Loose "Lootanical" Watercolor Irises | Cara Rosalie Olsen | Skillshare

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

14 Lessons (2h 25m)
    • 1. Introduction

      1:11
    • 2. Supplies

      3:02
    • 3. Gathering Inspiration

      4:57
    • 4. Proper Washes

      4:49
    • 5. Color Mixing

      15:23
    • 6. Loose Sketching

      13:43
    • 7. Wet Into Wet

      9:31
    • 8. Practicing Strokes

      8:36
    • 9. Putting It All Together Part 1

      17:27
    • 10. Putting It All Together Part 2

      19:34
    • 11. Finishing Touches

      12:37
    • 12. Iris Buds

      9:37
    • 13. Adding Stems And Leaves

      4:28
    • 14. Class Project

      20:06
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About This Class

Hello to all the returning students, and WELCOME if you are brand new!

One note before we get into the lesson - if you are finding me for the first time, be advised that this is an intermediate class. If you are just beginning your watercolor journey, I recommend you first take one of my beginning courses, Coneflowers or Tulips, and then come back to these.

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We are back today with our 6th class, in which we will marvel at and study the intricate nature of irises. These can be a somewhat complicated flower to capture in a loose frame, so we will break down the structure petal by petal before we put it all together in one moving flower.

This is the opposite approach from our peonies class in which we aimed to examine the flower as a whole, rather than each individual petal. Since Irises typically have anywhere from 6-10 petals, we can do this. This will help you feel more confident when we refer to the reference pictures we gathered and paint by memory.

Gathering Inspiration: we will search the internet to find a few images of irises to serve as inspiration and reference as we work. 

Loose sketching: using our inspirations photos we will sketch out a few blooms to get more comfortable with the iris structure

Color Mixing: I will show you step by step how I create a range of blues, lavenders, and purples to showcase the depth of a the iris.

Proper Washes: taking a moment to look at and practice water ratios

Learning strokes: we begin with introductory practice strokes to get a feel for the motion of the flower

Wet into Wet: I'll show you what to look for when working wet into wet

Putting it all together: next we will put all the techniques we've learned thus far into practice, becoming comfortable with the process of layering darker pigment on top of a lighter wash to create an even bleed

Finishing Touches: I'll demonstrate how by asking a few key details to a loose painting, you can strengthen the botanical nature of its appearance

Iris Buds: merging our lavender hues with greens to create buds

Adding Stems and Leaves: we conclude by using our brush to create leaves to accompany our irises.

Supplies:

Canson 140 lb. coldpressed paper

Brushes: varying rounds in duplicate sizes, specifically two 2's, two 6's, 2 8's

Watercolors: I'll be using Winsor and Newton and Daniel Smith, however any artist grade watercolor will suffice

Cup of water

Paper towel to blot

Palette

Pencil and Eraser

Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

Cara Rosalie Olsen

Floral Designer + Watercolor Instructor

Teacher

 

Hello, hello!

Goodness, I am SO glad you are HERE :-)

A quick intro before you dive into the lessons!

My name is Cara, and I am the owner of Rosalie Gwen Paperie, an online floral boutique. I’m also a watercolor instructor and can be found teaching budding artists in the Orange County, CA area. So if you’re local, please consider joining us for an in-person workshop!

Teaching is my passion. There is something incredibly beautiful about witnessing a person come into their creativity for the first or tenth time. I firmly believe words such as "talented" do not exist when approaching the creative realm. Every single one of us has been given the ability to share our story through the vein of creation, and it's simply a ... See full profile

