Let It Snow: Learn to Paint 5 Simple Yet Beautiful Snowy Watercolor Paintings | Zaneena Nabeel | Skillshare

Let It Snow: Learn to Paint 5 Simple Yet Beautiful Snowy Watercolor Paintings

Zaneena Nabeel, AURORABYZ - ARTIST AND INSTRUCTOR

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15 Lessons (2h 37m)
    • 1. Let it SNOW!

      1:40
    • 2. Here's our Snowy Collection

      2:12
    • 3. Materials you'll need

      5:31
    • 4. Colors on my Palette

      3:36
    • 5. Class Project 1 - PART 1

      16:37
    • 6. Class Project 1 - PART 2

      10:56
    • 7. Class Project 2 - PART 1

      14:36
    • 8. Class Project 2 - PART 2

      11:08
    • 9. Class Project 3 - PART 1

      14:31
    • 10. Class Project 3 - PART 2

      14:49
    • 11. Class Project 4 - PART 1

      18:15
    • 12. Class Project 4 - PART 2

      13:52
    • 13. Class Project 5 - PART 1

      14:31
    • 14. Class Project 5 - PART 2

      14:25
    • 15. Thank you SNOW much ;)

      0:36
134 students are watching this class

About This Class

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Do you remember the first time you’ve experienced the snow? For me, my first experience was four years back when we were in Georgia. It was indeed a magical experience.

We were planning for another winter vacation but due to the travel restrictions and unsafe conditions we dropped the plan. So I thought why don’t we virtually get together and travel to such a dreamy place through our watercolour paintings.

This is a simple yet beautiful class where we will be doing 5 snowy landscapes. I have chosen Polaroid style for this class just so that I can bring the holiday spirit in you and as you finish the class you walk away with the moments captured.

