there we go. We have stairs in about two seconds, so that is pretty cool. Now we can customize this how we want. So what we'll do is also like to both of these bottom Vergis e's hit X and then just delete them. So we just have stairs just like this. Then we'll go into object mode and scale this outwards. I'm gonna press s and X and skill it along the X who get a long staircase like this. And then I will go into front view. Let's go into a wire frame so we can see what we're doing by pressing Z and hitting wire frame. And now let's add in the rest of the objects. So I'm gonna place the stairs right about there and I'll skilling down just a little bit. Then I'll press shift a at in a cube and this is going to be just a plane going down like this. I'm gonna press s and Z and scale it down right about there. Then impress s and X and scale it along the X. So it's a little bit longer. They don't press G and just rotated. How I want something like that will look pretty good. And you can also press s x x. You had it twice and you can skillet along the normals and I'll drag it out just about their next. Let's press multi onto this cube. And what lt does shift ages duplicates it all. D will link it. So now if we go into edit mode and we do any changes, it will also do that exact change for this one as well. This includes materials and any editing that you do now we can rotate this in place it how we want. So right about there, I think we'll look pretty good. So fluid is going to roll down this way. Come down this and then accumulate at the bottom right here and now for the domain. I'm gonna press shift A at in a cube will scale this cube up until it matches the signs of our obstacle course so right about their looks. Good. Then impress S and Z and scale it up. So we have a taller cube. There we go. So now we have this sort of obstacle course, and the next thing I'll do is add in some walls on the side. I'm gonna press shift a at an another cute. I'll place it over on the left, press s and X and scale it down and they will press s and Z and scale it up. So we get a taller cube SZ one more time and then I might make it a little bit thinner right about there. And then I'll press all d to duplicate it an X to lock it to the easy access or to look into the X access and then I'll place it over on that side. Now, to make this a little bit better, I'm going to go into edit mode on these cubes right here and just drag these in just a little bit. So they're inside this cube, so it just looks a little bit better. And I'll drag this one this way. There we go. And then, of course, we need a flow object to actually input fluid into our scene. So I'm gonna press shift a at in another cube and I'll please it over on the top, skill it down and then press s and X and skill it down on the X. Do we get something like that? There we go. And then finally, the last object will add in this video is a plane for the background. So I'm gonna pressure today at an A mesh and plane hit our X 90 and then enter and then just scale it up pretty big. And finally, we'll just position these in place. So I'm gonna press s And why, along the domain to make it thinner, right about their looks. Good. Also like the plane. Move it backwards and to see what we're doing. We can press seven on the number pad and we can go into top you and just place this right there. So, like the domain, one more time and press s and why? And make sure it's the same with as the stairs. So right about there and then for these objects as well, you can select him both go back into top view in scale it down. So they're the same size as the domain. And there we go. We now have our obstacle course in place, and in the next video, we can start simulating. 26. Obstacle Course P2 Simulating: All right. Now, let's go ahead and create this simulation, some going to select the domain and go over to the domain settings and enable fluid and set the type over to domain. And, of course, the type is gonna be set over to liquid just like that. And then for the flow object will go ahead and select it, enable fluid and set the type over to flow. Switch it to liquid and for the flow behavior. I'm going to select inflow before we move on to any other objects. Let's go ahead and fix some of these settings. First off, I'm gonna open up the flow source and said the service emission to a value of 0.4. This will just bring more fluid into our scene. I'm also going to enable initial velocity and set the X direction to a value of 0.5 so it shoots to fluid along the X direction. Going this way, This use inflow check box right here. I'm also going to animate. So what I want is for it to emit fluid for 40 frames. So I'm going to skip to frame 40 and add in a key frame right there go to the next frame by hitting the arrow key, and then we're going to uncheck the use inflow and enable another check box so it will stop emitting fluid into are seen at a frame 41. Now, let's go ahead and go back over to the domain. I'm gonna leave the resolution at 64 the time scale. I'm gonna bring down 2.5 just so it slows down the simulation and then over here in the liquid particles, I'm gonna go ahead and enable that. And for the narrow bandwidth were currently with it sent to three, it will just have a thin line of particles at the top. If we were to turn this up to, let's say, a value of 10 it would have the entire thing filled with particles, and that is what we want. I'm also going to turn on fractional obstacles, and so it will slide along these obstacles a little bit more smoothly and for the end frame , I'm going to set this to 200. And finally, the last step is to add in the obstacles. So all select this obstacle here, the stairs and before we add in the physics. Let's go ahead and add in a solidify modifier because currently it's completely flat. I'll add in a solidify modifier. Bring it up a little bit, and we can also press control A. Apply the scale so it scales it evenly and turn on even thickness as well. There we go. So now that we have a little bit of thickness, something like that will look good. We'll select all of these objects and go over to the physics tab, enable fluid and set the type over to effect er and for the surface thickness. I'm gonna bring this up to a value of 0.3 hit control L and applied the modifiers to it and applies the fluid to each of these objects. And it looks like we got rid of the solidify modifier. So we'll just go ahead and add that back in. We'll bring up the thickness just a little bit. And there we go. And make sure this is above the fluid. So it actually takes into account the solidify modifier. And now that we've done that, let's select our domain and bake this in. So they're going over to the domain settings. Go ahead and click on a bake 27. Obstacle Course P3 Everything Else: the simulation is done baking, and now we can play this to see what it looks like. And that looks pretty cool. And as you can see, the entire thing is filled with particles. So now let's go ahead and apply a object to be those particles. To do this, I'm gonna press shift a at an a mesh and then an Aiko sphere right here and then open up this panel and turn the subdivisions down to a value of one. Then we'll move this over to the left and scale it down. Select your domain and go over to the particle tab and select the particle system right here underneath view poor and render. I'm gonna select render as halo to render as object and then, of course, for the instant object. So, like the Eiko sphere, then we will select the atmosphere and zoom in and scale these down. How we want, so probably around there will be good will player simulation to see what it looks like. If you want the particles to be bigger, just go ahead and skill up the ICUs fear. If you want them to be smaller, go ahead and skilled down the ICUs fear. I think they're pretty good how they are. So now let's go ahead and select the domain one more time. And I'm also going to turn off show emitter and then turn off show emitter in the view port as well. This is important if you don't do this year for seen will just render a solid cube. Now, if we go into solid view, we can see we have the particles just like that. And now we can set up the rest of the scene and render adapt. Now let's work on the materials and this is gonna be pretty easy. There's only gonna be two colors. I'm going to go into wire frame. And so, like all the objects also like the plane holding shift, also liked all of these objects right here, De select the domain and then we can go over to the material tab and click new on that material. This material is just going to be a blue color, so something like this will look pretty good. We can also go into rendered view to see how it looks as well. And this is going to be an E v. So make sure you come over to the runner settings and switch it over to E V, Hit Control L and Selected Materials. And now every single one of these objects that you have selected will now have that blue material that we just created now the material for the particles to go ahead and select the ICUs fear. Select a new and underneath the base color. I'm going to go with an orange color. Something like this will look pretty good. The lighting is a little bit dark, so select your lamp in the scene, press extra delete, then go over to the world settings. And I'm going to set the color all the way up to White somewhere around here and to give the scene a little bit more contrast and some shadows. I'm going to go over to the runner settings and enable Ambien inclusion. If we open up this panel and set the distance all the way up to one meter, we can see we have a lot more shadows in our scene and this looks a lot better. We can also select the obstacles on the sign and bring them in just slightly, So there are a little bit closer to the particles. I'll do the same for this one as well. Press G and acts and move him a little bit closer. There we go. That looks much better. And then I'll position the camera and we can render this out. I'll go into front view by hitting one and then hit controlled zero to snap the caramel to place. So, like the camera and then president to move and just place it how you want so g to move it g middle mouse button to drag it backwards, and I'm gonna position it so we have the entire view in the frame and we can see here. There's a little bit of a gap on the side, so also locked the plane and drive this up over in the outline. Er, I'm going to enable the camera icon by turning that on and then using the inflow object, I'm going to turn it off in the view port and in the render so it doesn't show up in the Render or the View port. And with that said, we can go ahead and turn on screen space reflections. Open up the color management and set the look to medium high contrast, and this will give us a little bit more contrast in this scene. As you can see here, over in the output section, we're gonna render this as a movie fella because TV does render a lot faster than cycles. I don't find the need to sequences out later, so I'm going to switch the file format over to MPEG and underneath the encoding, I'm going to set this to MP four and in the output quality, I'm going to select high. And, of course, we need to set a folder. So click on that button on the side and then navigate to a folder of where you want your movie file to go to. Oh, and also, make sure before you render you set the end frame to 200 down here so it doesn't render an extra 50 frames. I also just noticed that if we play our simulation that some of the particles go straight through this obstacle and that does not look good at all. If some of your particles are actually going through the obstacles, here are a couple of things that you can do to fix that first off in the domain settings, you can set the time maximum and minimum steps a little bit higher. I've set mine to seven and the minimum 24 And that seemed to fix a love the issues. Another thing that you can do is select the obstacles and skill them up just slightly doing S and Z twice. And you can skill them up just like this. The service thickness. I said 2.3 and I also turned on his plane. Are I did that for both of these and that seemed to work. So now when I play this simulation, we can see no particles are going through the obstacles and it's working properly as it should to render an animation and a V. What you need to do is make sure you have an output and the file format that you want to render in and then go up to render down to render animation. This will bring up a new window, and it will start to render out. So there you go. That is how you create a particle obstacle course to using Mansour flow. Thank you for watching. If you want to learn how to create a cube fluid animation, make sure to check out the next section 28. Rigid Body Cube Fluid P1 Active Objects: Hello, everybody. And welcome to a new section in this section. We're going to be creating the animation that you see on screen. We'll be learning a variety of topics in this section, including rigid body simulations, fluid collisions, particles and a couple more. So let's go ahead and get started in this video. We're going to create the rigid body simulation. So to do that, we're gonna be using a couple different objects. The first object is this cube, and this is going to hold the fluid. So what I'm gonna do is going to front view by pressing one, and then I'll move this over to the top left by hitting G. We're going to press shift E on this and drag this down and this is gonna be the first step of the collision. So the Cube is gonna hit this step and go down and just roll down until it reaches the plane at the bottom. I'm gonna press s and Z and scale this down right about there. Then I'm gonna press shift e, move it a little bit lower, shifty, and move this a little bit lower as well. Probably around there. Then most of life's All these. Move them up just a little bit and then fix the positioning if we need to. Next, let's go