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Transcripts

1. Introduction: Hello my friends and welcome to class. If you are joining me for the first time, let me just introduce myself very briefly. My name is Kara and I am the owner of Rosaline when papery, a fine art floral boutique. I'm also a watercolor instructor, and today I have cooked up something really special for you if you've taken my other classes, most of them will have been on the very loose end, but I've had some requests for something a little bit more detail, something that I call Lu tyrannical, which is a blend of botanical and loose R. And we're going to figure out how to merge these amazing styles together to get something that feels really free and untethered, but has a little bit more of a punch to it, a little more structure. So I'm really excited to share all of these tips and techniques with you. Onenote, if you are on the beginning and of your watercolor journey, I would highly recommend you start with the cone flowers or the tulips class. This will give you the mechanics necessary for what we're going to be studying today with loose Iris's. All right. Without further ado, let's get started. 2. Supplies: Okay, let's take a quick look at our supplies. We are going to be using two brands of watercolors on. But like I always say in my previous classes, any professional or excuse me, artist grade paints will suffice. I do use a mixture of the professional and the student grade. But as long as they are one of the reputable brands, you will be just fine. So we're gonna be using Windsor and new in and also Daniel Smith, extra fine watercolors. And I am actually going to take a moment, I think this sort of thing is kind of fun to be able to show you why I make certain choices along the way. Originally for these irises, because they are this lovely, sort of lavender, smoky blue color. I was going to use ultramarine violet and makes it with a little Prussian blue here. But the way that this color, even though it's a professional tube, it comes out sort of powdery and I'm going to show you why that is even though it's technically a professional grade, why sometimes it doesn't work as well as some of the other ones. So instead of using that color, we're going to use the Roosevelt for marine from the Daniel Smith. And we'll also be using Daniel Smith, rich green, gold, which is my favorite you will know from my previous classes, and a little yellow ochre. And then for our stems and leaves will be using green and burnt umber. And that's it for the paints. Grab yourself a pallet or a plate, whatever works for you. And then I am going to ask that you at least have to number six brushes because we're gonna be loading our brush and be doing a lot of timing work for this sort of botanical feel where we're doing wet into wet. It's going to be imperative that we have our brushes ready so that we can time the bleeds. So to number six is and I also want you to have a number two. And I'm using the Princeton number. I'm sorry, this is the number three printIn Princeton Heritage Series, which is my favorite. And they have several lines, Neptune in the velvet touch. So either any of those will work great, Princeton as my preferred brand. But if you have a favorite brush that you love to work with, by all means, also grab yourself a sketching pencil. I use this h b, as you can see, it's been, well love. And then this needle eraser and we're gonna do a little sketching just to get the feel and motion of the flower. And then obviously you'll want a cup of water and paper towel to blot off. And then also ideally you will have some sort of tablet that you can be referencing the flowers that were going to be choosing. So if not, you'd all be obviously just follow along with what I'm doing, but it's nice to have it close by and real and upfront so you can actually zoom in and do whatever you need to do as you are painting the flowers. So okay, so that covers our supplies. Let's move on to the next part. 3. Gathering Inspiration: So I just realized I completely neglected to mention the paper we're going to be using. That as always, is the Canson 140 pound cold press paper. This is the paper I tend to use for most everything. Watercolor brace because it has that wonderful sort of medium tooth surface. It's not too grainy, which makes it very tricky to lay in watercolors and it's not smooth, smooth the way hot press paper is. So a great paper and very inexpensive. I know you've probably heard me shout about it more times than you would care to hear, so all right, we'll move on. Okay. So I'm going to pop onto my iPad and so we can take a look at some irises together. This is an important part of the process. I do highly recommend you take at least five minutes and just have a look on the good old web and pick out a few flowers that speak mostly to you. I'm going to show you specifically what pictures I chose and you can choose the same picture so that we're on exactly the same page here. However, irises are quite uniform in that. Although they bend and move at different angles, they, they typically have like the same sort of feel to them. We're gonna practice petals in all of those regards. But let's just have a look. As you can see, I'm I searched this with iris and bud that I searched, but before I search that I was starting the main the main iris and there were so many that came up. And so really sky's the limit here as far as like colors and variety. And it actually was quite challenging figuring out which ones they wanted to do because there's purple and there's more of a rows of ultra marine color like this magenta. There's pain than there's these African irises. So for our purposes here, we're going to be focusing on the purple periwinkle with the yellow stripe running down the middle. So but anyway, like I said, I wanted to just show you this in the event that another iris reaches you on a more intimate level and you feel like that's the one you wanna do. By all means you are able to. So I'll show you the pictures that I chose. And I'd give you a little closer look at that. This is from Eden brothers and I like this because it had lots of different Iris's on one page. And so that way we can kind of take a look and see how they're all moving and bending together different angles. But I, like I said, as I was explaining, they all kind of move at the same sort of architecture. So that's from the Eden brothers. This is also the Eden brothers. It's just one single iris that I thought would be super cool because we aren't going to be doing a little bit more of a botanical feel. This is going to be a little bit more advanced as far as technique and adding in some of those really special details that kind of make loose art pop. There is a gamut of how to approach loose Art. And I've always kind of describe myself as a loo technical artist, meaning I take the both, the best of both worlds from botanical and loose art. So we're going to keep them very loose, enlightened, free. But we're also going to add in some of those few key details at the end that kind of just bring the flower to life. So that's that one. This is a bud. When we go to paint a different version of the iris. So you can see it's kind of emerging here. I really just loved the way he was just kind of exploding out from this stemmed super pretty. And then, and this one's from Peter niacin. I'll put all of these links in the class description so that you can visit and save these photos to your tablet. And then this one, I loved the color and we are going to be playing a little bit with the colors here. We're going to use two colors for the pedals. Even though in the pictures it's one color, some of the pedal work gets lost when you have a single color unless you are doing strictly botanical work. So in order to avoid, you know, pedal just sort of losing their shape and their moment in the spotlight. We're going to play with different colors to kind of give the flower just a variety of details. So again, another one's sort of exploding from stem. So that's it. That one was from luck, feature picks.com. So again, I will put all of these links in the class description so that you can have a look that these are the pictures that I will be drawing inspiration from. Feel free to grab these or pick your own. 4. Proper Washes: So I thought it might be beneficial for us again to take a look at proper water ratios. This is very important when learning how to control the waterflow. And just making sure that you are using the colors that are best going to suit the nature of what it is that you're painting. So, you know me and my food metaphors, they tend to use them quite often, one or painting just because everyone seems to know what cough syrup looks like and what honey looks like. But I also have seen this milk ratio or this milk metaphor. That works really well too. So we're going to kind of just watch out different washed pile so that you can see what each one would look like. Very light wash and medium wash. And then obviously like the richest color that it would be. So for us, we are mixing up that rows of ultra Marine with the Prussian blue. So we're gonna do that. And I'm actually going to start, I'm going to work my way backwards. Just because I'm going to mix it up as rich as I like. Again, I'm just kind of going back and forth here, adding a little bit of the blue, little bit of the pain. And now I have a color that is the closest to what I'm looking for. So when we're mixing the blue and the earth, He acts you, me the blue and the pain together. We're essentially we're trying to get that the richest version of this color possible and sign adding very little water to it. A wash is simply that the definition of that is the pigment that you use to mix with water. So we have it at its most potent. And so let's put that here under the whole milk. So that's what's going to look like at its richest. Just adding a tiny little bit of water just to mix it up. As you can see, what that looks like. And then next, and we have our 2% milk. So we're gonna draw out that pile just a little bit. And just adding a bit of water till we get something that looks like that. And when I teach intro to watercolour floor roles, we go over this in great detail and we actually draw out a color, sometimes up to ten times. So there really is a lot of variation between all of this, but for our purposes, three is totally sufficient. And then we're gonna do it a third time. This time I don't really pick up any pain. I'm just using a leftover paint that was on my brush to make that third pile, adding water to it. And now we have our skim milk. I'm going to rinse off my brush it even a little bit, just to get that very pale. Ok, so our initial color that we're going to lay down is probably going to be more of this 2%, this medium middle of the road. And then when we go to add in, and when we go to create our bleed, we're going to use more of the whole milk to skim milk kind of is a little bit to light. I don't tend to use it very much in my work unless I'm really trying to create this super bleed. It, it's really great for super loose art. So if you were to like, you know, kind of just make a really loose blob and then, and then go in with this whole milk. You're gonna get this amazing. In fact, I'll show you right here. I don't know if it's still wet enough. We're going to we're going to go into wet, into wet and just a little bit here. But it really does create this really rich bleed and this isn't quite what enough. And this has actually been diluted a little bit too far so that I'm not getting the kind of results that I love. But the lighter you go on that base coat, the more the better result that you're going to get when you add that darker color just for a more sharp response. So like for example, if I were to do it into, this is all dry now two, but if I were to put it into here, can see that there's not much color value between this color, the middle of the road in the dark, but using a super, super light color and then adding in that darker pigment really creates just such a beautiful result. Okay, so that's what a ratio is, pretty simple and straightforward. So I'll explain that as I'm moving along which sort of piles I'm mixing up. But like I said, for our purposes, we're really going to be using the 2% and the whole milk. 5. Color Mixing: Okay, you guys, so if you follow me on Instagram, you will know that color mixing is kind of my jam. If you're not already familiar with my watercolor mixing guides featuring vintage colors, please, please, please have a look at that on the website under artist resources. So much good information there. So I am possibly, to your chagrin, going to really go through this comprehensively. And I hope that it will be to your benefit and that you will be able to see how special getting the color just right can be. Granted. There are times when I literally take this palette and I mix up whatever is on the RAM, and I just mix it all together and it totally works. It's fine and I love that and for what it is. But when I'm trying to get a color right, there is so much beauty in taking the time and the care to getting it just right. So when I was picking these colors for you guys, looking at those beautiful Smokey purple irises, I thought. Okay, ultramarine violet for sure. It's a professional, Winsor Newton, which there's so much discrepancy about whether or not the cotton series is as good. I am one of those people that actually do think the Kauffman series is just as good if not better in some colors. But there are those I'm sure that you follow in our familiar with who