Learning Substance Painter 2021: From Beginner to Advance | Sean Fowler | Skillshare

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Learning Substance Painter 2021: From Beginner to Advance

teacher avatar Sean Fowler, 3D Instructor

Watch this class and thousands more

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

35 Lessons (8h 46m)
    • 1. Course Introduction

      1:40
    • 2. What To Expect in the Course

      9:43
    • 3. Understanding the Viewport

      13:06
    • 4. Learning to Bake Mesh Maps

      11:06
    • 5. Learn Paint Layers Vs Fill Layers

      16:58
    • 6. Masking vs Geometry Masking

      17:58
    • 7. Learn Glass and Smart Materials

      19:41
    • 8. How Emissive Effects Work

      10:44
    • 9. Breakdown on Exporting Maps

      16:58
    • 10. How to Bake Hi Rez Details

      19:56
    • 11. Texturing the Shirt Fabric

      12:35
    • 12. Starting Jacket Texturing

      18:36
    • 13. Texturing the Front Flaps

      10:14
    • 14. Jacket Trims Color Detailing

      16:45
    • 15. Texturing Shoulder Belt

      8:13
    • 16. Texturing out the Sash

      12:31
    • 17. Detailing the Nodules Discs

      16:30
    • 18. Texturing Out Shoulder Armor

      10:37
    • 19. Quick Texturing Pants

      9:26
    • 20. Texturing Shoes Out

      10:57
    • 21. Going Over Hair Cards

      10:32
    • 22. Making Hair Strands

      21:54
    • 23. Hair Card Construction

      20:56
    • 24. Assembling Hair Textures

      14:56
    • 25. Applying Makeup and Eyebrowls

      24:25
    • 26. Creating Synthetic Skin

      12:25
    • 27. Creating Overlaying Metal of Skin

      10:20
    • 28. Creating Mechanical Face

      18:07
    • 29. Texturing Breakdown of Eyes

      20:16
    • 30. Texturing Eyelash Transparency

      18:08
    • 31. Emissive and Translucent Effects

      15:08
    • 32. Going Over Skin Base Texturing

      23:35
    • 33. Finaling Skin Detail Specularity

      17:29
    • 34. Understanding Iray the Renderer

      19:55
    • 35. UVING Demonstration

      13:12
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About This Class

Hello and Welcome to:  Learning Substance Painter 2021

In this course you will gain a fundamental understanding in texturing 3D characters for all levels, and to do this we will be utilizing the popular texturing software Substance Painter 2021.

To that end, we will be suppling you a starter model for beginners, and as you progress later a full Cyberpunk Character model, yours to learn and practice texturing with.

For the first timer users we do have a optional beginner level section for all to participate to go over all the basic of substance painter along with a beginner level model for you to work with to learn the software.

We'll Go over:

  • Basics of Substance Painter and its UI

  • Texturing 3D objects and Characters

  • Learn to create your own fun custom fabric material to be reused as you see fit

  • Going over the basics of Fill Layer Texturing vs Paint Layers

  • Understanding Smart Materials vs Materials through your workflow of texturing.

  • Comprehending the importance of Masks Vs Geometry Masks

  • Learn Emissive Effects

  • Understanding Opacity for both glass and hair.

  • Going over a easy yet effective skin templates from scratch

  • Expediting our workflow by re using our created materials across different UV maps

  • Demonstration in how we prepare our model with UVing for context and understanding the 3D texturing workflow

In addition to this we demonstrate how we prepare our models by demonstrating how we UV and export out for Substance Painter using Maya so context of the production workflow in 3D texturing can be better understood. As well as demonstrations of our techniques in creating our hair textures in zbrush.

This course is a continuing  series of courses dedicated assisting those with an interested in learning and practicing new texturing techniques through this powerful texturing software.

By the end of this course I am confidant you will have a strong foundation of understanding in 3D texturing and Substance Painter.

Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

Sean Fowler

3D Instructor

Teacher


Hi there my Name is Sean Fowler and I have been a Professional 3D  Freelance Artist for over 10 years. I'm new here to Skillshare but nevertheless I hold currently 4 years of experience with online 3D instruction and looking to expand to a new platform to be of service to you.

Little about myself, I graduated from Full Sail University with a Bachelors of Science in Game Art at 2011, which pretty much means I am specialized to work in games, be it prop modeling and textures, character modeling and, straight up to animation cycles in maya.  You could say I do enjoy a lot of the disciplines in the game production workflow.  I am very passionate about what I do, and I’m very committed in learning new things everyday.  I ... See full profile