Transcripts

1. Let it SNOW!: Do you remember your first snow? For me, my first experience was four years back when we were in Georgia. It was indeed a magical moment. Hello everyone, my name is Zaneena Nabeel. I'm mom, an architect, an artist, and an art educator. I know many of you are enjoying snow and some of you are dreaming to travel to a snowy destination as you listen to me. I thought why don't we virtually get together and travel to such a dreamy place through watercolor paintings. I'm here with the gorgeous window themed class. Today we will be painting five simple, yet beautiful paintings. Just like my other classes, we will have a thorough discussion about the materials, the colors you will need, and slowly we will progress to our five beautiful snowy paintings. I have chosen a Polaroid style for this class, just so that I can bring the holiday spirit in you. As you finish the class, you walk away with the moments captured. Light up a candle, grab a cup of hot coffee, and set up that cozy mood. Now let's travel to a dreamy snowy destination and create memories together. 2. Here's our Snowy Collection: Hello, everyone. Thanks a lot for joining. Let's have a quick look at the five different paintings we'll be doing in today's class. All of the five paintings we'll be doing today, will be based on a very limited color palette. We won't require a lot of colors, and we'll be doing some simple minimalist beautiful paintings. Let's have a look at the first one. This is our first painting. In this painting, we learn how to paint a quick and easy snowy mountain, which you can use in your future projects and also, we learn how to paint this gorgeous sky. This technique also can be used in your future projects. You can just change the colors and apply the technique into any other color combination you want to try. That's the first one. Here is the second painting. For this painting, we'll be using just one single color. We'll be using beans gray for this painting. This painting is a perfect example on how to use different tonal values of a single color. This one is really simple, but then you are going to enjoy the process and you will really love the end product. Now, onto the third one. This one is another minimalist painting. Here also, we'll be using a very limited color palette. The main focus on this painting is these trees. We will learn to paint these simple yet, beautiful trees in this painting. Now, onto the fourth one. For this one, we'll go with the mountain and a little more advanced mano, we'll be adding more details onto this. For the first one, we went in with a very simple snowy mountain, but then you can look at this painting, we'll be adding some more details and we learn to paint a gorgeous snowy mountain. Can use the same mountain in your other projects. This snowy mountain is going to be a great addition into your paintings. That's the fourth one. Now, onto the final painting, which is this one. This is another great example on how to paint gorgeous snowy mountain. By the end of this class when you paint the final class project, you will have mastered painting snowy mountain. All of the five different paintings are carefully chosen, and I'm very sure you're going to enjoy the process and you will love the paintings you'll be doing in today's class. Without anymore do, let's have a look at the materials you will need. 3. Materials you'll need: All right, let's have a quick look at the materials you will need to follow this class. I'll start with the watercolor paper. For this class, I will be using my Canson Heritage cold-pressed watercolor paper. This one is 100 percent cotton, and it is 140 lb. My paper pad is 26 centimeter by 36 centimeter. I'm going with the Polaroid-style for my painting and this is the size I will be using. I have just cut my paper pad into six equal pieces and that is the size you see here. It is 12 centimeter by 13 centimeter. If you don't want to go with the Polaroid-style, it's totally your choice. You can go with any size you prefer for your painting. To get the best result, I will suggest you to go with an artist-grade watercolor paper, which is of minimum 140 lb and which is 100 percent cotton. Having a good quality watercolor paper will really make a difference in your painting and you will start to enjoy the process of painting. So if you can, go with the good quality artist-grade watercolor paper. That's all about the paper. Now let's have a look at the brushes you will need. I will be using four different brushes. The first one is a half-inch flat brush. This one is from Silver Black Velvet brush. I will be using this one mainly to apply any one coat of water onto the paper and also wherever I need to apply the gradient washes, I will be using this brush. That's the first brush. Now, the next one is a size number 4 round brush, again from Silver Black Velvet brush. This is one of the main brushes I will be using for today's class. Because the size of the paintings we are doing today is quite small, you don't really need a bigger size round brush. Size number 4 or size number 6 works perfect for this class. So grab a medium-size round brush. The next two brushes are detailing brushes. This one is size number 2 round brush. This is from Princeton Heritage series. The other one is a detailing brush again from Princeton. We'll be working with quite a lot of miniature details like this cable car, these delicate branches, so to get them very thin and delicate, you will need a brush which has a pointed tip and that is why I have these two branches here. Grab the smallest brush that you have got, which has a very nice pointed tip. Those are the four brushes. Now, let's have a look at the watercolor. For today's class, I will be using my White knight watercolor pans. For this class, we will be using all these colors. I'll be explaining each and every color you will need at the beginning of each painting, and also I have added a section where I'm explaining all the colors I have on my palette. If you're interested to know which are these colors, you can have a look at that. Now, as my colors are already on a tin box, I will be using this flap for mixing my color and also this side of the lid, and for the same reason, I wouldn't be using an additional mixing palette. You can use your panned watercolor or tubed watercolor, both of them will work perfect for this class. Depending on the kind of color you're using, you can choose to have a palette. As all the paintings we'll be doing today are quite small and we don't really need to mix a lot of paint at a single time, so it is quite easy to grab the pain directly from your watercolor pans without having the need of an extra mixing palette. But then it's totally your choice, if you would prefer to have an extra mixing palette, go ahead, there is no problem. For me, this flap is more than enough. Now, other than the watercolor, you will need a white gouache. We'll be adding some white details on our painting. If you don't have white gouache, it's okay to go with your white watercolor. But my first preference would be having a white gouache to get that opaque look for your paintings. Now, as I mentioned earlier, I will be using my detailing brushes to add these teeny tiny white outlines. If you're more comfortable using a white gel pen, that is absolutely okay. Instead of using a detailing brush and adding all those little outlines, you can use a white gel pen instead. You really don't need to stick to your white gouache and a detailing brush, it is okay to use your white gel pen if that is more comfortable for you. Now, to fix your paper onto your board, you will need a masking tape. This one is a very normal stationary bought masking tape. We will be going with very minimal washes of paint, so it is okay to use your washy tape or any normal masking tape you have got. We'll lead to add some pencil sketch. For that, you will need a pencil and an eraser. Then you will need a paper towel or a cotton cloth. Last but not the least, you will need two jars of water. One has to stay clean. We'll use this one whenever we are in need of clean water because at some places we'll have to blend the colors using clean water. This will be useful at those times, you don't need to run and change your water. The other one we can use for rinsing off the paint from our brush. Quickly go grab all the materials and join me in the next section. In the next section, we'll have a look at the colors I have on my palette. I'll see you there. 4. Colors on my Palette: Welcome back, my dear friends. Let's have a look at the colors I have on my palate. If you're already familiar with these colors, you can skip this section. At least some of you would want to know which other colors I have on my palate so I thought I will introduce you to these colors here. But then it's an optional section. You can skip this if you want. All these colors here is from the brand White Nights. I have more colors from the same brand, but then I have taken them out to my palate and I have added them into a separate palate. These are the ones I use quite often. These pastel shades here are new, I'm yet to use them. This one we'll be using in our class projects. Now let me quickly introduce you to these colors I have here. This one is Payne's gray. No matter which brand, this one is one of my most favorite color. That's Payne's gray. The next one here is violet, this is my another favorite color. I use it quite a lot in my night skies. The next one here is ultramarine blue. We'll be using ultramarine blue quite a lot in our paintings. Next one here is turquoise blue, another favorite of mine. I'm someone who loves blue color a lot. I love these three colors and I use them quite a lot in my night skies. Now, the next one is quinacridone violet, another favorite. The next one is carmine and this one is cadmium green. That's the top row, now under the bottom row, the first one here is quinacridone rose. Next one is a yellow, this one is cadmium yellow light. The next five sheets are pastel colors. The first one is a pastel orange. This one is Naples orange. The next one is a pastel pink. This one is called rose quartz. This one is lavender. I'm yet to try this. This one is may green, I got this to use in my night sky to add that neon green streak in my northern lights. That's a very bright and brilliant neon green color and the last one is one of my recent favorite color. This one is called mint, it's a beautiful pastel blue. Those are the colors I have on my palate. As I mentioned at the art supply section, we won't require all these colors. I know at least some of you would want to know the name of these colors, and that is why I added this section. Quickly go grab your art supplies and join me in the next section. Let's start with [inaudible] painting. 5. Class Project 1 - PART 1: This is the first painting we'll be doing today. Let me quickly introduce you to the colors I will be using. For the sky, I will be using two colors, the first one is ultramarine blue, on the top, and also to add in these clouds I'll be using ultramarine blue. The next color is mint. This is the color you see over the bottom. Those are the two colors I will be using for the sky. I guess most of you may have ultramarine blue. If you don't have it, you can use Prussian blue or any other brighter blue that you have got. Instead of mint, you can use any of the pastel blue you have got. You can use cobalt teal. cobalt turquoise, cobalt green, or any other pastel blue. Those are the two colors I will be using for the sky. Now, for the mountain and for the snowy ground, I will be using a lighter tone of ultramarine blue. The next color you will need is quinacridone rose. If you don't have quinacridone rose, you can use crimson or carmine, and it is not really necessary to use the same color for the cabin. If you would like to use a muted color, you can use burnt sienna or any other brownish tone. That is quinacridone rose. The next color is Payne's gray. I will be using Payne's gray to add in the final details. You can see these dry brush patterns over here, and also this door. For all of that I will be using Payne's gray. If you don't have Payne's gray, you can use black watercolor. Finally, to add in those white outlines, I will be using whitewash. If you don't have whitewash, you can use your white watercolor. You can also use your white gel pen. That's all about the colors. Now let's quickly start painting. I have my piece of paper already here. Now I'm going to tape down the paper onto my board. As we are doing a polaroid style painting, just set the bottom line. I will be going with a thicker border. The rest of it will be normal thin border. I have taped down my paper. Now let's add in the pencil sketch. We need to add a snowy ground. Now, over here we need to add a small little cabin. Adding the roof, which is like a triangular shape. Now add a batter line on either side. Now under the line, an inclined one, and another one. Let's add a new door over here. That is our little red cabin. Now, far away we'll have some snowy mountains. I'm going with three mountains, one right over here, another one, and one more over to the right side. Maybe this one we can make a little taller. That is our mountain. Now let's start painting. I'm going to use my half-inch flat brush, the silver black velvet brush. I'm going to start by applying an even cooler water onto the sky. Make sure you're not touching the mountain, we want them clean. We'll be retaining most of the paper white, so please make sure you're not adding any paint onto them. Now, I'm going with this pastel blue. You can use any of the pastel blue that you have got. You can use cobalt green, cobalt teal, or any similar color. Now, apply that with the bottom. Carefully take your brush along the outline of your mountain. Make sure not to add in any paint into the mountain. Once you have applied the pastel blue color along the outline of your mountain, you can take it till almost three-fourth of the sky. The color I'm using here is mint, it has drawn white nights. Now if you don't have any pastel blue, feel