ahead and add in the plane cell press shift A and underneath mesh I'm going to add in a plane. This is going to be the ground for the cube toe land on and I'll steal it up pretty big. Now let's go ahead and create the rigid body simulation to do this. Let's go over to the physics tab and with the plane selected, I'm going to select rigid body. The type is going to be set to passive passive allows the object to stay in the exact position. It will have physics, but it won't move at all. Next, let's select these objects here also like this one holding shift, This one and then I will hold shift in, select this last cube right here, click on rigid body and then the type. We are also going to set too passive. Now, instead of doing this for every single object, we can go over to object down too rigid body and then click on copy from active. Now, each of these objects have that exact modifier. You can see this type of set to passive. This just allows you to add the passive to every object without having to do each one individually. Now we'll select the Cube, click on rigid body, and this time we're gonna leave it as active. Now, let's position the cube where we want, so I'll place it right about there. Now, let's test our simulation to see if this works. So I'm gonna hit the space bar and we can see this plane and we can see it crashes down. And that looks pretty good. We'll play that one more time. Not too bad. So I think that looks pretty good. Now, what we're going to do is find out where the cube lands, so it looks like it lands right about at frame 100. So we'll go to 110 next. We'll go over to this panel right here and open up the rigid body world. What we're gonna do is bake this animation to key frames. So then we will be able to use this Cuba as a collision in the fluid simulation because currently the rigid body does not work with the fluid simulation so we need to convert this to key frames. So jumping over to this tab, I'm gonna open up the cash settings and set the end frame to 1 10 Then we're going to click on bake and we can see here it already completed, and this is a current bake. Now we're going to bake this two key frames. So to do that, we're gonna go up to object down, too rigid body, and then click on bake two key frames. Once you do that, we can set the end frame to 1 10 and then the frame step. This is the amount of key frames it will skip. I'm going to go up to two, so it's going to skip every other key frame. Then I'm gonna click on OK, and here we can see all of these key frames. Now we can enable the fluid simulation and this will work properly. We don't need the rigid body simulation on any of these objects any more, so I'm just going to select them and get rid of them just by clicking. That X will get rid of each of these since we don't need it anymore. And now in the next video, we will set up the fluid simulation 29. Rigid Body Cube Fluid P2 Fluid: Now that we've baked are rigid body to key frames, we can now set up the fluid simulation and it will work properly. So what we're gonna do is press shift day. We're gonna add in a cube. This is going to be the domain. I'm gonna go into front view, drag this up along the Z and skill it up. Something like this will work perfectly fine. And then I'll press s and X and skilled along till it is on the outside of the cube will go into top view and crazy and go into a wire frame. Then we'll just go through the animation to see if it works. You want to make sure the domain is outside the end of the animation, which it is, and we can also maybe skeletal along the y just a little bit to make it a little bit smaller. We'll play that one more time, and the cube is inside the domain. And that is what we want. Now for the fluid object. We're gonna place a cube inside of this cube, so I'm gonna press shift a at a another cube. We'll go into front view into the low price of G and move it into place. I'll press s and scale it down a little bit and metal prices s and C and scale it down. I wanted to be about half the size of the cube to probably around there will work perfectly fine. Now it's set up the fluid simulation, so I'm going to select the domain, click on fluid and set the type two domain. Then, for the domain type, we're going to send it over to Liquid. Then we'll select this object. Fluid said the type to affect her, and we're gonna leave it as collision. And then this object here is going to be the flow. So set the type over to flow, and then we're gonna leave it on geometry, so switch it over to liquid and leave it on geometry. Now, the next step is pretty important because if you don't do this, it's not gonna work properly. I'm going to set the sample sub steps up to a value of four, and this will just help with fast movie and fluid. And I've noticed when doing this simulation that sometimes it breaks that we're gonna leave the subsets at four next. Let's elect the collision. Object the surface thickness with it just being a cube. It is too flat on the inside, so we need to bring the surface thickness up. 2.5. Another thing I'm going to do is go over to the modifier tab, click, add modifier and add in a solidify modifier. And we're gonna bring this above the fluid simulation so the fluid will actually take into account the solidify modifier. We're gonna drag this going in the negative direction up a little bit, too about their There we go. So now we have a really thick you, and that is what we want. Next, we're going to select the domain and go over to the settings over here. First off the time scale, I'm gonna drink that. I'm gonna bring that down 2.5 so it slows down the simulation, and the next step is pretty important as well. The time steps maximum and minimum values. This will help with the collision. I'm gonna drive these all the way up to 10 and then I'm gonna drag this one all the way up to eight minimum steps. If you don't do this, you're particles will maybe go through the cube and you don't want that. You want them to stay inside this cube, so turning up the time steps will help with that. Next, we'll scroll down to the liquid settings here, and I'm gonna turn on fractional obstacles. And this will help the collision of the fluid look a little bit better for the end frame. I'm gonna bring this up to 1 50 So what? So when it hits, 1 10 will have another 40 frames for the fluid to just kind of chill right here, moving back and forth and for the resolution, we're going to set this all the way up to 1 60 This will give us a nice high resolution for the fluid, and it will look pretty good. We will bake in the mesh. But before you do that, I do want to see how the particles look. And now that that is out of the way, let's go ahead and save her project just in case it crashes. And then I will click on a baked data. The bake is done. Now we can player simulation to see what it looks like. And there we go. That looks pretty cool. You will notice that the fluid is staying inside this cube. If you are having trouble with the particles leaving, make sure you turn up the time steps and make sure you have the collision objects set 2.5. And it has a solidify modifier above the fluid modifier right here. Now that this is working properly, let's go ahead and bacon, the mesh and the other particles. So I'm going to scroll down here to the mesh. I'm gonna turn this on. I'm gonna leave the uprise factor at a value of two, and then I'm going to bake in the mesh. Now that the mesh is done baking, we're gonna go ahead and open up this in particle panel and bacon every single one of these particles. I'm gonna turn on spray foam and bubbles and then underneath the combined export, I'm going to slide all of these spray foam and bubbles. What this will do is it will create a new particle system with every single one of those in one. So it's easier to add in an object later. And another thing that will do is set Thea Paris factor to a value of two, so we have more particles in the scene, Then I will click on bake particles. 30. Rigid Body Cube Fluid P3 Particles: Now that we have of the fluid simulation done, we're going to go ahead and set up the particles to do this will add in a Aiko sphere to be the particle. I'm gonna press shift a and go underneath mesh and then use in ICUs fear right here. Now, before you do anything else, make sure you open up this panel and turn the subdivisions down to a value of one. This will make it so. There is less geometry on the mesh because there is a lot of particles, and the more geometry you have, the more ram and memory it will take up. So with that said, I'm gonna close that panel and then move this over to the left. Next, select your domain, which is the fluid object right here. And go over to the particle tab and select the spray plus phone plus bubbles particles. I'm gonna open up the render and I'm gonna open up the view port display underneath, render as halo weaken selects, render as objects now before you. So let the ICUs fear I am going to turn the amount of particles down to 5%. The reason for this is because once we select the ICUs fear, it will really slow down the view port, and it will be hard to move. So with this set to 5% it will. It will enable us to move around the V Portmore more smoothly. Now for the instant object salt, like the Eiko sphere right here. Then select the atmosphere and we'll zoom it right now the particles are way too big. We can see them right there. So I'm gonna press s to scale and I'll drive this down and we can see here. It's already slowing down quite a bit, and I'll scale it down until the size that I want. So a little bit more than that, probably around there is good. No, a little bit more. Let's press s and scale it down even more. We want the particles to be really small. Something like that will be pretty good. And now that the particle is the correct size weaken, select the domain, turn it off in the view port and then bring the amount all the way back up to 100%. At the moment, this view port display is currently bugs. So if you were to leave it at 5% in the view port. It would also show up as 5% in the render. So what we need to do is bring it up to 100% and turn off in the view port so it doesn't like the scene. Now, let's go ahead and work on the rest of the scene. Select your collision object and I don't want this to show up in the render. I only want the fluid to show up. So to do this, we're gonna open up this panel here and turn on the camera icon and then turn it off in the rendered view by clicking that camera icon right there. Now, this will not show up in the render. It will only display in the view port. If you want to hide it from the report as well, you can click that little I button right there and then we can breath easy and go back into solid view. So let your fluid object, which is this cube right here. And I'm going to turn it off in the render and in the view port. So now we just have the fluid right here. In the next video, we will set up the materials and lighting 31. Rigid Body Cube Fluid P4 Animation: this next part, we're going to set up the materials. So the first material that we can do is this fluid object. I'm going to go over to the material tab and click on New. From there, I'm gonna bring the roughness all the way down to zero and then the transmission amount. I'm gonna bring that all the way up to one, so it looks like fluid. The Iowa are with stands for index of refraction. We're going to set this to 1.333 This is the Iowa are of water, and it's basically at how light passes through the object and distorts it. So we're going to set that to 1.333 because that is the Iowa of water for the base color. Let's give it just a slight blue color. You don't want to go crazy because it will look a little bit strange. Just a slight blue color, something like that. And this is what it looks like pretty cool for the rest of the scene. You can do whatever you want these obstacles here. I'm just going to give it a blue color, something like this, and these should all have the same material which they do because we duplicated it. The plane. I'm going to give it a new material and the roughness. I'm gonna bring that down to a value of points one. So we have a nice, glossy look right there. The lighting. I'm going to go over to the world settings, and I am gonna be using cycles for this render. You can use TV if you want to. For this, though, I'm going to stick with cycles. We will be jumping into evey in a later section. So stay tuned for that. I'm gonna president and go into rendered view so we can see what our lighting looks like. The world color right here. If we open up this, we can add in a texture of what we want to. You can use an environment texture or you can use a sky texture which what? Which is what we're going to do in this tutorial. So if I enable the sky texture, we can see if I look over here. This is what the sky looks like. Pretty cool. If I bring up the strength to a value of three, we can get some nice lighting. Then if I select this point land, we can change it over to a son by going over to this panel here, selecting the sun and giving it a strength of about two or three. Something like that will look pretty good. And you can rotate this how you want. If you want the shadow to be pointing in that direction, do whatever you would like, and that's basically all we really need to do. Now, the next step is to just set up the camera. I'm going crazy and go into solid view. And for this animation, I want the camera to actually move around. I'm gonna position my view port right about here. Then I'm gonna hit control Ault and zero on the number pad to snap the camera to view if you don't have a number, that you can do that exact same thing by going over to view down to a line view and then underneath here, a line active camera to view it's the same shortcut right there. Control Alton. Um, pad zero. Since I already did that, I'm just gonna press zero to go back into camera view, select the camera and I'll just move it around. You