would say no way, professional line all the way it's worth every penny. So completely different schools of thought, neither are wrong. So I'm going to show you why I ultimately decided not to go with the ultramarine violet as we put some paint down on our palate. When I went to a swatch out this color, I realized that it just kinda has this light powdery feel, which could be really great for some flowers and for some process of painting the flowers. But the way that we're going to use this color, wet into wet and creating a really dark, rich bleed. It just didn't it didn't perform the way I needed it to perform. So I'll show you right here adding some water into it. And as you can see, it kind of looks pretty rich right away. What ends up happening? The more water that you use to dilute it, it just really loses its punch. It just starts to get really, really soft and does not have the same. Like I said, richness, vibrancy, whatever it is, I put quite a bit of paint down on the palate and that's all that I got out of it. You know, of course I would probably add more water into that. And now we have what I would call him medium, a medium grade watch. It's not light, is not dark. It's sort of in the middle. Now I'm going to show you some amount of paint next to Roosevelt or marine. So teeny little bit of paint. Since the Daniel Smith rinsing off my brush. I don't want any of that purple on there. I want you to see exactly what it looks like. Okay. Start playing with it. Okay, so I'm halfway in and I already have a way darker in richer color than what I had when I was halfway into this, you can see it's still looks almost as dark is what it when it came out like out of the tube. And the keep touching it and it's just gonna keep getting darker and then add some water to it. And it's still going to retain its vibrancy that, that culture marine violet, it, it lost, I would say 50% of its vibrancy upon adding the water. This just keeps its rich, vibrant color the whole way. Adding some more water. Now it's going to gradually begin to lighten, but not that much. I'll draw it out even further. Still, quite a powerful color. This is all that I have. I added this, I added less water to this and this is all I have. I still have half of my Daniel Smith little blobby here. So I just wanted you to see that that's something that, you know, a lot of artists, whether they don't have the time or the inclination to show you. A little can go along way depending on what you're using. Now I'm not saying that just because that the Daniel Smith is a really beautiful brand of watercolors. That they are superior to Windsor and Newton. I'm gonna show you Prussian blue next so you can see, and Prussian blue, which is the Koppen series, is just as beautiful, keeps its color and as you add water to it doesn't really lose its performance. So again, I would draw this out even further coming over here, not even dipping into this anymore. And now we have a light wash of this color. So you can see, haven't even used that. This it just didn't work. So when I went to add depression blew, it kind of made it a little bit better. I was able to get some of the results I want, but because we're gonna be doing a base of a soft wash and then adding in that really rich bleed. I'll show you over here along the edges, excuse me, from my scratch paper. You can see that I really wanted it to perform well and it, it, it didn't do exactly what I wanted it to do. It's just very light compare. So let me grab the other sheet. Again. Forgive my practice. But you can see I got a much better result here using that rows of ultramarine and depression blue together. So although it's a little bit more work, because we're now working with a magenta and blue versus a purple and a blue. We do, we have to take the time and I think it's worth it in this case to get the better results. So we have our, I'm going to swatch this out just so you can see what it looks like. So this is just straight, ultramarine violet and again, a lovely colour. And I would think it would work really nicely as a supplementary color, just as a base. And if you were say, doing like a cute little, like pinwheel flour and then putting in some really beautiful greens to it, like an undersea green or a stock green and burnt umber mixture in where the green would dominate. Purple would take on that green so nicely and you would create such a pretty bleed. So totally has its uses just in this case, this flower, you can see that different paints work better. So anyway, a little bit of the thought process behind my choices. I know it's a little long winded, but I just wanted you to understand why I do the things that I do. Ok, so like I said, very, very, very light. This is the darkness that it is. And then obviously we'd get even lighter as we add water and soften it off. Okay, so we're not going to be using that color. I'll show you the Rooseveltian marine here. So that's the Roosevelt Room rain just on its own. And neither of those are quite right for what we're looking for. So we are going to head back in to this Roosevelt for marine and add a bit of Prussian blue to it. So I'm going to show you Prussian blue, the same sort of stuff that I used here. Same same amount of blob. I think I got a little bit of brown on there. Sometimes you guys, I don't know if you ever do this artist fail. I put the wrong caps back on my watercolor paints because I'm using Sony at the same time. I just don't have time to close them up as I'm moving along. And so I got brown. I thought it was blue, but it was actually for my brown and it changed my blue. So really go, problem solved. Let's head back in here. K. Prussian blue is one of my favorites. It looks very deceiving though. It looks like it's going to be this really pretty navy blue based on the tube color, but it's actually quite a civilian. And it matches, it kinda actually looks like intense blue if you've ever worked with that color, but mixes fantastically with other colors. So again, you can see this is doing the exact same thing Roosevelt for marine did. And it's a continent brand. So barely added any water to it. And it hasn't lost its color at all. Really, really, really beautiful flower or flower color and great for mixing. Okay, so we have that there. Now we are going to head in to mixing. So I have my Prussian blue and I'm going to start mixing it here. And it's gonna take a little bit of tinkering. I am not a fan of purple for all of you Purple lovers out there. I apologize in advance. Purple is not my favorite color, but I do love a smoky lavender and I love violet, hence my daughter's name. And so whenever I work with purples, my goal is always to get the perfect balance between I'm blue and pink and get this periwinkle. That's, you will never see me use data purple in my work. But it takes awhile. So I'm gonna just kinda start mixing all of this together. I don't want that in there where you came from. And as you can see, this is very, very purple. But I'm going to get quite a bit here because I'm going to need quite a bit. And when we, when we do ratios and just a bit here I'll show you what your pile should look like as we work. Okay, so very purple. And I step back into my blue here and start darkening it up. I'm going to say that I tend to lend more towards the blue than I do pink. I'd rather have it be a little bit more blue than the pinky purple when I'm doing a purple color. So it's gonna take a little bit, but I think I think we're almost there. So it just takes, like I said, get your blobs out and just kinda start going back and forth and figuring out where you want to be. This is what it's always different seeing it on the palate than it is on paper. So this is why we swatch, let's bring it out over here onto our paper and see what we got. So I like that. I think that's a pretty good compromise between pink and purple. I may add a little bit more blue and just kinda see what happens that may not work. It may end up being way too blue. But let's just give it a go and see. And I hope by showing you how long it takes, you'll be encouraged to take the time to do it for yourself. I mean, I always, I have my standby. The model that anything worth doing is worth doing well, even this part type. So as you can see, there's quite a bit of difference between that. And I, like I said, it's a little bit more blue, but I think I'm more fond of that. It's a little too blue, so I'm probably going to try and aim for something in the middle of these two, which will get tricky because it comes down to how much water I'm adding in all of that, but that'll be my goal. So this will be one of the colors that we use. And I love how it sort of just smokes out. You can see the difference between that versus that. Just a really pretty soft blue. So we're also going to do one, a different mix of these same colors aren't more on the pink end so that we can get some variation between the petals. Like I was saying, when you have a singular color and you're doing loose art, it can be a little difficult to maintain the integrity of each petal and it's fine to lose a little bit of that. But one way to easily avoid doing that is to add a supplementary color to it. So I'm gonna mix up a little bit of that and I'm gonna kinda keep it on the magenta side of things. Try and really stick to the violet because if I add too much blue to it, I'm going to get purple. If and if I don't add enough, then it just ends up being a color that I'm not going to love working with. So so that's going to be my goal. Pretty much straight rows of ultramarine here. And as the colors are mixing because we're gonna be working wet into wet. Of course, we're gonna get a little overlap in new mixtures of colors, which is totally fine. But it's nice to have a working palette. Just an idea framework for what it is that we're going for. So this was the first try. I think it's more going to be this one and this one, but we might get a little bit of that one as well. Ok, so that is our palette for the actual puddles. We are also going to be using rich green gold, which is just one of the most lovely its colors I'm mixing with everything. So I'm gonna put a little bit of that appear. And this one likes to try up on me. And again, this is the Daniel Smith and I've had this tube and I mean, I don't use it every day obviously, but I've had this two for two years. So it really does go a long way. Just for the purpose of sticking with what I'm gonna be using. This is the number three brush and I'm gonna be using that for that middle portion of the iris. So you can see I barely need MA and it mixes up so vibrantly. And I'm pretty much just going to let that drop in as is. I could add a little yellow ochre to it or a little brown to it and change the color. But I think it's going to mute a little bit naturally because we're using purples. So I'm just going to keep it straight as it is. And we'll put that down there. That's gonna look really pretty as we lay it into the purples. And then I go over greens when we start to do the stems and leaves, not really a huge focus on those today just because they're not really a huge part of the iris flower. Okay, let's move on to the next portion. 6. Loose Sketching: So typically when I am approaching loose art, I tend not to sketch out any sort of shape of the flower just because one, I really enjoyed the whole approach of loose art, meaning that it doesn't have to exactly resemble what it is that you're seeing in nature. That part of the process is really nourishing for me. And so being restricted to something like this where I'm trying to get the angles, just write. It puts a lot of pressure on the artist and it can really take away just from the whole catharsis of painting. So I tend to avoid that when I'm, when I'm doing loose art. If you've been following me for a while, you may know that I used to do extremely detailed botanical pieces and in that case, I would spend upwards of two hours sketching out every little detail so that when it came time to paint, I knew exactly where things needed to go. But I switched to loose art because of just the forgiving nature of it. How Ember. Sometimes it can be really useful and beneficial for the artists to build up her muscle memory so that when she goes to put the brush strokes on the page, her hand already sort of knows what to do, having spent a little bit of time with a pencil on paper, um, for the most part, i will tend to just I things. I have my tablet next to me and I'll just eyeball it. Sometimes I get the scale right, sometimes it's totally off. I usually can make it work for me. But it is something like this where I'm trying to give you just the best look and approach to being able to paint what you see, but not exactly what you see. I thought it might be beneficial that we just spend a couple moments just kind of getting this shape of this iris. So probably would count out the pedals together and just kinda get a general framework for it. So it has 1234567899 pedal. That's, seems it's, it's actually quite a lot of petals. But if you were to look at a different flower, I know I'm being long winded here. I promise that it's all, it's all justified. When we were doing our peony is Class. A flower like that has so many petals that if you were to look at that flower petal bipedal, you would get utterly consumed and overwhelmed by attempting to approach it. This is going to be the total opposite technique. When we were doing pianist, it was we're looking at the flower as a whole and just getting like a general framework for it. For this, we are going to sort of map out where each petal is because we