Let's Make Friendship Bracelets #3: Chevrons: Regular, Alternating & Mixed Chevron Bracelet Patterns | Debbie Hart | Skillshare

Let's Make Friendship Bracelets #3: Chevrons: Regular, Alternating & Mixed Chevron Bracelet Patterns

Debbie Hart, Artist and Designer

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10 Lessons (40m)
    • 1. Introduction

      2:27
    • 2. Gather Your Materials

      2:16
    • 3. Pick Your Chevrons

      5:45
    • 4. Get Set Up to Create Your Bracelet

      2:50
    • 5. The Forward Knot

      4:05
    • 6. The Backward Knot

      4:32
    • 7. Knotting Regular Chevron Patterns

      3:51
    • 8. Knotting Alternating/Mixed Patterns

      6:46
    • 9. Physical Demo

      4:57
    • 10. Finishing Up & Final Thoughts

      2:44

About This Class

In this fun beginner class, you'll learn how to make your very own handmade chevron friendship bracelets step by step using embroidery floss, which is inexpensive and comes in a wide variety of beautiful colors. (You can also use other materials too, such as pearl cotton needlepoint thread, hemp or yarn; see the materials list in the Project Description in the "Your Project" section for more possibilities.)

We'll first learn two simple knots, the forward knot and the backward knot, and then we'll use these knots to make a colorful 8-string friendship bracelet in this popular beginner pattern that is both stylish and visually striking. We'll also learn several different pattern variations featuring regular chevrons, alternating chevrons, and mixed patterns (regular chevrons combined with alternating chevrons in the same bracelet).

I'll start with the absolute basics and cover all the steps in detail using both animated PowerPoint diagrams and physical demos, so no previous experience is necessary. However, you may still find it helpful to take my first two classes on regular and reverse candy stripe bracelets first, to gain more practice with each knot before you use them both at once in the same bracelet. Here are the class links:

Class #1: Regular Candy Stripe Bracelets and the Forward Knot

Class #2: Reverse Candy Stripe Bracelets and the Backward Knot

Here's what we'll cover in this class:

  • Materials needed (most of which you probably already have; see list in Class Project section)
  • Measuring and folding the strings to start the bracelet
  • Making a loop for the closure
  • Attaching the strings to a clipboard or other flat surface to use as a knotting workstation
  • Making the forward knot and the backward knot, shown first with just 2 strings
  • Using the forward knot and the backward knot with all 8 strings on the clipboard, string by string, to create the bracelet, including the differences in the process for regular, alternating, and mixed patterns
  • Making a braided tie to finish off the bracelet
  • Attaching your new bracelet to your wrist

If you're eager to join me in this exciting project for grown-ups and children alike, click the Play button, and let's get started!

More About Friendship Bracelets:

This colorful folk art jewelry form originated with the indigenous cultures of Latin America (including parts of North, Central, and South America, and especially Guatemala) and is currently popular worldwide with all ages.

These simple wrist adornments in bold colors and patterns make great DIY accessories for the hippie boho chic fashion styles that are currently in vogue, and are a fun, easy and affordable way to spice up your wardrobe. These bracelets are also great crafts to make with kids.