compress G to move it, and then G Middle mouse button to drag backwards and forwards opposition it right about here. Then I'm gonna hit I and add in a location key frame to the camera. Next. Underneath the timeline, let's set the end frame to 1 50 because that is how long the animation is. I'll skip to the end, then I'll press G on moving the camera down a little bit. We'll zoom in by heading G Middle Mouse button, rotated slightly and G and place it right about there and hit I and go location rotation. So now we will have an animation of the camera movie. And, as you can see here and just make sure that it goes all the way through the animation without losing track of the fluid, that looks pretty good. But another thing that I want to do is set the curve animation to a linear transition, because right now what this is doing is it's slowing down at the start. It's speeding up halfway in the middle and then slowing down at the end. This works for a lot of different scenes, but for mine. I don't want that to happen. I wanted to be a constant rate. So to fix that, we're gonna open up any new tab by dragging out the corner coming up here and switching over to the graph Editor Here is our animation data for our camera. If I select everything by hitting a I can t and click on Linear And now these are a constant straight line, so we won't have any speeding up or slowing down. It'll just be the exact same movement all throughout the animation. And this is what it looks like. I think that looks pretty good. So now we can close off this window by clicking in the top corner and dragging over to the side. 32. Rigid Body Cube Fluid P5 Rendering: and finally, for the last step, weaken set up the render. I'm going to select the fluid and right click and go shades mood just so it smooths out the fluid and then I'm going to go over to the render tap. The render sampling right here controls the amount of samples it will give per frame for Orender. And currently it's going to take a long time with 128. So I'm gonna bring this down to 40. Another thing that we can do is go over to this panel right here, the scene of you layer panel and turn on D Noisy data. Now let's go over to the compositing tab and enable the Denoix Zer the compositing tab. Is this have up here? And we can see we have a lot of different things right here that we can plug into. I'm gonna press shift a and go underneath filter and D noise. I'll place that right here. What this is going to do is Dean Oise the render. So there's not any of that grain or any of that noise in the scene. Then to get a little bit more data into it, so it looks better. We're gonna take the D noisy, normal, plugging that into the D noise, Then the d noise in Alvito putting that into the albedo just like that. And this will help make the render look a lot better. Now let's jump back over to the layout tab and go over to the output section. We're gonna render this into frames and then sequence it out later. The reason for this is because just in case it crashes, if you're rendering as a movie file, you'll lose that progress and you will have to restart. So I'm gonna leave it as PNG and I'm going to set a custom folder of where I want my friends to go to. Once you have found a folder, you can go ahead and click, Accept and now every single frame will go into that folder. You can also pause the render any time doing this method. If you uncheck overwrite, what it will do is it will start at wherever you left off, so it's going to start at one. But if I was to stop the render at let's say frame 43 it would resume at frame 44 keep going. If overwrite is on checks, if over it is checked, it will start back at one and overwrite every single image. With that said, we're gonna go ahead and save our projects and then go up to render and click on render animation. Once this is done rendering, we will take a look at it and sequence it out. The render is done at now, two sequences into a movie. Follow. What we need to do is go ahead and exit out of this window and then click on the plus sign on the top. Go down to video editing and then video editing. Or here this will bring us to a new window where we can add in our images and sequence it out. Make sure you were on frame one and then go over to add down to image sequence and the navigates where your images are. Once you have found them, we can see all of the images are right here. I'm gonna press a to select everything and then go add image strip and there we can see it going all the way across. Then all we have to do is just change it over to a movie, file the file format. I'm going to switch over to MPEG and then underneath the encoding, I'm gonna set this too. And before the output quality, I will set too high right here. Then we have to go up to render down to render animation. This will grab every single frame of that render and sequence it out. As you can see, it's moving a lot faster, and it will be in the folder that you specified in the output section. So there you go. That is how you create a fluid cube animation. If you created your own simulation, make sure you posted in the assignment after this video. Thanks again for watching, and I will see you in the next section. 33. Crashing Collisions P1 Animating: Hello, everybody. And welcome to a new section in the section. We're going to be creating the animation that you see on screen. We will learn how to animate collision objects and render this out using the new render engine Evie to get started. Let's go ahead and create the simulation and then we can start working on the E V settings for the simulation. I'm gonna use this default cube as the domain all skillet up, drag it up and skill it along the X. So it's a little bit longer. Then I'm gonna press shift D on this cube and then scale it down a little bit, then press S and Z and scale it down this way. And this is going to be our geometry flow object. Something like that will look pretty good. And then we can drag it down by hitting G and Z. Not too bad. If we go into a wire frame, we can see this a little bit better. And now for the collision objects, you can use whatever objects that you want and for the collision objects, you can use whatever you want. I'm gonna add in a monkey head for the first object. I'll drive this up and this is going to be in the middle venal press shift a at in another object to this time I will use an Aiko sphere. I'll drag it over to the right and then I'll add in another object. This time it's going to be a cube. And there we go. So now we have three different objects, and now it's dragged them all above the domain just like this, and also press SNZ and scale the domain just a little bit higher. Something like that will look just a little bit better, so we have bigger splashes. And now let's start animating the collision objects. So first off, this monkey head is going to crash through the fluid first. So I'm gonna rotate it at like a random direction, something like that. Then I will hit I and go location rotation. If I drag up the timeline, you will see that adds a key frame on frame one. Then we can go over to frame 15 right here, press G and Z and drug through. Just like that's right there. Then hit I and go location rotation. So now over 15 frames, it will crash through the water and that will look pretty good. Then from frame 15 I'm going to select the Eiko Sphere Hit I location rotation. Go to frame 30. We're going to skip every 15 frames, drag this through the domain right about there, hit I location rotation. And then finally this collision object here, the Cube. I'm also going to give it a random rotation. Something like that. Hit I location rotation at frame 30 than 15 frames ahead frame 45 a press G and Z and drag this through just like that. Also, skillet down just slightly, then hit I location rotation. Now the domain is a little bit. Some also also like both of these. Skill them up just so we have a bigger and wider fluid. I think that will look a little bit better. And their ago. We've now created our animation. And now let's work on the simulation. So I'm going to select our domain, go over to the physics, have enable fluid and set the type two domain and then switch this over to liquid for the time scale. I'm going to bring that down 2.5 once again. And for the maximum steps, since the objects are moving very quickly, I'm gonna bring this up to six. And this one I'm gonna bring up to a value of three. So this will just calculate a little bit better is just in case there are any issues with the collisions. The resolution I'm gonna bring up to 96 then we're going to scroll down here. I'm gonna turn on a mess. So weaken bacon, the mess and also the liquids. We can see exactly how it looks underneath that. We're going to said the end frame to a value of 1 20 So it bakes in 100 and 20 frames just like that. And I think that is all we really need to do for the domain. Now let's move on to the flow object, which is this cube? I'm going to enable food set the type to flow, switch this over to liquid, and we're gonna leave the flow behavior as geometry. Now for the collision. Objects also liked each one holding, shipped and selecting the Eiko sphere. Last fluid set the type to affect er and then we're going to hit control. L and apply the modifiers right here. This automatically applies the modifier to each of these objects. And there we go. Now we're ready to bake. So I'm going to select the domain and over in the settings we can go ahead and bake the data down here it is starting to bake. And once this is finished, weaken bacon, the mesh. The first bake is done, and we can go ahead and take a look at it by playing the animation. And look at that. That looks actually pretty cool. Now it's work on the mess. I'm going to scroll down here to the mass settings and I'm gonna click on bake Mesh and we can see down here. It's starting to bake. Once this is done, we'll continue on with a tutorial. 34. Crashing Collisions P2 Particles: the mesh is done. And now we're going to go ahead and scroll down to the particles and open up this panel. This will give us a real equal effect. So we're going to enable spray foam and bubbles and then for the combined export, I'm going to select spray phone plus bubbles right there. This will make every single one of these into one particle system which will make it easier once we add in a particle for the uprise factor. I'm gonna leave that one, and all the other settings look good, as I'm just gonna leave them as the default. Then we can click on it Baked particles and we can see down here is starting to bake. Once this is done, we will select an object that we want to represent as the particle. At the moment, whenever you are simulating particles in crates almost a grid pattern. I think this is currently a bug, and I think they're working on making it a little bit more random. But for now, we're gonna have to do a little trick with the object to make it look more random. The bacon is done for the particles and Now we're going to enable an object to be represented as the particle. If I play this, this is what it looks like. Not too bad. And we're gonna pause it right about there. I'm gonna press shift a and adding a mesh and then an ICUs fear. And this is going to be the particle. Now, before you do anything else, make sure you open up this panel and turn the subdivisions down to one. Then move this over to the left and scale it down Pretty small. Something like that will be good. Then select your domain object. If you go over to the particle system tab, we can see to particle systems right here. I'm going to select the spray and foam and open up the render and select render as Halo to render as object and then in the instant object, go ahead and selected the Eiko sphere by quitting that eyedropper tool and selecting the ICUs fear. Now we can't really see what we're doing. So I'm gonna brozi and go into a wire frame and then play. There's a just a little bit will pause it right about there. And if we zoom in This is what it looks like. This size is pretty good, but you might notice that the particles are very uniform. They're not really in different locations. It almost looks like it almost looks like a grid. Now, this works for some simulations, but I'm going for a realistic one. So we're gonna have to do a little bit of changing up the location. If we select the ICUs fear and go into edit mode, we can move the object around, but the origin point will stay there. You'll notice that when we're moving this object, it's also moving the particles on the right side. So what we're gonna do is so, like the ICUs fear hit em and move it to a new collection. I'm going to call this collection particle and then enter and hit. OK, then jump to that collection by hitting two on your keyboard, and then we're gonna go into top view. We're going to create a bunch of different particles with different origin points, and this will make it more random in the simulation. So I'm gonna press shift E and move this over to the left, and then I'll go into edit mode and move the mash away from the origin point to something like that, and then I will also move it upwards. Now we're going to do this a couple of different times, so I'm going to select this one, are here shifty, move it over a little bit, going to edit mode and then move this over down like that. So we get another random location and we'll do this just a couple more times until we get a lot of different particles in random spots. This one will be down a little bit, and then we'll do one more. So I'll select this one shifty and then maybe over here, like that's maybe rotated around, drag it down. Something like that, I think will be good. And now that we have different particles in different locations, we can go back to a collection one by hitting one on our keyboard, select the domain, and then, for the render as object, we can select render as collection and then select the instant collection right here particles. Once we do this, we can zoom in and you will notice that the particles are in a much random location. You can see here. They're way more random than they were before. In this looks a lot better. We can also click on pick random. And this will also randomize it a little bit more. And now we're gonna turn this off in the view port. So it just runs a little bit faster. As you can see here, we can move around a lot quicker. So now we're going to go ahead and work on the materials. 