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Transcripts

1. Course Introduction: Hi there. My name is Sean Fowler and I'm a professional freelance 3D artists for over 10 years in the industry. And I'm here to introduce to you my newest 3D course, learning Substance Painter 2021, a course dedicated to 3D texturing for all levels. Here we take a step-by-step lesson by lesson approach to teaching and building your texturing skill set. By affording you the opportunity to work on several 3D models, including a fully complete 3D Cyberpunk character. Now, Starting off for beginners, you will have the option to run through our first timers section to grasp the basics of Substance Painter. And there we cover the basic concepts such as importing models, fill layer texturing, smart materials, special effects and more. And of course, for the more intermediate users or higher, you can simply start in our second section where we build off of everything that we taught in the first section as you follow along with texturing or Cyberpunk character. Now, we go over everything from creating unique and fun fabrics, hard surface materials, hair and skin to lay down a foundation in developing your texturing skills. Now by the end of this course, you will have a strong foundation of understanding of 3D texturing through Substance Painter, as well as the strong confidence to be able to texture any character or environment in a professional manner. And with that said, let's get started. 2. What To Expect in the Course: All right, so let's get started. In this video, we're just gonna go ahead and summarize and do a breakdown of our course in terms of what to expect and going forward as this is, after all, a course for all levels from beginner to advance to that end, we do have an introductory section, which is in this very first section. So if you want to skip that section 1 introduction to learning the basics of Substance Painter, Please go on ahead and you can start into section 2 where we actually begin with the Cyberpunk girl, as you see right in front of you. So to begin with, there is some expectations, There's some mindsets that you have to have before beginning this texturing course in one of them is the first one is, please feel free to re-watch any video course over and over again. You wouldn't believe how easy it is to miss something in this whole course. It's very, very easy to find something new in the whole thing. If there is anything that's confusing, just please stop, rewind, move forward over and over again. That's one of the biggest advantages about a video online course. The next one I want you to have the strongest mindset of this Centralized theme of texturing that we're going to be doing is all about exploration. You don't have to necessarily get tunnel vision and into texturing exactly what you want to or that you're seeing in front of you, although you can, and that's certainly is an option. But feel free to be in an exploratory texture in mindset of taking the colors in a completely different direction. We want to see that quite frankly, we would love to see some of your pics and your interpretations of color theory. The way we set up our texturing workflow is going to be done through fill layers, which is a non-destructive, a texturing workflow. So you're going to be able to on the fly, go back anywhere and change out colors, roughness, metallic anywhere you see fit, or even go through different types of patterns or scalings of those patterns. So keep that in mind. Now, moving on, we're going to talk to you a little bit about all the sections, just kinda giving you a breakdown overview here. Like for example, the first section is strictly as I said before, for beginners who have never opened up Substance Painter just sort of giving you the outline of it with things such as the view port, baking out mesh maps to work for you. Federal processes like smart materials and smart masks. Actually going through the process of explaining smart materials and smart masks, and going over things like glass material and emissive effects as well. Moving on in, we start our official character, Cyberpunk girl, where again, this is a practice model for you to hone in texture out your skill set in learning Substance Painter. So feel free to use this as many times as you need to hone your skills. Section 2 is where we begin that and we'll be doing the jacket and the shirt to help you out and will be ending it with doing some hard surface stuff like the nodule disks you see on the upper left-hand corner of her body and the shoulder armor as well. Section 3 we're going to go through is going to be a pretty easy section. It's going to be about pants and it's actually going to show you some pretty cool tricks and how we can get some good-looking effects in a very small amount of time. As I say, this is for all levels. So we want to have something, a workflow solution that is easy for everybody here to get some good results. And to that end, we're going to show you how we can unnecessarily work with smart materials and drag and drop. We're also going to kind of show you how we do things like blend smart materials in which are very high-quality presets and manipulate the smart material of that preset to create some cool looking fabric materials as well. Again, we take it pretty easy and once you see how it's done, it will be like second nature to you. Section 4 we're going to go over is going to be about hair. We're going to talk about hair and Substance Painter and where the limitations are. We're going to talk to you also about our workflow and how we do hand hair string construction, and how it's traditional to do that in different softwares. However, we want to make sure that you're grounded to this truth, that we whatever software you're missing or do not have, aside from Substance Painter, we supply the textures just in case. So again, hair string construction, there's a lot of different approaches into creating it. We show you our approach and if you don't have any of the software to follow along, that's okay because we go on ahead and give you those textures in your resource. Folder. So after that, we'll show you some of our hair card construction, how we make the modeling for that, and how we bring all the individual textures together and assembling it in Substance Painter. Now moving on, we go into the face and the rendering. Now that's going to be Section 4. And we start off by establishing everything except for skin, believe it or not. We start with makeup, we start with eyebrows and we talk about how we create that synthetic skin you see on her neck and how we can reapply it in different locations around the body if you want. In fact, we also go over some real quick basic hard surface material mechanics and show you some ways we can blend different types of hard surface shaders together to get some really cool metal looks with very little ease in the whole process. We finish out with texturing the eyes and show you how we work with a little bit more opacity in the eyelashes of, then we finish off with some emissive wiring effects. And then lastly, conclude with making skin. So skin is going to be the last section. We, it's broken into two parts. We go over a very simple solution on skin. We don't want to over-complicate anything or set really high expectations. We create a basic concept of skin with a yellow, blue, red fill layer schematic format. And then we finish off with going through a demonstration of how, no matter what, I backup renderer that is built into Substance Painter in case you don't have marmoset Arnold or any sort of rendering engine in a max, we have a backup, a rendering engine called irae. Now, I re, is a very easy to use render in Substance Painter. And it's going to be how we finish ups and to produce a industry standard render shot for you. Now, it's pretty simple, self-explanatory, but we do our demonstration there so that you can kind of build off of that just in case you don't have any experience with rendering in any other engine, our rendering software, I should say. So with that said, we go through and do a quick little ending bonus section regarding Maya and UVB to kinda show you how we break up our educational model into multiple maps if you wish, and go through discretions of using one UV set versus to UV sets, which we kinda go over a little bit more towards the beginning in Section 2. So keep that in mind. Now, again, I want to end this video by reminding you that we want you to not just follow along with this course in terms of learning. The crux of learning Substance Painter, this powerful texture in software comes a lot through two things. Learning mask manipulation and learning how to experiment with different textures and blending different textures together. And we teach you how to experiment. So we really do want you to be in a sort of free roam stage where you can just go anywhere you want, not just with what you're seeing here, but maybe you want to see something more. For example, maybe you want to see what it looks like with more amiss of effects in different locations of the body or the face. Oh, there is that option and we teach you how to do that. So please feel free to use anything that we teach you to reapply into different sections. So with that said, let's go ahead and get started for the beginner section, which is Section 1, and start texturing. 3. Understanding the Viewport: Okay, let's begin. Now. In this video, we're going to talk to you a little bit about what happens when we open UP Substance Painter and remind people that this section is pretty much all for the beginner who hasn't opened up Substance Painter at all. If you have a little bit experienced fun things like fill layers and masks and generators and all those other fun, fun criteria. Then please go ahead and move on to the next section where we go on ahead and give you the Cyberpunk model girl in the project files, Resources folder, and just move on and start from there. Again, you're free to start in anywhere you want. If you want to use this section as a kind of a warm up to the basics or a reinforce. Get refresh to the basics, please feel free. But in this video we're just going to talk to you a little bit about the viewport of Substance Painter. Now when you open up Substance Painter, you're going to have pretty much three primary windows. And they're kind of going to be sort of your default settings if you want. Just make sure that you go up to Windows here and hit Reset UI. And you'll kind of notice that it has basically the same construct is made but like for MapR or example, if we go through our mouse, we can kind of make adjustments in things like which face or the amount of mass that you can actually put into space. Some real estate if you could, you can make adjustments everywhere that you want. So feel free, just make sure you're hovering your mouse over in that you see that mouse turn into a horizontal or a vertical upper down arrow radical. So with that said, let's just go over some of these viewports to start off with. We'll start with what's most visibly has most information which is down here. And what you have here is what's kinda of like substance painters built-in shelf. It's, it's built-in library shelf through it. You can kind of think of this as a resource folder. You can access a whole bunch of useful things. For example, maybe we have alphas, we can imprint into brushes to help us create customized brushes, or we can use them for areas to mask off a roughness value for fill layers. And then we can go even further to something a little bit more on the repeatable. And like we see here, we can also go through procedural processes who these are, where it's probably going to be way more repeatable. Like you can kinda see some fabric square repeatable textures that we can use. All of those things can help us in creating things like cloth and things like that. We also, we don't have much textures. Textures are typically imported in from other 3D softwares that you create. A good example of that is like when we create hair alpha cards, we could put, this would be a good place to put our textures right in here. Now, things like we also have things like for hard surface, sort of like normal maps where we can append extra normals and just kind of print them on the 3D model. And you'll just keep on going through some of the most prominent to shelfs that you're going to be using is going to be either materials, smart materials, and these are some of your bread and butter, especially when it comes to hard surface texturing, you're going to be using that. And we're gonna go over materials and smart materials later down in the introductory section. And then finally masks, which are smart masks, which are sort of like masks that have a procedural behavior. That it behaves in a way which the 3D models baked out high res maps handle a procedural way to mask a good example is like a PC, a 3D object. It kinda gives you a little bit of a display of how it will mask something based on information in its corners like curvature maps. Which again, we'll be going over that in the next video. So it's definitely something you want to experiment with kind of cycle through just to kinda get yourself a little bit familiar. We even have particle brushes, which are like dynamic automated brushes that help us create some cool effects. But make sure you have a strong computer if you're going to use these, because these can be a little bit tricky to handle if you're a first-time user. And as you can see, we have some fun little brushes here that we can even work with. So moving on, we're going to also see in this upper left-hand corner here, you're going to basically see the default area. And when we bring in a 3D model, it's going to come in right around here. And this is going to be where we do most of our texturing onto. It's going to be this area right here to the right of me, is going to be typically where the UVs are. Now every model has pretty much should be expected to have UVs cemented onto them while there is some auto unwrap UVs, I don't recommend for the time being that you rely on auto unwrap UVs, that substance painter has because And it's just better for you to learn how to UB on your own. Simply because you can make a little bit more efficiency with the textures and UV shells size for getting better resolution out and it doesn't really do a good job. So you're going to expect to see UV maps in the later models will even expand on things where you can have more than one UV set. Those you've multiple UV sets will be listed in this area right here, which is the texture set list. With this, you can kind of identify how a model has, how many UV sets a model typically has, which also coincides with how many shaders that a model has before it's brought into Substance Painter. Typically, lot of times if you're going to have more than one UV set, what will happen is that they'll have it in a 3D software like Maya Max, or Blender. And they'll make a whole bunch of UV sets in a 0 to one area and then assign a shader to those selected polygon meshes, and then move on to the next set of polygons of that same model and so forth. You'll, that will make more sense. It sounds a little bit weird when I explain it, but once you see the Cyberpunk role in how we structured it, you're going to show you how we do like multiple UV set so you can have a good amount of resolution. Now here in the layer section, this is going to be the second most important place. In theory. It could be the most. Yeah, who would be the second most? I would say this viewport is the number one. This one, this is second most, because this is where you're going to have all your layers. Mostly we're going to be doing it Fill Layer workflow, which we'll expand upon in our texturing workflow, which we will be utilizing this space here. Texture set settings saying shares the same space as fill layers through a tab. And through here, we just kind of go through and we do all our textures out through this. It's not really accessible because we don't have a model in there. Now, down here on the Properties tab, that's usually reserved for things like generators or maybe things like masked geometry, et cetera. And then further down, if you're a coder, place to be doing Python coding, since this is entailing for all levels we want. We didn't want to include any commands of coding here. To the left of here, you're going to pretty much see our selection tools and our painting tools. Now when we go from the two most important places that you're going to be using is going to be the polygon fill, which we'll expand upon in Phil's fill layers. And we're going to talk to you also a little bit more about things like paint and brush when we go over layers versus paint layers. So with that said, that's sort of the way to go. And what we're gonna do lastly, is, is that we're going to go ahead and we're gonna go over how to import a 3D model in and where to take it from there. So with that said, if you go into up here to File and you just simply hit New, you're going to see a new project here. And you're going to have a whole bunch of options here. And when we go over to our Cyberpunk or a will go in a little bit more depth. But when you want to choose your model, first you're going to hit Select. And then we're going to go through too the provided FBX file. And then we're just going to hit Open and it should be a sci-fi canister. I kept my document resolution at 2048, OpenGL, we'll talk about, but it pertains to the normal map of format in terms of the green channel. Like if you want to use on rail, if your model's going in Unreal, then typically you want to use direct accident. If it's unity, you typically want to use OpenGL. So if, if it's anything other than that, you can just use Direct X as well. So keep that in mind. So I'm just gonna go ahead and hit, Okay. And as you can see, you'll have a 3D model in here. Now, from here, we're going to finish off with showing you how to use the rotate around. If you hold, like for example, left Alt and left-click and drag your mouse around. You can kind of rotate like so. If you mouse up and down, you can kinda zoom in. If you hold Shift and right-click, you can kind of rotate the lighting like so. And if you have a thing where like it comes in like a quarter of the way, for example, you pan it and it comes in like that, just hit the F key and it will frame back in like so. And that goes to the last part. If you hold left Alt or Option, left option key and middle mouse button, you can do a pan. So that's just sort of to get you caught up. Again. What you're looking at is the 3D model, which all the painting we'll be done like you can kinda see here. And then on here. You can also paint on the UVs as well. And if you want, you can hold left, left command and just to undo or for the Mac it's going to be Command C. I'm not sure what it is for the PCA. I'm assuming it's Control Z because that's usually the most common route, but you'll have to double-check my work on that one. But make sure you understand control is the control Z or Command Z. Undo. Make sure if you're on a PC that you just go ahead and just check up here to see what the undo button is by just kinda mousing over and just checking the keyboard configuration. It will be different for PC, this is the command signal, so just wanna make sure we're on the same page there. So with that said, we kinda gave you a little bit about Crash Course breakdown of what to expect on here. Just feel free to practice around and just kinda get to kind of click on buttons is the best word I would say. Just kinda go through and just have some fun here and just kinda look at things. You know, you can just kind of enjoy things like using the Alpert grunge and you'll see it automatically changes your layer here, which we will be going later into, into something like this. You can also do something like that. You know, just feel free to explore with what we've gone over so far before moving on to the next. So with that said, stick around and stay tuned. 