Transcripts

1. Introduction: Hi, I'm Debbie Heart. Check out these cool bracelets in this class will learn how to make a variety of these colorful eight stream Latin American style friendship bracelets In the ever popular Chevron pattern, We'll learn about regular alternating and mixed shiran patterns. First, we'll cover the materials we need. The main element is embroidery floss, or you can use a number of other different materials, most of them inexpensive and easy to find. You'll also need just a few other simple items that you probably already have around your home. Well, then talk more about Chevron's and look more closely at the different Chevron pattern variations that you can choose from for this bracelet. How also provide a handout that shows 13 different variations and how to arrange the strings to create each pattern. Plus later on in the class, I'll also introduce 1/14 bonus pattern. Next, we'll talk about how to measure uncut the embroidery floss, fold the strands and tie them together to create a loop for the bracelet closure. You'll then learn how to set up your bracelet crafting station by attaching your newly made loop and flaw strands to a clipboard or other service. I'll also provide a PdF file of a ruler that you can print out and put on the clipboard underneath the strings to measure the length of your bracelet as you work well. Then learn to simple knots. The forward not and the backward, not which are the only knots you need to know to make the Chevron pattern and all its variations well, first learned how to make these knots with just two strengths. Well, then apply what we've learned and used these knots with all eight strings on the clipboard to make the bracelet. How walk you through the process in details. Step by step, using both animated power point diagrams and physical demos, finally will finish the bracelet by making abraded tie at the end to tie through the loop. Then I'll offer some final thoughts and show you how to attach your new bracelet to your wrist. So if this sounds like fun, keep on watching and let's get started 2. Gather Your Materials: to make a Chevron friendship bracelet like this one, you only need a few inexpensive materials. First, you'll need 2 to 4 skeins of embroidery, floss and different colors, depending on the colors you want in your bracelet. You can also use a variety of other fibers, such as Perle cotton Needle Point threatened in size three or five hemp jump, which is plastic lacing, thin leather cord or even just plain old string. You can also use thin Peric, ord linen or nylon thread silk thread yarn, and there are a variety of other possibilities as well. Next, you'll also need a pair of scissors and a ruler. Another thing you'll need is a clipboard, or you can also use some other type of rigid flat surface, along with a piece of tape or a binder clip. You just need something to attach the strings on to toe. Hold them in place while you're making the bracelet. I've also heard of people just using a safety pin to simply pin the strings onto the leg of their pants for a compact, portable solution. However, if you do this, be careful. Don't let kids use this method unattended, and obviously be careful not to poke yourself or someone else. I've also provided a PdF file of a ruler, which you can print out and put on to your clipboard or other surface underneath the strings so that you can monitor the length of your bracelet as you're making it. It's in both inches and centimeters for your convenience. Another helpful item is a tape measure to measure your wrist. If you prefer, you can also just wrap a piece of the embroidery floss around your wrist and then measure that with the ruler to get your wrist measurement. And finally, a toothpick is helpful in case you need to undo any of your knots, which can happen from time to time. And that's really all you need to get started making friendship bracelets. I'll see you in the next video. 3. Pick Your Chevrons: Now let's talk about Chevron's and the difference Chevron pattern variations that you can choose from for your bracelet. Chevron Zahra, Visually striking pattern. And they have been a popular design element worldwide since ancient times. Chevron's have been found on prehistoric petro glyphs, an ancient pottery and baskets, and they have also been widely used in architecture. Chevron's also appear frequently in heraldry on coats of arms, and they're often also used to indicate military rank or length of service in military or police forces. Chevron's air, also widely seen on road signs in the fashion world and even in natural rock formations. In short, they're everywhere. The chevron is a symmetrical pattern, with one side like an exact mirror reflection of the other. A Chevron is essentially composed of two stripes meeting in the middle. Hence making a regular Chevron bracelet, is essentially combining the regular candy striped pattern from my first class and the reverse candy striped pattern from my second class into one bracelet. We can also shift the regular Chevron pattern so that the patterns on each vertical side of the bracelet are offset from each other and no longer symmetrical to create alternating chevron patterns like this one. Finally, we can also create mixed Chevron patterns, which, combined regular Chevron's and alternating Chevron's into the same pattern in this class for the first time, will be using eight strings instead of six to give you more pattern choices for simplicity's sake, I'm imposing the creative constraint from Class one that will make our friendship bracelets with four strings that will be doubled over and tied together to make eight strings. This means that there can only be either 23 or four different colors in the bracelet. This provides us with a nice selection of Chevron patterns to choose from, but not an overwhelming selection for the alternating and mixed Chevron patterns. There are actually more different possible patterns than I cover in this class, but I have included the ones that I find the most visually pleasing. The different patterns you can make come from the particular order in which you arranged the strings before beginning the nodding process, using our creative constraint for a two color bracelet. One possibility is that you can have two strings of one color and two strings of a second color when doubled over there will be four strings of the first color and four strings of the second color. You can also have three strings of the first color and one string of the second color. In this case, when you fold them in half, you'll have six strings of one color and two strings of the second color. There are four