35. Crashing Collisions P3 Materials, Lighting, Eevee: very cools. And now let's go ahead and work on the materials and the materials for creating a glass and TV is a little bit different. Let's first restart the animation and will select our domain and go over to the material tab. We can see a default material already in place. We're gonna go ahead and get rid of this and add in a new material the roughness we're going to set all the way down to zero. So it has zero roughness and then the transmission amount all the way up to one. This will make it look like glass. And then the Iowa, which stands for index of refraction. We're going to set that to 1.333 Now, if we were going to go into rendered view right now, we can't really see too much. We're going to select the flow object, which is this object right here, and just hide it from the view so we can see what we're doing now. Currently, there's not that many reflections, so let's go ahead and add in a plane. So I'm gonna press shift a and in a plane and scale it up pretty big now, this isn't working too well. We can't really see through the object. So what we need to do is go over to the render settings over here and turn on screen space reflections. Open up this panel and turn on refraction, and this will enable us to use the glass. Now, if we go back over to the material with the domain selected and scroll down to the settings down here on the bottom, I'm going to set the blend mode to Alfa Blend. And this will enable us to see through the object, as you can see right there if we turn on screen space reflection. There we go. Now it looks like glass and we can actually see through it properly. I'm also gonna turn off the show back face because what this does is it just gives it some weird artifacts. If I play it real quick, I'll posit right about there. And if I zoom in and turned this on, you can see some weird artifacts, like right there along that edge. So I'm just gonna leave that off and that will help smooth it out. We can also right click and go shade smooth and for the rest of the scene, we're gonna go ahead and set up a quick HDR and do a little bit of lighting to add in an HDR. What we need to do is go over to the world temp and underneath color, select environment, texture. We can see everything turned pink, and that is because it's missing a texture we need to select, open and then navigate to an HDR. If you want to use the exact same HDR that I'm using, go to the article previous to this video and download it. The one that I'll be using is this one right here. Dry field four k, select it and click open Image. Once we do that, we can see we now have an HDR in the scene. The strength I'm going to set up to a value of two. So it just brightens out the scene just a little bit, and I want also select the lamp in the scene, go over to the lamp settings and switch it over to a sun lamp. Right now it's a way to bright, so I'm gonna bring the strength all the way down to a value of two We'll see how that looks . Then we can rotate this. We get a nice shadow along that edge for right there, select the plane and scale it up pretty big and then go over to the material tab. We're going to give it a new material and the roughness right here. I'm gonna bring down to a value of 0.1. So we get some nice reflections of the fluid, select the domain one more time and for the base color, I'm going to drag it just slightly up to a blue color. So we get something like that and I think that will look pretty cool if you want to. You can give these objects a material as well. I'm just gonna leave them as white. For now. Position your view port right about here at this angle. And then I'm gonna hit control Ault zero to snap the camera to place to select the camera, just select the border along the edge, and then you can rotate it like this by hitting R and Z. You can move it back by hitting G and middle mouse button. And I'm just gonna position this right about here. So we get the full view of the domain just like that, To give this simulation a cool effect, We will also enable depth of field. If I turn this on, we can open up this panel and we can focus on an object holding shift. I'm going to right click in the middle of the domain and that places are cursor right there . What about their looks? Good. Then I'm gonna press shift A and and and a empty object. This is the object that we will focus on. Also, let's empty and go back into camera view. So, like your camera one more time and then over in the focus object, we can select the empty that we just added. The F stop right here controls how much depth of field it will have. So if you bring this really low, it will be a very shallow depth of field. As you can see there, if it's higher, it's gonna be a sharper image. Let's go with a value of one, and this will give us a nice step the field and I think that will look pretty good. I think we're ready to render now. So going over to the render tab. I'm going to set the render samples to a value of 50 just so it renders a little bit faster . We can also turn on ambient inclusion and then underneath color management weaken set the look to medium high contrast and then jumping over to the output section. Let's switch to this over to a movie file because TV does render a lot faster, we're gonna switches to MPEG and then open up the encoding. I'm going to set the containers who? MP four and said the output quality too high. Make sure you set a folder right here of where you want your file to go to. Now we're ready to render. But if you were to render this right now, the flow object that we hid earlier is going to show up in the render. So we need to open up this panel and turn on the camera icon and disable the flow object in the render so it won't show up. And now we're ready to render. So I'm gonna set the and frame down here to a value of 1 20 so it renders a little bit faster and then we can go over to render and then click on render animation. This will publish a new window and it will start to render out. And there we go. Here is the final results. As you can see, the particles do look pretty good. And that is how you render fluid using E V. Thank you for making it to the end of this section and to the end of this class. If you enjoyed it or learn something new, make sure you let me know. Or if you create any simulations using the knowledge that you learned in this course, I would love to see them. So make sure to send him to me if you haven't already. I would love for you to leave a review telling me what you think of the course or how it can be improved, but that's going to do it. Thank you for making it see end once again and I'll see you in the next one 36. (2.80) Fluid Simulation Basics: Hello, everyone. And welcome to a new video. In this video, I'm going to demonstrate the very basics of the fluid simulation and how to add it into blender 2.8. For the blood simulation, you need two different objects. You need a fluid source and a domain object, and I'll be going through each one what they do, exactly how they work. But first off with this cube selected, I'm just gonna set this to be our domain object. To do that, I'm first going to scale it up by pressing s. And if I ever do something like a shortcut and I don't say what I did, just come down here and look and you'll see the shortcut that I press. For example, if I select a, you can see the A is down there. Now I'm going to drive this up by pressing G and Z and dragging it up. So it's sitting on the grid floor to add a domain to this cube. We need to go over to the physics tab, and that's this little button right here. It looks like a circle, and then you can click on fluid here. We can set the type of flu that we want. If I still like this, you can see there's a ton of different options here. And don't worry, we're going to go through every single one and I'll be describing in detail how they work for this demonstration. We're going to be selecting domain, and here we can see a lot of different settings pop up. Now. Since we have our domain, we need a fluid source to do that. Let's add in a new object sole power shift, a will go to mesh and then Cube. Now I can't really see what's going on inside our cube. So to fix that, I'm gonna presa sea and go into wire frame. Once we do that, we can see Insider Cube And there we go. I'm gonna press G and Z and drives up till it's sitting a little bit above the floor. Just like that. Now, one thing to keep in mind if you want your food simulation to be pretty big, you need to scale up your domain. The fluid will never leave the domain object. So here, this domain, this is the boundaries of our fluid simulation. If I want it to be bigger. Like I said, you need to scale this up. Now that we've done that, let's go ahead and give our fluid right here a fluid simulation. So come over to the physics tablets again. Click on fluid and I'm gonna set the type over to fluid. And here we can see a couple different settings will be going through all of these in a later video. This is just showing you how to add in a fluid simulation. Now that we've done that, let's go ahead and select our domain one more time. And now if we press the space bar button to play or clicking on the play button down here, If I had space far, nothing happens. The reason for that is because you need to bake in this simulation toe. Actually view the fluid. To do that, you need to open up the baking panel and then click on bake right here. If I do that, I click Bake. Now you can see the fluid is in our scene, and you can see the progress bar down at the bottom. It's at 16% and it's going up to 100. You can set the end frame right here. So if you want a shorter baked time or you just want your animation be shorter. You can said that here and then you would hit bake. I'm gonna go ahead and stop the baking by hitting the escape button, and that will cancel the bake. So now if I hit the space bar to play this, we can see our fluid is in our scene. And there we go now, since I stopped the baking halfway through, it didn't bake these frames down here. It only baked up to, let's say, 77 of frames so anymore, it will go back to its original domain size. And as you can see here, this is what our food looks like. And if I prizes E and go into solid view, we can see how that looks. Now, if you're done with the baking, you can go ahead and delete your cube right here. But I recommend you don't do that. I recommend do you move it to a different collection or you just hide it in the view port because if you ever want to go back, its going to be hard. So I recommend just turning it off in the view port by clicking on this little eyedropper tool, and there you can see it disappeared. If you don't see the options over here, that's because you need to click on this menu and enable them right here. So in this case I have the camera icon is to make sure that's turned on, and then you can disable it in the rendered view. So that is the very basics of adding a fluid simulation to your seen. In the next video, we'll go through the baking and how that works. 37. (2.80) Domain Fluid Settings: Hello, everyone, and welcome to a new section in this section. We're going to be taking a look at the domain settings and how the domain affects the fluid simulation. Let's first start out by taking a look at the fluid sittings right here and in the next couple videos will be taking a look at the bacon cash, the boundary, the particles, the world, all of that. In this video, we will focus on the settings. First off, we can see the simulation threads. Basically, what this is is for CPU baking, and it's a little bit confusing, but basically what it does. If it's set to zero, it will automatically calculate the CPU cores that you have and make it accordingly. Or you can set the amount. Of course that you want to bacon this simulation here. I think that is what it does. I'm not completely sure, though moving on from there. We have the final resolution. This is the resolution that will be in the rendered view. If you turn this up, the bacon will take longer. So let's take a look at the bacon cache memory required. It's 27 megabytes. If I turn this up, you can see the bacon. Cash is now going up as well. The devolved is set to 65. But if I'm going to do a final bake, I would usually set this to 1 28 Or if I'm doing a super high res bacon, I would send it to 2 56 And you can see here that bacon cash is quite big underneath that we have the preview and this is for the view port. So let's say you want your final resolution in the rendered to look really good, but it's lagging your computer. So you would said the View port preview right here to a little bit lower so you can actually move around your scene. Underneath that, we have the render display currently that set to final, so it will display the final resolution in the rendered view. If you wanted to. For some reason, you can change it to the preview. So whatever you set in the preview will show up in the render as well. I don't know why you would ever change it. To preview our geometry, you would always usually just stick to final. We also have here the view port so we can set that to final. So it will display 256 resolution in the view port on. We don't have to set that here. We can just set the view port to final preview. It'll just displayed the preview amount that we set here and geometry. What this will do is it will just display a box. So currently, this is our geometry in our scene. It's just a