4. Learning to Bake Mesh Maps: Okay, So continuing on in this video, we're going to talk to you a little bit more now about baking a mesh map or a set of mesh maps out for a 3D model so that we can take advantage of things like smart materials or smart masks, which are some of substance painters, most prominent and powerful features in the whole software. So it's a very important first step for us. Now, we should give a little bit of context here. This is a very important area for you, but it's also, you know, it's not a 110% mandatory, especially if you're doing something like fill layers or paint layers and you're doing a 100 percent paint layering, you can still work as if this was a Photoshop file and if you really wanted to. And that's going to be kinda covered in the fill layers and the paint layer section coming up. But we wanted to kinda go over this area because it's going to be a very important one when we're texturing our Cyberpunk. So let's go ahead and begin with that. Now, if we go up to where it says layers, the real estate that it shares with a tab is texture set settings. Now if we scroll all the way down here, you'll notice we have mobility. And at the bottom where it says mesh maps, we have a area called bake mesh maps. Now this is the area where you would typically plug in either the low res itself or a high res model that you have exported out separately from this, either from ZBrush or some Skulpt from Blender. And you would put that in to here. Now, we're going to do a couple of examples. And one example of baking we're going to be doing is baking this low-res model to itself. So no separate high res model. Later on when we do the Cyberpunk girl, we're going to show you how we plugging a high res model made from ZBrush exported out to be plugged in. And that's going to have a different workflow. So to get started, when we bring this pop-up menu up, you're going to probably see a whole bunch of things like, for example, on the left-hand side, you pretty much have a whole bunch of tabs with a list of sliders that equal our parameters regarding the quality of how well you want that map to be break baked out. Again, all these maps are important in some degree. For example, curvature map. If you see, if I kind of hit cancel here, if you look at the smart materials, steel paint, and you kind of see that silver edge that in a thumbnail right there. Well, curvature map it to be, we need to bake out a curvature map in order for that to happen. For example, if I tried to drag that on here right now, it looks absolutely nothing like what you say. So I'm gonna hit Command Z and undo that. So let's go back into our bake mesh map. I'm going to hit use low poly mesh. I'm also going to turn my output size a little bit higher. And then I'm just gonna kinda click on ambient occlusion and maybe turn up my rays just to be a little bit higher. And I'm going to turn on anti-aliasing up to a two-by-two. So it doesn't look very jaggedy on the edges there. As far as maps, frontal distance and max, we're distance right now. We're going to keep these at their default state. They do a pretty good job of going through here as far as math goes, you can choose for now either always or mesh by, or by mesh name. It's not going to mean much if it's by mesh name because I didn't label a suffix of underscore low or underscore high. And I did do a suffix for that in the Cyberpunk girl. But the reason by mesh name is a very important form of baking is because it keeps when you're doing this normal map or when you're baking out the ambient occlusion Mac. We sometimes get these little issues where we see like little blotches of the normal map spill into the adjacent geometry. And cooking by mesh name kinda matches up all the bakes mesh to mesh by their names. And that's kind of what's going on here. So for example, like 50 Cyberpunk girl and I have a low resonant, higher resin I blamed named the geometry with an underscore of low. And then I had the exact same name with underscore high for the high res of the head, then it would just focus on baking between those two match names and therefore create a cleaner bake, which is very, very important and very nice. It makes things go smoother. So with that said, you know, before we say anything, you know, all these maps, this kind of goes through. If you kinda put your, your mouse over it, you kind of get a little bit of a help clue that kinda gives you some information that helps you educate you in how everything works. And it's kinda listed right underneath here. And so feel free to kinda take your time going through this. In learn as much as you possibly can. You know, things like thickness maps. You know, if you're doing any sort of smart material that recruit or errors, something with subsurface scattering thickness is definitely an important one. A lot of hard surface replot relies on curvature. A lot of ambient occlusion also relies on curvature as well as smart masks like sand. So, you know, all these maps, they all play a part in it. He only maps I don't like to use because we're, we're going to be relying on masks quite a bit from mask manipulation quite a bit is going to be ID. Now again, if any of this sounds a little confusing, trust me, you just got to kinda pace yourself either and it's going to make sense as you continue on. So I'm just gonna go ahead and hit bake canister and take note that the ambient occlusion map is going to be the map that typically takes the longest. One thing I think I'm just going to go ahead and do. And so I think I'm still going to go through and I'm just gonna go ahead and just bake out that ID map. There may be a smart material that I might play that might require it. But as you can kinda see as we bake those maps out, all of those areas are a little bit more filled in. So if I click on that, you can kind of click and see sort of like a thumbnail show itself. And if you left one out, you want to read, bake it. You can do simply do this. You can just bring up maps, turn off, turn on something like world space ID, and then turn off everything else. And then it will just bake these two maps and then you can just simply hit bake canister and then voila, you've got the extra maps that you want it. So now if I were to bring this in, you would see it's a very different type of material now it's not some sheen, yellow, It's actually relying on some stuff here. So that's sort of like the breakdown. If we had a high res, we'd probably see a more predominant yellow or I'm sorry, predominant silver spiking. But we're just using this smaller material to kinda show you its importance and how we go over that. So that's sort of the importance about baking a smart materials. We use them as a way to help us in the process of creating our smart masks are smart materials. If I were to go through and we might do a smart mask demonstration. For example, we haven't talked to you about fill layers because that's going to be coming up here in the next lesson. But I'm going to kinda give you a taste of things to come. If I were to do, for example, like a color of red and then maybe duplicate that color and make this one blue. And then pull wanted to, for example, add a black mask and then go through and use sand. I'll just drag that through. You'd have something like this. Kind of see if we click on the mask editor. Now, we can kind of see all the maps that are being used right now for this particular smart mask. In addition, if you want, you can go ahead and just do an invert. So that's sort of having that kind of power relies on having that I'm sorry, having that kind of power, having that kind of automation. It relies on your capacity to bake out mesh maps, even if it's just something as your low-res, having that definitely save some time in allows you a lot of flexibility to experiment with a lot of fun stuff. Quite frankly, you know, you can just make this any way you want. Now you feel free to just kind of work with the parameters. These are all parameters for the smart masks, but we're kind of, um, I'm, I'm getting ahead of myself. This is not the video course regarding masking yet. We're not there yet, but I wanted to give you a little bit of a taste of things to come down the road as we progress finally into the more advanced section are Cyberpunk girl. So with that said, the next video, we're going to talk to you about paint layers and versus fill layers and how we're going to go with the fill layer production workflow, texturing workflow. So with that said, stick around and stay tuned. 5. Learn Paint Layers Vs Fill Layers: Okay, so let's continue in this video now we're going to kind of outline to the ARRA layers in Substance Painter and talk to you a little bit about paint layers and versus fill layers. Now, before we go on further, we should take note that in this whole course we're going to be focusing on fill layers as opposed to paint layers, because fill layers have a little bit more wiggle room for a non-destructive workflow compared to paint layers. It takes a little bit more practice, but you have a lot of flexibility once you get it down, especially when you combine it with masking. So with that said, we're just going to get started. Now, if you notice that my mouse, if I tried to left-click and drag, I can't really paint anything on this 3D model now. And that's okay because what we need to do, the reason for that is because we need to assign a layer on here in order to paint some sort of data, like for example, color or roughness or the metallic of something. We need some sort of data for that. And to start off with, what we need is a layer. And in that case, we're going to talk to you about a paint layer as our first example. Now, paint layers can be created simply by going over to where it says layers in this real estate area here. And kind of hovering where it says that paint brushes, it says Add Layer, click, left-click on that, and you'll notice that you get a paint layer. Now if I go over here and just left-click drag and you can kind of see I'm painting basically a layer. Now you notice it's white. So if you want to change anything about this or modify, for example, the brush stroke and alpha to attach to it or maybe the spacing of it, you would do so below the layers area to where it says Properties. This is where it gives you all the information about your brush and how to modify it. For example, if you want to change the color, you can pretty much go all the way down here to where it says material and you'll have your color to change down here. In addition, you can access it by clicking on one of these four icons to get different selections that you can just simply left-click and just simply go right to where it says materials. So for in this case, I can choose red. And now I'll just paint right over where it says read, pretty much easy. Now let's say we wanna do something that's a little bit more spacing because we see a little bit of spacing that's being mess with one. Let's go to our top where it says brush. And let's go ahead and look at scroll slightly down to where it says spacing and just kinda turn that all the way down. Now when we drag across, we hold left shift and right to manipulate the light around. You can kinda see a much smoother stroke. In addition to this, you can do things like change the opacity, like so. And you can even change the softness of it. Now, the softness of something, I would probably argue is easiest to be done if you hold left command and right-click, you can kinda get a softer fall off here. And you notice it's a bit shiny. It you see here, well, that's because of the material that we're painting on here. So if I click on that material now, that shininess is decided by the roughness value, right now it's turned all the way down. That's what's making it very reflective. So find, kind of turn it all the way to read. You'll kind of see that a representation over here is being shown by its value right there. So if I kind of just paint over it like so you can kind of see a little bit of a change in the roughness or the specularity. In addition, you have additional channels like metallic, which will, let me go ahead and just change my stroke. Full. Which can kinda make the look metal. And then you can experiment with combinations of the two, like for example, high, middle and low roughness to get a chrome look. Kind of like what you're seeing right here. You can kind of see as you paint this, it's updating in our UVs, like so. And that reflection right there, that's sort of a panorama, that's sort of like an invisible image that's wrapped around the model just so it can have something to work off of. Again, that can be changed over in the environment map, in the display settings. Which we're going to go over a little bit later on during our eye ray preview and our opacity and emissive channels preview breakdown in tutorial. So you can kind of see as we go through, we have a lot of options. Now, notice when we make a change to the material, it doesn't update here, but you have to paint over it. In addition, if you wish to erase anything, you can do so simply by hitting the two key or clicking up here where it says eraser. Additionally, paint is also up here. If you want to switch back, you can just simply toggle between the one key and the two key for erase paint. So one in two, if you're going to be very hell bent on trying to go the paint layer approach. So you can do a lot of different things in addition to this. If you go into paint layers, you can do something like for example, there's the alpha. Remember we went over a little bit of that where we kind of changed the alpha. We can make any of these library textures like, for example, there's fabric textures that we can go over that can be sort of left clicked and dragged over to this Alpha. And now we kind of we can find ourselves painting an alpha if we wish. And I'll, that's very distinct possibility. Although fill layer would be much easier to do there, you can do pretty much anything we want. With an Alpha. We can kind of do painting very similar to this. It's got a lot of opportunities for fun and playing around with. But the thing is, is you got to constantly be changing the color or just simply make another fill layer. Some people like to go through and just simply do a deal where they don't like combine the channels like metal roughness, normal height or anything like that. We haven't touched. But we're going to, some people like to just do something like color. And then they'll go onto layer, double-click on it and say color. And then just organize this layer to be nothing but color. And they'll just talk about color and then they'll maybe duplicate the layer and then change that out and it's going to be nothing but they'll erase it and then just kind of paint in a little bit of roughness there. A lot of people like to do that. But that's sort of like a quick breakdown of how we handle paint layers. Now we're going to do some a little bit different because it can get awfully messy, awfully quick. With paint layers. One of the issues that I have about paint layers is that they tend to be a slightly more destructive than fill layers and a little bit more harder to organize in knowing which layers have what on them. And a lot of the times. It's, gets to be a very nasty habit that people like to go ahead and just use the eraser button as opposed to a Mask button. Really screws up, which creates a destructive workflow and texturing and fill layers solely strongly work relies on either masks, which is a non-destructive workflow, or geometry masks another non-destructive workflow. So we say non-destructive workflow because we don't have to repaint anything back in that has been erased permanently. So that's why we're saying it. So we're going to now talk to you a little bit about a fill layer and how a fill layer differs from a paint layer. Now, if we go to where it said originally add layer and just go one over, we'll see ad Fill layer. It's that little bucket that's shows it sort of being filled. We click on that. And you're going to have a little bit less to work with and something that just has more of a material attributes. And also going to have this weird-looking square. And what this is, is sort of the representation of what is within everything that you see here that you make. So if you'll look at color by change the color to red like before, the whole area becomes red. Now you may think, well, what if I choose? That sounds a little clunky. I mean, what if I want to paint specific areas? We'll again, we'll go over mask manipulation pretty quick once you see how it works when we go over material or sorry, masks and generators. And versus geometry masks, you'll, it'll make a little bit more sense. So you can kinda already see this pretty much encompasses the whole area. But in addition to that, this that you see here is sort of anything that is outside of it will still be red. And that's mainly because of the UV wrap is set to repeat. But if I set that to none and then drag around, you can kind of see now every thing. Kind of manipulate one certain area. Now that's going to be a very important part to remember how this whole thing works with unwrap set to none, and being able to toggle the manipulator, the scaling manipulators, especially when we get down to Alpha hair cards. So try to remember that. Now fill layers, they're pretty much an easier avenue to take, especially when it comes to masks. I'm going to give you a quick little preview of that. If we wanted to just make like a certain area of it of selectable, then what we do, and instead of trying to manipulate things through a eraser or such, we can go through and either manipulate things through the polygon, communicability, things through the UV shell. We can make manipulate things just through individual polygons. Or furthermore, we can just manipulate things through a try of a polygon. Instance, a polygon quad is pretty much two tries put together. So, you know, we don't talk about masks. So again, I get a little bit ahead constantly. But I wanted to kinda give you an idea why this is going to be a very important part of the, of course coming up because again, you can do some pretty easy things in it's a little bit easier once you get enough practice to it. You can mess around the same with a fill layer versus paint in the same manner where you can just tend to turn things into metallic if you want. You can eat if you want to work with height. That's going to be something that you can do also like for example, we take that we can just simply go through and I selected the wrong one. Go through there. And you can kinda see height is then manipulated through a fill layer. We can have a lot of fun with this. Now, this is actually going to be very important for you to grasp the basics of this. Now we didn't do much regarding the mask or talk to you about masks and we're gonna go ahead and delete that mask. But masks are going to be something that we will be talking about in the next section. Along with why I should say, we're going to be talking about masks in the section after, but in the other one we're going to be talking about fill our mass. Pardon me? We're going to be talking about masking versus geometry masking. And then we're going to be talking about how it pertains to fill layers as we go down the road. So with that said, that's the difference between them. Paint layers is much like Photoshop. When you make a layer and you start painting everything on there, fill layers is like a fill bucket that just kinda affects the whole area. And you're using masks to manipulate what you want to see specifically, whether it's manually or whether it's through a specific area like what I'm doing right now as I'm clicking on a mask and then I'm clicking on a paintbrush. And then I'm just simply, I'm painting things in the paintbrush. Again, this is just simply painting the mask. Then I'm doing right here, I hit the X key and I can change the value to black and I can paint things back out again. Now while like that so much because you can constantly change the value, you may not know what color you have and fill layers give you an opportunity to go through an iterative process to find out what you like, which is going to be a very important thing. And now, so keep that in mind. Also, do some experimenting like for example, dragon Alpha in anywhere. Like you see right here. Maybe you want to drag an Alpha in through here, for example. You can do that. Or you could do something like this if you want. Once you to really have some fun with combining textures and drag and drop, don't mess around with textures or normal maps or anything like that. Because all I want you to do is just kind of get yourself to understand what a fill layer and how a fill layer works. If you don't like which Seeing click off of everything that you see here, you can go ahead and if you want just free, set everything if you'd like. That's fine too. No biggie. Like I said, fill layers are like an entire filled bucket here, and they are used to simply manipulate the entire model. And we use masks to typically isolate which areas we want to see. Well, I wanted like for example, this fill layer to be seen only through for example, x, like in this area. That's fun. Now this fill layer that we make all our adjustments to, all our iterative processes will be designated to this area. So all of that, please please keep in mind because stack on. Now, again, I'm not I haven't asked you to do anything. This has been just so far a breakdown in our upcoming courses. We're going to talk to you now about how we work with masking and geometry masking. And then we're gonna do some assigning of colors coming up. So that said stick around and stay tuned. 