different to color Chevron pattern variations that you can make under these conditions. Three regular and one alternating. Here they are. For three color bracelet, you'll have two strings of one color, one string of a second color and one string of 1/3 color. When doubled over there will be four strings of the first color, two strings of the second color and two strings of the third color. There are five different three color Chevron patterns that you can create with this constraint. Two regular two alternating and one mixed. Here they are, finally, for a four color bracelet. Each of your four strings will be a different color when doubled. Over. This will make two strings of each color. There are 44 color patterns you can make with this constraint one regular and three alternating. Here they are. So all together, you have 13 different chevron patterns to choose from. I've also put all these patterns together into a Pdf file that you can download from the class project section and print out for reference. Now is a great time to start your class project. Step one is quick and easy. You just say which colors and chevron pattern you plan to use for your bracelet. I'm excited to see what you decide. 4. Get Set Up to Create Your Bracelet: Now let's get set up to start making your bracelet. First, you'll need four strands of embroidery floss in 23 or four different colors, depending on the bracelet pattern you want to use for a Chevron bracelet. Each string needs to be 72 inches long, or about 183 centimeters. Note that this is longer than the string length needed for the candy striped bracelets in my 1st 2 classes. Once you have your four strands of flaws, fold them in half lengthwise so that you have eight strings that are each 36 inches long, or about 91.4 centimeters. Next, tie all the strings together at the looped end in an overhand knot like this to make a loop of about 1/4 of an inch, or around 1.3 centimeters to use as a closure for the bracelet. We'll be making a braid at the end of the nodded part of the bracelet that we will then thread through this loop and tie to attach the bracelet to the wrist. Next printout. The PDF file of the Ruler, which you can find on the class project page next to the project description. Be sure to print out this ruler, and it's actual size so that you can accurately measure the length of your bracelet as you're making it. Once you've printed out the pdf attached to your clipboard or other flat surface. Now put the looped part of the strings underneath the clipboard as well, and arrange them in the order shown for the pattern you're using. Next, measure your wrist with a tape measure by wrapping it around your wrist. Or you can also use a piece of embroidery floss that you then measure with a ruler In general, the nodded part of the bracelet should be about 3/4 of your wrist measurement. For example, my wrist measurement is six inches, so I multiply six by 3/4 or 60.75 and yet 4.5 inches for the length that I need to make the nodded part of my bracelet. In general, the nodded part of the bracelet should be about 3/4 of your wrist measurement, leaving the remaining length of string to make the braided tie. That attach is the bracelet to your wrist for the braided tie at the end of the nodded part of the bracelet. You should make it at least four inches long, or about the same length as the nodded part of your bracelet. In my case, this will be 4.5 inches. Now that you've set up your bracelet crafting station and figured out all your measurements , I'll see you in the next video. 5. The Forward Knot: before we get started on our Chevron friendship bracelet, we need to know to basic knots. In this lesson, we'll learn the 1st 1 The forward, not the forward, not is used to make the regular candy striped bracelets from my first class. And it's also used to make the left side of the Chevron bracelets in this class to keep things simple to start. How first show you how to make this not with just two strings on the clipboard. First, I'll show you how to make this not using diagrams to show each step, and then I'll show you a video demo of the process in motion. Here we go to make this, not you. Take the first string the green string on the left and cross it over the second string the pink string on the right so that the streams resemble the shape of a number four. You then bring the first string around and underneath the second string and pull it up through the opening of the four shape and to the right like this. Next, you pull the string tight. To form or not. You then repeat this process exactly the same way with the same two strings in the same places a second time, and now you have a completed forward, not the forward not is also sometimes called for, not because of the shape you make with the strings when nodding it. It's important to remember that single forward not actually consists of two knots. So you need to remember to always do this process twice for each, not notice that the forward not moves the first string forward from left to right, so that the original first string, the Green one, is now in the second position. This fact is important to know later when we're working with all the strings together on the clipboard. Now let's see this process on video first in slow motion while I go through the steps again . Then, at normal speed again, you take the first string, the green string on the left and cross it over the second string, the pink string on the right so that the strings resembled the shape of a number four. You then bring the first string around and underneath the second string and pull it up through the opening of the four shape and to the right, like this next, you pull the string tight to former, not you. Then repeat this process exactly the same way a second time, and now you have a completed forward. Not and again. The original first string, the green one has now moved forward and is in the second position. Now let's see this process again at normal speed. Feel free to replay this video as many times as necessary to get a feel for how to make this. Not if this is your very first friendship bracelet class. Even though this class shows you everything you need to know, you might still find it helpful to gain some practice with just the forward, not by itself. First, by making a few regular candy striped bracelets before adding the backward not to your repertoire. If you're interested in doing this, I'd recommend taking Class Number one in this series, which focuses entirely on making a regular candy striped bracelet using just the forward. Not having said that in the next lesson for this class will now move onward to the