cube. So if we were to bacon a simulation and set the view port to geometry, it would Onley display acute. It would not display fluid at all. Moving on from there we have time start and time end, and this deals with seconds. So you want to think about how long your animation is. Currently, it's 250 frames, and if we look at our frame rate, which is right here, the frame it it's currently set to 24. So if we wanted an accurate a simulation that looks realistic, we would divide our 250 frames. Times are divided by 24 so that would be around 10 10.5 seconds. So from there we would go back over to the physics settings and set this to a value of 10. Now, this will be an accurate simulation, and it will look pretty good with its set to four. It's stretching out over those 250 frames, so the fluid is actually gonna move in slow motion. If you're wondering why you attained the time start value, that is, for if you want your fluid to already be in a certain position, let's say I want my fluid to come down here and start at this position. But I don't want to move the U V sphere, so I would figure out when in the simulation it drops to here. And then I would set it said that value here. So let's say I want to start it one second it. So when I baked this, the fluid will probably start around here because it's one second into the animation. If that makes sense, I'm gonna sit that back to zero, and I'll also demonstrate this real quick, so I'm going to set this to a value of 30 32 actually just to go a little bit faster and then I'm going to set this to 150 then just click bake, and it should bake extremely fast. All right, so there we go. We can see it now. If we play our animation, we also need to make sure the view port is set to final. We play weaken CR fluid in our scene, and it started from the UV sphere. If we said that start time to a value of one, we bake this again. We can see the fluid didn't start in the U. S. Fear is actually starting on the floor. So if I said this 2.5, it should start somewhere around here. Let's actually go a little bit lower. Let's go 0.3 and then click on bake. We should be able to see. There you go. You can see it started right there rather than in the UV sphere. So that is what this value does here. The speed value here is pretty easy to understand. It just controls the speed of the simulation. So if I said that to do 22 and I bake this and then we restart the animation and play, you can see the fluid is moving a lot faster than before. You can also slow this down. So let's say I go with a value a 0.4. Then I click on bake. Then we restart the animation hit the space bar. You can see the fluid is going in slow motion. And underneath that we have generate speed vectors. And if we hover over the description, you can see generate speed vectors for vector blur. Basically, that means if you if this value is turned on and you use motion blur or any sort of blur in the compartment in the composite er, it will enable you to accurately display the motion blur. If this is turned off, the motion blur won't work properly to my understanding. So you should always just leave that on. Just in case you want to generate blur after your animation is done, reverse frames. What this will do is it will just reverse the frames. So if I play this, you can see it starts at the bottom and then it just reverses it. And so the fluid gives up pretty easy to understand. Now the offset This is kind of similar to this time start. Basically, if I turn this up. It will start the animation of wherever I said it to. I'm gonna set this back through zero, and then I'm just going to hit Bake, and this will take a second to bake. And now I can set when I want the animation to start. So let's say I wanted it to start at frame 50. So if I go from 50 and then we can see that's down here and then I play it Now let's take a look at where that is in the timeline. So let's go back to zero on the offset. And then I go to frame 50 You can see is the exact same thing. So this just offsets the animation by frames. So there you go, guys. Those are all of the settings in the fluid, and in the next video, we'll take a look at the boundary down here. 38. (2.80) Boundary Settings: Now let's take a look at the boundary options over here, so the first thing that we have to take a look at is the type. Currently it's set to partial slip, and if I click on this, we can see there's three different options. Free slip, partial slip and no slip. This option determines how sticky the flu will be with interacting with other objects. Partial slip means you can control the amount that it will stick. Teoh. If I set this to free slipped, there's gonna be no stickiness at all. It's going to just slip off any objects that it encounters. If this is on no slip, it will stick to the objects. Let's go ahead and test that, so I'm going to set it to no slip. I'm gonna pressure. If they will add in a Aiko sphere, I'll scale the ICO's were down and just drag it up a little bit and move it over to the side. Something like this. Now, for an object to interact with our foods in relation, we need to go fluid type and set it to obstacle. Now here we can also see the slip amount. If I click on the type. I consent this to know Slip so it will stick to it. Now it's bacon the simulation. So the resolution is set to 32 the speed of one. If I click on bake weaken, see what this looks like. It'll just take a second. Once it's done, I'll hit the space bar to play it, and you can see the fluid is now sticking to the top of our like a sphere. Now let's take a look at it with free. So So if I set this back to free slip, also like the ICUs fear, set this 12 free slip as well, and then we click on Bake. It will slip right off of our atmosphere without sticking to it. So if I hit play, you can see the fluid flows right off without sticking. There we go. So those are the different options, and then partial slip. You can control the amount, so basically, if it's at zero, it's gonna be no slip. If it's that. I mean, if it's at one, it's gonna be no slip, and if it's at zero, it's going to be free slip for the default settings it set 2.2, and I find that that's pretty good for most scenarios. Underneath that, we have the surface smoothing, and this just helps with smoothing out the fluid so it doesn't look as jagged how you can turn that up to a value of five and it won't go past that, or you can go with less zero, and it will just be very jagged. One usually works perfectly fine, then, underneath that we have the subdivisions. Now this option here is basically the same as adding in a subdivision surface modifier, except it's built into the fluid simulation. So if we turn this up to a value up to, we click on bake and it will take a little bit longer to bake, as you can see here but are fluid, simulation already looks a lot more smooth. You can see there's a lot more geometry to work with, and it has a higher subdivision. Not too bad. So play this. You can see what it looks like. There we go now. Another thing to note is with using the subdivisions. Once we get into the particles, you will need to set the subdivisions up to two. So if I hover over this, you can see what this looks like. A number of Iot service subdivision. This is necessary for the inclusion of particles into your surface generation. So in a later video, when we take a look at the particles, you will need to turn this up to enable the particles down here. The last option that we have is removed air bubbles. So basically, this means that if there is a pocket of air in our fluid, if something goes wrong in their system, weird air stuck inside this option will get rid of any of those air bubbles usually should just leave that on to not cause any issues. 39. (2.80) Creating Particles: hell over one. And in this video, we are going to be talking about the particles in the domain settings. Particles allow you to add in a very small amount of detail to your fluid simulation. For example, if this would splashes onto the ground, Ah, lot of particles would fly out, just like in real life. And this option allows you to do that. And here in the domain settings, we can see that I've set up a quick seen. I've set the View port to Final, and then we have a sphere right here, which has a fluid setting so it will just fall down and interact with the domain all the way down here, we can see that there is an option for particles. One thing to note is in the boundary options. If you want to add in some particles and you need to set the subdivisions up to a value of two in the particle tab, we have two different settings. We have tracer, which we'll talk about in a little bit, and then we have the generate value. The generate value allows you to add in particles to the fluid itself, so let's go ahead and set this up to a value of 0.3 You want to be careful with this value here because if you go to high your particles are your fluid will look like an explosion of particles in it. It will just look a little bit weird, so keeping this at a relatively low value will help make your fluid look realistic. So with this at 2.3 and a subversion set to two, let's go ahead and bacon are seen and see how this looks. Alright, the baking has finished. Let's go take a look at our particles. So if I hit the space bar, we can see what this looks like. And, as you can see, there's a lot of particles all around where the splash hits, and that is what this generate value does. It just adds those little bits of detail in the fluid simulation, and you can see that looks pretty good. And even with a value of 0.3 you can see there are still a lot of particles. Let's view it one more time, and that looks pretty cool. Next, let's go ahead and talk about the trace of setting did demonstrate this. I'm gonna open up a new scene in blender, so hit control end and then I'll just discard the changes. All right, here we are. And Amy have seen a blender, and I've set up the basic seen that we had previously with the Cube and the sphere. So what we're gonna do now is add in a tracer object to have particles interact with our fluid. To do this, you can add any object that you want. But just a default cube will work perfectly fine. And I'll just move it over to the left over in the physics tap, we need to cook on fluid and set the type over to Particle. And here is where we can set up the size and the Alfa values and we can see there's three different options right here. We'll go through each one of them. Let's start at the bottom, which is tracer. So we'll click on that check box the influence size we can see here. If we hover over this, the amount of particle skilling zero is off all the same size and one is the full range. So basically that means if it's set to zero. Every single particle will be the same size. If I said this up to one, some particles will be bigger and some particles will be smaller. Same thing here with the Alfa. And this is for Alfa buys, which is transparency. So if you have, if you said that to one some particles will be are the smaller ones will have more transparency. The bigger ones will have last transparency. Let's go ahead and said that back to zero. And now let's go over to the domain Settings will open up the particles and here we can set the amount of tracer particles that we want. So I'm going to set this up to a value of 5 5000 Let's go 5000 and then we'll bacon are seen. So all we have to do is set that up to 5000. And we don't need to set up the subdivisions over here. Since we're dealing with tracer particles, select your domain and then all click on bake. All right. The bacon has finished, and here we can see that are tracer particles are working. If I play this, we can see exactly what it does. Basically, the particles will just trace out where the fluid has been, and it actually looks pretty interesting. You can see it started up here and then it comes down, and then it goes up on the size so you can see the corners have some particles, and then most of the particles are in the middle. Hopefully, that one more time. As you can see it, the particles will just trace out where the fluid has been. Now, Currently, there just rendering as halos and you can use it object for the particles. To do that, we need to add in a new object. Surprised today, you can add in whatever you want. Let's just go with a cute for now and I'll move it over to the right and I'll scale it down to change out your particles. What you need to do is select your cube. Go over to the particle system, make sure you select the particle of system right here. Turn on Brenda as halo to render as object and then select that object right here. Once you do that, we can see that every single particle is now a cube and you'll notice since we've said the size to one, some of the particles are bigger and some of the ones are smaller. With that done, you can also do something interesting by hiding the fluid itself. So if I select it, then hit the H G, we can hide it and just view the particles, and this will give it a cool effect. And that looks pretty interesting. So that is what the tracer particles do. They basically just trace out where the fluid has been, and it looks something like that. Now let's move on to the floating particles. So what I'll do is also left my object right here and go over to the physics tab and change it from tracer over to float. Then we'll hold. Then we'll hit Ault or option H to bring back our flu domain. Now with the float particles do their basically just floating on top of the surface of the fluid. Now you will need to turn up the generate value for these ones. If you set the tracer to 5000 but leave the generate at zero, nothing will happen. You need to make sure that you set the generate up to Let's go with point to Now that we've done that, let's go ahead and bacon are seen and see what this looks like. All right, the bacon has finished, and let's check out what the float particles do. So if I play, this will notice that once it