free to go within your few light to blue. Now add more paint and fill almost till three-fourths of the sky. Over to the top, I'm going to switch to ultramarine blue. I'm washing the paint off from my brush, and I'm switching to ultramarine blue. Adding that on the top. I'm washing the paints off from my brush, and I'm going to blend those colors together. We need a gradient sky, so blend those colors well. Now again, I'm going with ultramarine blue and I'm going to add some random lines onto the sky especially along the bottom where I have that pastel blue. You can see I'm using a very light tone of ultramarine blue, and I didn't add a lot of lines. I just added few lines along the bottom. In-between you can add some lines using a brighter tone of blue. I want to redeem most of that pastel blue, and that is why I am adding very few lines onto the sky. I'm washing the paint off from my brush, dabbing my brush on a paper towel. I'm gently running my damp brush along those blue color we added over the bottom, and helping it to put. This way it will look more smoother. You should be very gentle with your brush movement. If you're already happy with your sky and if you have got clean smooth clouds over there, you don't need to do the step. Only if your clouds are looking very sharp and prominent, you can run a damp brush on top of them to make it look more smoother. Now, I am adding some more clouds using a taco tone of blue. I am using ultramarine blue. Now the same step I'm repeating again. I'm just running my damp brush on top of those patterns I applied and making them look smoother. You have a nice pretty sky there. Let's wait for the sky to dry, and after that, we'll be painting those snowy mountains. I'm using my size number 4, silver black velvet brush. I don't want that blue to blend it into my mountain because I want to retain most of the paper white, which is going to be my snow. Let's wait for the sky to dry completely. Meanwhile, let's paint the bottom part. Again, I'm going with ultramarine blue, a light tone, and I'm adding in few lines of ultramarine blue onto the bottom. Just like that, now I'm washing painter from my brush, and I have some water on my brush. Now using clean water, I'm just blending those streaks into the background so that those lines won't be that prominent. Looks like that has dried. Now, again, I'm going with a light tone of ultramarine blue. The first step is to divide your mountain into two sections. We need to add a free flowing, irregular line in the middle, and that will separate the mountain into two different sections. On one side we'll be concentrating on the shadows, and on the other side, we'll be concentrating more on the snow, which will be about paper white, we won't be adding much of color onto that side. I added an irregular line in the middle. Now over to the right side, I'm applying a lighter tone of ultramarine blue. You can leave some white caps in between. Now as I'm hitting the bottom I'm going to wash off the paint from my brush, and using clean water I will simply smash that color into the background. Now I'm washing paint off from my brush, and using clean water I'll simply blend that into the background. To make your model look snowy, you should be going with a very light tone. To make your model look snowy, you should be going with the very light tone of blue. No matter whether it's Prussian blue, ultramarine blue or cobalt blue or any other blue that you're using, you should be using a very light tone of blue. Now to that section on the left side, I'm going to add some random blue strings, again, using a very light tone of blue. Most of the area will be rating the paper white. Just at some places we'll be adding from random strikes like this. Now in a similar manner, let's paint the other two mountains. I'm going with that little one in the middle, starting with a lighter tone of blue, adding an irregular line and filling up that right batch in a lighter tone of blue. I'll do the same on to that mountain on the right side, adding in irregular line, filling up the right side in a lighter tone of blue. Now, washing of the paint from my brush and I'm switching to clean water. Now blending those colors into the background and making it look smoother. That's about snowy mountain. You can see how easily we created that snow, we looked about painting. We didn't add a lot of colors, we bend in a very minimalist way. We used a lighter tone of blue and added that on to only one side of the mountain. Onto the other side, we simply added few lines and that's it. We painted a beautiful snowy mountain that too very quickly. We leave the mountain super-simple, we won't be adding any more details onto that. Before we go with the snowy cabin, I want to add a little of blue right behind the roof so that our snowy cabin they'll stand out as the roof is covered in snow, and you have a snowy mountain in the background. It will be a little difficult to differentiate between those two. All I'm going to do is I will extend that irregular line in the middle, which we added for the margin on the right side, and fill up the area behind the roof and a lighter tone of blue so that we don't need to add any paint or any detail onto the snowy roof. We can leave it as paper white, it will be automatically visible once we have that lighter blue in the background, you can see that right here. Once you have added that light blue color around the house, blend that into the background and make it all smooth and even. That is our snowy mountain. I'm pretty happy with the way our painting is turning out, and I hope you guys are enjoying it too. Now it's time to paint this little cabin here. First, let's add a lighter torn of ultramarine blue onto the snowy roof. Let's start with that. Go with the lighter tone and add in few lines onto the roof. Here also you need to retain most of your paper white, you need to add few lines like this. Go with a very light tone and that's a snowy roof. Now let's paint the wall. For that, I'm going with a brighter color, I'm going with quinacridone rolls. As everything in this painting is looking quiet simple and subtle, I want to bring in a contrast towards here, and that is why I'm going with a very bright color. Now, if you want to follow a same color palette for your painting instead of quinacridone rolls, you can use carmine or crimson as I mentioned at the beginning of this section. Now, if you want a muted colors, maybe you can go with born fina or any brownish tunes so that it won't look too bold and bright if that's what you prefer, which will be the color you have chosen leaving that white roofline. Fill up that triangular piece in the color you have chosen. Follow that outline and simply fill up that shape. You can see that contrast I brought in by introducing a darker and brighter color. Feel free to choose the color for your cabin. Now, I'm going to add in a darker tune here here. For that, I'm using a little of paint screen, and I'm mixing that with my quinacridone rolls and I'm adding a darker tune along this line. These are those shadows you will have underneath the roofline, which will be the color you choose for your wall, go with a darker tune of that and add in a thick line along this roof flying. Now, over to the other side, I'm going with a thin line. Once we have added in the shadows, we'll have to wait for this to dry before we go in with the next details. The only task left as detailing out the cabin and also adding few more shadow over the crowned. All right, that's a base layer of our cabin. 6. Class Project 1 - PART 2: Now while we wait for that to dry, we can add in the remaining details on the bottom ground. We are going to leave the mountains as it is because it is quite far from you and I want it to look very soft and simple. I'm not going to add any more details onto that, I'm quite happy with the way it is looking right now. Let's add in the remaining details onto the bottom part. For that, I'm going with a bit more brighter tone of ultramarine blue, adding a pinch of Payne's gray so that I get a bluish-gray color, go with a lighter tone. Now you can add in a few shadows like this. Remember to go with a lighter tone. I'm going to add another line right next to that, over here. Maybe one more on the left side, just to bring in more shadows on the background. I would also be adding a pathway which is leading to these red little cabin. I've added the shadows on the ground, you can see the color I'm using here it is a very light tone. To bring in that snowy character to your painting, you should be working with lighter tones. Now let's add the pathway. Again, I'm going with a lighter tone. I will add the shade first, then I will make that pathway look a little subtle by smudging that into the background. As you could see, I'm not going with a smooth curve, I'm adding some little lines and some broken patterns in between so that it will look like there are footsteps. Once you have added that shape, using clean water, smudge that into the background, and make it look a little softer. We have added the shadows and we have added the pathway. Now once this dries, we will add in some dry brush pattern to the Payne's gray to make it look a little more realistic. Because there will be more details, shadows, and footsteps on the area closer to the house, we'll have to add that in. Now let's go back to our cabin, make sure everything gets completely dried. Now, I'm going to add a little chimney on the roof. I'm going with a darker tone of Payne's gray, and simply adding a rectangular piece right right the roof, a long rectangular piece. It is these little elements which will add a lot of beauty to your paintings, never underestimate them. That's the chimney. Now, I will go with a lighter tone of plain gray and to have a lighter shadow for this chimney. That will make our snowy roof look more realistic. You can use a color which is slightly lighter than the color you used for the chimney, it shouldn't be too dark, or it shouldn't be too light. It should be visible on your roof. Once you have taken paint on your brush, simply add an inclined line like this. You can see how beautiful our snowy roof is looking when we added that little detail on it. This is the magic of details. Now let's add in the remaining details onto that red wall. I'm going with a deeper tone of Quinacridone Rose. I'm mixing a little of Payne's gray into Quinacridone Rose, and I'm going to add a line right over here, parallel to the roof line. I will be adding a similar line on the other side as well. It is just a simple line which is parallel to your roof lines. So this means you will have a double triangle. Now we'll have to add the remaining lines onto the wall, and also we have to paint that door we have added there. To add on these lines, I'm going with a medium tone of Quinacridone Rose. I'm adding more Quinacridone Rose into the earlier mix we created, where we added more Payne's gray to get a darker tone. Now using that color, I'm going to add some vertical lines onto the wall at a regular interval. This line should be very thin. So if required, switch to our detailing brush or any other brush which has a pointed tip, and adding these lines with more or less equal spacing. All right. Now I'm switching back to Payne's gray, which is very much close to black, and I'm adding that door over here. You simply need to fill up that shape in a darker tone of Payne's gray. Once this dries, we'll be adding a white border for this too. Now let that dry. Let's add few dry brush patterns onto the roof and also onto the ground. I already have Payne's gray on my brush. Now I'm dabbing my brush on a paper towel. I'm not going with a darker tone, I'm going with a medium tone of Payne's gray. I took a medium tone of Payne's gray on my brush, and I'm dabbing my brush on a paper towel, until the paper towel completely absorbs the water content of the paint. Now I'm simply adding in some dry brush patterns, the ground, especially along that pathway we added in the middle. Now we can add in some random pattern testable, but we don't need a lot, just a little around the house. The rest of the area, you can leave it as it is, now a little onto the roof as well. Now here also you don't need to add a lot just a little is all you need. This is just to give an impression that the actual color of the roof is something else, it's a darker color and there's snow on top of it. So just a sneak peek of Payne's gray is all we need. Now I'm taking out a little of white gouache, just a teeny tiny bit. Now I'm going to add an outline for this little door over there. We need a crisp and clear white border around that door. Make sure you're using a brush which has a pointed tip, we don't want a very bold line. I added a drop of water to my gouache, and I'm going to add the outline for this door. I have added a clean white outline. Now adding a line in the middle. For this step, instead of adding the white outline with a brush and white gouache, you can also use your white sharpen if that is more convenient for you. Now, I'm adding a tiny drop of white onto this chimney, and with that, we're done with our painting. I'm literally loving everything about this painting. The sky, the snowy mountain and that red little cabin, everything has come out so nice. I'm also pretty happy with that contrast we've brought in here. Now let's remove the masking tape and have a look at our final finished painting. I'm really loving the colors we have used here. I hope you guys are enjoying it too. We have finished our first painting from the lettered small collection. We have four more to go, and I'm pretty sure each of them will be very close to your heart. There is something to learn in each of the paintings we'll doing in today's class. Here is a closer look of our painting. Look at that red cabin, so beautiful. Give it a try and let me know how you feel in the discussion section. After you're done painting this one, join me in the next section where we will try our second painting. 