backward , not 6. The Backward Knot: Now that we've learned the forward, not it's time to learn the other basic. Not you'll need to make Chevron bracelets. The backward, not the backward, not is used to make the reverse candy striped bracelets from my second class, and it's also used to make the right side of the Chevron bracelets in this class has before To keep things simple. How first show you how to make this not with just two strings on the clipboard. First, l used diagrams to show each step, and then I'll show you a video demo of the process. As you'll notice the backward not is basically a mirror image of the forward. Not that I covered in the last lesson. Let's get started to make this, not you. Take the first string in this case, the green string on the right and cross it over the second string, the pink string on the left so that the strings roughly resemble the shape of a letter p You then bring the first string around and underneath the second string and pull it up through the opening of the P shape and to the left like this. Next, you pull the string tight to form a. Not this intermediate not is called 1/2 hitch. You then repeat this process exactly the same way, with the same two strings in the same places a second time, creating a second half hitch. And now you have one completed backward, not the backward not is also sometimes called a P, not because of the shape you make with the strings when nodding it. It's important to remember that a single completed backward not actually consists of 2/2 hitches. So you need to remember to always do this process twice for a full backward, not notice that the backward not moves the first string backward from right to left so that the original first string, the green one, is now in the second position. Now let's see this process on video first in slow motion while I go through the steps again . Then, at normal speed again, you take the first string, the green string on the right and cross it over the second string, the pink string on the left so that the strings roughly resemble the shape of a letter P. He's then bring the first string around, and underneath the second string and pull it up through the opening of the P shape and to the left like this. Next, you pull the string tight to Forman Intermediate, not called 1/2 hitch. You then repeat this process exactly the same way a second time, creating a second half hitch, and now you have a full completed back we're not. And again, the original first string, the green one has now moved backward and is in the second position. Now let's see this process again. Normal speed. Feel free to replay this video as many times as necessary to get a feel for how to make this. Not again. If this is your first ever friendship bracelet class, even though this class contains everything you need to know, just is with the forward, not you might still find it useful to gain some practice with the backward not by itself, first, by making a few reverse candy striped bracelets before combining both forward and backward knots together in the same bracelet. If you're interested in gaining extra practice with backward knots, I'd recommend taking Class Number two in this series, which focuses entirely on making a reverse candy striped bracelet using just the backward not in the next class will move on to combining both of these knots to make the Chevron pattern. 7. Knotting Regular Chevron Patterns: now that we've learned both the forward and backward knots with two strings, let's use them together with all eight strings on the clipboard to make the nodded part of the bracelet. At this point, you should now have your strings attached to your clipboard with the looped part underneath the clip like this. Now, if you haven't done so already, you can move the strings around so they're in the right order to make the particular pattern you want for our demo bracelet. I've chosen Pattern 10. The regular Chevron pattern with four colors with the regular Chevron patterns, noticed that the 1st 4 strings are a mirror image of the last four strings. Now let's start nodding, starting with String one, the orange string that's furthest to the left make a forward not with string one and string to the green string. Now that we've made the first forward not in this row, the orange and green strings have switched places so that the Orange string is now in position to and vice versa. Next, use the same active string, which is now in position to to tie a forward, not on the third string. Once the knot is made. The second and third strings have switched places, and the active string is now in position. Three. Repeat this step again and now the active string has moved forward to Position four at the center, and we're now done with the first side of Row one. Now switch to the orange string that's furthest to the right in position. Eight and make a backward. Not with the green stream next to it. The seventh string. Now the orange and green strings have switched places so that the Orange string is now in position. Seven and vice versa. Next to use the same active string to tie a backward, not on the sixth string. Once the knot is made, the seventh and sixth string's have switched places, and the active string is now in position. Six. Repeat this step again, and now the active string has moved backward to position five at the center, finally using the two orange strings at the center in positions four and five. Since this is a regular chevron pattern and the two strings are the same color, you can make either a backward not or forward not at the center. Your choice. You have now finished Row one know that there is always one less not Perot, than the number of strings in the bracelet. In this case, since we're making an eight string bracelet, there are seven knots per row. Now repeat the same sequence of steps, starting with the new string that's now on position. One toe. Add another row. I'll now speed up the process so you can get a feel for the back and forth rhythm of the nodding. He'll also notice that I've decided to use backward knots for the rest of the centre strings for this pattern. As you add Rose, you'll see the pattern you chose starting to emerge, which is always exciting for regular Chevron pattern. After you've done four rows, you'll have one full iteration of the pattern, and the strings will be back in the same order as they were at the beginning. At this point, the pattern will start to repeat, and you just keep adding rows in this same way until the bracelet is the length you want. Now that we've learned how to not a regular Chevron pattern in the next lesson will use the same strings arranged in a