crashes onto the floor, a lot of particles are now floating on top of our fluid, and that actually looks pretty cool. We'll check that out one more time and what this general value does with the tracer value. I think it multiplies this tracer value amount. So with this set to like one, for example, they'll be a lot more particles than just 5000. With this set to two, though, it will multiply it by two. I'm guessing I'm not exactly sure how it multiplies it, but basically it will just take this tracer value and then multiply it somehow. Using this and here we can see what that looks like. Let's go ahead and hide the fluid and just check out the particles so hit H and then I will play it. And once it's playing, there we go. We can see the particles didn't emit exactly when the fluid started. It happened one once it crashed down, and that looks pretty cool as well. We'll view that one more time. Not too bad. So float is just The particles are floating on top of the surface of the fluid. I'll hit old age to bring back our domain, and the last one that will check out is the drops. Now drops basically act as we're something splashes and they go, they fly out. Those are what the drops are. So once this domain crashes onto the ground, there will be particles that will fly out in every direction. And those will be the drops. So now that we said it two drops, let's go ahead and bake in this one more time and see what this looks like. All right, eat the bacon has finished, and now let's take a look at the drops Someone's I play. The animation will notice that the particles flout into the corners, and then some of them fly up as well. Now, I set this originally 2.2 the generate value, but I didn't see any particles, so I re baked it at 8.5, and that seemed to add in a lot more particles. I also think this generate value is tied to the final resolution. So if you said this to a higher number, there'll be more particles in your simulation as well. So that is basically what the tracer and the generate values do. I'll show in animation on screen of the float particles with a very high generate value, any high resolution and you can see what that looks like. It almost looks like foam on the fluid, which looks pretty cool. All right, so that's gonna be a for this video in the next one will take a look at the world settings . 40. (2.80) World & Viscosity: hell over one, and in this video we will cover the world settings, and we will also cover the viscosity settings down here. Let's start with the world settings. Here is where you can set the direction of the gravity. Currently, it's great out, and that is because it's over in this panel here, which is the scene panel. It's using this gravity. You can mess with this gravity, and it will change the simulation. Or, if you wanted it to be in the simulation. If you want to edit the gravity in the domain settings, you would just turn off that check box, go back over to the fluid settings, and then we can mess with the gravity. So let's go ahead and mess with this. I'm gonna set the Ex Im gonna Control X that so it copies. It said that 20 And then let's go with the X value of negative nine. So now the fluid should go in one of the directions of the X. Let's go ahead and bacon our simulation and see what this looks like. So if I played this now, you'll notice. Let's wait for it to update a little bit you'll notice that it's acting like the gravity is going in that direction. That looks pretty interesting. Let's go ahead and stop that bake and restart the animation underneath that we have the scene size in meters. Currently, though, it's great out now what we need to do to make sure that it's not great Out is go over to the scene panel once again, underneath units set the unit system from metric over to none. Now, I don't know why you need to set this to none for it to work. I think that might be a bug or something that shouldn't be a thing. But now, once we go back over to the domain settings, you'll notice that the ruled size we can change it now here deals with the domain size, and it's taking Ah, look at the longest side of your domain. So let's say, for example, our domain is scaled along the X, so it's taking this size right here and making making it look like it's only half a meter long Now. This value is for whatever you're trying to create. So, for example, if you're going for a pool, you would set this to maybe like five or 10 meters. So if he said this to 10 meters, it will take into account that this domain is 10 meters long and it will simulate the fluid accordingly if you're going for, like, a coffee cup or something like that. You had said this to a very low number like 8.2. So now it's saying our blender things, that this domain sizes now 0.2 meters. So if you're going for realism, make sure you know what you're trying to create and set the real world size right here. Underneath that, we have two different options. Optimization and compress ability optimization. I think this just optimizes your fluid simulation Ah, using grid levels. And I did a lot of research on both of these. And there's not a lot of information on how these to affect the simulation For my understanding, though, this deals with good levels and it will optimize your seen a little bit. Negative one is just an automatic, and you can change this up to a different sizes. But you'll notice that the size of our bacon cash has gone up quite a bit, from which is automatic it's only eight megabytes and then all the way up to 32 compress ability. From my understanding. What this does is it just compresses the large bodies of fluid that are standing still. If we take a look at the blender manual, you'll notice that it says right here. If you have a problem with large standing fluid regions at a high resolution, it might help to reduce this number. I have never wants to use these options before, and I don't see why there is a need to let's go ahead and set the world size back 2.5, and then we'll close out this. Now let's get on to the viscosity. Here is where we get into some interesting settings. Let's go ahead and scale back our domain to be a square. The base and the exponents controls how the fluid acts. If we open up this menu here, you'll notice that there's three different presets. Honey, oil and water. Now you can get into a lot of different math and try to figure out exactly how this works, or you can go open up the blender manual one more time and scroll down to this section here . If we take a look at this panel, you'll notice that there's two different panels right here. This one dynamic viscosity in CPI. This deals with Sen Tai Poise units. Blender, on the other hand, uses chromatic viscosity units. So here is where we would set up how we want blender to change the fluid. So let's go ahead and take a look at melting glass. We can see the base is set to one, and the viscosity is set. Are the exponents, I mean is set to zero. So now if we go back over to blunder, will set the base to one and then we'll set the exponents 20 Now our fluid will act like melting glass. Let's go ahead and test this out. If I open up the bacon cast, I'm gonna go ahead and click on Bake, and we can see that it's starting to Baker scene. We'll take a look at it once it's done all right. The bacon has finished. Let's go ahead and take a look at this and you'll notice that it acts like melting glass would where it hits it and kind of slowly expanse. Let's go ahead and research animation. Check it out again, and that looks pretty interesting. So that is basically what the base and the exponents do. They changes how the fluid operates, and you can set it to have different presets. You can enter a new preset, so what I'll do here is oldest type in melting glass and all hit that plus sign, and that will create a new preset with the melting glass exponents and ah, base and experiment. So now whenever I want to use the melting glass preset, I'll have to do is click on this menu and select melting glass. If we take a look at the blender manual one more time, you'll see that there are a lot of different equations and math to try to figure out exactly how the fluid works. You can get into that if you want to all link this in the description and in the article previous to this video, and you can go over this in detail if you want to. That's gonna be it for this video, though. Thank you for watching, and in the next section we will get into the different types of fluid 41. (2.80) Fluid Type: Hello, everyone. And welcome to a new section in this section. We're going to be taking a look at the different types of fluid in the last section. We have chucked out the domain, and all of its settings in this section will go through the flu, the obstacle inflow and all the other ones down here. In this video, we will start out with the fluid one. So what I'm gonna do is just adding another cube and then drag it up. So it's sitting right on top, just like that. This cube here is just a simple domain with the View parts at two Final. And now let's select our cue that we just added, and then we'll give it a fluid type. So click on fluid, and then we'll set the type over to fluid. The verse in that we have to take a look at is the volume initialization, and if we sell like this, you can see there's three different options. The first own, which is the default, is the volume, so that means that the entire volume of the mesh will be fluid. So the inside of the mesh and the outside everywhere that the blame is will have a fluid. If I said this to shell on Lee, the shell of the mess will have fluid. So, for example, the outside edges will have some fluid. But the inside of our cube will be hollow. And then the last one is both. So that means the shell and the volume will have fluid. Let's take a look at the shell first. So we'll go back over to the domain and then I will click on bake and we can see what this looks like. Now if I go inside our mesh and go into solid view, we can see that the inside of our cube is hollow. So that is what the shell does. It leaves the inside hollow and the outside just has the shell. And now if I press the space bar, we can see what this looks like. Underneath that, we have export animated mesh. If I hover over this, you can see that the export this mesh as an animated one. So that means that you haven't if you have an armature or some deform Ah, using like a lattice or something that deforms the mesh, you might want to turn this on. I think by default, it's actually turned on. I have never wants to use this, but if you do have an armature or something that deforms the mess, you might want to turn that on. And then underneath that we have initial velocity. I'm going to set this back to volume and then we'll talk about the initial velocity. So here this means that the initial velocity at the start of the animation you can set it for the X, the why or the sea. So, for example, if I wanted my fluid to fly in the air upwards, I would set the X value to like three. Or if I wanted the fluid to fly over to the right, I would set the Are that I mean the Z value to three and then the X value, which is going sideways. I would set that over 23 as well. So one I Once I bake this, the fluid will probably end up somewhere around here, and then it will fall down. Let's go ahead and check that out. So I'm going to click on Bake. And once it makes a little bit hit the space bar. So now if I hit the space, bar it, you can see that the fluid went over to the top right corner before falling down. So that is what the initial velocity does. It just takes your your position of your cube and then moves it in a certain direction that you set here. So those are all of the settings in the fluid. In the next video, we will take a look at the obstacle. 42. (2.80) Obstacles: Hello, everyone. And in this video, we're going to be talking about the fluid type obstacle. Now. Obstacles do is they allow you to put in certain objects for the fluid to interact with. Let's go ahead and add in a cylinder for a demonstration, and I'll scale the cylinder down and just place it right about there. Now what we need to do is go over to the fluid and set the type over to obstacle. Now here we have the same settings that we talked about in the previous video, with the volume initialization volume Shell on both. We also have the export animated mess if that's used for armatures, and here is where we have the slip type. There's three different options. No slip, parcel slip and free slip, the 1st 1 no slip. That means that the obstacle will be very sticky and the fluid will stick to it once it touches it. The next one is partial slip, so this means that you can set the amount of slip that you want all the way up from one means free slip. So that means it will not be sticking at all, and then zero is no slip, so you can set the amount that you want here, using this slider or if you want. If you know what you want, you can set it to free slip. Partials are no slip. Precept again means that it will be very slippery, and it won't stick to it at all. And then here we have the impact factor, and basically what this does is it will take away fluid, or it will add fluid to your scene in This only applies to moving objects. So if you have a key frame on your cylinder and you can add key frames by hitting I and then selecting the key frame that you want, for example, if I go location and then I moved to another frame and I move this around and then I hit location again. It will move to that spot over those frames. So with this setting, if it said to a naked of value or zero, it will take away fluid, or if it's said to a positive value, it will add fluid to your scene. Let's go ahead and take a look at this scene right here. I've created a simple animation with this cylinder. It just moves over to the right just a little bit over certain frames, and the impact factor is set to 10. So what this does? If I play the animation you can see it adds a ton of fluid to our scene. Let's go ahead and do that one more time. And as you can see there, it just fills up the entire cube over just a couple seconds with the impact factor being up to 10. And then, of course, negative values will take away. So that is what the obstacle does. In the next video, we will take a look at the inflow and the outflow. 