7. Class Project 2 - PART 1 : I hope you all had a great time painting our first snowy landscape. Now, let's go with our second one. Before we begin, let's have a look at the colors you will need. Actually, you don't need colors, you will just need a color. We'll be just using paints gray. We'll be using multiple tones of paints gray. We'll go with the lighter tone for the sky. We'll go with the next one for these trees in the background, and also for the shadow over here. Then we'll go with the darker tone for this tree and the road here. It's going to be an exercise where we will be using different tones of paints gray to finish our painting. Quickly grab your gray watercolor tube or watercolor pan. Let's start painting. First of all, I have changed my water. I have two jars of clean water. I'm going to keep this aside. I have another piece of paper here. I'm going to fix that onto my board using a masking tape. Now, just like how we did for our first painting, I'm going to add a thick border at the bottom. For the other three sides, I will be going with a thin border. My paper is fixed on to the board. For this one, we'll be only using one single color, which is paints gray. You can use your tubed watercolor or the panned watercolor. Both of them will work perfect for this painting. Now, for this painting, you really don't need to add a pencil sketch. The only thing you need to add is horizon line, the line which separates your sky and the bottom snowy ground. I'm going to add that. This is how it is going to be. Now, we'll have a tree over here. I'm just adding a line for now. We don't need to sketch that out. We can detail it out while we are painting. Now, we'll have a road over here. Again, that also you don't need to sketch. We just need a free-flowing natural curve for our road. You really don't need to sketch it out. But if you want, you can simply add a curvy, irregular line like this, but it's not a very complicated one. You will get to see that in some time. Because when you add in that sketch, you will be restricted to play along that outline. If you don't sketch, you will have quite a lot of freedom. You can tweak the shape however you want to while you paint. That is my suggestion, but then if you want, you can sketch it out if that is more comfortable for you. Let's start painting. I'm going to apply an even coat of water on to the sky. Don't add any water over here. I'm going to leave the bottom as it is. We just paint the road in a darker color and we'll add some shadows along the outline. Other than that, we will be adding any paint over the bottom. The rest, I will be leaving as paper white. I have added an even coat of water. Now, let's go with the light tone of paints gray, I have my paints gray here. I'm going with the very light tone. Now, I'm adding that in. Just don't even wash off your paints gray. Now, let's wait for a minute and after that, we will be adding trees over here, along this line we drew. I'm not going to add them right away because my background is too watery now. If I add the right now, they will start spreading into the background. So it will be very difficult to control the way they are spreading into the sky. I want to control the way they are spreading and that is why I am waiting for some time so that my background won't be too watery. It will be just wet and the paint won't spread into the background in a very fast manner. I will have more control over it. You can see that shiny coat water on my paper. I think we can go ahead now. It is not too watery. I'm switching my sizable full round brush and I'm going with a bit more darker tone of paints gray. You can go with the kind of color which is one tone darker than your background color. It shouldn't be too dark. Now, focus on that line we added. I'm simply going to drop in some paint. You can see the way they are spreading. I waited for more than a minute, maybe like I have waited for two minutes, even then, the paint is spreading into the sky a little too much. If you're introducing your darker tone of paints gray when your background is too watery, it will go into the sky in a very uncontrolled manner. Wait for a minute before you apply your darker tones. Now, in a similar way, I'm going to add in some darker tones of paints gray on to the other side as well. At some places, you can make your shape are little bigger. You can take it a little more into the sky. At some places, you can make it some smaller shape. If you play with different size and shape, it will make your painting look more beautiful. At some places, maybe you can go with a bigger shape and at some places, your shapes can be much smaller. As I mentioned at the beginning for this painting, we'll be using just paints gray. Once you get through with the technique, maybe again, try the same with any other color you prefer. You can use a purple sheet or a forest green sheet or maybe indigo. All of them can be used for this painting. Just give it a try. That's the sky and the trees in the background. Now, let's wait for this to dry. It looks like everyone has completely dried. Now, it's time to paint the road over here. For that, I'm going with a darker tone of paints gray. A very intense bold tone which is more close to black. I'm loading my brush for the darker of the paints gray. The road that I'm going to add will be super narrow over here. When I'm starting out, it will be very narrow and thin. As I come down, I will make it more wider. That is the only thing you need to keep in mind. The shape, you can follow your intuition and add in whatever shape you prefer. If you want, you can make it more wider, or if you want to make it more narrower, that is also totally up to you. I will sketch the shape. I'm just going with my intuition and adding a curvy line however I want to. At some places, I'm taking my black color into this road and adding some pockets so that it will look more natural. Now, if you don't want an irregular shape, if you want a nice, clean curvy road, that is also totally up to you, just go ahead and add a new road however you want to. We have added our road. Now we'll have to wait for that to dry. Meanwhile, let's add some shadow onto the snowy ground to make it more realistic. Now, I'm switching to a very light tone of paint's gray. I'm adding more water, and I want a very light tone of paint's gray. Using that, I'm going to gently add in a line. Leave a small gap along that shape, and add in a light tone of gray. You can simply add few random lines. You can see the kind of color I'm using here, it is very light. You shouldn't be going with a darker tone, your color should be something similar to this. Now, go around and add in a similar line along the shape of your road on either side. You can clearly see, I didn't add a lot of lines, just few lines here and there, and that one a very light tone of paint's gray. We brought in that snowy character to our painting quite easily by reading in the paper white. We didn't add much of color on top of snowy ground, other than adding those shadows using a lighter tone of paint's gray. Also we created a moody background by playing the two different tones of paint's gray. We applied an even coat of color onto the sky and then we added some trees in the background using a darker tone of paint's gray, just one one darker than your background color. We applied that onto the wet background and created a moody background. I'm quite happy with the way our background has turned out. Now we need to add a tree over here. This tree is quite far from you and it is going to be a little detailed. We'll be adding some teeny-tiny branches on it. So you have to go with a brush which has a pointed tip. I'm using my size number 4 round brush. This brush has a pointed tip, but then it won't work for those teeny-tiny delicate branches. For that, I'll be switching to a detailing brush. Now, I'm going to add the main skeleton of the tree using this brush. I'm starting with the tree trunk. Then we will add the main branches, and after that we will add in so many delicate branches on it. That's the tree trunk. Now I'm going to add the main branches, which is going to be a little thicker, just like the tree trunk. You can add in how many main branches as you want. I think I will go with three or four thicker branches. I have added the main skeleton of the tree. Now, I'm going to add in more and more teeny-tiny branches onto this. 8. Class Project 2 - PART 2: For that, I'm going to switch to my detailing brush. You can see the thin pointed tip my precious coat. You should be using a similar brush, otherwise your branches wouldn't be thin entelechy. Look at that tip. We'll switch to any of your detailing brush. It could be size zero or it could be size one. Don't go with any bigger size brush. Now, adding as many branches as you want onto all these thicker branches we added. This particular step might take awhile to finish, but then it is one of the most important step in this painting. This is what will add a lot of character to your painting. Be a little patient and add hundreds of branches onto your tree. You can see the kind of branches I'm adding here, they are super thin. This is the kind of lines you should be adding. Otherwise, it may go out of proportion. The beauty of this tree lies in these little delicate branches, so you will have to add quite a lot of them to bring in that character. If you don't have a pointed brush, it is okay to use a pen if that has a pointed tip. But make sure you're not adding bold lines. If you have such a pen which has appointed tip and that is more comfortable for you, you can use that, no pressure. This is very high raised, it's been two minutes since I started adding these branches, and still, the tree is not looking so full, I will have to add some more branches. Let me quickly add that in. I know it's a little boring to keep on adding these branches, but then you can see how our tree is taking shape, it is looking so gorgeous. It has a lot of character and that is the main focal point of a wall painting. You shouldn't be lazy, keep on adding those branches. The only thing I'm hating here is that my brush cannot hold a lot of paint, so I need to keep on loading my brush every now and then. I can go on and on and on with those branches, but then I think I have added quite a lot and I'm going to stop it there. Now using the same brush, I'm going to add a shadow for the stream. I have my paper towel with me. First, I will add some dry bush patterns and along with that, I will add few lines using paint gray, a lighter tone of paint gray. You don't need to add a lot of detail over here, just the shadow of the tree is all we need to add. Go with a lighter tone of paint gray, adding a line on the ground. It can be a little thicker line. Make sure you're going with a lighter tone of paint gray, it shouldn't be too dark and bold. I'm really happy with the way this painting is turning out. We just used paint gray for this painting. You can do the same thing with any other color you prefer. We played with different tonal values of paint gray. We created a funky background, and we created a snowy ground. It is a very minimalist painting, but it has a lot of character. Now, right underneath the tree where the tree is standing, I'm adding some darker tones. Make sure you're not adding too much darker tones on your ground. Other than the area closer to the tree, we don't want darker tones anywhere else. The rest should be left as it is. Now let's wait for everything to dry, the last step is to splatter some snow and also to add some snow patches on the road. Everything has completely dried, now I'm going to switch to white gouache. Now using white gouache, I'm going to add some random shapes onto the ground, which is going to be snow patches, and simply add some irregular shapes on the ground. Load your brush with white gouache, and simply add some irregular shapes on the road using white gouache. Some of the patches can be smaller and some of them can be a little bigger. I added some big patches, now I'm adding some teeny tiny patches. In all my classes, I use to say if it's trees, you should be working with different heights and different sizes. It is the same thing with anything and everything you do. Even here, some of the patches I'm adding are bigger and some of them are smaller. It is this combination which gives that realistic look to your painting. It could be mountains, it could be trees, it could be some little stones. Whatever you are adding, you should be working with different size and shapes. This will automatically bring in a natural character to your painting. When we were creating that funky background also, I mentioned the same. At some places we added some bigger shapes, and at some places we added smaller shapes just to give it more realistic look. I have added enough of snow patches, I'm going to take out a little more white gouache and I'm going to splatter some snow onto the entire painting. This is going to be the last step, and after that we'll be done with our painting. I'm loading my size number 4 brush with little gouache, and I'm going to tap on this using another brush to create the snow. We are nearly done with our painting, I'm going to quickly go around and add in few more patches of snow on the road. That's it my friends, we are done with our second painting. I'm really loving the final outcome, I hope you guys enjoyed it too. Let me peel off the masking tape and show you the final painting. There you go, look at that painting. It really looks like a polaroid photograph, right? I really love that tree and the funky background. I hope you guys are as happy as I am looking at the painting. 