6. Masking vs Geometry Masking: Okay, welcome back. In this video now we're going to talk to you a little bit about masking versus geometry masking. We're also going to give you some examples of house the pros and cons of these work and how we can use them in combination to work several things like smart masks with geometry masks. So let's just go ahead and get started. Now when we last left off, we kinda gave you a breakdown of how fill layers worked and we showed you how we pretty much affects the overall model. Wouldn't this lesson's going to start showing you how we can focus color specifically, we're only using color for now as the example. Use more channels like reflect our sorry, roughness, metallic channels, things like like down the road, but we're just wanting to keep things. So in pull right now in the introductory section, with that said, we're going to go ahead and we're going to break down to you what geometry masking is and how it's a new feature in Substance Painter 2021, how it differs from regular masking and how it's still important to keep regular masking incorporated in your fill layer texturing workflow. So we're gonna get started with that. So before we begin, I'm going to go over towards says layers here and I'm going to click on add fill layer. And for now I'm just going to make it a. Now, let's see here, I'm thinking about a color, maybe something like that. Maybe can be a little bit bluish. Something like that. You know, some pretty easy to work with. Can work with a little bit to the Sultan. Easy. Here we go, Some like that. You don't have to, it's not really too important. I'm going to click on Fill layer, double-click on it and rename it to brace. And let's just go ahead and show you how we can use geometry masking to basically only allow just this area to be seen. So let's begin. Now. To begin with, when we look at our fill layer, we notice when we go over here that we have a click the thumbnail to edit. It's pretty much our area where we enabled geometry masking mode. When you click on it, look below the layers and you'll see pretty much a whole list of checkboxes. Now these checkboxes are basically the polygons or that came in the model. It pretty much represents each area like this is the glass area. This glove represented by a box. There's the frame braces that are here and the cap, which is on the very top cap holder. And there's even a rod which is within the glass. We'll go over that with opacity later on down the road. Now, to go in further, we're going to talk to you a little bit about if we turn off all of these and we pretty much would, this brace wouldn't affect really anything. And you would even see as 0 corresponding. But this is called the frame braces as shown here. We clicked on that and then went back to let clicking on the brace fill layer, you would see that the Fill Layer then only affects just this area. So That's kind of the basic breakdown of it. If you left-click and drag on everything, the whole thing is pretty much being affected. If you left-click drag with command, I think it's control for the PC, you pretty much turn things off. So in addition, you can just left-click on there and just simply bring it up like so. So that's one way to do it. So another way that you can do it is, for example, you can click on this and turn it into a mask and then go up to where it says Properties and click on that four out of five, you can just see you drop down right there. If you hit Invert, that's gonna take all the check marks and turn them off and all the turned off checkmarks and turn them on. That's what invert is. And you can also make things work that way as well. So keep that in mind. That's just sort of the first breakdown of how we will be using masks. Now, let's just go ahead and move on. Building off of that. I'm going to hit, I'm going to go ahead and just click on the Fill Layer. And I'm going to right-click and I'm going to go for duplicate. And what that is gonna do is gonna make a duplicate fill layer. And I'm just going to call that cap. Folder and I'm just going to call it that just for now. For now, you'll notice that this is pretty much being delegated with the same things being seen as this. So for now, what I'm gonna do is I'm just going to go ahead and left-click drag and turn all that off. Because now what we're doing is we're going to show you how to do something very similar in exactly the same thing, except we're going to do that with masking. So here's how that's going to work. I'm going to go ahead and left-click on the Fill Layer. I'm going to right-click. I'm going to add a black mask. As you can see, when you add a black mask, again, it turns pretty much everything that it was making off. The idea here is the mask that is black covers up everything. A mask that is white shows everything. A mask that is gray pretty much has everything half shown in every value between corresponds to that. So with that said, we have for masking to methods of selecting one is through the paintbrush. Which means we can kind of go through and paint back our details. Because again, we're painting on the mask and we're only painting on values of black and white. We even have parameters similar to the paint layer. Help us out in how we paint these values. If we hit the X key, it will go all the way down. X key kind of shifts between the polar marine opposite. So the X key was here, it's going to end up showing up around here. It's pretty much the polarizing opposites. So that's sort of like your race button. It's also sort of like your undo button. Now, in addition to painting something, it's sometimes a little hard to paint what you want over here, even if you kind of go through and try to do it really small, you're going to find yourself probably painting onto here. So what we're going to do, we're going to show you the next method of manipulating a mask, which is going to be through the polygon filled tools. Now when you click on that, you go all the way to properties. And again, you've got to remember your app to always be on clicked on mask. When that happens, you have four different film modes or four different selection modes in which you can select geometry. First is the try mode. And what that is, it's selecting one try to be filled. Notice that it's on white. So that's why you're seeing everything come back on this fill layer. Again, if you hit X, you can kind of take it all away again, because X switches it back to black and black covers everything up. The next one is the full polygon mode. And the next one after that is the, it's like a polygon. It's like the whole mesh bill. So if this is a separate polygon model and this is separate MOOC polygon model and they were kinda combined together. You would see the whole thing pretty much cover up like so it x you can undo it. So kinda keep that in mind. And finally, the next one you're going to want to do is going to be the UV chunk fill. Now this is dictated by what UVs you selected more as. So if this whole areas encumbered by UVs, you can just kinda select the UVs. Here. It goes without saying if you can also select what you want through here as well. So just bear that in mind. So that's kind of how you delegate. And I'm just going to go ahead and this one a little bit more of a different color, but this is why we like fill layer so much because unlike paint layers, you have to go through and really do some digging around on what colors you want. But with fill layers, you've got a lot more of a less destructive workflow. You can kind of just go through the whole process of like doing an iterative issue like right here, maybe you want to see some different colors. Maybe you want to get an idea of something being a certain way. You can kind of go through here. In addition to that, you can plug in some of the procedural textures on here. Like just to get an idea of just to see how they work. Way to go about saying it. I don't really recommend like going with anything. It's more important like to do is like a learning process than it is like trying to see like how something works like for example, this is a pretty good grunge texture that works well with roughness being plugged in. Or you can just kinda go through and just duplicate the mesh and just painting roughness where you wanted. You know, again, this is your model. You can do whatever you want. In the next lesson, I may work with some of this. So with that, said, once you have chosen the colors that you are content with, the next thing we're gonna do is we're going to show you how we can combine both masks as well as the geom new tree masks together to make sort of a smart material, or sorry, to make smart materials work more viably without having to create a folder. So here you're probably get into your head a little wonder and what that'll, I'm saying. What that means is that some masks can't be edited. And as a result, that typically happens when you're working with either a generator or a smart material. Because again, even though we can like left-click on this mask and we can paint on it like so. If we put a smart material are, are, are, um, sorry, a smart mask in there, which is a procedurally generated mask, or a generator which we haven't done yet, then we will not be able to do what we're doing right now. That's a terrible role. I don't know why Substance Painter could never fix that, but apparently that's kind of a issue. So we're going to show you a way in which we can do some workarounds for that. So it's going to be sort of like the last example of how we can combine both masks and geometry masks together. So to begin with, I'm going to go ahead and go to this boy racer. I'm going to hit Add black mask. So now this blazers completely covered up and even covers up the geometry mask. I'm going to click on Smart material. I'm sorry, not smart materials, smart mask. Keep getting those two Muslim. And then I'm going to click on something like sand. And then I'm going to go ahead and drag that onto braces. And that's going to create a smart mask. A mask that is procedurally behaving in a certain way based off of the parameters and the baked maps that we did, as you see right here at the beginning of this introductory section, when we first brought our 3D modeling. Now, I'd like to have this white area B. This area be where it's white and everything else be where it's its original color. So I'm going to invert the mask. So I'm doing a global in Berg. And again that's under the mask editor. And now what I'm gonna do is I'm going to add a fill layer. And that fill layer is going to go underneath this mask. I'm sorry, this fill layer. And I'm just going to call it green grunge. And then for that one, it's just color we're working with. We're not doing anything crazy. Let's just go ahead and just work with crazy looking color right here. And we're just going to have it affect just this area. So we can do it either through here or through another mask. It's up to you. No judgments. I encourage you to try to do it through here because this one takes more practice and you're going to need to learn it anyways. So now we have a little bit more of a grunge. We have a little bit more to work with here. In addition, we have a little bit of a issue with this area here. So one thing I can do is I can either remove the smart material, like let's say right here. How do we fix that? Well, before we show you how to fix that, I'm going to do something here. I'm going to go through and remind everyone how we did it. Now, we have a material that is basically we have a fill layer that is only being shown through the, the geometry mask. And that it's being, it's being channeled with a smart mask to affect just this area we have and everything underneath it. We are having now this area right here being affected. Same thing. Now, what we need to do is just finish up with just making this area right here a complete shell. So what we're gonna do is I'm just going to simply duplicate this layer. I'm going to go ahead and just simply hit add white mask. And actually, I'm sorry, I'm going to hit Add black mask. And now I'm going to make sure to choose my select my mask, choose the polygon fill. This time around, I'm choosing the polygon fill mode. And now you just go in through the UVs. And I'm just kind of showing you how we're manipulating everything like that. Same thing here. I don't think I selected the wrong, you'd use my MBA. There we go. Find where these are on the UV map is a little bit more trickier. Alright? So now you kind of see a little bit more on how we can kind of manipulate a mask in its color in different areas. And of course, we can just if we want, we can also create a folder and just call this area. It's just folder that I made That's just to the left of the trash can. And we can just kinda hold left Shift-click, bring everything into this folder. Let's call this area braces. We have something that's sort of a beginner startup. Now again, this is how we did mask manipulation. A combination of mask manipulation in fill layers to kind of illustrate how we do color and things like that. We are going to build off of this in the next tutorial, we're going to go over smart materials and how they pertain in a similar way to how what we're seeing here. So with that said, cigarette and stay tuned. 7. Learn Glass and Smart Materials: Okay, welcome back. In this video now we're going to be talking to you about materials versus smart materials, and how important they are and how they can pretty much catapult your model to look amazing. And we'll be finishing that video up with how we can do a demonstration in creating glass. So you're gonna see this model look very different by the time this video comes through in. So let's get started. Now, materials and smart materials are like your library. I want you to think of this like a cooking rack and all these pieces that you see in the shelf where it says material or like spices, using to create your own ingredients for your own unique flavor. And you got two kinds of spices, pretty much materials and smart materials. Now, materials are a little bit more easier to understand as they pertain to a single fill customized layer. If I drag one material on here and I'm just gonna go ahead just for now and turn off what we did so far. I'm just going to drag a material on here. And if you see it, it's basically a lot similar to some of them are quite a bit similar to like fill layers. They're like preset fill layers. Some of them function like that. If you go through, you can kinda see more of these preset fill layers, but then some of them will also have additional things like parameters established on to them. And you know, you just want to have fun just trying to mess around with them, especially in areas like the scale. For this or rotation. You can have a lot of fun with that and you just want to experiment one of the nicest ones. Here's one for wood and so forth. Now, you're probably going to, how does this differ from smart materials? Will smart materials are very similar to materials except they function a little bit more heavily dependent on the maps that you baked out. So they're very similar to like the smart materials are smart masks. So a good example of one is like steel page. If we open that up and we can kind of see like a steel pain, it's a slightly more advanced. You'll notice in the layer section, it's slightly more advanced than a material because if we open it up, they usually come in folders that are a combination of fill layers put together to create one solid material. So you can kind of see all the areas like if I click on the base met base metal, you can kinda see how the position in world space normals are being put together through one of its many fill layers. So it's smart material is kind of like that. So with that said, it is strongly encouraged that you have some fun with this and just try to experiment, drag and drop and just see what things look like. And then keep in mind some of your previous lesson learnings about how we can manipulate and quarantine materials and smart materials into specific areas of the map or a specific areas of the model. I mean, policies. And it's going to be pretty similar to that. But that said, you feel free to work with the UV transformations like scale or rotate, which is something that is also within all fill layers. We didn't go over that during the anatomy of the fill layer, but it's something that you're definitely want to take a look at. This is an example of a wooden material. I believe there's also a smart material version, which is it's pretty good and they got several different, well would materials that you can kinda choose from smart materials area. So definitely want to just check it out. Kinda keep in mind that there's a lot of fun that you can have with this. If you just want to just experiment, see all the fun things you can do. But also bear in mind something else about smart materials. You don't want to just necessarily every single time just dropped some smart material in and just say, well, that's what it was meant to look like. Now, you can go through, open up a smart material, look at where the color is. Start working on different colors through it. You want to change the material up, go ahead and change it. But one thing that my instructor always said is this is a really nice thing to actually just drop a smart material in, open it up and go through every fill layer to learn how something works. Now, for example, there's one fill layer that's showing us roughness, Grunge. So if we kind of mess around with that, we can kind of learn about how roughness uniform color works, and how procedural maps are, how roughness works in itself. We can go through and kind of click and say what's driving that. We'll click on the mask and then we see a generator. And we haven't talked about generators yet. But it's actually going to be something that down in the advanced section of the model, of the character of the site by character model will be bringing more of a expansion too. Generators are very, very, very helpful. There are very similar to smart materials there like an outlet that can be used with smart material or or I'm sorry, smart and masks, they're an outlet to plug into. Smart masks are very similar in the process. So that's just something that kinda taken into account. You know, you can manipulate the smart material. You don't have to take whatever you put on there as face value that you can change its color. You just have to kind of take the time to just kinda like look in this steel pain. How do you change the color? Open the folder up, look for where it says base metal typically at the bottom, checkout what they got for color and change it. Or you can actually check out how they manipulated things through modifiers that they attach. Almost every fill layer has something called modifiers, like if I clicked on this mask and click underneath here, you got a little bit of a modifier that you can kinda attached to you here. And when I say that, I mean these things right here, think of them kind of like, you know, when you establish a layer in Photoshop and you add levels to it, That's what these things are right here. So bear that in mind. So let's give you some examples of how all this is put together and how we can make this really stick in transform your, the whole model and make it look like something completely different. And we'll focus for now just on mainly the glass area. So I'm going to turn on my color and we're going to see if we can use smart materials to sort of amplify the color that we're seeing here. So to get started, we're going to go ahead and I'm looking at what I'm doing on one and make a glass texture. And in order for me to make glass, I need to enable certain shaders and I need to add certain channels, my fill layer so that it can be enabled. When we give you an example, I'm going to add a fill layer. This is just here to show you what I mean. Right now. These are all the channels I have. What I need is an opacity channels so that I can actually manipulate the transparency of something. So to do that, we need to do two things. First off, we're gonna go all the way up here to where it says shader settings. And then we're going to click on where it says PBR metal rough. Click on that. And we want to click all the way down here PVR metal rough with alpha blending. I go with blending. Don't go with the next one to the right. Go ahead and click that out. Now let's go to texture sets settings to the right of layers here, and go to where the channels are. You notice these are all your channels for your fill layer, we need to add one more. And that one more is going to be opacity. So let's go back to layers now. And if we look at our layers, you'll notice there is now an Opacity channel. If I click on it, it's like a black and white value. We can make the whole thing disappear pretty much. So that's just sort of there to show you what that looks like. Now using that concept, let's go ahead and blend this in with steel pain. I'm just gonna go ahead and just drop steel pain in there. And I'm kinda looking at it and seeing where it seems to be aright, where it could use some improvement. Like so. I'm kind of liking what I see. But I'd like to have like a transparency glass through steel paying. Well, there's a couple of ways I can do that. I can first of all, just kinda mess around with the opacity, but I'm going to be mess with the whole thing. So let's first of all make this steel paint have a mask on there. So we don't affect everything using what we learned in the last ones which this polygon. Now let's look and see. We're just kinda messing around. We're experimenting to see what something looks like. And yeah, it looks like that it's transparent but it doesn't have that glass looks. So what I need is something. We're going to turn that off briefly. And then I'm going to say, yeah, it's transparent but it's not glass. I need something that has a glass