43. (2.80) Inflow: in this video, we're going to be talking about the inflow setting in the fluid simulation To demonstrate this, we need to add in another object to emit fluid into are seeing Let's go with a circle now, currently, with a circle added in, you can see that it's just if I drag it above, you can see it. It's just a circle and there's no geometry in the middle. So we need to add this and we need to add a face to this. So I'm gonna go into edit mode and press F to fill in the face. There we go. Now let's position this. So I'm gonna go into front view and g to move, and then I'll just rotate it. So it's sitting inside our cube just like that inside our domain. Now I'm gonna go over to fluid in set type two inflow. All right, so what the inflow does? It basically adds fluid into your seen constantly. I'm going to go into a wire frame so we can see this a little bit better. So with this set to zero, it's going very, very slowly. Add fluid into our seen If we want more fluid to be added quickly, we need to set Thies to higher values. So let's go with a negative two for the Z, and then we'll go with two for the X. So it's probably gonna emit very quickly at this sort of angle and hit this corner. Now let's go ahead and test that. So I'm going to select my domain and then just click on. Actually, I'll set this to a little bit lower. Let's go 45 then click Bake, and we could see it breaking down at the bottom. It goes pretty fast, and if I play this weaken, see, nothing happens. The reason for that is because the volume initialization is set to volume. Currently, this is just a completely flat circle, so there is no volume. What we need to do is changes to shell and then re bacon the simulation, so click bake one more time, and there you can see it's taking the shell of our circle and applying a fluid simulation to it. Now, if we play this, you can see it's constantly adding fluid to our scene just like that, so we could go back and take a look at that. Looks pretty cool. Restart the animation. Take a look at it one more time. All right, so there we go. That is what the inflow does. Now there's another option that we have here, which is local coordinates. What this does is it will take into account the rotation of your objects and emit fluid from that direction. So currently are normals are pointing this way, and it's emitting in the direction that we set here. So let's go ahead and test this out. We're gonna be rotating this while is simulating, so I'm gonna add a key frame to the circle. I'm gonna hit I location rotation. Then I'm gonna go to frame 30. I'm gonna move this over to the right and then rotate it this way, then I location rotation. So currently, if this local coordinates is unchecked, the fluid will still emit in this direction. But if this is checked, it's going to take into account that rotation. And he meant the fluid. Now, this way, let's go ahead and test that out. So I'm gonna hit bake one more time, and then we'll restart the animation, wait for it to bake a little bit now. If we play this, you can see once it rotates, it's emitting the direction that we specified. So it's taken into account that rotation and then admitting the fluid in that direction. So that is what the local coordinates does. You can also animate this flow value. So, for example, if you want, if you wanted your inflow to stop emitting fluid at a certain point you can add a que frame to this flow. So let's go ahead and do that after frame. Let's go with 50. I want this to stop emitting fluid, so I'm gonna hover over this check box and then hit I. Then I'm gonna go to the next frame for him. 51 uncheck this and then hit I one more time. So over one frame is going to be turned on, and then it's gonna be turned off. Let's go ahead and test that I'm gonna hit bake. All right, So now if I play this after a frame 50 it will stop emitting fluid into our scene. So there are some interesting things that you can do with this check box right here. You can have it like turn on turn off at a certain point, then turned back on. There's some pretty cool stuff that you can do, so that is what the inflow does, and in the next video, we'll take a look at the outflow. 44. (2.80) Outflow: in this video, we are going to be talking about the outflow sitting. So currently we're in the same scene as the previous video, and I don't know where my bounding boxes for my domain and I don't know where to add in the outflow. So an easy trick to figure out where the domain boundary is is you can select your domain, which is the fluid hit shift D. And then right click. You can get rid of the fluid by clicking on that. Then go over to the object panel right here underneath Vieux Port. You can see it the display as texture over to wire. Now, this does not do anything to your seen. It just enables us to see where the bounding box is. And then if you were to do a render, you can come over here and uncheck this so you don't see the cube in the rendered view. All right, so now that we know where our bounding boxes, let's go ahead and add in and another object So let's go with a cube. I'm gonna press s and Z and scale the cube down Pretty small. Something like that. There we go and now will enable this as an outflow. So I'm going to go over to the physics tab, click fluid and set the type to outflow. Now, what outflow does is it basically deletes fluid from your simulation. So if any fluid from our inflow was to hit this cube right here, it would get deleted. Then, of course, we have the same options for volume shell in both, and then the export and mated mash. And then we also have the float so we can turn this off or on. And we can also animate this value as well. Now, before we bake in our simulation, I'm going to set the volume over to Shell because this is a pretty thin cube right here. And I don't think volume would work very well. So I'm going to set this to shell so it takes into account the edges of our cute And now, once you're once you've done that, we can go ahead and bacon are seen. All right. The bacon is done. And now if we play this, you'll see that once the fluid touches it, it gets deleted just like that. And you can see sometimes on the edges. It's still there. But anything that touches this cube will get deleted. All right, so that is basically what the outflow does. It just takes fluid that touches it and gets rid of it. And you can also, of course, animate this value here. 45. (2.80) Super Cool Control Type: Hello, everyone. And welcome to another video. In this video, we are going to learn about the control object in the fluid simulation. Now, what the control object does is it allows you to control the fluid in a certain way. For example, if you have a UV sphere going through this domain right here, once it reaches up, stop, It will look like there's a floating UV sphere of fluid right here, and I'll be going through how to set that up and the different settings that you can change . So its first ad in a control object to do this, you're gonna add in any object that you want, but it's going to have to be a mesh. Let's brush it day and will add in a UV sphere, and then I'll drive this below our domain. So for this animation that will bacon in just a second, I want the U. S. Were to go through the fluid and end up right here and have fluid floating. So what we're gonna do is select, are you be severe. And on the time line right here, I set the end frame to 100. So our animation is 100 frames long with the U. S. Were selected on frame one. I'm gonna hit I and go location. That's ads in a location key frame. And you can see that right here Now if we go to frame 30 So if we click on 30 right there, all press A G and Z and drag my use fear through the fluid, then hit I location. So over 30 frames is going to go from here all the way up to the top, and now we've set up a quick animation. Let's go ahead and take a look at the domain settings that I've set up here. We can see we just have the basic settings. A resolution of 65 then the flu right here is just a basic fluid shape. Now that we've done that, let's go ahead and select our UV sphere. Click on fluid and then we'll set the type over to control. Here we have a couple different options. The quality this controls, how good it will look. Now you want to be careful with this, because if you turn it up really high, the baking will take quite a long time. I did some testing with the quality right here. And at 10% with some certain settings in the domain, it took three minutes and 11 seconds. Then I changed the quality up to 20%. And it took four minutes and 27 seconds. So that is a 40% increase by just changing the quality up to 10 are up by 10. So you want to be careful with this. If you go up to 50 or 60 is going to take a very long time to bake for this animation. I'm going to set this to 20%. And now let's go through the other settings. So reverse frames This will just reverse the frames it. Once your animation is done, it will just reverse it pretty easy to understand. And then here we have the time start in time end. These are the exact same options in the domain settings we talked about in a previous video . It just it simulates the control object in seconds. Over the course of your timeline, underneath that, we have attraction strength. So what this does If you turn this up pretty high, the fluid will be attracted to this object and once it goes through, all of the fluid that it touches will stick to it. So if this is set to a value of point to like it was at the default setting, not a lot of food will stick to it. If it goes up, the fluid might fall off a little bit later. For this animation, let's set the attraction strength to one, and then the radius value what this will do. If this is set to a higher number, the more fluid it will grab. So with this set to a value of zero, it will just be the size of our ubi sphere here. If I turn this up to like a value of five, the water will probably be around here and then go all the way around in a big circle. So that is what the Radius value does. I'm going to set this to a value of point to, so it's just a small amount, and it should end up probably around there. Now let's talk about the velocity, what the velocity shrink does. It's kind of like a force field that is applied to your UV sphere. So once the UK sphere goes through the fluid, it will kind of like push the fluid away and it will make it look a little bit crazy. And then the radius value controls. How? How much that IHS, Let's go ahead and take a look at a new scene over here. This scene. If I select my UV sphere, we can see the velocity strength. Is that 0.8? And then the radius is that point to. And now if we go back and play this animation, you can see it created like this weird force field effect, and you can see what that's doing there. So makes the fluid have a lot of velocity. It kind of pushes it away and makes it go crazy. That is what this will Aussie strength does. We'll pay that one more time so you can see it moved all of this around here, even though the UV sphere did not touch it. It's moving all of that, and if I unhygienic SUV spirit, you can see that this is the control object and you can see that there's fluid floating inside it. But currently it's not sticking to it that much because the attraction strength is that point to? Now let's take a look at another. Seen this scene right here with this scene. I set the velocity strength 2.1, the Radius 2.1. The radius of the attraction. Strength 2.1 and the attraction strength to one. So now if we take a look at this, you can see it's a lot more clean and the fluid is just kind of floating right there. Now let's go ahead. And Bacon, our last seen right here that we were just creating and let's take a look at the quality difference. So I'm going to set the quality to 20 and I'm going to set the end frame to 100. It already is, and we'll set up the same scene. So I'm gonna go 0.1 for the velocity strength 0.1 for the Radius. With all those settings. Let's go ahead and bacon are seen. So select your domain. I'll set the I'll leave the resolution at 65 then I will click on Bake. Now, this will take a little bit of time, so I'm gonna positive here until it's done. All right, are baking is done and now if we hit the space bar Weaken, see what this looks like. You can see the fluid is staying right there until the end of the animation. You can also do some cool things with the control objects over here in the control settings , you can set the attraction strain to a negative value. This means that the fluid will actually fly out of the control object. So, for example, if you wanted to create an animation like this, what you would do is set the strength to a positive value. And then when you're ready for the water to explode out, you would set it to a negative value. Two key frame, a setting in the fluid simulation. All you have to do is hover over it. So, for example, if I want at frame 70 to have the water explode out, I would hit I while hovering over this. Then I go to the next frame frame 71 down here. I would said this to a negative one and then hit I. And now we can see that the water will explode out. But that's gonna be it for this video. Thank you for watching. In the next one, we will take a look at realistic fluid materials 46. (2.80) Crashing Through P1 Adding the Objects: Hello, everyone. And welcome to a new section in the section. We're going to be creating the image that you see on screen right now. We'll be using the Pollute simulation, plus the render engine cycles and a couple obstacles to get this event. In this video, we will just start out with modeling