9. Class Project 3 - PART 1 : We've finished two simply beautiful snowy paintings, and now let's go with our third one. Here is the painting we'll be doing in some time. Let's have a quick look at the colors. For the sky and for the snowy ground, I will be using ultramarine blue. Then for these trees in the background and for this big here, I'll be using puce gray, and for these windows also, I will be using puce gray. The next color is this mint. As I mentioned earlier, you can go with any of the pastel blue you have got, if you don't have a pastel blue, you can use a lighter tone if it requires blue, or if you prefer any other color for your house, that's also totally up to you. So those are the three colors you will need for this painting. Other than that, as you all know, you will need a white gouache or whitewater color. So quickly go grab those three colors, this one one one of my favorite painting, I cannot wait to take you through the process, lets quickly get into painting. First, I'm going to tape down this to my board. On the bottom, I'm going with a thicker border and on the other sides, I will go with a thin border. Now, as I mentioned earlier, if you want your painting to be in a different orientation, or if you want your painting to be in a different style, you could do that. Now, let's add the pencil sketch. So we'll have a snow field ground at the bottom, then we'll have some trees in the background. We won't be sketching the trees, we can add them as we paint. The trees will be some basics surrounds, it won't be a very detailed trees. Now, the next step is to add house over here. I'll just be adding half of the house and just to make it a little interesting. So that's our house. Now, I will have a window over here, which will be just half seen then we'll have a line there. Now we have another window here. So that is our pencils sketch. You just need to add this much. The rest we can add while we paint. Let's quickly jump on to painting, and I'm starting by adding an even coat of water onto the sky. For the sky, I'm going with ultramarine blue. I'm switching to my size number 4 round brush, and I'm going with light tone of ultramarine blue and I'm going to simply drop in some blue into the wet background. I'm adding some lines starting from the right corner and simply dragging that into the wet background. You can see the way how they are blending into the background. I'm not going to take my brush on top of it, I'm quite happy with the way they are blending into the background. Now, let's add in some blue over the bottom. To make our snow prominent, we'll have to add a lighter tone of blue right behind the house and also along the horizon line. We'll be adding white color along the roof-line. So in order to make that prominent, you will have to have a background color. Once you have a darker looking background, the white will be automatically prominent, and also the snow on the ground, then you have our blue color right about the horizon line, you really need to put a lot of effort defining the snow over the ground. Now, I'm adding a little more of blue on the top, just a little more over here. With that, we're done with the blue sky, I'm quite happy with the way it is looking. Now, in a similar way, I'm adding some water onto the bottom. I'm not taking the water close to that horizon line because I don't want that color to spread into my bottom ground. So I'm carefully adding water only till here by leaving a little of gap in there. Now, again, I'm going with that light tone of ultramarine blue. Now, just like how we did the sky, drop in some lines, just some free hand lines in the wet background. Let that spread into the background naturally and create a smooth blend. That's the sky and the ground. Maybe right over here, closer to the house, we can add a little more bluish tones. Along the bottom of the house add a blue line then smerge that into the background and make it look smart. That's our snowy ground and our sky. Now, I'm going to mix a little puce gray to ultramarine blue. I'm going to go with the bluish-gray color. This is the color I'm going to use. I'll begin with the lighter tone of that and I'm going to simply add in some lines over here. Just some lines right behind the house. You can fill up the entire horizon line in this lines. Some of them can be taller and some of them can be shorter. You can see I'm going with a very light tone and to my background is still a little wet. My background is not watery, it is just a little wet. You shouldn't be adding these lines right after you've painted your sky, at that time your sky will be too wet and watery. If you add them right away as your background is wet, those colors will start spreading into the background in a very fast manner. It will be very difficult for you to control the way they are spreading. So it's better if you wait for a minute or two before you add in these lines. Everything has completely dried. I'm really loving the soft look we have got here. The snowy ground, the sky, and those foggy trees in the background, everything is looking so perfect. I'm really loving the way it is progressing. I hope you guys are enjoying the process and the way your painting is progressing. Now let's paint the little house here. For that, I'm going with the spacer blue. If you want to go with red, brown, or dark blue, we can go with any color you prefer. I tried out a painting with this color and I really loved it. So simply fill up that entire shape in that pixel blue. Once we have added that one, we add some deeper tone using turquoise blue. Now, I'm switching to turquoise blue and I'm going with a medium to enough turquoise blue. I'm using this color, I'm going to add in to a deeper tones. First, I'm adding the shadow right underneath the roof line. I'll put up a thicker line. Now, on the right over here, and also along that horizontal line in the middle. Now lets add a deeper tones around the windows, I will add a thick line on the left side and also over the bottom. We applied a base layer and we added the deeper tones. That is it. Now I will let that dry. Once everything has dried, we can add the remaining details on to this house. I'm washing my brush. Now the next step is to add in the trees in the background. I will add a huge tree over here and then few trees right behind the house. To add in the trees in the background, I'm switching to a size number two round brush. I'm going with Payne's gray. I'm going with a medium tone Payne's gray. You have to make sure that your background has completely dried. Let's start by adding the tree trunk. After you're done adding the tree trunk, add in the main branches. You can go with any kind of height you prefer for your tree. I'm going to make these trees a little short because I will have a huge tree on the left side, and I don't want a lot of focus on these trees. I want to stress on something. Just make sure you're going with the medium to light tone of Payne's gray when you're adding these trees in the background. It shouldn't be too dark. Otherwise you won't get that sense of distance in your painting, because we'll be going with a darker tone of Payne's gray for the tree in foreground. These ones in the background has to be a little lighter compared to that one. Once you have added the major tree trunk, you can add some teeny tiny branches onto this. For that I will be using my detailing brush, so that I can draw those thin and delicate branches. Now let me add a few more trees. Once I've done adding the main skeleton, I will switch to my detailing brush and add in those teeny tiny branches. Now I'm going to add those teeny tiny branches. For these trees in the background as it is very light in color and it's not too detailed, I'm using the same brush. For the main tree which is in the foreground, the one we'll be adding on the left-end, to add these teeny tiny branches, I will be using a detailing brush. Add in as many branches as you want. The more branches, your tree will look more beautiful. You can see my lines are very thin and delicate. This is what will bring in that sense of depth and proportion in your painting. Go with a lighter tone. You shouldn't be going with a bold and dark color. Go with a similar light, grayish tone and add them in. You can see how light they are. Now let's go with the main tree in the foreground. Again, I'm going with a medium tone of Payne's gray, not too dark. I'm starting with the main tree trunk. I have added a tree trunk. Now, I'm adding the main branches, the thicker ones. You can take your tree in any shape you want to, maybe you can go with thicker and huge tree. It's totally up to you. Also you can add as many branches as you want. Let me quickly go around and add in more thicker branches. Once I have added the main skeleton of the tree, I switching to my detailing brush, and I will add those delicate and tiny branches. Let me quickly go around and finish the main skeleton. That's the main skeleton of our tree. In the next section, we can add more details and remaining branches. 10. Class Project 3 - PART 2: We have the main tree trunk and the branches ready. Now onto this main branches, I'm going to drop in some darker tone of Payne's gray. I'm going to all those little pockets where those branches are starting off from the main tree trunk, and I'm adding a darker tone over there. We just need some darker tones in-between. We already have a lighter tone of gray. To bring in more textures and more realistic look to our tree, we just need some darker tones. Simply pick some random area and add in a darker tone like this. Now our task is to fill up the tree with so many branches. There is no limit, go around and add in so many branches onto your tree. First let me add in as much as branch as I can using this brush then I'll switch to my smaller size brush to make them look overwritten and delicate. Now when you're adding new branches you don't really need to follow the way I'm taking my brush. Just follow your intuition and add in your branches wherever you can, and wherever you find it looks pretty. Our idea is to add in as many branches as we can. Wherever you're adding, it doesn't really matter. Now I'm switching to my detailing brush and I'm going to add more and more branches onto this. I know I spoke about this quite a lot. You should be using a brush which has a pointed tip, otherwise, you won't get these delicate branches. If you're going with those bold thick branches, your tree might look little weird. It will go out of proportion. To get to that wintery feel and to make your tree look more beautiful, you should be using a brush which has a pointed tip. Even though this step is quite easy, it is really time-consuming and it could be boring too. If you want to take a break, go ahead, grab a cup of coffee, take a walk and come back and finish your tree. I added quite a lot of branches, but still my tree is looking quite empty. I will add some more branches and make our tree look full. This is the brush I'm using. You can see the kind of pointed tip my brush has got and that is why I'm able to get these teeny-tiny branches. When you're adding these branches, there are two things you need to be careful about. One is, you shouldn't be going with black or any dark color, you should be going with a lighter tone of that. You can see the color I'm using here, it's a lighter tone of Payne's gray and that is why I'm getting that wintery feel. The next thing is the thickness of your branches. It should be very thin and delicate. Make sure to use the smallest brush that you have got. I will go one more round and add in some more branches wherever I'm finding some space because at some places it is looking quite empty, and at some places it is looking little thick and dense. I'm going in one more round and adding a few more branches. For these trees in the background, we paint in with a much more lighter tone of Payne's gray. For the one in the foreground, we paint in with a bit more darker tone of Payne's gray compared to the one on the background and those colors are giving you that sense of distance. I'm quite happy with everything as looking at the moment. Now right over here, we can add in some dry brush patterns using Payne's gray. I wouldn't be adding dry brush patterns anywhere else, just at this area closer to the house. Dust of the area, I'll be leaving as it is. So all you need to do is load your brush with Payne's gray, tap your brush on a paper towel, and remove the excess amount of water from your paint and simply scratch your brush on the paper and create some dry brush patterns over here. You don't need to add a lot, just a little along the bottom line of the house. Okay. Now the last step is to add the remaining details onto this blue house. The first step is to add some lines onto these walls. I'm going with turquoise blue. Over to the top it, I'm adding vertical lines. I'm using the same brush I use for adding those branches. You should be using a brush which has a pointed tip. Now onto that triangular piece we have on the top, I'm adding vertical lines. Onto that bottom piece, I will be adding horizontal lines. Add in some thin and delicate lines with almost similar spacing. Don't go with a very deep tone. You should be using a medium tone of turquoise blue. Now, add in lines like this at equal spacing. Now, onto the remaining area over the bottom, I'm going to add horizontal lines in a similar way with an equal spacing. Now, it is absolutely okay if you add the lines on top of the windows. You can take it through the windows, it's okay because we'll be adding Payne's gray onto those windows and we'll be adding a white border for those windows. At the end, those lines won't be visible. Because when you break your line, it might be a little difficult for you to get a straight line. That is why I said you can take it through the windows. Add in your lines however you want to. You being comfortable is the most important part. I have some more space at the bottom, maybe I can add two more lines, one more and another line. Now, the next step is to add Payne's gray onto those windows. I'm using the same brush, and I'm going with a darker tone of Payne's gray. I'm going to fill up those two windows in pain gray leaving a white gap. That's the first window. Now, let's do the same onto the other window. I'm adding Payne's gray leaving a white border. Now, if you couldn't leave that white border, that's absolutely okay. Once everything dries, we'll be coming back with white gouache and we'll add a white border. So it doesn't really matter if you get a perfect outline or not. I