shade. Well, we have a glass shader specifically in Substance Painter and that's glass Pfizer. So I'm going to drag that now in there. And you can kind of see it already looks a little bit more like glass. I'm going to go ahead and just add black mask on there. Bring it up. Kinda see, it definitely is looking more and more like glass. And again, this is a smart material. So I'm just gonna go, but I wanted to kind of look a little bit more like this. Like I want to fuse this reflectivity of glass with this steel painted glass. So how am I going to do that? Well, it's a very simple thing. How I'm going to do an unjust coin to experiment and find something here. So if you can't see anything right now above, if you can't see the steel painted because the glass Pfizer is covering it up. I wonder what it's going to look like if I open this and just simply cover some of this stuff up. So let's drop the glass fives or into the steel painted folder and then see what we can get out of this. So for now I'm just gonna do above and look at that. You've got something that's a little bit more making sense. You can, if you want, mess around and draw, draw it in different orders. But truth be told, I kinda like it right there. And maybe color value. I'm just basically going to replace the right there with this. You can kinda see already it's kind of what I want, but I don't have to just stop there. I can go through open the glass Pfizer up in here. This is the glass smart material and I can manipulate its values. Maybe I want something different. Maybe I want a little bit more of a green value. Maybe some dark. I could do something like that. So you can kinda see how we're starting to bring something out. Now, we're starting to slowly work around. This is that power of some of what we can do, not really push in, really the full throttle of all the things that we can do on here. We can do quite a bit still on here. We can add more materials if we want. For example, it may be, I want to do still dark age, and I only want it to affect everything except the glass. You can do that. So like I can just go through and maybe choose this one. Maybe I wanted to. And you can even have that as part of the glass instead of visor or steal pain. And kinda just once again goes through all that. You can manipulate the color a little bit more. Maybe something like that. And this is what I'm talking about when I'm saying about things such as experimenting and having fun is essential. You kind of see how my canister starting to transform. Now we haven't gotten into emissive yet. We haven't gotten into making everything glow around here yet. So we're still having fun here. We're not to, they're just, just yet. But we will be. And again, that could be something that we do here. Again, if you want to do something different, maybe you wanna go back to that turquoise blue. Again, this is all fill layers. So hey, you can do whatever you want. You want to go with the grain, Do you wanna go with blue? It's just the matter of knowing where to look. Wanna go with red and cyan, anything, go with the grain. So that's sort of an idea what to do. I can, you can already see right off the bat just how far it's starting to look. Now, one thing I didn't talk to you about is blending modes. So what do I mean by that? I kind of skipped something that I shouldn't have skipped. And that is that in Photoshop you have all these different blending modes. You notice that, for example, you have your fill layer right here, and you have where it says base color, and then you have 35 over here. And that's basically the opacity. So what that means is that the opacity of color for steel Dark Age smart material will be at a very low percent. If you turn it all the way off, only that which has color in this material is going to shine. Let be channeled by everything else below. It's not going to be channeled through here. And if you want to turn it back on, make it look a little desaturated. Maybe. You can kinda do that as well. Kinda like this one a little bit more because it's a little bit of a sheen to everything. So that's just sort of little bit of a stopping spot. You can do the same thing with everything else. So let's talk about like steel Dark Age and its roughness value. Let's turn into roughness and see what happens. You saw what I did when I turn roughness. Now let's turn it all the way up. Makes everything really blurry again. That's all, All that blurry stuff is the roughness of what represents steel Dark Age smart material. I turn that down and then the roughness of steel paint is being shown predominantly below. So you can just kind of work that concept. Same thing with metallic intermetallic down. Doesn't make it look very good, but you get the picture that the values below start to take into effect a little bit more. So I'm just going to go ahead and do that through here. And don't forget, there is a blending modes like multiply. These are similar to how you would go with in Photoshop, which you can experiment with. The only real noticeable change is probably screen or multiply pretty much on here. I don't really like anyone. I just like to keep them on normal, pretty much. So default. But if you wanted to amplify any of them, you can just hit multiply and divide it and try to give yourself like a weird sort of look like that. Maybe you can just, again, try to experiment with all sorts of different looks, different views. It's, you know, it's here, model, It's whatever you want it to be. Maybe go back to normal Remus here. So we're going to go into roughness. I like that better. So with that said, that's sort of a breakdown of the materials and how smart materials we didn't use any materials on here, but that doesn't mean we couldn't have I just didn't really find anything that was worth my time. One thing just to say in reiterate materials rule of thumb is that they kind of are single fill layers that are driven with more parameters than the standard base fill layer. And a smart material is not just with parameters, but also driven with a multiple amount of fill layers that require the bait mesh maps and use a lot more generators in the process. So they're a little bit more complex and they take a little bit more time to learn, but you can have a lot of fun with it, it, once you start understanding, I mean, you can just see right off the bat how much time I got through with that. So with that said, and the next lesson where we're going to try to do is I'm going to try to finish off with working with emissive effects and how we do emissive effects and how we can make that look, that last piece look really, really cool. So with that said, stick around and stay tuned. 8. How Emissive Effects Work: Okay, welcome back. In this video, we're going to finish this off now by showing you a demonstration real quick, easy demonstration of some emissive effects. And then after that, we can then proceed to the next section, which is going to be our cyber girls. So let's get started. And now in emissive effects are similar in some ways to the opacity where you gotta go through texture sets settings, and you gotta go through channel and add a emissive channel. Now that means that your emissive fill layers are now going to, all your fill layers are basically going to have now in emissive channel attached to it. Now, with that said, you may have noticed some blue effects hazing around here. And that's just basically the smart material of the glass Pfizer. It apparently has a glowing edge fill layer on there that utilizes in a miss of channel. It is your call if you want to use that or not. I honestly, I kinda like the look of it. It kinda makes a cool little area of look pretty neat. But I'm going to just keep going on from there. So let's go ahead now. And with all that taken into account, let's add a fill layer. And with that filler, make sure it's dragged to the top. Just going to call double-click on that and you call it in MIS kids. And I'm just going to for now turn off everything except submissive. And I'm just going to bring the missile to a bright color. And I'm just going to maybe turn it a little bit green. So now notice that everything is just had the ambient taken out of the equation and everything's a little emissive. So we got to first of all, make sure it's only affecting that center rod. We can do that in any number of ways, but I'll just go ahead and do geometry masking. So I'll click on just the UV that is the center rod there. And I'll just go ahead and hit invert. So it's just that switch back into, again, you'll see now it's just that area that is being affected. But it's not really glowing very much as well. That involves a necessity to manipulate some of the shader, a post effects that go through Substance Painter. And to do that, we first have to go to the very top right here in where it's the display settings. So the first thing we have to do is kind of go all the way down to where it says activate posts effects. And we got to look where it says glare. And we'll just kind of move this little horizontal bar over so we can do a checkmark on glare. That's probably going to not change too terribly much, but it is a requirement. So once you go on ahead and do that, one thing I'll do is I'll go ahead and hit anti aliasing. That's just gonna make the lines a little bit more smooth there unless jaggedy. I'm going to then go over to where it says shade or settings in once crank that MRD, emissive intensity up, kinda see a little bit more of a choir of Bloom effect. Now if I go over back to display settings and go all the way down to where it says glare. You will also notice that the shape has an option for bloom. And that might help see things a little bit easier. We kinda just see how everything goes from there. Now, this is still a little bit predominant while this I want dominant. So again, remember what we did in the last video. We talked about some things where you can go ahead and control the emissive channels opacity through individual fill layers, through the blend. For them, the opacity channels that are right over here that you see. So what we'll do is, is we first step in this case, I want to turn down the emissive on all of this, but I want to keep the emissive on this clear. So first thing I'll do is I'll go to steal pane, open the folder, find my glass Pfizer that I dropped within there, and then open that folder. And then underneath that will be the glowing edge is one. I'll click on that. And then I'm going to click up to base color, click emissive. And now I have a little bit of a note passing the slider. Let's turn that down just a little bit so we can kind of make sure that's predominantly seeing. Now the next thing I'm gonna do is I'm just going to just do one quick little thing. I'm just going to duplicate this off and add a black mask on here. And this time I'm just going to turn on all of the, all of the geometry masks because again, I just want to affect certain areas of the geometry through the black mask. So first I'm going to, because I'm, what I do is I want to kind of color in these areas you see here within. Texture. So I clicked on the mass of the emissive copy one. I'm going to click on polygon fill. I'm going to choose the polygon fill option. And then what I'm gonna do is I'm just gonna kinda go through I can do it also on here if I wanted to. I'll just do it here. It's just easier. And like so. And what's nice is because this is a separate layer from the rod, I can control the emissive intensity a little bit easier. We will make things go a little bit, oh, whoops. Yeah. Do it this way, then. You have a little bit of a issue with that. So the nice thing about this is, is now that we have that we can also change the color of any of these things like so. Computers also glitching on some of this and turning off. This happens to you. This is probably a substance painter glitch, because every time I make a change, you'll see suddenly it just switches off. That's a glitch. You know, that's a glitch. Hopefully you don't have to do that, deal with that. So now that we have that taken care of, let's just go ahead and just, you know, now at this point, I can easily say that we're done with establishing the goal for this video of showing some of the emissive effects we've accomplish what we wanted to do this with a main purpose of this video was mainly just to show the emissive, to activate the emissive channel and how to create some glow effects. I'm going to be doing some extra credit or towards the second half of this. This is not mandatory for you to do, but what I'm going to do is add some smart masks on over the emissive channel to cover up certain sections of the emissive to kind of give it sort of like a radioactive look. So that layers below which are darkened can actually radiate through just to kinda crackle. So I think what I'm gonna do is take like a smart mask of sand and drag and drop that pretty much right on top of the top fill layer that has my radioactive glow. And if you click on that mass, you can kinda notice underneath There's a mask editor that's sort of our generator that has all the parameters. And you can just kinda go through and just kinda go through everything. It just kind of get yourself educated through it. Just click on random buttons like I'm doing right now and just seeing what it does. So you can kinda learn how all of this pertains. Now again, it's not mandatory to do any of this, but I'm just kinda doing that right now. So I'm probably going to start with ambient occlusion as one of my main ways and kind of get that kind of radioactive rods so that it covers up patches of the emissive fill layer so that darker, darker fill layers below it start radiating through. And I may even just go through my dysmenorrhea, my graphics or shade, shade or settings to kinda add a little bit of a glow to it. Just to have some fun. And I can do more things like maybe I want to take that blue haze around the glass and maybe make that a little green. I can do that and have some fun there. Maybe make it a little bit more brighter in like for example, the window area. And there's a whole bunch of things that you can do. So that's just sort of the way just giving you a little bit of a taste of how to do this. Now again, we're coming up towards the end of the beginner section of this being concluded, we have one more video that is about exporting out the textures. And once we show you how to do that, we're going to move into the main course, which is going to be our Cyberpunk girl. So we're gonna kinda add on to what we've done there. And from there, we're going to just kind of build off of what we have. So again, not necessary to get that radioactive look. Because that's a little bit more complicated for some people in attaching a smart mask or I'm sorry, a smart mask onto a fill layer. And then using a mask geometry to occlude specifically that one area. But we'll get a little bit further deeper into that as we go through the Cyberpunk girl regarding generators. So with that said, we got one more video. It's about exporting our textures then onto the Cyberpunk girl. So cigarette and say Tim. 9. Breakdown on Exporting Maps: All right, So let's continue. In this video, we're going to go ahead and conclude our beginner level section core saw with a crash course in how to do an export of the textures that we've made so far. For some, this can be a little bit intimidating at first, but we'll try to give you a basic rundown of how it goes in remind you when we go into texturing the next section, starting with the Cyberpunk girl, we'll go into a little bit more debt, so easy when with the little bird basics of a breakdown in how this works. To get started, I'm going to go ahead and go up to File here. And I'm going to hit scroll all the way down to Export textures. And when you do that, you're gonna get a little bit of a pop-up menu here. And on the top left you're going to see three tabs here, starting with settings, going over to output templates and list exports. And we're going to talk to you a little bit more. The primary two that you're going to be focused on is settings and output templates. Now, to go over this, we'll start with settings. There's, as you can see in global settings at canister map. Now, if you have a model that has multiple uv maps or multiple textures set lists, they will be displayed up here, and of course, there'll be also displayed as well over here as which you'll be able to click on each of those maps. If it's just one map and it'll be that one map. And you'll be able to kinda go over all the parameters and the output maps that get export it out. For example, you see the file directory of where this will go. That usually is going to start right here. In the global settings. You'll go over things like file type. You can choose like PNGs or Chagas or jpegs. And probably size is an important one to remind yourself, whatever you want all your texture sizes to be, they will all export to that one size. Now, padding is a little bit of a dilated. Just go ahead and just click on that. It just kind of makes sure to give sort of an edging around the UV shells and make it a little bit easier. And output maps, these are a list of all the maps that you're exporting out typically. Like, for example, one thing that we can go over is this base color will be an output map size you're going to go over. Like for example, the color information. Or for example, if you did any roughness, texturing like any of your fill layers have any roughness. It will get all those fill layers will be all imprinted onto the roughness map. So you're probably thinking, wait, can it just be as simple as one texture? And that's it. And I wish the good old days were like as easy as it was in the good old days. I toke thing that is going to be that simple. So once you go through that, one thing you wanna do is take a look at output Template. Now, this is something under canister map, which is in the texture set settings. This directly is a connection to what you're seeing in output template here. Output templates are basically the different templates of maps that are being exported out that are required to be plugged into the unique kind of Shader of that particular software. And as a result, you're gonna get different maps, different kinds of quality in the map. I'm sorry. I should probably say that the maps may look a little bit off for a little bit different because they will be channeled a little bit differently through. This is the part where it starts to get a little confusing for the beginner. So we'll just go ahead and just keep it simple for now. We're going to start with a PBR metal roughness. I choose that one mainly because it has the most corresponding it's the easiest off to go with because all its maps correspond with the fill layers that we have in a standard fill layer. And I want to help you make that connection with what you're seeing. So to start off with, like when we do PBR metal roughness, you'll see a template here. And each of these bars right here represents a map that's going to be exported out. It gives you information about its file format and the bit depth. And you'll also notice things like, for example, we have a layer that says Fill Layer. Well, you can kind of see the input map is being chewed, plugged into the RBG. As well as all our opacity information is being plugged into an alpha. That's going to therefore define this as an RGB with an Alphas. So you can kind of see as we create, we can create additional output maps in plus our template. Now, if you're going to do anything like modify any of these, I'm just going to give you a little bit of a warning right now. First off, do something where you just want to go ahead and maybe just copy the preset and then go all the way to the bottom and make your, your particular modifications there. If you want to add something like, for example, I can create a new output map and maybe I want to channel just again the height. Well, we can do that too. We can do a whole bunch of things like that. I'm just giving you sort of an example of some of the things we can do here. And I'm just gonna go ahead and hit the minus sign to go back or undo that. But as we kinda go through, I want you to kind of see all the different areas. Like a height map is a gray scale map. And you don't really need like a whole bunch of color information for something that is only grayscale. A normal map requires an RGB channel. And so you would just go to where you would find the normal tab right here and kinda just drag over to here and just place that in as a normal so you can I'm just trying to give you an idea of how these things are all created in how you might want to create any of these manually, of your own. But as you kinda go through all these different maps, you see a different number of maps going through. That's because they require different parameters. Like if we go through on rail, you can kind of see all the things that are piped in through here that you can, once again piped through unreal or I'm sorry, that was Unity Unreal stone here. You can kinda see all the different settings. So it's pretty in-depth here. We're going to keep it simple and just do some basic demonstrations before we go further in with the Cyberpunk