can isolate these petals in a way that makes sense to our brain and will possibly make it easier for us when we go to put it on the page. So I have my HB pencil and really not going to attempt to get it exactly right. But I just kinda wanted to show you what I would do when I'm wanting to get a flower, the right scale. So I'm gonna take a look at it, and this is a little bit of composition. Those of you who have been asking for a composition class. This is a little bit of how I approach composition. So I look at the whole shape of the flower and just kinda get a feel for it. And if you've looked at it. It has the triangular field to it, tip to tip. So that's what we're going to do right here on the page. We're gonna make sort of a triangle. Kind of dips here. But now we kinda have are loose framework. And I, like I said, it's really messy, sloppy sketch. I don't try and make it perfect because the more I try and make it perfect, the more overwhelmed they get. And then I get stuck in a race or land where I am sketching and receive, sketch human racing. And I can't get to the part that I really enjoy. So we have our loose framework here. I always like to start in the middle and work my way out. So we have this sort of middle pelo, pelo petal. And I have found no other way to describe this little part of the petal other than a bottom? That's what I've been calling it in my head. So that's what I'm going to call it. As we're painting, it just kind of looks like a cute look tissue. So I'm gonna start with the tissue and just sort of map out this little roughly two sheep, okay, from there. And obviously I'm drawing everything quite large. We were not gonna paint it this big, but I just kinda want you to get a feel for how it's going to appear on the page. So that's quite large. So I'm going to have to make this next peddle even larger. In fact, just kinda looking at this space we have, I think I'm gonna go ahead and erase that and make it a little bit smaller. Just because I don't want to run off the page here, so try that again. Making it a little bit smaller. There we go. And I'm not really worrying too much about those ruffles, ruffled edges, I'm just trying to get the shape right. Okay, so then we come down here. So there we go and you can kinda see him just making these quick gestural lines. When you try and like, really like get everything right unless you are a practiced illustrator, it's going to be really challenging. And like I said, you kind of lose some of the joy. So please, Like I said, give yourself some space to just capture the framework of it. Alright, so the next one we're gonna do are these two outer ones is kinda comes bending upwards, comes down, it dips, comes in there. Go for here. And we have a next one. So obviously when I'm painting, I'll probably make a little bit more of an effort to capture that ruffle a little bit more. But that, then I'm going to work my way out here. Kinda gets lost into this pedal. And you can kinda see I'm already expanding a bomb beyond that triangle, but it just kinda gives me an idea of where I'm going. I am going to look at this petal. And I'm going to see that it comes to about here. I don't want to go down because then I'm going to lose the shape. So there's definitely an angle here. Okay, so then I have something like that with the little middle part coming out there. And we're gonna head up here. And this one will pop over here. You get a said we're just getting just the loose sort of feel for it. I'm capturing the details along the way like I did with this one just to kind of get that feel. But obviously we're not going to work too much into this nature until we're putting our final little details into it. So I might just kinda come in here and get an idea of what it will look like, you know, on a pedal or two. But I'm not making this a strict sketch. Ok, so I don't see any details over here that I'm really worried about when I'm wander coloring, it's going to have a totally different feel, but I might try and pointed off there just to give it some movement. Then I'm gonna come over here and this one's kind of arching up. Comes up a little bit lower, as you can see, there's little angle right there. So just went too high. It's where the eraser comes in and I love this eraser. Just a little note on this in case you haven't seen any of my other classes. These needle erasers are wonderful. You can actually do a sketch like this very, very lightly under your painting. And then when you're done, you can go over it. It will not erase the water color, but it will erase the pencil. Just like I said, do it very lightly because the more watercolor that you lay on top of it, the harder it will be to get underneath to that surface level. So the lighter the better. Okay, so this is kinda coming up right here. A little bit of a roughly side there. Again, I kinda went this one's actually a little bit higher, so we're going to do that. Okay? Sorry if you're hearing the dean and the backbone, Amazon has just delivered some packages. Thank you very much. Amazon appreciate you. Don't have to leave my chair or get out of my pajamas. Always a good day. Okay. Then we're going to come out here or come this eighth petal. And then I do see a really pretty little detail over here, so I am going to capture that. So we have the upper spot. And then we have this was the kind of detail right here, coming out. Again, we have this pretty little. And I didn't get that quite right. Just fine. But here we go. Here we go. Again, like I said, when I were water coloring, it'll have a different feel to it. Had back in there and just kind of get an idea of the positioning of things. I'd like to make these motion lines just it's really for my brain only and just reminding myself that this is the direction that we're going. When you go to add these details. They're sort of make it or break it. So if you add them at an angle that is just not natural, it really will kinda just pull away from the whole feel of things. So I'm very limited when I do loose art to just add some key details. Nothing that's going to permanently make it feel as though it's wrong or it's off. Unless of course that's the feel that you are going for. Okay, so then we have this last pedal, which kind of comes sneaking out from here. It's going to bend Again. We're being mindful of this angle right here. So I don't want to really go past this point. So we have this and go and again, the angles not completely right is just to get an idea. It's more of a straight edge there and then it kind of curves and then it ruffles out. But again, and like I said, when we're painting, we can always modify and bring things down a little bit. And, you know, just having a look at things, we know that this is the smallest pedal, This is the largest petal. And then these ones are sort of long and Angular with these twisting, curling motions. And then if we want, can kind of take a look the stem here. Kinda see that they have their shooting up. So we will definitely aim to capture some of that. That leaves beautiful work. And so basically that's all I would do if I were just trying to build up my muscle memory for this flower. And I'm not going to go in and start adding in some really crazy details for things you know, where I'm going to get all of the little ruffles just right and whatnot with loose are, we're just trying to get the shape and the scale. So we accomplished that. We made sure that this was coming down at the same angle over here. We made sure that we weren't dipping into the wrong territory. Here we have our PQ and we have the other supplementary flat or petals complementing the whole flower. So that's that first sketching portion. I hope that was beneficial to you. I know it was a little bit more than we usually do in some of the classes, but with a flower like the iris, I really didn't want to give you just the whole comprehensive look at it as we move forward. So the next portion, we're really going to take a look at getting the colors right, which again is sort of a time consuming part of the process. And as I always say, the process leading up to the painting should be and two times, if not three times, longer than the actual painting, which can be a little boring. I understand. But the more prepared you are when it comes time to lay the paint on the paper, the better result you are going to yield a promise you every time the more prepared I am, you know, unless I'm just slapping some paint on a paper to say, okay, I painted today. But if I really want to do something nice, the more prepared I am loading my brushes, getting the water ratio is just right having it already. It makes for such a more enjoyable process. So I'm trying to build that and instill that into you as you just expand your love for watercolors. Alright, let's move on. 7. Wet Into Wet: Okay, at this point, I would like you to get your tablet out if you are referencing the pictures that we saved initially, we're going to kind of pull away from staring at the photos as we move into creating the flowers themselves. But in the beginning I think it will strengthen again muscle memory to kinda just BY looking painting, looking painting as we just learned, the general strokes for this flower. So again, our goal is for nine paddles and to just kinda keep the shape and the scale of the flower. If you want to pull out your sketch and just be able to reference that, that might be helpful as well too. I'm going to be eyeballing my tablet to the left that I have propped up as we just start learning the strokes together. So for that, that middle two she cut all. We remember that it has sort of this little insert here and here. And just kinda come up here. And again, I'm not really worrying about the ruffles yet. I'll put a little bit of that in. But we're just kinda getting the strokes down. So what I like to do, and this is my, my approach is I like to trace it in. Again. The risk of repeating myself is super forgiving in that I can just go back in and sort of like if I were outlining something in CRAN and then I go back in and draw in the middle. And if you were to do that on a different paper, you would still have that line on the outside, which is not ideal for water color. But you can sort of outline and then just kinda go back in and wash and not really worrying too much about the wash puddle I am using kind of a lighter, I'd say the 2% mixture that we mixed up earlier. For this, like I said, we're not really going to use that skim milk. So this is that, that middle one. And I'm just sort of taking my brush and getting the shoot right. And eventually we are going to be blending this color anyway. But it's just nice to be able to see initially what it's supposed to look like. So that's what that looks like. We're gonna do another one. I'm not going to add in the second degree of color yet. Just because I want you to get a sense just for how the the base coat lays down crazy. So now will come out here and do that big middle pedal. And again, I'm just kind of sort of eyeballing it. Not really worrying too much about the ruffles, but just getting some shape, heading back into that pile, picking up a little bit of water and come back in and fill it in. Later on, we'll definitely have some timing that will need to pay attention to. But ultimately for this, it's just a matter of getting the coat down. And you may touch these and let them blend. I let it dry a little bit, but you can still see where it would be. Now when we go to put all of this together, we're going to be running a golden stripe down the middle of this. But again, we're just learning strokes right now. Okay. Picking up a little bit more color on my number six. And let's go ahead and do that third pedal. I'm gonna move this over. Losing my range of motion here. And just kinda sweeping things long, creating that little ruffle and coming back to fill it in. And again, I'll be creating some more detailed lines later on that we'll really emphasize what happened here. But right now, like I said, I'm just trying to get the shape and get an even coat of paint. And we're gonna come down here to sort of dragging the brush is sort of this motion. You're alternating pressure. So tip down, tip down. So we did this in our beginning class and like I recommended the class description if you are finding me for the first time, this is definitely not the class that I would, I would say to start with because we need to practice on all sorts of strokes and whatnot. But that is just kind of the general motion of things is laying your brush tip angle and then increasing the pressure. Okay. There's kinda dried up on me a little bit, but that's okay. Again and turned to be a little mindful of the scale here. I may have to come out here and add a little bit of length just so I don't the scale here. And again, I'm just kinda coloring thing then. Not really too worried because like I said, when we add in that second layer of color, we're gonna get a bleed and it's gonna cover all of that. It's come up here, right here. Just kind of loosely lose the, capturing the motion of it. And this comes up a little bit higher. And we have this one over here, this sweet little F0 coming over. You know, I'm going to add a little bit of color here. Just to show you guys with that, ultimately it's going to look like we'll go over that in more detail when we mix up our colors. But as you can see, super, super, super pretty happening here is still wet and we're adding in a little bit of color. So now these petals, you're gonna get a little bit more of just a moment. And again, this is probably a little too dry, but we're going