have filled up those two windows in Payne's gray. You can see how beautiful our house is looking when we added that turquoise tone. We are onto the final step. I'm switching to white gouache, and I'm going to add a white line along the roof and also a clean white border for those windows. This is my white gouache just from Royal Talents. I'm going to squeeze out a bit of white gouache onto my palette. For the roof, we'll be going with a thick and bold white line. But for those windows, we'll need a thin and delicate line. If you feel your gel pen works better, please switch to that. I loaded my brush with white gouache. Now, I'm going to add a thick white line along the roof. Next, I'm going to add a white line right over here. Adding these lines is the last step. This will give our house a finished look. Okay, and [inaudible] a second white line. Now let's add a white outline for those windows. This is going to be a little tricky if your brush doesn't have a pointed tip. As I mentioned earlier, if you have a wide gel pen, if that is more comfortable for you, use your gel pen and add in the outline. First step is to add a white border for these two windows. After that, we will be adding a line inside the window to show that partition. That's the first window. Now let's do the same onto the other one. Now, I'm going to make that roof line a little more thicker. I want to make it look more prominent. So I'm making that line a little more thicker. This one is actually an easy painting. Most of the time went in adding those branches, but then, you can see how beautiful our tree is looking. That effort is really worth it. This painting is actually one of my favorite from the five paintings we'll be doing in today's class just because of that blue blue color. I'm really loving the color combination we used here. First, I actually wanted to use a brownish tone for this house, but it was very accidentally I thought of trying this color, and I was really impressed. Anyway, let's go with the final step and finish our painting. I'm going with white gouache again. I'm going to add the final lines onto the window. Now, the lines I'm going to add now should be very thin. It is those divisions in the window. So you shouldn't be going with a thick line. If you don't have a detailing brush and if you're not confident to add this line, you can skip this step. You can leave your windows with just a white border around it. Now, let's add lines onto the window on the top. For that, I'm going with just a single line, a horizontal line right at the middle. With that, we're done with our painting. I'm really happy with the way this has turned out, especially that blue house. Let's quickly peel off the masking tape and have a look at the finished painting. Here's our finished painting. I'm really loving the color combination we used here. The tree is looking so beautiful. I hope you all had a great time painting this snowy landscape. If you haven't tried it yet, do give it a try. I'm very sure you're going to enjoy the process of painting this simple yet beautiful painting. 11. Class Project 4 - PART 1 : All right guys, we've finished three beautiful snowy paintings, now it's time to go to our fourth one. For this painting as well, we'll be using the same colors. Other than that, the only color you will need is pistil orange, this one is nipples orange. For the sky, just like the previous painting, I will be using ultramarine blue. Then for the mountain and to add in those details, I will be using paint gray. For the lake, I will be using mint, and also a little of turquoise blue, to add in those deeper tones. Finally, for that cabin, I will be using this pistil orange. This color is called nipples orange. Now, to add in those little details, you will also need white gouache. So those are all the colors you will need for this painting. We already had a look at the colors, now let's quickly fix the paper. Just like how I did for the other paintings, I'm going to go with a thicker border over the bottom and thinner border along the other three sides. I have fixed my paper. Now let's add in the pencil sketch. For this painting, we'll need to add some snowy mountains in the background, and we'll have to add a little cabin over the bottom. So let's start with the mountains. I would like three sets of mountain, a taller one on the left end, then a shorter one, and another one. Now I'm going to add that irregular line in the middle, this line will act as a guideline and we are applying those shadows and deeper tones. Now here also I'm adding on the mountain, and I added that irregular line, another line there, now I'm adding a line over here. So that's my mountain. Now we'll have a snowy ground over the bottom. Now, this is where our little cabin will be sitting on, let me add that in. I'm starting with the roof line, now adding a tiny horizontal line, and from there I will add a vertical line touching the ground, same on the other side. So that's the base shape of your cabin. Now let's add few windows, one on the top, and a horizontal long window over the middle. So that's our pencil sketch. Let's start painting, and I'm starting with the mountain. I'm not going with the sky first. This is just because if I add the sky, I will have to wait for that to dry before I go over the mountain. So just to release that waiting time, I'm starting with the mountain. I'm using a light tone of paint gray, and I'm going to carefully add that along this patch we created on the left side, take it along that line you have added there, and simply fill up that area in a lighter tone of paint gray. So we're focusing more on the left side. This is where we will have all the shadow and all those deeper tones. On the right side, we will be retaining most of the paper white. We will simply add some lines and little driver's patterns onto the right side. So I have applied a light tone of paint gray over the top. Now I'm dipping my brush in water, and I'm going to make the color look more even. When I'm approaching the bottom, I will go with a darker tone of paint gray. Switching to a darker tone. Applying that over the bottom. Now the rest of the area, I'm going to fill up with a darker tone of paint gray. So first we applied a light tone of paint gray along that irregular line we added in the middle. Over to the bottom, we went in with a bit more deeper tone of paint gray. Now, you don't need a clean blend of lighter gray to darker gray over here, it can be little rough because we'll be anyway adding more texture onto it, so it doesn't really matter if you have a clean blend or not. The first three paintings were a little easy compared to this one and the next one we'll be doing. Our time went in adding those little details, but otherwise the painting was quite easy. Now for this painting, we'll be adding some more details onto this mountain so that it'll be helpful for your future projects as well. So I have applied that medium tone of gray over the bottom. Now, I'm simply taking that into the lighter gray I have over the top. Now adding more darker tone over the bottom. As you can see, I'm not going with a clean blend, I'm simply adding some darker tones because I want my mountain to look little rough and textually, and that is why I'm not going with a clean blend. We have a little piece left on the right side, let's fill up that in a meeting tone of gray. The next step is to add in lighter tone of gray onto the right side. We will be retaining most of the paper white on the right side. So we have two sets of mountain here, I'm going with a light tone of gray, and I'm adding some shadow. Now same onto the other part here. Okay, now I will dip my brush in clean water, and I will blend that into the background so that those lines won't look that prominent. It will look little smarter. Now adding few lines using a lighter tone of gray. Okay, so that is our base layer. Now let's wait for that to dry, and after that we will add more details onto it. So the main thing you need to be careful about here is that you should be having a clear separation line from that lighter tone and those darker tone. Which means you should add irregular line in the middle, and onto one side you should be adding your darker tones, and onto the other side, you should be leaving most of the paper white, and just add few lines of light gray. Now, we have a lake in the middle. First, I'm going with a darker tone of paint gray, and I'm adding a line right under the mountain. You can see the lake we have here is very narrow, and it is in the background so we don't need to put a lot of effort into this lake. So first I added a paint gray line, now I'm washing all the paint from my brush. Now I'm switching to turquoise blue and I'm adding that right underneath that paint gray line. Seeing onto the other side. Now, again, I'm washing all the paints from my brush and switching to that pistil blue we have here. For the rest of the area, I'm adding the pistil blue. You can start by adding that right next to the turquoise blue and blend them well and fill up the rest of the area in that pistil blue, same onto the other side as well. Don't worry if you don't have a pistil blue with you, you just need to use a lighter tone of turquoise blue over the bottom. Just dip your brush in a little of water and make the tone lighter. But it's absolutely okay if you don't have a pistil blue. Now, I'm going to do the same onto the other side. Okay, that's our blue lake. As we went in with paint gray and turquoise blue first, all those reflections and those details of the lake is done. Now, we're not going to add any more details onto this. Make sure your background has dried. Now, let's go with a darker tone of paint gray. Grab your paper towel. Once you have taken a darker tone of paint gray on your brush, dub your brush on a paper towel, and remove that water content from your paint. The step will help you in getting those dry brush patterns very quickly. My paper towel has absorbed all the water content and I will have dry paint on my brush. Now, using that brush, I'm simply scratching along the right side of the mountain and adding few dry brush patterns. To this side, I won't be adding a lot, I just need a little. As I mentioned earlier, I want to retain more sort white. Onto the left side, we will be going with more dry brush patterns. The other thing you need to keep in mind is that you should be using a smaller sized brush, preferably size six or four, not bigger than that, because if you're going with a bigger brush, the size of your patterns would be bigger and your painting will lose that proportion if you go in that bigger patterns. Now, onto the left side, we will follow this irregular line in the middle and we'll add more dry brush patterns. I want my left side to look more rough and texturey compared to the right side. You can use the same technique and paint the mountain in indigo. Into rough paint gray, you can use indigo. Wherever we use a lighter tone of paint gray, you can use lighter tone of indigo, and wherever we have added those dry brush patterns using a darker tone, you can switch to a darker tone of indigo and do the same. Now, it's time to add dry brush patterns onto the left side. As I said earlier, on this side, I will be adding quite a lot of dry brush patterns. I'm going with the darker tone of paint gray. I dub my brush on a paper towel and I'm adding dry brush patterns along this irregular line we have added, and I'm taking my lines in an inclined manner. From here, I am taking it down. This is just to indicate those slopes on the mountain. Dip your brush on the top and drag it down in an inclined manner. When you're adding your dry brush patterns, follow that irregular line, add your dry brush patterns over there, then take your brush in an inclined manner, and add in your dry brush patterns following a sloping line. You can see how beautiful our mountain is looking [inaudible] Just because we focused on the lighter tones and darker tones, our mountain is looking so realistic. Now, I'm going with a darker tone of paint gray and I'm randomly adding in some lines and little dots and some patterns using a darker tone. Don't go overboard, you just need a little here and there. All you need to do is pick some random area and add in some teeny tiny spots and lines and some scribbles just to add more texture onto a mountain. You don't need to add a lot and it doesn't need to have any particular shape. Now, over to the bottom, I'm going with some bigger patterns and I'm adding some dry brush patterns using a darker tone. Over to the bottom, I want a dark and denser look, and that is why I'm adding more patterns over here. That's our story mountain. Now, let's paint the sky. Because I painted the mountain, I didn't have to wait for anything to dry. I say it quite a lot of time. Anyway, let's paint the sky. For the sky, as I mentioned at the beginning, I'm using ultramarine blue. First, I'm going to apply a lighter tone of ultramarine blue onto the entire sky. When you're adding your blue you need to be a little careful when you're closer to the mountain. Just take your brush carefully along that outline of your mountain, make sure you're not adding any paint onto your stony mountain. Now, I'll fill that up. Please be extra careful when you're adding paint over here. Gently take your brush along that outline of your mountain. That's a base layer of our sky. Now, I'm going with the medium tone of ultramarine blue and I'm going to add in some random lines onto the sky. My sky is already wet, and I can seen the lines I'm adding in are nicely spreading into the background. Simply added some lines, I think some color cart mixed into my blue. Never mind. Maybe I will add some more lines on the top. So I went into the mountain folds just because I didn't want to wait for the colors to dry, I wanted to finish up quite quickly. Just like how we normally do, you can start with your sky. Once that dries, you can be in the mountain. Either way, you have to be very careful when you're adding paint over here, you need to carefully take your brush along the outline of your mountain, make sure you're not adding any paint into that, we want to retain those spike to make our mountain look snowy. 