girls exports. So for now, let's just go ahead and just kinda, we're just kind of touring you through here. We're going to select our PBR metal roughness. We're gonna go ahead and make sure that we change our output template here to match that PBR metal roughness. And you can see all the maps are now matching to all the maps that are matching there. So everything is created there were choosing our file type as a PNG with depth, will choose 2048. And we'll go over to global settings. And you can notice that I've already set it to a folder of mine on the desktop. You can set that wherever you want. Then of course, the output template is for now going to just simply be going to choose PVR, metallic roughness. And I'm going to choose my file type to be a PNG. And the gain of choosing size to be 2048. And now I'm just going to hit Export. And that's going to go ahead and export everything out. And if we go ahead and check behind here, we can kinda see all the maps that have been sort of export it out. Now, we'll just kinda give you an open these up to kinda show you like right now we're looking at a map that has nothing but base color in it. So only the color information is being shown here. Now, this is the emissive map. And if you want to, if you were expecting something like a haze or a glow, try to remember that is an effect for that particular software you'll have to use. This map is a sort of channeling output for effects in different softwares. And let's go ahead and go down to height. We didn't really do any height information. We didn't work with too much height information, so we really didn't need it. So nothing was really exported there. There was a little bit of metallic of information, as you can see here, that probably is resulting from Samovar normal maps or I'm sorry, not normal maps that came from some of our smart materials that we decided to put in there. And of course, we have a little bit, it's a little bit hard to see, but we have a little bit of the normal map that came through here. And again, all of those things came from, again, some of the normal or smart materials that we made. And of course, here's our roughness data and we didn't. Now, you'll see a whole bunch of things going on here, but this is all grayed out completely. Again when we That's because the UV shells that are around this area were just the top and bottom parts of the base of the canister. And we just did a couple of fill layers on there and just did a solid color on the roughness and a couple of different values of solid colors on the roughness. Whereas. When we did the glass, we had a smart material go through there. And that's smart material mess around pretty deeply with all the different values of roughness. So that's why you're seeing something much more complex over here in the roughness. So again, as far as transparency goes, it is piped into we do have an alpha in there. It is piped into there. But it's going to be something we're going to go over in a little bit more depth as far as alphas go. If you want to get an idea about Alpha maps or things like that, one thing you can do, let me show you some just sort of as a conclusion. You can export textures, additional textures that are just strictly Alpha or sorry, like Grey Map opacity channels. Let me go over that real quick. If I go back to export textures, looked at that PBR metal roughness, and I wanted to copy that because I don't want to mess with the original template unless you want to re-install Substance Painter. I can just go ahead and click on that, go to that bottom one. And I can add a gray channel because I don't need red, green, or blue or any of that. And I can just take my opacity information, choose gray channel, and then go ahead and go back to settings. Let's go to that canister map, change our output Template to the copy that is at the very bottom, PBR metallic roughness copy because again, that output, the name of what we have just made recently. I can rename this whatever I want up here, but for now, I'm actually, I probably have to double-click and do it over here. But for now, we're just going to, just, for the sake of showing more that you can add more maps. We're just doing this as a quick demonstration. So we see that that's called grade scale. If you want, you can call that city better yet. You can just hit Control or Command C and just go ahead and change that Mrs to opacity. And then we'll just go back and we'll see everything's there. Let's go through and do something like really quick where we just go take our textures here, and I'll just move those to the trash so we see something a little bit different. Once that's done, let's go through and we'll just export, re-export everything out again. And this time, you should see an extra map here. And that's going to be your opacity channel. So not all, not all shaders work differently. Like for example, one thing that can be a little bit confusing is as you see white, I honestly would love to see black on here and we'll go over that a little bit more down the road. But if I was doing this more meticulously, I would probably just not extraordinary capacity channel and just remap everything through the alpha channel that's been exported with the base color. So that's just one way to save it. Again, there are a whole bunch of different ways down the road too. Maps because we have so many different softwares. We have pretty much different set of number of maps that are required because there are so many different kinds of shaders. And as a result, you get a very different views like you saw. That's what it looked like for an Opacity channel, but maybe the surrounding white border will be black instead of white. And there's a whole bunch of different fun, confusing ways to kind of throw people off. And that's for a beginner to see all that and have that thrown at their face can be a little bit confusing. So we just want you to, bottom line, what we want you to take away from, this is the base of how to get these maps out of here. That's all we want you to focus on right now, is just how to get these maps out of here and how to understand what it is that you're taking. Now, understand that shaders have a whole bunch of different channels in which you input these maps into. It's sort of like matching them. Color to color, emissive to emissive channel, and so on and so forth. They may have slightly different names because they don't all aren't exactly the same, but they can easily be picked up on that. So with that said, that's just sort of a breakdown of quick little crash course on are exporting process. Again. To recap, we've gone over all the parameters on what to expect and how when you're expecting exporting textures out a substance painter that you are going to be getting multiple textures out. We've gone over a demonstration of not just how we choose one of our template presets. I'm how to read them, but also how to copy that and make a little bit of a modification example real quick just to show you that we can add more maps of our own through the input maps that we have through here. And don't forget, you can do just about anything. You got to just experiment and have fun is probably the best, best in important takeaway from this. And don't get tunnel vision into this. We want you to kind of kind of use what you're seeing here and go beyond it. So, but that said, we're going to wrap this up and now move on to our Cyberpunk girl. So with that said, stick around and stay tuned. 10. How to Bake Hi Rez Details: Okay, let's officially get started. Now in this video we're going to begin our Cyberpunk girl. And the first thing we're gonna do in this video is we're going to import a low-res model in and get all the details of that low-res model baked on from a high res model, specifically, three high res models. I know we're doing a curveball for you right now in your gravy asking yourself, why are we doing three high res models? Shouldn't it be just one high res model? Will, I'll tell you what we're going to explain why we have those three high res models down in later on in this video. But first things first, what do you say? We get that low res model of our Cyberpunk girl into this software. So to begin with, I'm going to go ahead and go up to File. I'm going to hit New. And now I'm going to go ahead and get a new project like before. Now this template, I'm going to go with a good little general template I always start off with is the PBR metallic roughness. If I don't really have any special plans of a special area, I like to always start with this one, document resolution. This kinda pertains to the max resolution of where you want to start your default texture map size on. And that's up to you based on how fast your computer is. I for me, I have a moderate computer, so I'm going to choose 2048 normal map format as is right below that. Pretty much it pertains to the green channel in a normal map, whether it's inverted or not. So depending on what software you use, Mac Maya or I should say, unity likes to go with OpenGL for normal maps, then you're going to want to, and you're making a game character, then you might want to go unity. And if you want to go with Unreal in PC, then you're probably going to want to go direct x. So I would check the normal map functions for whatever software you're imported into. But if you make a mistake and choose the wrong normal map format, don't worry, we'll go over a way to show you how to change that out. Now further on down, we don't really need to worry about use UV tiled workflow import cameras or auto RAB. We have our low-res model added in here. Let's just go ahead and get our mesh in here. So if you go ahead and scroll over to the selected files, the first thing you should be looking for is something called Cyberpunk character low-res. And I called it V2. But I might just go ahead and leave out that V2 later on down the road. And I'm just going to hit Open. And then let's just go ahead and hit Okay. Once it comes in here, you should see a kind of a squirrely looking hair card system. And E might even look over here to the UVs to see it kind of is framed out. That's okay. You just left-click on here and hit the F key to reframe everything in. Now, one of the first things that we're going to talk to you a little bit about is z. As you look at the model that we brought in, take a look at our texture Set List. Year seem pretty much for texture settling when you bring this in. Another words, for UV maps on this model. Why did we do this? Why did we have for UV maps on this model? Probably the same reason why we're going to be baking in three high res pieces onto one low-res model. And I know it's crazy. Why would we do that? Why can't we just bake it just once with one high res? Well, I'll go over that right now. And that is the answer is very simple for a few reasons. One, this is an educational model. It is meant for educational purposes only. So we have broken the maps up so that you can get as much practice as you can in understanding how to bake over and over and over again. So that is why we have a high res, uh, multiple high residues were working with. The other reason is with Skillshare's website, we needed to break our high res model up. For the the file size had to be below a certain threshold. So we needed to break up all the separate pieces into sections for you to kinda go through. So like there is a high res for the head and hands, there's a high res for the legs and feet. There's a high res for the midsection. And so what we're gonna do is we're going to take a high res for the head and the low res for the head and bake these two together on top of each other. Then we're going to go on into the jacket, do the same and the legs do the same and they have to be done in a certain way. So that's what we're going to kind of go over now. And we just kinda want you to look at this all as, you know, an opportunity to look at seen each one of these uv maps like a coloring page for you to practice off of. So that kinda works out for us in the end. So to give an idea, this is kind of what your high res looks like over here in ZBrush. All three high residues are put together. However, all three, the high res of this whole model has been cut up into three high res FBX files that we're going to import and bake it onto this map one piece at a time. So let's do that right now. To begin with, we're going to go over to texture set setting. And we're going to take a look at everything that we have here. The first thing we're kinda look at is, is that as we scroll down, this mesh maps is where we want to be. So let's collect, click on bake mesh maps, and we gotta go through a couple of different settings. First thing we have to do is make sure when we say use low poly mesh as high mesh, we want to make sure that's off this time because we're not baking a low-res onto a low-res. This time we're bringing in high residues and we're going to bake that onto here. Now, the next thing that we're going to do is we're going to go ahead and change our output size. And you can change whatever you want. Some you might want to go 4096, but just kind of be wary. That's going to give you some long, long bake times. And then I'm just gonna go ahead and choose 2048 to play it safe. And then since we're our first map, you notice I'm on midsection map one. So if you need to pause it and just go to this map, make sure you are there. We're going to then go ahead and go to the high definition meshes and select the high res that goes for that piece. And for that, we're going to be going with the mid section, map, one high res FBX file. And you can go ahead and download that over into the other page there. So I'm going to select Open. And now we're just gonna kinda scroll down here. And I'm going to turn the anti-aliasing to two-by-two. Remember, with anti-aliasing enabled, your bake times are expected to go up. I'm going to choose mesh by name since these are FBX is. And now I'm just gonna kinda go through everything to make sure every normal world is all that I want. Like for example, let's see, for my rays I'm going to turn them up to around 150, something like that. And I'm going to make sure it's just for this. I can also hit apply to all since I'm going to be going through all of these. And then I'm just gonna kinda go through and just change my settings here and just make sure everything is kind of in the right order that I want it. And once you are done, you're going to have a safe settings. You can click on that. But you're going to have a couple of things. I want you to hit bake midsection map because what that's gonna do is that's just going to take the high res of the FBX we imported, which was just for the mid section here. That's the jacket and everything that was in the visibility and it's just going to bake the high res details to that section. So I'm just going to hit bake right now so we can go over it. And depending on how fast your model is, some of this might go fast, some of this might go slow for you. It's kind of based off of how your computer is, but there is one thing and we wanted to go over and that is errors, crashes that you might have. And one very common crash error that substance painters had. They may have fixed it down the road. But it's a error that is involved being GPU processing. And what that is is it encounters this sort of error that goes through when when it hits the ambient occlusion, it kind of falls into a sort of crash statements. Either bake fails or the whole of software kind of fails. But as we kinda go through all this, we're gonna go ahead and circle around. I'll show you how to correct that. So as you can see, it's going through all the maps baking out specifically for the jacket because again, we imported a high res onto high res of the midsection only and we're baking it specifically to this midsection. Remember, that's not necessarily the only way that you need to do this. You can't just have one single high res that you can bake across all maps. And that is just fine too. We're just doing this so we can get as much practice soon as we can. So that's what we're doing right here and now. And it looks like it's coming through fairly well. All right. And it says it's a completed its process. We're going to go ahead and hit Okay, and you kinda see all the details are now on here. And we have updated details around here too. In addition. You can see all the maps or I've been filled out. And remember these are maps pertaining to the midsection maps. So if I click on a different map, we need a different set of maps for the next UV texture sets. So this is the texture set for this area. And again, I keep being repetitive on this, we can bake a single map or single high res export, a single high-rise and do this as all one single piece. All you have to do is just simply go with bake selected textures. And that's about it. That's the only difference. So we're going to repeat that clip before we do that, let's go up to Preferences under Substance Painter, and scroll down to baking options. If you get any errors, just make sure you turn off enable GPU ray tracing. That tends to very commonly fix a lot of errors where crashes most commonly happen. So let's go ahead and do this a couple of more times. We have two more high residues left here. So let's click on the head map. Next, let's click on bake mesh under the texture sets setting. And we're gonna go through, and this time I'm going to select that and minus that off. And I'm going to click on the folder. And this time I'm choosing my head map to FBX. And once again, we have to make sure sampling is 2-by-2 mesh by name. That's important because we'll explain this as we bake. Wire. Mesh by name is important. And let's see suffixes, low suffix, underscore, high, checkout or ambient occlusion. Rays are there. So once again, it's not baked selected textures that would bake the high res across everything and this would eventually go blank. We want this to be bake head. So while that's going through, I'm going to just briefly touch on the issue regarding mesh by name. The all these meshes have been named something individually. Like for example, this is jacket underscore low, but the high res has a matching separate mesh that says jacket underscore high. And what's Substance Painter does is it has a little bit of a area, if you remember where we said underscore low and underscore high. What it does is it matches all the baking parameters piece to piece to those areas and it doesn't let its normal mapping get to splotch dt over to the other side. It's just healthy. It's just a way to keep the ambient occlusion a little bit more quarantined. So you can kind of see, if I click on the jacket here, I'm going to left-click and show you like the high res of the jacket we go through here and it says main jacket high, underscore, main jacket underscore high. But the low-res model that is read topologies guys is titled main jacket, underscore low. And then there is settings that are on here that basically tell substance painter everything that is low, quarantine it to that matching this name. Everything that is high, only bake to what it matches with me. We're almost done. Almost there. You see the now for those that are wondering all the different maps, we'll go over that over the next bake here. If you're trying to learn what all of these different maps are, we'll kind of go over that. Just going to wait until the low time. And as you can see, we have our piece which has now taken care of. So now that we have all that We got one more left. So let's go to lower maps. And once again, go to our bake mesh maps. Let's remove this by left clicking and minusing that off. And now let's bring in the final FBX, which is lower legs map underscore three. We're going to hit Open. Let's go through here. And you can kinda see this is the area when it says mesh by name. This is where it's saying match everything, where it's suffix, if it has the same name in the low res is the same name in the high res, a get and it has a direction of underscore low. The high rises are all labeled underscore high and all the names match. It will do a cleaner job, especially in ambient occlusion to give you a better bake. So let's just make sure everything's there. Now. Let's go ahead and hit bake lower legs. So we're getting our practice in getting our repetition in and add a hearing to some of the diff file saved set file size settings for ZBrush. Now, one thing we'll go over is some of the maps. Normal maps dictates. So like the bumpiness of the peace, world, space maps and ID maps, ambient are kind of something that help with probably smart materials, I'd say. And I, we don't use ID maps, but there's a workflow that dictates around ID maps that's very common to use, but we're going to use masks instead. Real heavy mass workflow. Ambient occlusion pretty much is pertaining to like all the cracks and crevices and dark shadowing that is highlighted throughout. Kinda gives the model it's little pop. Now the curvature is something that is pertaining to like you can kinda see all of the areas that are thinned out. It gives it self a curvature and it's very important to have, especially towards things such as smart materials. Smart materials take a lot of advantage over the curvature map being baked here because you got to remember, we're not going to export all these maps, okay? At most, you don't have to. The curvature map is being used often for to be generated so that Substance Painter can take advantage of some of its procedurally generated features that smart material, like smart materials are smart masks. And the thickness mask often is for translucent effects like skin and glass and such. So that's kinda how that works. So as you can see, we have our piece all taken care of. So all that's left now is to kinda go over just a couple more settings and we're almost through here. I promised we're almost through. One is, is that we want to go through edit, project configuration to talk about some things here. Now, remember at the very beginning I told you if you wanted to switch out your normal map function just in case you've got the right, wrong version. You can always do so through here. But the other thing I wanted to talk to you about is you can change your T pose here as well. For example, right now we have the low rest of Cyberpunk FBX file. Well, we have another low res FBX file, another Laura's, and it's posed. So in other words, it was taken into a 3D modelling software rigged and post out. So let's just go ahead and select. And I'm just going to choose posed sci-fi girl and hit Open. And then I'm just going to hit OK. And because it's sharing all the same parameters and UVs as before, none of the UVs really changed at all. So basically nothing really major got affected in the whole process. So with that said, we're going to go ahead and move on into the shirt now that we got to this state, now if you have to repeat and re-watch this as many times as you want, feel free to go ahead. So with that said, let's get started. 