to be adding in some really pretty details here. It's hard for me to not even get ahead of myself, but I really just wanted to show you the basic structure of this before we really began. So I think that's probably enough practice. Again, I've lost scale here. I'll be paying a little bit more intention to that as we for real. But I just wanted to kinda see the the process of outlining and then going back to color it in. So I don't want you to be too concerned or worried or have anxiety about getting down a perfect coat of paint. Because what ends up happening is you run out of paint, starts to dry up, even when you have your brush really loaded. So feel free to outline. And they'd come back in and color. I think it's just a nice, gentle way of painting. Okay, so that's the beginning strokes. Your petals are sort of just kind of bending and swaying at different angles. So definitely practice tip and then coming down, pushing flat on that brush. Vending things at different angles. Cut it just the way that we have in our prior or leaf classes so that you see it kinda has a leaf look, but then we add some ruffles onto it. And then you'll see later on as we go in and if we add more color, obviously we're going to get more of that pedal feel. But just kinda practice here coming at different angles and letting those, excuse me, I've run off the page here. Letting those petals really move, really flex that range of motion between where it begins and where it ends. So I would definitely I would take maybe five to ten minutes to just kind of practice that motion of light pressure, increasing the pressure and then back to tip and just sort of getting a feel for how it, how it feels. You can even do more like little stringy, which I may end up doing too when we're in the moment and adding different amounts of water to it, really, sky's the limit here and I don't want you to feel pressure to get it just right. The reason we did that sketch initially was just like I said, to get a better understanding of how the flower is shaped. But in the moment we're gonna do some really fun things. You can already see how pretty that is when we mix two colors is kind of a variegated wash. So we're gonna go ahead and mix up the colors that we're going to be using. Now I will show you that process as well. And then just, you know, this is the flower that I'm referencing. It's the one I'm sure you've figured it out and as you were watching. But we're gonna start with this one and we're going to add it all the details together now. All right. 8. Practicing Strokes: So what artists mean when they say they're working wet into wet is that they are surprise. Surprise. Not working with a wet canvas or excuse me, a dry canvas. They're essentially laying in pigment to a water base already laid down, or they're laying down a base with color and then adding another variation of that color on top of it. So I wanted to show you sort of both so that you can kind of see wet into wet is one of those things that it takes a lot of time and craft to really master to get it down. And there's a lot of control in to just adjust the flow of color and also to know what to look for. It took me a really long time to really feel like I had a firm grasp on this concept and definitely was discouraging along the way. I would attempt to do it and not get the results I was looking for, which I will show you. For this flower. It's very important that we are timing things properly to get the results that we're looking for. If your paper is too dry, then when you go to lay in that darker wash of color, it's going to go nowhere. And it's just going to create a line wherever you put the brush on the page. If it's too wet, it's just going to sort of pool everywhere. And again, you're just not going to get that gentle natural movement, water flooding out. It's just going to be this one does giant puddle. So I'm gonna take my paint water year, which is just kind of a very light purple so you can see and lay down some water. And then I'm just going to sort of watch it for a moment. Now this is where I would advise you to get down I level and what you are looking for is a sheen of color. You don't want it to be pooled in certain areas and you don't want it to dry up on you quickly. This is why we load our brushes. So this I have over pool so that by the time I dip into my pane over here, It's ready for me. Again, this is one of those things that you just have to pick up. Like, I know how much time it's gonna take me to get the paint on my brush. But for sake of 0s, I have my students load their brushes so that they don't have to like, navigate like okay, it's gonna take me 35 seconds to get in here, mixed it up the way I want and come back to the page. There's just a lot of thinking. It is something that just happens naturally as you improve your craft and you just get on the paper more and more. But when you're beginning, it's just one more step that can kind of muddle up the whole process. So I wouldn't have put this much water down if I were planning to. Launch right in with my color. But again, it's going to be where I want it to be by the time I get back in. Okay, so I'm going to lay color on top of this and this is just a wet wash and there's no actual paint and we'll see what it does. So this is what you're looking for, just that gradual bleed of color. It's moving, but it's not dominating the whole swatch. Okay, now I'm going to do a dominance watch and I am going to load up my brush this time so that it's just ready to go. So I'm taking my number six and I'm heading into my whole milk pile. Probably actually more 2%, not quite as dark. So I'm going to lay down that wet wash again. And this time I'm gonna put way too much water down. So now I have a puddle on my page. It's not bad. It's not terrible, but it's not doing. You're almost getting this sort of anatomy. Jello jellyfish look to it. And a lot of fluid artists, this is exactly what it is that they do. So it still can be pretty, it's just not serving the purpose that I have in mind for doing these Iris's. So I want more of this gentle flow. This is more of it's just kind of it's stagnant and then it just sort of pools everywhere. So again, it has more of like a fluid art. No, if we were to Lake, I said do this in like a flower petal motion. So here's trying to like over water it and add in the water or MCU excuse me out in the pigment as just not doing what I want. No, let me show you the difference. Okay, this will be the proper ratio. And again, you just kinda get familiar with this. And you have to get down on eye level. You need to be able to see the xin of the paper. There's way more water control versus sort of the blobby feel that I have over here so you can see the difference, okay, now, this is what it looks like when you're piles to dry. Now excuse me, when you're washes to dry. So I'm putting on just a little bit of water. And again, if your brushes loaded, you're not having to reason how much time it's gonna take for things. Okay. Okay. So there's a little bit of movement there, but not much. So you're kind of just making this line. It's not really going all too far. Again, I'll show you here is just kind of a line and Canson paper is really forgiving and vector probably looking at going like, well, it's not that bad. I mean, it's not like it's just going nowhere. Which is very true. Cancelled paper, which is why I pick it, is very forgiving in that there is a lot of time to get back to your wet into wet. And also you can still get pretty decent result even if you're not timing. Things were like that ended up not looking not bad. I just have a hard time making a bad pile because it's something I worked so hard to avoid. But yeah, Canson paper just tends to be very forgetting. But ultimately, we're trying to go for this. And as you can see, this is still wet. If this were to be happening on Arches paper, it would have dried up ten years ago. Arches paper is very tricky. I actually wanna do an entire class based on that paper because it is so beautiful to work with. But you have to have copious amounts of water loaded onto your brush and time everything perfectly. Canson paper is, like I said, just so much easier to navigate. So again, you can see all of these beautiful things happening. This is just kinda still a blob. And if I were to let it dry up a little bit and go into the drier areas with some darker color. I could still have some pretty good results with it. But for the purpose of this flower, I'm definitely wanting a little bit more control and what it is that I'm doing. So is this still pretty wet? And it's just kinda going nowhere. Okay. So that is just a closer look at wet into wet and what to look for and how to navigate it. 9. Putting It All Together Part 1: Okay, we're going to start from scratch again here. See you actually see what it looks like. I already have a little bit of that Rosel ultramarine right here. And then the Prussian blue, okay, for this part is very important. I want you to have three. Number six is because we're going to have the base wash on one. We're going to have the darkest wash that whole milk on another one. And then on the third brush, we're going to have more of that magenta color. So I want you to have three working brushes. I also want you to have your number three available because that is the brush that we're going to use for that middle stripe and then have that mixed up off to the side. So I have mine right here over here. And I'm just gonna sort of wet it, get it ready to take your number three loaded up and just sort of get some paint on there. If you need to dip in in the moment, which I probably will just to kind of refresh your brush, that's fine but get some yellow on it and then just go over here, lay it down to the side. Forget about it for now. Okay, so let's use our first brush to mix up the whole milk version of our color. So quite a bit of Roosevelt Jr. marine adding a bit of water to it. Coming in blue, more pink. Again, I don't want to have to be mixing color in the moment, so I'm really going to do my best to get quite a bit. And we're going to be painting the flower quite big. So it's important that you have enough of it. So make sure your colors the way that you want it, you may want to swatch. I've made this color so many times that I pretty much know what I'm looking for. But again, you can watch it out on your paper just to make sure that it has enough blue toned purple tons, whatever it is that you're looking for. Okay, so that's our whole milk and gonna mix and even drier pile over here just to dip into if I wanted even even darker, darker upon dark. Okay. So then from there we come out and we make that second wash. And that's exactly the color I'm looking for. And adding some water to get it the color that I like. Okay, here we go. And now over here we're going to mix up a little bit more of a magenta. So we'll put down more Rooseveltian marine and little purple here. So I'm going to make it more Rooseveltian marine and then draw it out here to make it just a little bit lighter to that 2% milk color that we're looking for. So this is our working palette. We have our dark, dark right here, whole milk, then we have our 2%, and then we have our Roosevelt from rain that is about 2%. Then we have our stripe color right here. And that again is like at the middle of the road wash. Again. When we're working wet into wet, we're really going to have to make sure that the pedal is wet but not too wet. Or when we go to add that stripe in there is just going to dominate the whole pedal. So that's why I really wanted you to see towards to dry looks like what to wet looks like. Because for this flower dropping in those details, it's going to be really important that the campus is prepped the way that it needs to be in order for it to do what we want it to do. Okay, so those are our mixes. Now let's go ahead and get a fresh new sheet of paper and begin putting it all together in one sort of seamless motion. So typically when I am approaching loose art, I tend not to sketch out any sort of shape of the flower just because one, I really enjoy the whole approach of loose art, meaning that it doesn't have to exactly resemble what it is that you're seeing in nature. That part of the process is really nourishing for me. And so being restricted to something like this where I'm trying to get the angles, just write. It puts a lot of pressure on the artist and it can really take away just from the whole catharsis of painting. So I tend to avoid that when I'm, when I'm doing loose art. If you've been following me for a while, you may know that I used to do extremely detailed botanical pieces and in that case, I would spend upwards of two hours sketching out every little detail so that when it came time to paint, I knew exactly where things need to go. But I switched to loose art because of just the forgiving nature of it. How Ember. Sometimes it can be really useful and beneficial for the artists to build up her muscle memory so that when she goes to put the brush strokes on the page, her hand already sort of knows what to do, having spent a little bit of time with a pencil on paper. And for the most part, i will tend to just I, things. I have my tablet next to me and I'll just eyeball it. Sometimes I get the scale right, sometimes it's totally off. I usually can make it work for me. But it is something like this where I'm trying to give you just the best look and approach to being able to paint what you see, but not exactly what you see. I thought it might be beneficial that we just spend a couple moments just kind of getting this