the basic simulation. And Kiefer, I mean the obstacle. So the first thing that will do with this Cube is well, just scale it up by pricing s and right about there looks pretty good. You can see it's about eight grade units across. Then what I'll do is I'll drag it up. So it's sitting on the grid floor. I also want to make sure that this is pretty tall because I don't want the fluid to hit the ceiling. So I'm gonna press s NZ and skillet along busy access and then drag it up. That's pretty good. And then what we'll do is Oprah shifty on this Cuba here in little Press s NZ, and scale it down until the size that I want probably around there and then I'll just drag it so it's right on the floor and currently it's clipping through the domain. So what I'll do is I'll press s shipped Z and that will skillet along the X and the y, but not the easy access. And then I'll just drag it in words. So it's inside the domain. I might scale it up just a little bit more. All right, that looks pretty good. The next thing I'll do is I'll add in an obstacle. Now you can add in a monkey head and ICUs fear you be severe acute whatever you want. For this tutorial, though, I'll just use a UV sphere self worship day at in a mesh and then you be sphere right here. I'll go into front view, and then I'll presidency and go into a wire frame so we can see what we're doing. And I might skill it up just a little bit. So what we're gonna do for this animation is it's going to crash through the water and make the water kind of fly outwards, and then we'll render one of those frames. So what I'll do is I'll press G NZ and drag this below our domain and then make sure you're on frame one, and you can move the frames by just clicking in this black bar. Make sure your own frame one right here and then hit the I key on your keyboard and go location. If I drink this up, you'll notice that there are there's key frames right here that have been added. So now what we need to do is go to another part of our animation. Let's go to frame 15 all press G NZ and I'll drag this through the domain are through the fluid, I mean and then press I I'll go a little bit higher. Dental press I location. So over 15 frames is gonna go from there all the way up to here, and that should look pretty cool when we simulate it. Now that we've done that, let's go ahead and move on to the simulation. 47. (2.80) Crashing Through P2 Simulating: for this simulation. I'm going to select my domain, go over to the physics tab and then click on fluid. I'm gonna set the type over to domain. And for the resolution, I'm going to go with a value of 1 28 the View port. I'm going to set two finals. We can actually see what the final resolution will look like. And then for the time, the end frame, we don't need to bake in 250 frames, so I'm going to set this to a value of 40. We only really need to bake 40 frames because we're gonna be doing a still image. If you're creating an animation, you might want to set this to, like, 100 or something like that. But for our scene will just go with 40 for the end time right here. Since we're only bacon in 40 frames, I'm gonna be setting this value to to underneath the boundary. I do want there to be a little bit of particles, so I'm going to set the subdivisions up to a value of two, and then the particle amount I've done some playing around and testing with this generate value and even with a value of 0.1 that's still a lot of particles. So I'm going to go with a value of 0.1 and then enter so just a very small amount, and this will give us some particles to work with. Now that we've done that, I think those settings are done so you can go ahead and set an output cash right here. I'm going to call the bacon, cash crashing through tutorial and then click. Accept. Now let's move on to the fluid. So select your fluid right here, click on fluid and set the type to this. We don't really need to change any of the setting tears, so we can just leave them at the default for the UV sphere. I'm going to go fluid and set the type over to obstacle. The parcel slipped. This controls how sticky the Ubi spear is. If it's set to zero, it's gonna be really sticky. If it's said to one, the water will just slip right up, so I'm going to set it to a value of 10.7. So it's a mixture between the free slip and then no slip. Now that we've done that. I think we're ready to bake. So go ahead and select your domain. Scroll down to the bacon cash right here and then click on bake. 48. (2.80) Crashing Through P3 Materials and Lighting: All right. The baking has finished, and here is our result. If I play this, you can see how it looks. And you can see the water just flies out and all of the directions, and that looks pretty cool. Now, what we need to do is find a frame that we want to render. You can just go through here and find one that you like. Yeah, Let's go. Is 16 now what we're gonna do is set up the material. The first thing that will do, though, is selected my fluid box right here. Since we're not gonna need this anymore, I'm just gonna hide it in the view port and then hide it in the rendered view. Once again. If you don't have these icons, click on this menu here and make sure the camera icon is enabled. Next, I'm going to select my UV sphere. Go over to the modifier tab. Click Add modifier in subdivision surface. This will just help to smooth out that, then All right, click and then we'll go shade smooth. I will also do the same thing for the fluid. So select your fluid, right? Click and go shade smooth. Now It's up to the material for the fluid. Go over to the material tab and it should already have the basic material in place. I'm gonna be setting the roughness value here to zero and then underneath the transmission set this to all the way to one and then the Iowa are we need to set this to 1.333 The i o. R stands for index of refraction. And it's basically how light passes through the water and bounces all the way around. And the Iowa are of water is 1.333 I did a video on this in a previous lecture, So go check that out. If you want more information for the IV E sphere, you can do whatever material that you want. I think I'm going to go with a blue color. So Owego, new on the material, set the roughness to zero. And then for the color, I'll just give it a nice blue color somewhere around here, Enterprises E and going to render view to see how that looks and that is looking pretty cool. The next thing that will do is press shift a go to a plane, and then we'll scale up the plane for the background. I just want this to be a curved plane. So what I'll do is I'll go into edit mode, select both of these ver tee's holding shift, also like that one right there and then press Ito extrude and Zito, lock it to the sea access and just drag it upwards. Now to give this a curve, what you can do is select both of those ready seeds once again holding shift. Then you can press control or command be and give it a bevel. Now you can drive this out, and if you want more geometry, just use your score will. So all the use my scroll wheel until I get a lot of geometry right there, and it makes it look really smooth. And then we'll just left Click, then, right click and go shades moved to smooth out that plane for the camera. I'm going to go into front view than press control Ault and zero to snap the camera into place and then I'll select it. I'll drag it up a little bit, then double tap are and move it a little bit lower to get this angle that is looking pretty good. And now for the lighting, it's just gonna be a sun lamp. So select that lamp that's already in our scene. Change it to us online and set the strength of this to a value of to for the color, just give it a slightly blue color. You don't want to go too crazy, just a slightly blue color. Something like that I think will look pretty good. Now we need to rotate this son lap to be on our cube right here. Sell press are to rotate. And also I should describe what I'm doing. I press seven to go into top view and then I press are to rotate and move it at this angle . Let's go in a camera view and see what this looks like Surprise zero on your number pad Z and go into rendered view that is looking pretty cool for the world settings. You can drag this up just a little bit to give more light to our seen. Something like that looks good and one more material that will do in this video is all select the plane. Go over to the material tab and click new. The roughness all turned down to a value Appoint one, and then I'll just leave the color as weight. Now that we've done that, let's go ahead and render out our image. 49. (2.80) Crashing Through P4 Rendering and Compositing: Now we're ready to render out an image. So what we need to do is a couple of render settings. First off, I'm going to go over to the materials have and then underneath color management, I'm going to set the look too high. Contrast. This will just give our overall scene a little bit more contrast, and I think it will look good. Then underneath the sampling section, I'm going to set the render amount to 1 50 The higher you go with this render amount, the better the image will look. But the longer it will take to render. So I'm going to just set it to 1 50 I think that will be perfectly fine. Another thing that will do is go over to this panel here, the scene panel and then underneath de Noisy. And I'm just going to check that box. What this will do is help get rid of any noise that's in our scene. So check that box and that will help. And I think that is all we really need to do. So before we render this, we should probably save our project. So I'll hit control as to save it and I'll just call it crashing through tutorial and then save blender file. Now that we've done that, make sure your render engine is cycles, then go up to render and then render image. This should only take a couple of minutes salt posit video until it's done. All right, The render has finished in. Here is our results. Now, before I end this video, I do want to do a little bit of color grading to really make the image stand out. To do this, I'm gonna go ahead and exit out of this. And then there is an option to go over to the compositing tab right here. Click on this and then we can see this is our window. I'm gonna press end to close off that panel and then over on this left side, I'm going to click and drag to close out. That would know, since we don't really need it, Then I'll just drive us over to the left now to bring in a pure notes so we can see what we're doing. If we hold control shift and left, click on a render layer, it will bring in this and we can see what our image looks like now. Currently, it's too big. So I'm gonna press V a couple times to drive that back. Now the first thing that will add is a color balance Note. Surprise ship Day and I'll go to color and then color balance right here. And then I'll take this image and plug it into the composite just like that. Now there's three different values here. Lift is for shadows. Gamma is for the mid tones and then gain is for the highlights. What I want to do is drag the shadows a little bit lower so it just darkens up, are seen that will drag the highlights up. And this will just give a contrast to our render. So as you can see, if I press the m key to mute this this is before and then mq un mute. This is after and you can see it looks a lot better for the mid tones. I'm just gonna drag this up to the blue just a little bit, something like that. So I'll do this one more time. M to mute. This is before and then M. This is after and it looks a lot better. One more thing that'll add, is a vignette, and this basically darkens the corners, so the focus is in the middle of the image. To do this, I'm gonna press shift a go to distort and then lens distortion. This distort value will distort the edges of our image, so I'm gonna set this to a value of one. The next thing that we need to do is add in a blur note. So it's not a completely black Leinart here. There's actually some blurriness self worship day and added a blur note. Take the image and plug it into the image of the burnout and then over a shift A and add in a color mix right here. Place that in between of the color balance and the viewer note. And then we'll take this and plug it into the composite. Take the image of the blur node and plug it into the mix, and we can see what this lens distortion is doing. You can see it's distorting the edges just like that. Now, if we set this value to multiply, it will get rid of the white values. But leave the black values. So here is our image. What we need to do now is blur this lens of distortion, so it doesn't look really sharp. How we're going to do this is set this too fast, change it to relatives. So it's using the relative perspective, then said it to why? And here you can control the blur amount. So if you set this along the act, you can see that's what it does. And then if you bring up the why it blurs out that edges, I'm gonna be setting both of these values to 15% and we can see what that looks like now. This factor value in the multiple, I note, controls how dark it is. So if I set this 20 there will be no darkness on the edge is if it's all the way up to one . It's at 100% currently, though, is way too strong. So I'll set this to a value of 0.6, and I think that will look pretty good. All right, so that is basically all we really need to do in the composite. Now, if you want to save her image, what you can do is hit F 11 to bring up your render right here. And this is before without the composite. Then if I click on this in select viewer node, this is after then all you have to do is go up to image, save as image, and you can save it to wherever you want. All right, there we go. That's gonna be it for this tutorial. Thank you for watching. If you made your own image, I love to see it. To make sure to post it in the assignment after this video. Thanks again for watching, and I'll see you guys in the next one.