12. Class Project 4 - PART 2 : Now let's paint the snowy ground. For that, I'm using a lighter tone of Payne's gray and I'm simply going to add some lines onto this snowy ground. Later, once this dries, we'll add in dry brush patterns. But then for now, you just need to go with a lighter tone of Payne's gray and add in some random lines. You shouldn't be adding a lot. We want that purple white in the background. Just some lines like this. This is all you need. Now let's wait for everything to dry. This is how our painting is looking right now. Everything has completely dried. Now in the next half goes to paint the little house over there. For that, I'm going to go with pastel orange. This one here is Naples orange. We want that fresh orange color, so make sure your brush is cleaned properly. There is no stain of Payne's gray or ultramarine blue or any other color on your brush. Now leaving those windows, fill up the end of your house in this orange color. You can use any kind of orange you have got. If you want a lighter orange, you can mix a little of yellow into your formalin and go with a lighter looking orange. Or you can go with a red cabin, that is also totally up to you. We have applied a pastry orange onto the entire house. Now I'm going with quinacridone rose mixing a little of Payne's gray to get a deeper tone. Now I'm going to add some shadows onto the walls, aligned right underneath the roof line and also along the windows. Those are the shadows. You can see how those windows popped out when we added the shadows. Now let's wait for that to dry. After that, we will add the final details on to the house. Meanwhile, let's add some dry brush patterns onto the snowy ground. I'm switching back to Payne's gray, going with the darker tone of Payne's gray, then tapping my brush on a paper towel. Now I'm going ahead with the dry brush patterns. Just like how we did for the other paintings where we had that cabin, I'm adding some dry brush patterns to the area closer to the house. Over here you will have the shadow of the house. There will be some footsteps and all those little details. Onto the area closer to the house, you can add some dry brush patterns using a darker tone. Over to the other area, you can add dry brush patterns using a lighter tone. Those are the dry brush patterns. Now I'm switching back to a darker tone of Payne's gray and I'm going to add some random spot onto the ground. Just some little spots and little lines. You can see the way I'm adding it. They are too tiny. These little details will make your snowy ground look more realistic. Just go ahead and add in some little scribbles and little dots like this. Looks like that has dried. Now I'm switching to my detailing brush. You can see how pointed this brush is. Now I'm going to add in the remaining details using this brush. First I'm going with quinacridone rose. I'm going to add in some vertical lines onto the entire house. You can see how thin and delicate my lines are. In a similar way, add in more lines and somewhat equal spacing and fill up the entire wall. I have added all those little lines. Now I'm switching to Payne's gray, going with a very dark tone of Payne's gray. I'm going to fill up all those little windows I have here, leaving a white border. If you didn't get a perfect border, that's fine. We'll be coming back with white gouache and we'll be adding a clean border for all these windows. It's absolutely okay if you couldn't get a perfect border for this. Once we have added Payne's gray onto the windows, the final step is to add a white border for these windows and also a white color over the roof. That is only thing remaining. Go ahead and fill up your windows using a detailing brush. Now let that dry. Now our final task is to adding all the remaining details using white gouache. I'm going to squeeze out a lot of fresh white gouache. The first step is to add a clean white line for the roof. That's the roof line. Now I'm adding a white line on either side. For this step, instead of your white gouache, you can also use your white [inaudible] that is more comfortable for you. Finally, we're going to the windows. This is the last thing we have to do. Adding a white border first. Either use a detailing brush or use of a white [inaudible] and add in a clean border for these windows. But that's the window on the bottom. Now I'm going to do the same thing onto that window we have on the top. We have added a clean white border for those windows. The last task is to add few more lines inside the window to show those window panes. For this step, it is very important to have a brush which has a pointed tip. If you don't have such a brush, you can skip this step because the size of the window is already so small and you shouldn't be going with very thick and bold lines. It should be very thin and delicate. If you doesn't have a fine liner brush, you can skip this step. I added a horizontal line in the middle. Now I'm adding vertical lines, one on the right side and one on the left side. It is these teeny tiny details which is going to add a lot of beauty to our painting. If you can add them in, otherwise it's absolutely okay. You just need to add that white border and you can leave it there. That's that long window. Now let's do the same onto the upper window. I'm adding a vertical line first. Now adding a horizontal line, and with that we are done with our painting. This is the brush I used. You can see the kind of tip my brush has got. This is the only reason why I was able to do all these little lines. After you finish this class, if you're interested in painting those miniature details, go get a fine liner brush. It is really going to help you in your future projects. Now let me peel off the masking tape and show you the finished painting. I'm really happy with the way this one has turned out. I really loved that gray mountain, the blue lake, and the orange house. The color combination has turned out very pretty. Here is our painting. You can see those little details we have added here. I hope you all had a great time painting the snowy mountain and our orange cabin. We have one more to go and I will see you in the next section. 13. Class Project 5 - PART 1 : Hello, hello, we are on the final painting. Just like the previous painting, for this one also, I will be using ultramarine-blue for the sky and for the snowy ground. For the mountain, I will be mixing ultramarine-blue and Payne's gray to create a bluish-gray. Then to add them, these darker tones and all those shadows, I will be using Payne's gray. That's our second color. Now, the last color is quinacridone rose. Those are the three colors you will need. Now, to add this teeny tiny line here, I will be using white brush. You can also use your white gel pen. Those are the colors you will need. Without wasting any more time, let's start with our final painting. I'm going to tape down my paper. For this painting, we'll have to set up more than the background and a snowy ground over the bottom. Let's start with those huge mountain we have on the foreground. This one is going to be a little more detailed. As I'm drawing the shape of the mountain, I'm adding that irregular line as well so that it is easy for me to add the shadows and deeper tones. I created a little bucket there where I will be adding more darker tones. That's the basic shape of my foreground mountain. A teeny tiny one here. Now, let's add the ones in the background. I'm starting it from here, one mountain there. I will add another one. We have our background and foreground mountains ready. Now, we will have a snowy ground over the bottom. Here, I have two set of mountain in foreground and two in the background. You don't need to exactly replicate what I'm doing here. You can go with your intuition. If you want to go with three mountains or four mountains, or if you want to go with one huge mountain in the foreground, it's all your choice. Adding a mountain however you feel it will look better. We just need some mountain in the background and some in the foreground so that you will get that depth in your painting. Now, I'm adding the snowy ground over the bottom. That is of a pencil sketch. Now, I'm adding a clean cold water onto the sky. I'm carefully taking my brush along the outline of the mountain. I'm not adding any water into that. I'm going to go with the gradient wash of ultramarine-blue, a medium tone over the top, and a lighter tone over the bottom. Washing the paint off from my brush. For the rest of the area closer to the mountain, I'm simply taking my brush and adding a very light tone of ultramarine-blue. I'm taking my brush very slow and carefully, and I'm making sure I'm not adding any color onto the mountain. That's my sky. We just went in with a gradient tone of ultramarine-blue, a medium tone over the top, and lighter over the border. Now I'm going to grab a piece of facial tissue. My sky is still wet. Now, I'm going to lift up some paint using this facial tissue to create some clouds. Gently keep dabbing your paper towel on the sky and lift off some paint. You can see how easily I got a cloud there. Every time you lift the paint, your paper towel will get dirty, you can see the blue stain on my paper towel. When you go the next cloud, switch to a cleaner area. The shape and size of your cloud totally depends on the way you're holding your paper towel. You can see I have crumpled it into a smaller shape and I'm adding some smaller-sized clouds. You can see the paint stain on my paper towel. You shouldn't be using this area again, you need to switch to a cleaner area and then add your remaining clouds. Otherwise, all those paint stain can get mixed into your clouds and you won't get that white fluffy clouds. So gently press your paper towel against the paper and lift off some paint. You can add in as many clouds as you want. The step needs to be done before your background dries, so you have to be a little quick and consistent to get that white clouds. Otherwise, when you lift off the paint, you won't get that to right color. Now, there is a trick if in case you didn't get your clouds right, you can squeeze in a whitewash or white watercolor, and gently run that color on top of that white spaces you've created, and make it look a little more smoother and even. Mine is looking okay already, so maybe won't get the difference. You just need to go with some whitewash, and gently add that on top of the patterns you created, and smudge that into your blue sky, and make your clouds look pretty. This is just an optional step if your cloud are looking pretty, and if you're loving the way it is, you can leave it there. You don't need to go with whitewash. As we have a lighter tone for the sky, the whitewash you're adding may not show up a lot. But if you're going with a brighter color, I will show you an example. In this painting, I went into the brighter tone for the sky. I applied a gradient wash of ultramarine-blue and that [inaudible] blue. Then I lifted off some clouds using a paper towel. Then I went in with whitewash and made those clouds look more white and fluffy. In this painting, it really makes a difference because I have a brighter tone for the sky. Whereas for the painting we are doing right now, the sky color is already very light and it doesn't really make much of a difference. My idea was just to show you how you can fix your clouds if you didn't get it right. It's just a quick fix if you are not happy with the way you lifted off the paint from your paper. That's for the sky. Now, let's go with the mountains. I'm going to start with the ones we have in the background. For that, I'm going with the bluish-gray. To create that bluish-gray, I'm mixing a little of Payne's gray and ultramarine blue. If you have a blue-gray color with you, you can use that. If you don't have it, you can mix and create your bluish-gray. We just need to add a little of Payne's gray into your ultramarine blue or whichever blue you're using. This is the kind of color we are going with. Now, I'm going to apply this color onto the right side of the mountain I have in the background. That is where I'm going to add more shadows. Create your bluish-gray. Go with a lighter tone and fill up that batch you created on the right side. Now, onto the left side, you can add few little lines using a lighter tone of that bluish-gray. You need to read in most of the white you have on that side. Just few lines are all you need. That is our mountain in the background. Now let's wait for that to dry. I think as we wait for that to dry, we can start with the right side. For the mountain, the foreground as well, I'm going with the bluish-gray, a bit more deeper tone of bluish-gray than the background color. You just need one tone darker than the one we have in the background. It shouldn't be a too dark color. A little brighter than the background color. Now, using that color, we're going to add in the shadows first. Learning to paint a mountain can be a great asset. For this one, we are going with more of bluish tones, and we are retaining the paper white, and we're making it a snowy mountain. Again, use the same technique and just by tweaking the colors, you can make it a green mountain or a brown mountain. You just need to play with different colors to get different look to your painting. I have a darker tone of bluish-gray. Now, I'm going to add the shadows starting from this side. I have already added a line in the middle. I'm simply following that line. I'm adding the shadows. I'm not going to take the shadows entirely down. I'm going to start with somewhere in the middle so that I can add a little mountain over the bottom. When I'm right here, I'm adding another mountain. Now I'm going to dip my brush in water. Using clean water, I'm going to blend it down so that those sharp lines will go away and we'll have a much more smoother looking mountain. Now, onto that little mountain we create at the bottom, we can add some lines using a lighter