shape of this iris so that we would count out the pedals together and just kinda get a general framework for it. So it has 1234567899 pedal. That's, seems it's, it's actually quite a lot of petals. But if you were to look at a different flower, I know I'm being long-winded here. I promise that it's all, it's all justified. When we were doing our PNAS class. A flower like that has so many petals that if you were to look at that flower petal bipedal, you would get utterly consumed and overwhelmed by attempting to approach it. This is going to be the total opposite technique. When we were doing pianist, it was we're looking at the flower as a whole and just getting like a general framework for it. For this, we are going to sort of map out where each petal is because we can isolate these petals in a way that makes sense to our brain and will possibly make it easier for us when we go to put it on the page. So I have my HB pencil and really not going to attempt to get it exactly right. But I just kinda wanted to show you what I would do when I'm wanting to get a flower, the right scale. So I'm gonna take a look at it, and this is a little bit of composition. Those of you who have been asking for a composition class. This is a little bit of how I approach composition. So I look at the whole shape of the flower and just kinda get a feel for it. And if you've looked at it, it has a triangular field to it. Tip, tip, tip. So that's what we're going to do right here on the page. We're gonna make sort of a triangle. Kind of dips here. But now we kinda have are loose framework. And I, like I said, it's really messy, sloppy sketch. I don't try and make it perfect because the more I try and make it perfect, the more overwhelmed they get. And then I get stuck in a race or land where I am sketching and sketching in racing. And I can't get to the part that I really enjoy. So we have our loose framework here. I always like to start in the middle and work my way out. So we have this sort of middle pelo, pelo petal. And I have found no other way to describe this little part of the pedal other than a bottom. That's what I've been calling it in my head. So that's what I'm going to call it. As we're painting, it just kind of looks like a cute little tissue. So we're going to start with the tissue and just sort of map out this little roughly tissue, okay, from there. And obviously, I'm drawing everything quite large. We were not gonna paint it this big, but I just kinda want you to get a feel for how it's going to appear on the page. So that's quite large. So I'm going to have to make this next peddle even larger. In fact, just kinda looking at the space we have. I think I'm gonna go ahead and erase that and make it a little bit smaller. Just because I don't want to run off the page here, so try that again. Making it a little bit smaller. There we go. And I'm not really worrying too much about those ruffles, ruffled edges and just trying to get the shape right. Okay, so then we come down here. And so there we go. And you can kinda see, I'm just making these quick gestural lines. When you try and like, really like get everything right. Unless you are a practiced illustrator, it's going to be really challenging. And like I said, you kind of lose some of the joy. So please, Like I said, give yourself some space to just capture the framework of it. Alright, so the next one we're gonna do are these two outer ones is kinda come to bending upwards, comes down, dips, comes in. There. Go. For here. And we have at next one. So obviously when I'm painting, I'll probably make a little bit more of an effort to capture that ruffle a little bit more. But that, then I'm going to work my way out here. Kinda gets lost into this pedal. And you can kinda see I'm already expanding a bomb beyond that triangle. But it just kind of gives me an idea of where I'm going to, I'm going to look at this puddle and I'm going to see that it comes to about here. I don't want to go down because then I'm going to lose the shape. So there's definitely an angle here. Okay, so then I have something like that with the little middle part coming out there. And we're going to head up here. And this one will pop over here. You get a said we're just getting just the loose sort of feel for it. And capturing the details along the way like I did with this one just to kind of get that feel. But obviously we're not going to work too much into this nature until we're putting our final little details into it. So I might just kinda come in here and get an idea of what it will look like on a pedal or two. But I'm not making this a strict sketch. Ok, so I don't see any details over here that I'm really worried about when I'm wander coloring, it's going to have a totally different feel, but I might try and pointed off there just to give it some movement. Then I'm gonna come over here and this one's kind of arching up. Comes up a little bit lower, as you can see, there's little angle right there. So just went too high. It's where the eraser comes in and I love this eraser. Just a little note on this in case you haven't seen any of my other classes. These needle erasers are wonderful. You can actually do a sketch like this very, very lightly under your painting. And then when you're done, you can go over it. It will not erase the watercolor, but it will erase the pencil. Just like I said, do it very lightly because the more watercolor that you lay on top of it, the harder it will be to get underneath to that surface level. So the lighter the better. Okay, so this is kinda coming up right here, roughly side there. Again, I kinda went, this one's actually a little bit higher, so we're going to do that. Okay? Sorry if you're hearing the dean and the backbone, Amazon has just delivered some packages. Thank you very much. Amazon appreciate you. Don't have to leave my chair or get out of my pajamas. Always a good day. Okay. Then we're going to come out here. Were come this eighth petal. And then I do see a really pretty little detail over here, so I am going to capture that. So we have the upper spot and then we have. This with the kind of detail right here. Coming out. Again, we have this pretty little. And I didn't get that quite right. Just fine. But here we go. Here we go. Again, like I said, when I were water coloring, it'll happen different feel to it. Had back in there and just kind of get an idea of the positioning of things. I'd like to make these motion lines just it's really for my brain only. I'm just reminding myself that this is the direction that we're going. When you go to add these details. They're sorted, make it or break it. So if you add them at an angle that is just not natural, it really will kinda just pull away from the whole feel of things. So I'm very limited when I do lose art to just add some key details. Nothing that's going to permanently make it feel as though it's wrong or it's off, unless of course that's the feel that you are going for. Okay, so then we have this last puddle, which kind of comes sneaking out from here. It's going to bend Again. We're being mindful of this angle right here. So I don't want to really go past this point. So we have this and go and again, the angles not completely right is just to get an idea. It's more of a straight edge there and then it kind of curves and then it ruffles out. But again, and like I said, when we're painting, we can always modify and bring things down a little bit. And, you know, just having a look at things, we know that this is the smallest pedal, This is the largest petal. And then these ones are sort of long and Angular with these twisting, curling motions. And then if we want to kind of take a look, the stem here, kinda see that they have their shooting up. So we will definitely aim to capture some of that, that loose beautiful work. And so basically that's all I would do if I were just trying to build up my muscle memory for this flower. I'm not gonna go in and start adding in some really crazy details for things you know, where I'm going to get all of the little ruffles just right and whatnot with loose are, we're just trying to get the shape and the scale. So we accomplished that. We made sure that this was coming down at the same angle over here. We made sure that we weren't dipping into the wrong territory. Here we have our PQ and we have the other supplementary flat or petals complementing the whole flower. So that's that first sketching portion. I hope that was beneficial to you. I know it was a little bit more than we usually do in some of the classes, but with a flower like the iris, I really didn't want to give you just the whole comprehensive look at it as we move forward. So the next portion, we're really going to take a look at getting the colors right, which again is sort of a time consuming part of the process. And as I always say, the process leading up to the painting should be and two times, if not three times, longer than the actual painting, which can be a little boring. I understand. But the more prepared you are when it comes time to lay the paint on the paper, the better result you are going to yield a promise you every time the more prepared I am, you know, unless I'm just slapping some paint on a paper to say, okay, I painted today. But if I really wanna do something nice, the more prepared I am loading my brushes, getting the water ratio is just right having it already. It makes for such a more enjoyable process. So I'm trying to build that and instill that into you as you just expand your love for watercolors. Alright, let's move on. 10. Putting It All Together Part 2: Ok, once more real quickly, I just wanted to show you the flower that I'm going to be referencing. Again as we get more. Just into the flow, just the flow of painting and not really being too concerned with everything because that's why, that's why we've prepared we put so much work to get to this point. And I don't know if that feels overwhelming for you to think about having to put that much work in prior to what you're painting or if it's sort of exhilarating for you or something in between. I tend to, I tend to feel like it's so much, so much work to really get what I want. But then again, I feel once I created something that it was made better all the more for the sweat and the labor that went into it. So I think one of my favorite quotes goes along the lines of, I don't enjoy writing, but I enjoy having written. And that's so true for my art and for my writing that the actual process of it is so grueling, it takes so much. But once you have actually written, have painted, being able to look at what you've done is just it, theirs, feeling like it. So anyhow, I hope the lead up has felt good to you. I hope you feel like you've been equipped to come now with peace in your heart. That's what all of this was an effort to do was just to give you a sense of peace, to feel very prepared. Obviously, we're going to be moving a little bit faster, looking for proper water ratios, blending colors. It's a lot, it's still going to feel very overwhelming at times, but I hope that I've taken some of the guesswork out of it so that you feel just a little bit more confident coming into the page. So anyway, this is the flower. This is the sort of scale that we're gonna be shooting four. We're also going to move into the buds, which are just as fun. So will it be adding some, some green doing some wet into wet here? But first we're going to tackle this big beauty right here. So go ahead and take your tablet or whatever it is that you're using, put it off to the side, blow it up to a comfortable size for you, and now we can begin putting it all down. So again, like I've already mentioned, please do have your three brushes. You're going to want to load those up with the colors that I've already mentioned. So I have haven't quite loaded them up yet, but I have my dark wash, I have my medium Washington, I have the magenta color. So I'm going to be using the middle of the road color and we're going to start with that little pushy, pushy pedal. So go ahead and dip into that middle pile. And we'll go ahead and start. And again, we're just trying to capture the shape of it. And not really worrying about the ruffles yet because that part comes next. Okay. So just get that general shape, color it in. Hopefully everything's moving and flowing the way you wanted to. And let that sit for just a moment. And now we're going to come out and do that next. Peddle, the big one. Again, just kind of try and get the shape of things. Don't really worry too much about the ruffles. Back into your water. Fill it in. Back into your water. Let those colors touch here. Okay, so we kinda lost the tissue here, but that's okay. We're going to bring it back. Now what we're gonna do is we're going to head in with the darkest, darkest, your whole milk. Let that bottom pedal just kinda marinate for a moment. We're going to come in here and we're going to add some more of the ruffles. You can see that it's bleeding quite nicely. We do want this to still be on the lighter side because we're gonna have some darker petals. So lay a little bit in there and then just kinda drag it along the edge and a little bit more. And then if you want just to kinda get a sense of where things are going, you can do a stripe right up the middle. As you can see, we have our little twitchy right here. If we were to make a shape for it, which we can just kinda do that stripes so that you know what direction it's going. So there we go. There we go. We have our ruffles. And again, it doesn't look exactly like our picture. Not totally fine by me. You can always go in angled