11. Texturing the Shirt Fabric: Okay, so let's get started In this video, we're just going to start off in the mid section here and we're going to work on something very simple to ease you into this. And that's going to be our site by shirt. So we're just going to take our time and get Shia like started with working with smart materials and how you can look into smart materials and change the anatomy to modify them to your own. So we're gonna take it pretty easy here. So first thing we're going to do, I'm going to turn off transparency. And if you want, you can turn off all the maps since we're working on the mid section. But just make sure you click on the right texture set list before you begin. And the first thing I'm gonna do is I'm going to do create two things. So I'm going to create a fill layer and I'm going to create a folder. Now, the reason I'm creating a folder is because there might come a point where I'm going to have multiple fill layers and I don't want to have to keep adding masks upon masks on each fill layer. So one way that it's very easy to kinda compensate that is to sort of have a folder so that it can mask all those fill layers out that way. I don't have to worry about going through each and every single Fill Layer and always designating the and spot. Having said that, we'll select to make small customized adjustments by creating masks in certain areas, but this is going to help us to stay organized. So as you can see, I made a folder, I made a fill layer. I am now going to go ahead and just double-click on that and rename that shirt. And I'm just gonna do the same thing. I'm just going to simply use this fill layer as I, I'm not really going to name it anything I can just name it. Test is just going to help me to designate my test fill layer like so. Now what I'm gonna do is I'm just going to drag and drop that in there. And you'll notice that nothing really changes except I can open and collapse it. But now what I'm gonna do is I'm going to have a black mask. I'm going to right-click on their ad black mask so I can put a mask and cover up everything. Now I'm gonna go ahead and select that mask and left-click. And I'm just going to go to polygon fill. And then I'm gonna go over to where it says Properties. And I'm going to choose my polygon fill, make sure my value set to white so it through. And that's what I'm basically using the test for just to help me get a little bit of a spot that I can kind of know that I correctly adjusted in designated that properly. So now that that's done you now that I have my fill a mass created, this is going to be something that's very basic and very common to do. I'm going to now do some experimenting. So I want you to be in an exploratory state when you do this. Because the more you do this, the more you're going to understand more and more about how to work, the smart materials and how to pick and choose certain aspects of smart materials to manipulate. So I'll give you an example for this shirt. I'm going to, after doing some testing, one thing I've found I liked was that I found I liked the under smart materials, a fabric, stretchy, sci-fi material. And I'm going to start with that. And that kinda gives us sort of our default look. And honestly I'm almost happy with it, but I may want to make some adjustments here and it gives me an opportunity to learn about the anatomy of a smart material. And that's a very important thing. That's why it's so important to experiment. And as I've said before, one of the most common ways to change, easiest, I should say, one of the most easiest parameter to change in a smart material that they all have in common is color and colors typically the bottom most fill layer within the folder of smart materials. So I'm going to go ahead and mess around with that and change that out right now. You can kind of see, you just kinda pick a color that you like right there. Now feel free to kinda turn off the visibility on and off, just so you can kind of learn to see what everything is. You might even like this if you want, where it's kinda predominant like that. That's kinda cool, but I kinda like that. Why? So now that I got that, I'm just going to go ahead and just make one more adjustment in this fill layer. And it's probably going to be just said add little collar trim or maybe I'll add yeah, maybe just some simple color terms. So what I'll do is instead of using the smart material, I'm going to delete my chest. I'm just going to add another fill layer. And I'm just going to call that color trim. And what I'm gonna do now is I'm just going to go ahead and change that to maybe a darker tone color. And I really don't. Need any roughness, but actually I'll take the roughness off because I don't want it to mess with the roughness of my smart materials. So I'm turning off all channels and I'm just going to for now focus on color. So I still have some things I gotta do for what I wanna do is I want to use this color trim fill layer just to kinda occlude and cover up to have sort of like an outline of an area right up here. And the same thing down here, just to give myself a sense of a trim to this. So first thing I gotta do is is I got to set it up for it to be workable. And to do that, just gonna go ahead and first I'm going to add a black mask to it. Then I'm going to just paint just a little streak to test it out. And then I'm looking at this and it looks pretty good, but I see that it's a little bit, It's kinda just going right through the material. So I need to find a way to cover it up a little bit or find a way for this fill layer to cover over it because right now it's just blending with it. So I'll just go ahead and maybe choose a little bit of a darker material. And then I'll go ahead and work with height. I'm just going to mess around them, turning the high channel back on. Just gonna go ahead and give that a sense of a little bit of a depth. And then I'm going to go through the height channel again up here. And I'm going to see that it's being blended. So I'm going to turn that to normal by doing that and going through normal than it is therefore going from no longer in its previous blending mode, it is being taken off. And now it's just a normal blend mode. If you kinda look at the sides, you kinda see the roughness is still blending with the previous smart material. So let's go into roughness now. And let's do the same thing. Let's just go ahead and hit normal. Now nothing's going to change because we don't have a normal roughness map painted in. So let's enable that channel. So now we add some nuts covering up. Now we can go ahead and just kind of now that we've set up our fill layer, Let's just add a black mask. So now what we can do is, is I'm going to switch between black and white. And I can either do this in two ways. I can paint along here, like so. And this is what I love the most about. This is what I love the most about the Fill layer approach because I can just kind of go on here. Maybe I want to make this a little bit stronger of a height map. Maybe I want to see that color contrast a little bit better. So we'll just make that completely black. And let's just kind of dealing with editing things on the fly. Now. Maybe I'll make it a little bit bigger. No, All I'm doing is just painting through the mask on what this is. Just sort of doing. Some editing might be a little bit difficult to do down here. Just remember you have a couple of steps you can do like we did in the previous one. The previous section or the beginner section, we can isolate, select this, and start just painting around it. But one thing we didn't really do was find the c's here. This is we could just simply kinda go through and just kinda paint out something like that. Again, it's a little bit easier. Another thing that we can do is we can hold left command and right click button in that will end. Just kinda go up and down with the mouse. And you can kind of adjust your smoothness if you hit the right mouse button, you can also bring up your brush settings. So if you don't want to go over here, we can change that space spit down, so that's a little bit easier. I'm going to hit X again to swap out my roughness value. And I'm just kinda holding Shift to draw that mark key line. And that might be a little bit too little, too much. So I'm just going to pick my C. It's just a little bit of a, take your time. Essentially. Spring this little round. So you can kinda see, kinda got through that pretty quick. For the hand. The shirt. Now, low warning, it's not all like that. Dragging and dropping and materials always kinda nice. But there might be scenarios where you might need to combine a little bit more of work around on it. And we're gonna kinda go with that demonstration down the road. Week. For example, when we do the main Jack jacket fabric will show you some tricks. Will involve more anatomy carving of the smart material. So there we go. We've got ourselves a little bit of a shirt. Now remember, this is why I like fill layer so much. It's not just colors are I'm sorry. It's not just the fact that it's a non-destructive workflow. It's also that you can really go back and manipulate colors and do a lot of experimentation for color theory and things like that. That's always a nice thing to have available for you. But we'll just be kind of building off this concept. This is a base, base, easy mode, just starting off really easy to get you started down the road. Coming up. We're going to be working on this whole jacket here and taken a few different approaches. So with that said, stick around and statin. 12. Starting Jacket Texturing: All right, So let's continue in this video, we're gonna get started on her jacket now. Now we're going to build off of what we've done so far in our last video where we made a smart use the smart material like the superhero fabric. The fabric superheroes smart material to create a shirt, we're going to kind of expand off of what we did in both ways. First, we're going to build off of how we can get a more of a customized mask folder established for the jacket. We're then going to go on ahead, work on how we can alter that same Smart material that we made right here to create a different kind of smart material and how we can use other smart materials additionally to blend in with it, to sort of create a very different looking fabric in the whole process. So again, what we're going to be doing is this area here. So let's just go ahead and get started. Now the first thing we wanna do before I do anything is as I wanna kinda go up to where it says not up here, but where it says textures, set settings. And I want to make sure that I have an emissive channel. So if you haven't already, just go ahead and hit Channel, hit Plus sign and look for the emissive channel. In addition, you might need to go up to where it says emissive intensive, even crank that up just a little bit. Under the shader settings. That way, when you drop any smart materials that has a plug-in fill layer of a miss of channel that requires, you can quickly disable that because we will be using some emissive effects, but we don't want to see other smart materials we've used in the past to light up. And we don't want to have to go through all our layers and troubleshoot every single one. So we're kind of enabling that early just to kind of catch ourselves. All right, So with that said, let's just start in. I'm going to go ahead and create a folder here. I'm going to title that folder jacket, like so. And just pause if I'm moving too fast or if anything, That's the beauty of video tutorial is as we pause this and in there, just go ahead and create a fill layer. And let's just go ahead and just set that to a red and drop that into there. And we're using this as a sort of a bear to get our bearings on where we are establishing our mask for our jacket. So along, once the fill layers within the folder, you can just add a black mask, click on the black mask and just go over and just start establishing your mask. You can either do it this way or give yourself a head start and go ahead and do it. Kind of texture mask the whole thing. Remember xs, how you switch between values. Now what I wanna do is I want to just basically have this folder, have just this area, this area and this area and this area. I don't want the shoulder pad or the trims of the jacket or this little strip here or the zipper. So we'll just go ahead and paint those out. So to start off with, let's go to our our little Cufflink right here and see if we can paint that out. And that's also wanna do with through the UV. So I just made a stroke, just kinda choreograph that right there. And again, I'm holding Command and right-click and horizontally swiping across to change out the size without having to go up here. And we're just kinda painting our mass. We're establishing the mask on here. Don't forget, you can also hold right-click are not hold right-click, just tap right-click and just adjust the spacing so you have less steps. So that if you do something like holding down the Shift key, you can kinda bring yourself to give yourself a little bit more of a straighter line, like so. All right. Let's just go ahead and run through like so. All right. Let's do the same thing over here. And I'll just kind of bring it all around. And then I'm just going to hold down the Shift key. Click and then hold down the Shift key. And bigger mask here. We're just kinda using hidden black value to just cover up this mask. It's a little tricky and likes the spill and that's because the so like Sir, roll-off, pretty heavy symptoms have to do this on the other side. So a little bit tricky, especially around here. Alright, doesn't have to be picture perfect. So now we need to do the shoulders. Same thing. So we'll just go ahead and first thing I'll do is I'm going to click on. Fill Layer and I'm just gonna go over to my Geometry, select that all this stuff is in the y. So I'm just going to click on the jacket, do an invert, and then just get out of our Geometry select. And since that's the only one selected now we can just make that disappear. We have a little more wiggle room to work with here. Let's just paint this out. I'm not going to use the UVs for this. And hold Shift and right-click if you need to adjust the lighting, if you're losing lighting anywhere. We're just kinda going through mask and everything out. Don't get too crazed out or meticulous directing to the model here. Let's just go ahead and bring this a little bit out, like so. And same thing here. We'll just go through now and hit X. And we'll just kinda clean up everything. We just obliterated. Like so. And kind of see a little bit of that lead now to Newton. Kinda just eyeball it if you want. It's not really a two terrible or on easy mode still. It's tedious. But the reason we're doing this now is, is so that we don't have to go through that. We don't have to keep doing this for every single of fill layer. To make this customize mask, there may just be a certain pieces that we don't. There might just yeah. We just want to just drag and drop everything in here. Yeah. Just go ahead and clean that up. I'm kind of going through it a little quick. Alright, so let's bring everything back. Let's turn everything back on again. In the Geometry select to avoid any crashes. Let's move on. So now that we have a little bit of a swatch here, so let's just go ahead and take that off. We have a splotch also there. Let's just go ahead and use your Geometry select and just get rid of those splotches. You have any splotches, you can just use Geometry select. And that will take care of them. Alright, so now that we have all that, we don't really need that fill layer anymore. So what we'll do is we'll start off by what we did last time we worked with fabric, superhero, smart material. So like I said, we're going to build off of what we did and try to get you to learn more about altering smart materials to look like something completely different. This is going to be very important carryover into your next texturing project. If you're constantly doing this, you're going to constantly have more tricks up your sleeve. So that's what we're trying to build as sort of like a snowball effect in all of this. So let's start off by doing what we did before. We'll do fabric, smart material and we dropped it into our folder and it only affected these areas. Now it looks just the same as it is right now with the shirt and we want to make that difference. So the first thing we'll do is we'll open up our smart material, go through all the fill layers and see what you like and don't like before starting for me, I'm just going to turn off that hexagon pattern on my just deleted to save memory. And already it's starting to look a little bit more like a different kind of texture. But we can even take it further. Maybe you want the color of this to contrast more with this. Well, you can do that too. If you go to the base color here, then kinda check that is the base color. You can kinda turn that off and see how that kind of works with the jacket. Maybe you just want to make your own kinda color of a fill layer right here. We want you to get that the sky's the limit on what you wanna do. For me. I'm just going to go ahead and just simply work with just making sort of like a purplish color, maybe something like that. And just for now, that's all I'm going to work with. So now what we're gonna do is we're going to add another smart material in here just to sort of get it mixed up with the other fabric, super hero materials, smart materials so we can kinda see what they look like. So remember glass Pfizer in the canister. I'm gonna go ahead and drag and drop that in there. Now, two things about this smart material. One, you notice it's not transparent. That's because we didn't enable any transparency channels. Or any set the opacity of the shader. The other thing is, is you notice that it's a little bit bright. Well, that goes back to why we wanted to enable emissive. So that whatever we drag in a smart material that enables glowing effects week, we can just kinda troubleshoot it on the fly and not have to go back once we have to turn it back on at the end. So let's just go ahead and troubleshoot that the fly. Let's go ahead and change our color out. Maybe we, like we did before, maybe we wanted to see something a little bit. Make sure it's a good contrast. This one. Maybe we want to see a little bit more purple on this one. All right, so it's still kinda covering up everything. So let's just see if we can find a way to blend this in through a mask or a generator. Now we can use smart masks. We, we've been over that before where you just take a smaller mask and you just simply drag over. But another thing we can do is just simply after we make the mask, we just simply add a generator. And the generator is very similar to a smart mask, but it gives us a little more options for adding things like procedural maps into that. So let's go ahead and just do that. I'm going to work with curvature as my choice. And it's not bad. Let me see. One thing we can always do is kind of work with the texture here. And what I'm doing is just doing some experimenting just to see if I can find something that I like here. May see. And it's not really doing too much and see if we can have this already set to invert. And it's kind of shown a little bit, but not too much. We kinda have a little fun really with an, I think the global balance a little low. So we can kinda see a little bit more worked