tone. Just some random lines like this. Now, onto the right side, we can add some darker tones. You have your shadows on the right side and all those lighter tones on the left side. Now, in a similar manner, we can paint that taller mountain. Honestly, if you get the idea and technique right, painting mountain is one of the most easiest and interesting thing. You just need to get that harmony between the light and the dark. Now, I'm adding some lighter lines here. I'm going to add some darker tones under this patch I have here. When I paint this little patch, you will get to know how easily we can create a snowy mountain by playing with the light and the dark colors. It is just a play of shadows, nothing else. You need to create these kind of pockets and add in your darker tones. On the one side, you need to concentrate on the white. You just need to retain your paper white and adding few lines using a lighter shade. You can see how pretty our snowy mountains are already looking, once I added that darker patch. Now, I'm going to add few more patches and add a darker tone in between. I will be retaining most of the paper white, just few patches of darker tone in between just to create that shadows. Make sure not to add a lot. We want most of the paper white to be seen. Once you have added those patches, you can dip your brush in clean water and blend that into the background to make them look smoother. That's my next patch. Now, I'm going to add another one right over here. I'm just taking it in a different shape, adding some lines onto the other side. Now, adding an irregular line here and filling up that patch. For this painting, I added the shadows in the right side. You can do the same on the left side as well. But which will be the side you're focusing on? It should be same for all the mountains. Focus on either left or right and add in your deeper tones. On the other side retain most of the paper white and adding few random lines using a lighter tone. With this method, you can create your snowy mountain quite easily. You just need to get that idea of dark and light. Play around and create a beautiful snowy mountain. I'm really loving the way this painting is progressing. It is really giving me that holiday vibe. It just looks like those mountains where you ski. This painting is really making me feel like going on a holiday right now. I feel like packing my bag and just running away to a snowy destination. Anyway, that won't happen at the moment, so let's finish the painting. I have applied an even coat of water onto the entire ground. Now I'm going with a lighter tone of the ultramarine blue, and I'm adding few random lines, some thick lines but in a very light tone. Make sure not to fill up the entire paper white. Now, I'm dabbing my brush on a paper towel, and I'm running my damp brush and making those lines little smoother. With this step, we'll be done with our base layer. We'll have to wait for everything to dry completely. In the next section, we will be adding more details onto this. We will add some dry brush patterns onto the mountain to make it more realistic and also few patterns over to the ground. Then we will add a cable car, which is the main focus of our painting. I'll see you in the next section. 14. Class Project 5 - PART 2 : Everything has completely dried, now it's time to add the final details onto this mountain. Our task is to add more textures to these mountains using dry brush technique. I'm going with the paint gray. I'm loading my brush with paint gray, and I'm dabbing my brush on a paper towel. I'm going to add in some dry brush patterns onto this part and the background. For this one, I will be going with very little patterns. I don't want to make it busy as it is in the background. I'm adding some patterns along that irregular line we have in the middle. Just a little. Now, I didn't go with a very dark tone of paint gray. I went in with a medium tone. As I mentioned earlier, I don't want these mountains to look too busy and I don't want the details to be too prominent. I'm going with the medium tone of paint gray. Dabbing my brush on a paper towel and adding some more dry brush patterns. You can see the color I'm using here it's not too dark. For the mountain in the foreground, we will be going with more dark and more prominent patterns. For this mountain, your task is to cover the medium tone of paint gray, then dab your brush on a paper towel and remove the excess amount of water from your brush. Then add a few dry brush patterns onto the right side of your mountain where you have those darker tones. Just randomly go ahead and add in some patterns. Make sure you are not going with the darker tone and make sure you're not adding a lot. Your mountain shouldn't be looking too busy. I hope that is clear. You can see the way I'm adding the patterns. They are not too dark and prominent. With that, we're done with the mountain deep background. Now, let's do the same onto one one in the foreground. But using a darker tone of paint gray, we'll be concentrating on those areas where we have out of the shadows and we will follow the same technique. I'm going with the darker tone of paint gray, loading my brush with paint gray, dabbing my brush on a paper towel, making sure the excess amount of water is removed. Now I'm going to add in the dry brush patterns. Now concentrate on the area you have these darker tones and add a new dry brush patterns. You can take your line in an inclined manner so that it will look like there is a slope towards the side. When you add more darker tones onto the right side, it will automatically elevate your left side where you have the lighter tones. This is where we'll bring in that contrast in your painting, and this is what will make your painting look more realistic. These darker tones will elevate the white color you have on the other side, and it will make it really look like a snowy mountain. But then you shouldn't be adding a lot. You shouldn't fill up that entire background blue color you have there. Just go very randomly and add in some patterns focusing on that irregular line you have in the middle. In between, you can add some teeny tiny spots and some broken lines. You can see how gorgeous our mountain is looking already. Once we added those darker tones, our mountain is starting to look more realistic. If you have that background layer right, where you have applied those patches. Once you have got that right, the step is quite easy. You just need to focus on those patches and adding your darker tones. Simply take your brush and add in more dry brush patterns onto the side where you have your shadows. I have added dry brush patterns onto the site. Now I'm adding some teeny tiny lines and that, this side of the mountain is done. Now I'm going to follow the same method and I'm going to all of those little patches I created there. I'm going to add some dry brush patterns using a darker tone of paint gray. Onto the area where I have left the paper white, I will simply add fill patterns just like this, which are not so prominent. Those are our mountains. Now I'm going with the medium to one of the blue gray we created earlier. I'm going to add a few lines on the snowy ground. I wouldn't be adding any dry brush patterns or any other prominent patterns over here, just a medium tone of that blue gray we created and adding few lines along the slope we have here. Make sure not to go with the darker tone. We just need a medium tone. All right, so that's that. It looks like the scene is quite empty. Maybe we will add a few lines over here using that lighter tone. With that, we're done with the major part of our painting. Now it's time to add the cable car. Firstly, let's add the cable railway, we just add continuous cable where the cable cars are fixed onto. You can either use your detailing brush and add a smooth curvy line. Read need a smooth continuous line without any break. I'm not so confident to go with a brush, so I'm going with the pen. A pen will be much easier than a brush because you will get the same thickness throughout and it is much easier to draw freehand line using a pen. That's my first cable railway. Now I will add another one, parallel to this. You can use a black gel pen or a ballpoint pen, any pen which has a similar thickness. You shouldn't be going with a marker. My first line came out perfect. Now I'm going to add another one. Just add a smooth curvy line without lifting your hands. Add that in one go. My cable railway is ready. Now we need to add those small cable cars onto this. For that, I am switching back to my detailing brush, my size number 2 round brush. Okay, wait, the pen I used was this one. It's Pilot twin marker. On one side, I have a marker tip. On the other side, I have a pen. This is the one I used. You can use any of your gel pen or a ballpoint pen or any sort that can give you a similar line. Now onto cable car, first, you need to add a rectangular shape onto the cable. I will be adding two cable cars, one over here and one slightly behind this one. That is going to be much smaller than this. You can go with any number of cable cars you want to add, but then, you have to consider the size and proportion. That's the first piece. Now, onto this, I'm going to add a J shape. This is much higher to use so you should be going with the detailing brush or any brush which has a pointed tip. Don't go with such a big cable car. The size of your cable car really matters here. If you add in a big one, it will go out of proportion and it can spoil your entire painting. I added a rectangular piece on the top then from that, I added a J shape. Now I'm adding a straight line. Now onto either end, I've allowed a little spot, just a tiny spot on either side. This is that piece on the top where the cable car is fixed onto. I used a darker tone of Payne's gray to add this. Now I'm switching to quinacridone rose. That is the color I'm going to use for the cable car. It is totally your choice which color you want to go with. Maybe you can go with a dark blue or a yellow, orange, or any other color that you prefer. I'm going with the very bright tone of quinacridone rose. The shape of a cable car is quite easy to draw. You need to start by adding a line. This is the top line. Then, add a line onto either side. The corners shouldn't be sharp. You need to go with a rounded corner. Basically, you need to add a square shape, but all four sides rounded. Then add a line somewhere at the middle of that shape and fill up the bottom area of that shape. This is the shape. You see, it's not a complicated one. Now in a similar way, I'm going to add another cable car quite behind this one, so that is going to be much more smaller. Go with your smallest brush and add a square with rounded corners, then add a line in the middle and fill up the bottom area. That's the car. Now I'm going to switch to Payne's gray and add that top bit. Actually, you can use your pen to do this because it's too tiny and your pen might be much more easier. I think I will use my detailing brush instead of my size number 2 brush. This might work than the other brush. According to your convenience, either use your detailing brush or use your pen to add that teeny-tiny bit on the top. You need to add a J shape and our small rectangular piece on the top. That is our teeny-tiny cable car. I'm just adding two of them. If you want, you can add more, maybe you can add one or two on the other cable rail, even my big cable car is also too tiny, and this one is super tiny. Now, if you're adding other cable car, keep in mind the size and proportion. If you're adding it towards the top, it can be a little more bigger than the one we have in the middle, and if it's towards the other end, it should be smaller. Go ahead and add in as many cable cars as you want but then please try to give a spacing between each of them. The final step is to add the remaining details onto this cable car. I think I'll fix the shape of the cable car first. I'm going back to quinacridone rose and I'm making this line straight. Now it looks much better. Now, I'm washing off the paint from my brush and I'm going with a lighter tone of Payne's gray, a very light tone of Payne's gray. I'm adding a curvy line over here just to make it look like it's glass. The final step is to add those white lines, for that I'm switching to my white gouache and using my detailing brush, I'm going to add a line, a thin delicate line. For this step, you can also use your white sharp pen if that is more comfortable for you. I loaded my brush with white gouache and I'm adding a line. Now onto the small one adding a similar straight white line. Now, adding another white line over here, just along that rounded corners on either side. Now, switching to Payne's gray, adding a rounded corner here, and also on the side. I didn't want that white, a Payne's gray corner looks better. We can just leave the white rounded corner on the top. The rest can be in Payne's gray, and with that, we're done with our painting. I'm quite impressed with the cable cars. I hope you guys are impressed too. Let's peel off the masking tape. I'm really happy with the way this one has turned out. Snowy mountains and that cable car, everything is looking so pretty. I hope you guys enjoyed the final destination off of our winter holiday. In our last winter holiday, we traveled in a cable car on snowy mountains and it was a spectacular moment, so If you've ever get any chance, don't miss that. It's indeed a wonderful experience. For now, just enjoy that from our painting. You can see those gorgeous snowy mountain and the cable car running on top of it. 15. Thank you SNOW much ;): Thank you so much for joining this class. I hope you all enjoyed traveling with me to these five cottages, snowy places. I really hope you all were able to enjoy the process and you were able to create gorgeous, snowy paintings. If you haven't tried it yet, do give it a try. I'm pretty sure you're going to enjoy the soft, simple, yet beautiful snowy landscapes. Thanks again for joining me in this journey and making this winter a memorable one.