things off a little bit if you like. Hey, we're gonna do the same thing now. But first we're going to add in that stripe of yellows to dip into your rich green gold. And you're gonna come right here and lay in the color. And I'm gonna come back in. And if you are controlling the water flow is shouldn't be going everywhere, should be staying pretty much right where you lay it and then expanding out. And we're also again, I know it's a lot of timing, a lot of moving, going back into our darkest pile. And now we're going to darken up this pedal. Now we're kind of doing some more of the roughly motions. And go ahead. And just draw it out a little bit. And let those colors touch. Let it all blend together, should have a nice even coating. Again, did the other side kinda capturing some more of those ruffles this time. It's a little bit more curvy than I had intended, so I'm gonna kinda raffinate up there a little bit, coming along the edge and then using my other brush to blend it all together. So there you go. It's a pretty even coat. It's a nice base. I don't want it perfect. And again, I might come in. I don't want it to be darker than this because this is our lightest pedal. So I wanna make sure that that staying quite light. And so come in again. Here. We have a really nice pedal. Alright, so now we're going to go in to the lighter color, once more, that middle of the road. And we're going to come out here and this is where we're going to be picking up our magenta brush. So you may want to have that one ready. So that's our third brush divided into your Roosevelt for marine. We're going to lay down initially that blue color, but then we're going to drop in some pink because if you look in that flower, it really does have some pink elements to it. Okay. Coming out, coming up that beautiful ruffle. Just kinda tracing the shape of it. Coloring union K. And then once I have it, sort of where I want it to be. Now, I'm going to drop in a little bit of magenta and give it some shape is pretty smooth along that belly, but just to start to give it a little bit of Brussels. And then I'm actually going to come under here and draw out that ruffle shape a little bit more. And you can see how those colors mixing together really pretty. Okay, well that's still wet. We're gonna come down, dip back into our dark color. Right about here. And stern kind of creating the ruffles for that as well. It's okay if these colors touch and blend, ideally, that's exactly what's happening. And then before things get too dry and we're going to pick up that number three, go back into our rich green gold. And that belts along the middle. Go. Again. The darker that puddle, the more muted that yellow is going to be. Some really pretty ruffles. Go, darken it up along the edges. Alright, so we've made sure that we maintain the integrity of the, we're letting them blend together so nicely. Here we go. Okay, now we're gonna come up here, do the same thing, and start doing that next one. We're going to come in with pretty dark color on top of that light and that should be dry enough now that we'll be able to go on top of it. I did this little middle pedal a little bit darker than I think I would've initially like to have done. It, will still be able to work with it. But for future reference, in order to get a difference in color, really do want to be mindful of getting the color right. I'm going to kind of offset that by coming in with some magenta and going along the edges so that you get that there's and single pedal here. And it's not too. Or excuse me that it is two pedals, right? So we're gonna leave that one as is. It's a nice color. And we will move on to the next peddle. And this is the part of the lesson where your teacher realizes that she completely missed and neglected to see a pedal hiding in the flower. Some of you may have already caught it. And we're probably yelling, no Kara, there are 1010 petals. So if we look back at our painting or a painting. Our picture here, we can see that there is a petal tucked in right here. In my eye. I just kinda saw these two as being the same one and split in half. I don't even know. You can see what I was sketching. It learned that sketch go. I originally thought it was just this kind of split flower here and this was coming up on the ruffle. O, but sadly it is not, but I'm not gonna get too caught up with it. So anyhow, if you are wanting to break up these petals and make them into two pedals instead of one. By all means, please go ahead. There are 12345678910 pedal of you guys. So I thought I would just make a note of that before we continue. Okay, so moving along as though that pedal does not exist, I'm going to keep working around on our iris as we make our way back towards the center pedal. So this next petal we have comes up a bit of an angle. So I'm gonna start up here just to get that angle right and then come down. And then I'll add a little bit of the roughly details. Coloring can kind of flip flop in the picture. And it's petals much darker than this one. But because this ended up being darker, i'm just going to sort of flip flop and that is the beauty of loose art. And I'm gonna come over here, do the same thing. This one's just a little bit lower, so we'll start right about there. Pretty ruffles cannot do there. And back in, we're going to be capturing more of the structure once we add in those details at the end. So for now it's looking quite basic, but we'll prepare the canvas so that we can then go in and add details. So I'm going to add the little stripe that I see here in the video, and that's a little dark spot right up here. And also just add in a little bit of pink. Right here along the edge. Had a little bit of ruffle. Ruffle their out, a little bit of pink into here. Pretty straight edge. And then we will come out over here. This petals quite light. So I'm going to just dip into that medium. Wash, really get it nice and wet. Here. Create that ruffle first. Bring it back to center. Touch. Go blending those two colors. Yeah, that makes for a really pretty bleed. Come back in and go. I'll note that there's this little ruffle over here and make sure to give it some more detailed structure once we're adding in the details, still too wet to do anything. So I'm just going to let it be. And now we will come back over here. I'm gonna pick up my brush with the darkest wash. So you can see I'm constantly holding brushes and my hand moving them back and forth. It becomes second nature after awhile. And I'm going to do is create a blade here and come down. Try it up a little bit, but that's okay. And come back again. Create some really pretty pleads here. And then I'm going to finish it with the pink. And we see a little bit of a peeking out down here. So go ahead and add that little bit here. And go ahead and soften off the spot. Go back in and add a couple more ruffles along the edge of that vein down the middle. And then also picking up that number three, creeping back into the rich green gold and adding in that little belt of yellow. Okay, so there we have our working iris again, some things ended up being a little darker than I would've liked. This is a little bit darker, but we're going to ameliorate that by adding some details. And then we also did some lighter pedal work over here, which I think sort of compensates for the darker areas. I'm gonna go ahead and just kind of darken things a little bit here. And softened. Softening off as a technique we learned in our previous class where we take a brush that has just a bit of water on it and just drag it through the wet. Okay. Alright, so it's not perfect by any means, but it's a great working start. And we'll repeat this process again. Now we are going to move on to adding the details. We're going to let this fully dry however. So go ahead and you can either take a hairdryer or you can just let it dry naturally and we'll come back and add some detail. 11. Finishing Touches: Okay, so my flower is semi dry. I still have some wet stuff happening over here on the left, but by the time I get over there, it'll be dry enough that I'm adding in the details. It's gonna be just fine. So what we're gonna do is we're gonna take a look at the picture that we're working with. And if you're using this iris, then we're just going and kind of zoom in. Look at the beautiful details. Take note of where we see some things happening. So there's lots and lots of line work here happening along the edge. We're not going to try and capture all of that. We did. We would end up just sort of muddling up our loose flower. But we are going to add a few of those little key details, just kinda make it pop and give it a real nice Lu tannic will feel Same thing with the darker areas. We see some darker spots such as what's happening up here and then along here. And then these pedals as well have some darker spots. So I'm just going to take note of that. And I'm not really going to marry myself to what's happening, but I just have it in my brain and then I'm going to let it go, put it off to the side and just start putting those details where I see them. So I'm gonna start with this middle flour. And again, like I already said, it was a little bit too dark, but we're going to add in some little areas that just sort of highlight it and make it stand out. So go ahead and dip back into your whole milk wash. And we're be using our number six brush makes sure it has a nice pointy edge. My sixes, you know, depending on how roughly I'm using them tend to flatten out, but I keep one on and that I use just for this sort of works like it retains its, it's poisonous. Okay? So it has this nice little stripe up the middles. We're gonna create that little tissue that we last right along here. And we'll add in some other elements here. But just to kind of recreate the framework here, now we're going to pop in and just start adding a few lines. You really want to make sure that you're utilizing the tip of your brush so that you get those fine, fine lines. The middle here, again, not all of the spots, but just in a few key areas. So there we have a few little details spot that look real nicely. Okay, I'm gonna bring you in a little bit closer so you can see me work on this next pedal. Alright, so again, I'm dipping back into my darkest wash. And I'm going to approach that. Middle pedal minute. Leave this area open, not adding anything in there. And I'm going to come out here on the sides and start adding in those details. And I'm just sort of flicking the brush around, really, really coming up on the tip and trying to get those curves. And I'm coming from both angles so that I don't get this sort of stagnant feel. If you tend to, if you come out a little bit from your pedal, that's totally fine. If some are a little bit thicker, that's great too. Variation is key here. If you have too many lines that are the same thickness are, then it's going to end up looking very fake. All right, I see a little bit of a darker spot, so I'm going to take note of that. And where I see these little edges happening, that's where I'm creating these lines. Okay. So that looks pretty nice. Not overly detailed. Adjust detailed enough. Okay, and coming back in, you really need to make sure that you have quite a bit of paint loaded on your brush for this. If not, you're going to lose the details depending on how light your work is. I'm just kinda trying to stay mindful of the direction that everything's moving. Not over embellishing things. Okay, moving on to the next. Now is where I can really draw out that pretty ruffle by creating a line underneath it. You can see by having some more of these lighter areas along the edges, the details really pop. So it's constantly a blend of, of trying to capture what it is that you see, but also being mindful of what you're capable of with paints. Paints is not nature and so you have to take certain precautions when you're painting so that you get those more pronounced details. This is going to have that little like map, the front. Little bit too intense. So I'm just going to soften that off a little bit. And there we go. And then I don't really see too much line work down here. It's more happening over here and along the ruffle. But again, trying to be mindful and not over detailing things. So again, this is where I thought this was part of this pedal here and not a separate tenth pedal. So if you ended up going back and creating a ten pedal, obviously it'll look a little bit different here. Okay, let's move on here. Really annunciate this part of the pedal. Since it is the darkest. And create somebody pretty bleeds are rescued me, details me. I'm up here. More details in there. Come back over here. I see some darker spots here. So again, I'm just sort of glancing off to the left, but trying not to overly detailed things line up the center. And here I'm on the edge. And you can see it takes quite a while to really, to do it justice to not overdo it. You're standing back looking at what you've done and then heading back in for a little bit more work. And really just kinda trying not to overwhelm the flower. I sort of have something folding here, so be mindful of that. And sub-circuits edges here. Over here. Again, a lot of brush work happening off to the side. I'm dipping in constantly making sure that I have enough paint on my brush. Really want that whole milk darkest dark is version for the details. A little rough on there. And then we also have one here. Nice and dark so that we get a sense of that pedal peeking out. Same thing over here. And here we go coming down for this last one, really, really dark, dark, dark because this petal has