different order to not an alternating chevron pattern 8. Knotting Alternating/Mixed Patterns: in the last lesson, we learned how to not a regular Chevron pattern for alternating Chevron patterns. The nodding process is the same as in the last lesson, but you'll notice that the 1st 4 strings and the last four strings air not mirror images of each other. This time, I'm choosing Pattern Number 13 an alternating chevron pattern, so that I can point out a few of the differences to keep in mind when you're not in an alternating pattern. As we noted earlier, the regular Chevron pattern begins to repeat after four rows, but notice that the alternating Chevron pattern takes eight rows before it starts to repeat . Now let's see the nodding process in action for an alternating Chevron pattern. Since the process is mostly the same as in the last lesson, I've removed string numbers. - The main difference with alternating Chevron patterns is that when you get to the two center strings in the row, the two strings air different colors, so you need to choose which color you want. The center not to be. This choice determines whether you make a backward not or forward, not in the center. The first option here is to make a backward, not using the pink string on the right to tie and not on the orange string to the left. This will result in a pink, not at the center. The other option is to make a forward, not using the orange string on the left to tie and not onto the pink string on the right. This will result in an orange, not at the center. In this example, you would choose option one the backward. Not if you wanted the pink and white side of the pattern to be larger and appeared to be the foreground part of the pattern. In this case, you'd make backward knots at the center for the 1st 4 rows. On the other hand, you would choose option to the forward, not if you wanted the orange and green side of the pattern to be in the foreground. I'm choosing this option for this example. Let's continue note that after four rows with an alternating pattern, the strings air now in the reverse order from where they started, and the Panter now begins the alternated Row five. Since the pattern has now switched sides when you get to the center, not in Row five, you switched to making a different type of not at the center. In this case, I would now switch to making backward knots. Let's continue with an alternating pattern. It takes eight rose to make one completed aeration of the pattern. The strings are now back in the same order as they were at the start, and the pander now begins to repeat itself with Row nine. At this point, you switch back to making forward knots at the center, and you just continue the pattern from there has shown in this diagram to recap in the previous lesson. We covered the regular Chevron pattern, where the 1st 4 strings and the last four strings are mirror images of each other. And in this lesson, we've now covered the alternating Chevron pattern, where the 1st 4 strings and the last four strings air not mirror images. For mixed chevron patterns, you combine the two approaches. Here's a bonus mixed Chevron pattern that's not in the pdf. I've chosen it because it's made with the exact same strings as the other two examples here , but just arranged in a different order, note that in a mixed Chevron pattern, like this one for the rose that contain regular Chevron's. The strings for these rows are mirror images of each other for the rose that contain the alternating pattern. The strings air not mirror images to not a mixed Chevron pattern. The process is the same, but when you're working on the roads that contain the regular parts of the pattern, you can make either a forward not or a back. We're not at the center, since the two center strings will be the same color as we saw in the previous lesson. When you're working on the roads that contain the alternating parts of the pattern, you will need to choose forward nuts or backward knots according to which color you want The not to be, as we saw in this lesson in this particular case, we choose forward knots here to get this pattern. Here are the remaining nodding choices for making this particular mixed Chevron pattern. Okay, in the next lesson, we'll see a physical demo of the nodding process 9. Physical Demo: now that we've learned how to make the nodded part of the bracelet using diagrams, let's watch a physical demo of the process in action. - It's okay. In the next video, we'll learn how to finish up the bracelet by making a braided tie at the end, and I'll share some final thoughts. 10. Finishing Up & Final Thoughts: Now let's finish up our bracelet with a braided tied at the end. Then we'll try it on, and I'll share some final thoughts. Once you've not had the bracelet, leave it attached to the clipboard and separate the remaining lengths of string into three different groups. One group of two strings and two groups of three strings next will break these string groups together into a single braid. Here's a quick animation of the braiding process to make a three strand brain. First take the group of strings on the left and cross it over the group of strings in the center so that the left group is now in the center. Next, cross the right strings over the center strings so that the right strings become the new center strings. Then just repeat this process, controlling the string tension as you go to keep the braid tight until the braid is the lengthy Want. Once you've completed the break, finish it off by tying all the strings together in an overhand knot. Finally, trim the ends of the string toe. Leave about 1/2 inch of French or about 1.3 centimeters, and that's it. Congratulations. You finished your bracelet to try your bracelet on. I found that it's easiest to thread the brave through the loop first, then pull it over my hand and onto my wrist wants the bracelet is on your wrist. Simply pull the braid until the bracelets as tight as you want it, and tie the braided tie to itself with an overhand knot. Now is a great time to take a picture of your finished bracelet and add it to your class project. I'm excited to see it if you'd like to gain more practice with forward knots, backward knots and Chevron patterns, feel free to make more Chevron bracelets and other colors and patterns. The's bracelets look really cool when you wear a bunch of them together on your arms. At once in a stack. Feel free to come back and update your project any time to add photos of the new bracelets , you make thanks so much for taking this class. If you enjoyed it, I'd really appreciate it if you could leave a positive review. Thanks again and have fun