some dark edges to it. Really want those to stand out. Often tip. Letting in some ruffles over here. Really, really utilized that flicking motion. Okay, I'm gonna go in here to this pedal right along here and add a little belt of pink. And then soften that off bet. Okay. Pull you back a little bit so you can see the whole thing has its coming together. Is you can see we have a pretty detailed gives me pretty detailed iris. At this point. I don't think I would do too much more to it. I like it. I think it has just enough details to feel Lu, technical and to have that word botanical field, but not so overwhelmed with the details that we lose the sense of the loose nature. Now, obviously we could do a much looser version of this. And if you want to do something that's a lot more looser, you can and then add the details on top and you will get somewhat of the same results. I really wanted. People have been requesting this for a while that we have more of a botanical class. And although it's not quite my style anymore, I didn't want to just honor that request that continues to come up. So as we've covered so much of the loose aspect of art, I did want to train, inject more of the botanical feel into the sense this flower is so incredibly detailed so that, that let's move on to creating some beautiful iris buds. 12. Iris Buds: All right, moving on to Iris buds. I don't know why, but I tend to really love the buds of flowers more than I loved the full bloom flowers. Like, I really can't say why that is, but I think possibly it's because of this joining aspect here. If the stem into the flour and the potential with watercolors to just do something really special. So we are definitely going to utilize wet into wet and merge these beautiful colors, this sort of lime green, Along with this really pretty Roosevelt ultramarine. Put this off to the side for now and just be referencing it. And then we will start working here. Just basically just flipped my paper over so that we can see the bud beside the iris, although the iris is upside down. So in order to get the color of that stem, I went ahead and mixed up a little bit the Daniel Smith understood green, along with the Daniel Smith rich green, golden. It really is quite exact. I tend to not use the greens that I see in nature because they are a little bit harsh and sometimes just a little too bright. I tend to lean towards more of the vintage Hughes than anything. But I think the combination of these colors together are going to be really special. So I have that all mixed up. I'm gonna go ahead and create a sort of whole milk version of it. And then also more along the lines of that 2%. So there we go. Okay, so for the stem, we're gonna keep it really, really loose. I am not going to over over embellish it. So just getting my pile right. They come over here and just kind of sketch paint what I see happening. Oh, I forgot to mention you do want to have your other six Press loaded up with your Roosevelt or marine In order to time that bleed, right? So minds pretty much ready to go but I will just wet it. And in order to get that color into it at the right ideal moment, definitely have that brush loaded. So I have that sitting in my hand over here off to the side. Okay. So I have a nice working stem here and now I'm going to head in with a magenta. I'll come up here first. Just do a little bit of touch, touch. Pretty wet cement to let that sit for a moment, come back over here, are things are starting to dry. And you can see very loose, very pretty comeback in here. Add a little bit of a darker spot along the edges. Take my third brush here. Just soften off a little bit. I apologize. I had been dodging the gardeners all day. You wouldn't know it, but I have been turning the film off and coming back when they're not here. They tend to work all over the place at different times and so they don't do one area which means I end up just playing tag with them. And if you know me at all, you know that I have to baby girls and Mondays and Tuesdays are the only days where I have some help, so unavoidable. Thank you for your patience and understanding. Alright, so this is still quite wet, but we're going to head in here anyway and just start putting together or iris. You can already tell this is gonna be so fun. Same sort of motion that we were using before. These curly roughly motions. Dragging it along the edge. Meaning these pretty, pretty beads. Come in here and do the middle part now that things aren't so wet, there we go. That's exactly what I was looking for. Timed it right. It's a lot to explain things as I'm doing it and be mindful of what everything looks like, but I got it right this time. Okay. Or come up over here, bending down, creating a little bit. So, so pretty. I love the buds. I don't know. I just think they tend to be a little bit more open, which is ironic because they're not as open as the full-blown pores. Okay. So we have this one kinda holding back a little bit. And then we have this really pretty it's happening, it's really pretty Line happening here. So I'm going to just kinda be mindful of that. And leave a little whitespace, whitespaces key when working with loose art. Getting back into my darkest dark, gonna create an, a pedal over here. And there's a lot happening in this picture, and I'm just going to refrain from overdoing it. And just add the key components. Oops, I added some green. That's what I get for working with multiple brushes, but no mind. It all goes together so nicely. Softening off a bit here and makes all that up. And then we'll go back to the Rooseveltian marine. Darken up that edge. Oh, so pretty. I'm going to add some details while everything is still wet. And this little spot up here actually has some green in it. So I'm going to add some green into there, some green into there. This isn't quite as sharp as I would like it to be. Not getting the sharp lines that I, I tend to like the best, but they work. We have this little line up here defining those details. We come down here. Pretty details in here. You know, some line works since this is quite a big pedal. And a little bit of line work appear. And as you can see, even though we're doing what? The details on top of wet, it still works. And you were able to get those beautiful bleeds. You have the purple running into the leaves here. And again, as you're working, you could even maximize that more. You'll just want to get down on eye level and make sure that you are achieving not Xin, everything's not pooling. So there we go, there we have our Bud. So pretty probably my favorite of all of them. And next we will move into adding some stems and leaves onto our full-blown iris. 13. Adding Stems And Leaves: Okay, so looking back at that initial photo that we use to reference as we were painting this iris, I'm gonna take a look at the stems now and the leaves, like I said, initially, they're really not a focal point of this flower, but I think it will add just another element of dimensions. So I'm going to use the same exact colors that rich green, gold along with the undersea Green. And I'm going to just make some just gestural motions, nothing too detailed. Mostly just want an organic field for everything. So it comes down right here and it kinda just drops off this page. So you can tell that it's kind of shooting up and probably gets lost somewhere into here. And leave a little whitespace as well. And then I'll come back in and add some darker spots once we're moving along. And then we have a few sort of shooting up from the side. Again, just keeping things very gestural. And coming here up at the top. We have a little peekaboo. Now I'm just sort of embellishing things just to add my own little spin in flaring Ahmed. And I'm gonna make a little darker pile of that rich green gold and come back in here and just add a vein. While everything's still nice and wet. Or you have that very loose. And again, please don't feel like you have to be married to the way you see things that was not there in real life, but I think it needed it. It was sort of an empty gap namespace. I also think there's some sort of motion missing air. So I'm going to do really utilize my brush and do some back bending. With there we go. And now we have some lotion. Everything was just looking very vertical to me. And then we're going to continue this up here. And we go and we have it. A very beautiful iris that has kind of encapsulated the best of both worlds, botanical and loose, but it's kind of it's own thing. So I really hope that you enjoyed this process of loose work, but also putting the botanical spin on things. Obviously it's a little bit more time consuming. There's more prep involved. But I think you'll be very pleased with the results. This this is something that I'm extremely proud of. It I would sell this in my store, you know, if I were still working in this style, but yeah, it's just so much fun to be able to do different things with your style. And as we've talked about so many times, this is all about finding out who you are and what you want to say with your artwork. So again, please practice, take the freedom to make your own liberties and make it your own. That's what makes your art so special. And then of course, do not forget to tag me when you post your beautiful creations. So we're gonna do one last loose iris feel for our class project, combining the bads and Iris, the full bloom Iris just, you can kinda see it working together just for fun. It's really nothing, nothing more teaching. I'm involved with that, but I just kinda wanted to show you how it all looks together. I'll be working silently, moving into flow so you can see what it looks like coming together without explaining every step as I'm putting it together, which is kind of fun, right? 14. Class Project: All right, so here we have a blank page. I am going to be redoing that first, initial full-blown flower along with the bud, putting it together. And just a very basic loose composition. I'll be moving quicker without much instruction, as it is basically the same thing that we learned, but I just wanted you to kinda see how it all comes together seamlessly in 11 motion. I will likely be adding the details as I move along as they see that things are drawing. But I'm not going to be too stuck on making sure everything's exactly as dry as is I possibly would when I'm teaching. In the meantime, please enjoy. Beethoven. Didn't wanna make mention that I'm going to be using all of my brushes here. We're going to have four brushes this time, I'm going to have my 2% and my whole milk in that blue, lavender color. I'm gonna have my magenta on another brush. And then I'm also going to have the Daniel Smith blend the green gold and the undersea green on a fourth brush. So all of those brushes are going to be working together. Anyone who wants to place bets on how quickly I lose track of which brushes, which by all means start a pool. It will happen. I'm sure we will save mixing up everything off to the side. I think we're ready to begin. Mixing up a little bit of the rich screen gold off to the side, but I am going to wait until that is a little bit drier. Okay. Okay. Okay. Right. In any case. Okay. As you can see, things start to come together a lot differently when you're working in flow. And you just sort of with the piece itself and nothing else. Obviously, I try and do the best that I can when I'm explaining things, but they can get a little complicated. Bumped into my other pal over here. Usually, I'm all about flipping the paper around, but I was trying to keep things nice and straight for you so you can see. So I'm just going to have to come up at a weird angle here and finish it out, which is fine. I am prepared for such challenges. Cannot defeat me wet paint. I actually think it looks super pretty and bumped my hand into it and then I just added a little bit of water and it created a really nice, pretty bleed copy X-Men. We always talk about those doubly happy accidents are my favorite. A little bit of pink into that. So now I'm adding in details, even though things are somewhat wet, it's dry enough. Mm-hm. More, more, more. Sorry about the bumpy ride their Fermat just refocusing. So there we have our main resume. I've flipped around quickly, dab a little bit more paint on my palate because I am running out. Mm-hm. Taking my own liberties here with the leaves for sure. They definitely don't look like this. And the picture that I'm referencing. But thanks for my favorite. So I tend to a lot of liberties with them. So again, like I said, things happen a lot different when you're kind of inflow and you're just going with the pain. Things probably looked better as also because I've been now painting irises for the last hour and a half with you. So it's so great to see what can happen if you don't like your first result, please, please, please get back at it. I painted 25 versions of my loose Poppies, which continued to be my most cherished and favorite thing I've ever painted. Even though I don't paint anything like that anymore. I painted 25 versions of that painting, that same painting before I liked it enough to put it in my shock. And till this day it continues to be my most popular. So please take that as encouragement, as inspiration to keep going. I promise as you explore this medium, this technique, you will find you amid the whole process. So I want to thank you so much for being here with me today. I had a wonderful time. I hope you enjoyed painting these irises and I look forward to coming back to you with another class in the very near future. All right, take care my friends and happy creating to you.