out here. But one thing that I am looking at, I am kind of seen is that you can kinda see how the glass material kind of blends in with the super high fare of fabric material, which is something I kinda like, like right down here. That's kinda nice. Another thing that we can do is we can add a paint layer because again, this is a generator. So what that means is if I click on here, I can't edit. It's because it's a procedurally built-in mask. So to do that, we need to add a paint modifier, which is kinda left-click on the mask, right-click and then add paint. And then we're going to click on that paint. And now we can kinda paint away the mask as we see fit. So that's just something to keep in mind. I don't feel like I need to do anything for painting on here, but it's up to you if you want. One thing you can do is you can go back into your base and remember this is a fill layer. You are used to seeing the roughness, used to seeing everything else. Maybe you want to make it a little bit more of a dryer color. So it's not so glassy. Maybe you want to work with the color to be a little bit darker. And now it's up to you. Maybe you do want to use maybe like something like a paint layer on here to bring in. For example, what's wrong? You do want to add maybe like a paint. Maybe you just want to create a very soft mask. And you want to go with like a very low stroke capacity. I'm just kinda blend out things little bit more like. So so that like, you know, you see it really glassy here or maybe you just wanna kinda blended down. Well again, because this is a smart material, it cannot be affected like a normal mask, like we did with the folder. It's a procedurally some built-in generator mask that we used. Therefore, we have to add a paint layer. And because of that, we're painting away some of the details of the smart glass, which is now bleeding in to the fabric superhero. So you can kinda do stuff like that. We clipped, but you gotta make sure you're on paint when you do it. You can kind of meld and a little bit. Right? Okay. So that's just going to be how we take care of all bad for the main base Jack. So we're going to build off of again, that to incorporate new concepts, new colors. We're just gonna kinda reuse stuff and just create sort of like a snowball effect with everything that we see here. So that's sort of a basic breakdown. So in this video, we covered how to modify a noose of the smart material to be something very different looking from what this is, even though these are both the same smart material. We showed you how to create a glass material and explained how opacity will not get involved if you do not have the emissive shader properly and the emissive channel properly introduced. We also show you why it's important to have emissive checked on when you're using the last Pfizer. And also we showed you how to work with a generator, which is a procedurally built mask. Like a smart mask is a procedurally built mask. And then we went through and showed you how to experiment with the parameters, particularly global balance. And then finally, because a, it's a procedurally built smart mask in its own. It can't be painted over normally. So you have to click on the Mask, add a modifier like paint, and then just paint in the materials that you want to see in order to manipulate the procedurally built smart masks. So that's what we got out of this one. Again, that may seem a little complicated in some ways, especially for first-time are. So what I'm going to say to you is, is that these basic rules are like something that are mandatory and definitely important as we move forward. So feel free to re-watch this as many times as you can get to get a good, strong foundation. And the next one, we're going to work on this front flap here and see how we can get some fun out of that. So with that said, stick around and stay tuned. 13. Texturing the Front Flaps: Okay, welcome back. In this video, we're going to continue on and we're going to work on texturing these front flaps here in a little bit of texture in here of the collar to get started. Now, remember that because we are working with fill layers, if you feel any need to do any adjustments of color or anything like that, that's the best thing about this non-destructive work flow is, is that fill layer approach is we can go back and make like, for example, little tiny adjustments. Maybe if you want to make this a little bit more red or slightly brighter, you know, you can go ahead and do that. Now that's always available to you. So just free if you want to make anything interesting or fun to work with or experiment with different colors. Feel free to do that. All right, so moving on, I'm going to now work on this area and we're going to come up with some different material ideas that we can work with. So first thing we will do like we did before, we'll create a new folder. We'll talk, we'll call this front flaps column. And we don't necessarily need to use a fill layer on this one because I think we'll just go ahead and just do a selection tool and drag out the whole piece that way. So it kinda looks like that. So in this folder the mask is going to carry these two pieces. So let's go ahead and get started. Now, the first one we're gonna do is we're just going to make it fill layer and put that in there. And we're just going to turn off all the channels for now and just make that black Excel. We can change that later if we want. We'll call that dark tone base. And I'm just gonna go ahead and duplicate that. And we're going to call this light face. And we'll just go ahead and work with a different color on here in the schematic. Maybe something like little bit of a blue maybe. And nothing too special there. We'll just go ahead and want to maybe. What I'm gonna do is I'm just going to add a black mask. And then we're going to see if we can blend these two colors together. We can do this in many different ways, from smart masks to generators where we plug in our own textures, anything we want to do we can do. So this is where I want you to just kind of use everything you've learned. It, sort of come up with your own experiment of where you want to see it like, for example, do you want to see it like this? How does this look when it's inverted? Yeah, but we're not seeing much of the black on here. So let's go ahead and just hit Command Z or Control. And you can go ahead and go through any of these. This one's kind of a nice one and it's dust soft. Want to kinda looks nice. What does it look like when it's inverted? Let's just try. It's a little bit nicer. Think I like it more the other way. So that's kind of a nice looking color blend right there. Feel free if you want to do some tones there. But once you have something like this, we'll go back to this in a second, or we're gonna do next is we're going to go to make another fill layer. And we're going to have basically just a roughness in a metallic channel for this film. And we'll just call this speck there. Okay, so let's just go ahead. Like probably the metal low for now. But one thing we never really did is while we can do, we can always manipulate fill layers this way. One thing we never really did was we can also drag in procedural textures as well. Like for example, I'll try a fabric. There's fabric procedurals. Like for one example of a fabric procedural that we can kind of go through all this. Find ourselves an interesting one. This one kinda looks cool. You just sort of left-click drag and just drop that into the roughness channel and we can manipulate, you can kinda see how the roughness of the pattern is like contrasting outright here. But that's a little too big, so let's make that smaller. So we're going to go up to here and adjust the scale. It's, it's a little bit better. Kind of a nice-looking Xin. We want. Now one thing to take into mind is if it seems a little shiny, you can flip. Invert this. This is like an alpha black and white channels. So we do have an option in the parameters of our roughness when we drag and drop it in some pops up, you can always flip that if we want. See if you like that or not. You can make it look something like that. Maybe. It's up to you on how you want it to look. Kind of little little bit like the, it's kinda nice. And if the, if it still seems a little too shiny here, you can always just add another fill layer just above it to kinda controlled and overarching roughness of everything. So like, you know, we go ahead and change this fill layer over 2 roughness and you could change it to overlay. Well, it's kinda like normal, little bit better because what we can do is we can just switch it here all the way to a complete fabric looking roughness. And then we can kind of control how while this looks, either be opacity of the roughness is turned off completely to 0, or we can kinda just make it kind of blend in a little bit easier. So that's a little bit more of an easier approach of how we can do this. So keep that in mind as we do this. I don't know. It's really up to you. I'm kinda like caught in-between on many of this do kind of like do kind of like how it just kinda gets smaller and smaller, like kinda translates and reads a little bit easier. Doing now is just experimenting, taking my fill layer like that a lot more. So what I'm doing is I'm just kinda did the opposite. Where did the specularity all the way down like that. So it's completely glossy and this overarching fill layer, I'm going to call this over our rough. Yes. And then I made that look glass and then I switched to my channel that controls roughness and, and change the opacity down. So it has some, a little bit like that. So if with that said, now, this is probably the stopping point I'll have for this one. The only thing left is, is if you feel any need to kind of mess around with curvature, feel free to do that. You can mess around with curvature all you want. Maybe you want to work with some of the parameters. I just kind of to get yourself like, you know, just kinda to teach yourself some of the parameters that are here to help you work out. Anything that you want to see, like maybe you want to see something like this a little bit more. What do you want it to blur out? A little bit easier. But you want to see a little more contrast on the line. You know, you can do that just to get yourself sort of in that mindset. You can also invert it and then do the same thing. Mess with the global parameters like this a little bit. I think. Kinda liked it the other way. That maybe you just give it a little bit of a blur, a little bit more like that. So now we got a little bit of all of that taken care of. So all we have to do is after we get all this taken care of, well, we have to do is we have to create a trim texture for here. And we have to create sort of like a secondary contrasting texture for this leather area right here. So with that said, sick around and stay tuned. 14. Jacket Trims Color Detailing: Okay, so let's continue. Now. The next video that we're going to do here is we're just going to work on sort of touching some things up on the front collapsed by creating sort of like a color, a color to kinda go around here. And we're going to work on trying to fill in some extra areas here because our color scheme is starting to get slightly consistent to one thing like for example, if I turn it over here, you can't really see too much of how the color, the color between here and the jacket kinda separate. So we were going to try to create a border to kind of create a strong outline in, sort of mix it up and make it more interesting. So let's just go ahead and we're going to again, just work on creating color here. We're going to try to create some color, some very light Cyberpunk yellow looking colors on here and finish off with the zipper. So let's just get started. Now. First off, we'll just do what we did before. I'm just going to create a new folder. I'm going to call it blue trims. And we can either drag a glass visor or we can just put in a regular, normal fill layer in here if we want. Let's go ahead and just work on just establishing that color right now. While we have it, Let's see, we can just do some like this. And oh, really need height on here. Well, we might, if we need to cover something up, just work with what we've gone. I don't need normal and don't need a miss of just need roughness and more importantly metal. So we'll do the metal here. Maybe goes something like this. See if we can yeah, we can have something like that, maybe make it just slightly blue. Something like that can actually work for what we need. We'll call this layer blue trim. And now we'll just go ahead and just add a will for this one I think will add just on the screw it, we'll do an on the folder. Maybe you want to do more. Just add a little bit right there. And we'll go ahead and color over this. So let's just go ahead and make sure this occludes over the material. We'll do a practice draw. It's like it does. So we're just gonna kinda color these borders. And so we can do this either here or we can do this on the UV map. You wanna do it on the UV map. One thing I like to do is I just kinda like to draw on it, like so just to see where it is and that's my UV shell there. So I'll just undo and go over here and just kinda manipulate the light so I can see it. If you're still having trouble seeing it, you can just turn off the flaps. Just sort of like temporary to kinda assist you in the whole process. And you can just sort of texture. It's a little bit of an issue. So it's kinda like a coloring book. Just stay in the lines and do here. So just have the, maybe if you want, you can just go through and play a scene in your head from a movie like Ghostbusters, don't cross the streams. You know, you can kind of apply that to the scenario or a here. And it's pretty much the same thing. So don't cross the lines. Sucks. We're just kinda go on through. I don't think it's going to be necessary kinda color the inside area there. We'll just kinda have that black, dark and doubt. All right, so we got that taken care of. Next thing we'll do is we'll do the same thing over here. And this time we'll be kinda texturing. I think this time I'll just kinda go through and texture without worrying about crossing lines and then just subtract it off. No ongoing in some time. So when you're texturing right on the border of the UV shell, you may lose something. It is six. Seem like he saw it skip a little bit there. That's because my brush when out here and it kinda just cancels itself out. It has a tendency. So, so now we'll hit black. Let's go ahead and right now it black. And I'm just gonna kinda bring it through. Okay. So a little bit splotch right here. So we'll just go ahead and take care of that. Let's go ahead and finish up. Again. I'm just holding down the Shift key. That's how I'm establishing that little mark key line right there. Almost done, almost done. So we're there to get x and x again. And really the most drawn out mascot ever done so far. Right? So alright, perfect. Let's turn everything back on. Now we got a little bit more of a lighter color tone that is a little bit easier for us to see. Now, again, you can maybe adjust a little bit more if you want. If you need to work with a little bit more of a lighter blues, if you want, or maybe adjust the metallic of fraction in conjunction with color. You can do that just to kinda give yourself a blackout. Don't forget to also kinda fix areas that you may have splashed over. So like for here, which is kinda switching the black. Kinda go through. Again, just making sure everything is kinda taken care of. And one thing I forgot to do is and I'll do that real quick, is I'll just go ahead and just super, super quick here. Just make a quick little texture on the mask here. Okay, so now that we got all of that taken care of, let's just go ahead and move into the next phase of this, which is going to be working with some yellow trims. Let's go ahead and see if we can access a smart material if we want to. I like this fabric, synthetic one right here. My work with that one. And it doesn't look exactly as I want it. So you know enough now to edit out what you want to see and what you don't want to see. So let's go ahead and start from the bottom up and see I want the pattern whole bumps gone. Could take it or leave it on that one. Let's go ahead and make sure we have some lunches. We can also do pattern holes. See how it looks like that will keep the dirt temporarily for now. Now, just simply add a black mask under here. And what I'll do is I'm going to drag this underneath blue trims and I'm going to use it to sort of texture this area right here. So that way, I don't have to kind of be meticulous with the bottom kind of work that in like so. And it's a little bit quicker as you can see, when you don't have to worry about everything that's on the bottom. Okay. So that's a rundown of there. See if we can make it a little bit more there. All right, so let's see if we can now do the same thing. I think I want to also make the zippers here and the trims of the coat also. Let me see if I can do do some code. Maybe I can drag this below the jacket. Will I lose everything? Yeah. Coase of the front flaps here. So I'll just have to go through and do this the hard way. What I'm gonna do is I'm just going to click on the mask. And I'm going to choose my spots that I want with the fill selection. And also right here, I'll paint the textures in here, and I'll paint the zipper out here. I'll start with the zipper. Can do. Sure I hit X to switch out. Again, just hitting, holding down Shift, hold time to get that nice little straight line lazy mouse. That's one side. So if we go a little bit of it to occluding over here. So let's go ahead and cover that out. Back to our other mask to it. Why am I covering this up? Well, because I want to put another texture and other smart material in here. And I have one smart material I want to use, particularly for zippers that I find pretty good to for. Like, if you have like a polygon strip that has the normal map baked in. It's a pretty good one because it addresses procedurally all the cavities here. Think that's steel Dark Age. So let's just go ahead and find that it's this guy right here. I'm just going to drag that below synthetic. And you can kinda see how the zipper maxes out there. Straw black mask, cover it all up. And let's go to our fill layer. Just make it work here and here. So you can kinda see the zippers right there. So we'll just go ahead and finish this off by painting some yellow trim right here. Let's see here. Make sure this is covered up fairly well. Everything has to be cooked, no. So we're kinda come in and what we're moving along here. And I'm going to go to where it says strips here. And I'm just gonna kinda kinda if you get in it to if you've seen this leg right here that you're seeing because now it's starting to kinda take its toll. This tends to happen when you have too many smart materials. If this happens for you, like it is for me, one thing you can do is you can go to your texture sets settings and go to size down to 2048 and you'll get a much smoother ability to paint. So kinda keep that in mind when we're going through this. Right now, the dirt is somewhat at this point subjective and can be taken off. It's kind of on a hiatus about it. Alright. So that's pretty much how we're going to do, are going to call this yellow trims. I'm going to call my steel Dark Age Sippar, so that everything is a little bit more labeled. It will be important down the road if you want. You can also fill in the jacket here as well. Let's see, I think next for the next one, we're going to go ahead and finish up into our shoulder pads and then our sash and then we'll do the shoulder armor as our last piece. And then we'll move into the belts, which will be really easy, and then move on to pan. So that said cigarette and stay tuned. 15. Texturing Shoulder Belt: Okay, so let's continue in this video, we're going to kind of work on some of the bottom base of the jacket trim in the little bit of the shoulder will be sharing the same material here, and we'll finish off with the bell here on this video. There'll be pretty easy and simple. So let's just dive in. So to get started, let's go ahead now. Let's see if we can just make a mask detailing this area, this area and this area will leave out the belt for now. We'll have that in a separate area. And for that, I'm just going to call it shoulder and base term. And again, I'll just go ahead and see if I can just establish some smart materials for here. What all go for is something very simple, something that won't be too crazy here. Let's see here maybe one of this stylized leather approaches with, with woodwork and kinda like the stylized leather the most. So we might do something like that. Kinda shopping around here. I think we can go with something like that. So let's go ahead and just edit out our colors here. So let's say from what we're seeing, the base color is, are going to be affected the most. So let's kind of switch that out and maybe go with something that's looks a little bit like that. And let's just go ahead and just make this a little more research or the curvature, There's a little bit of brown in the curvature. Let's just go ahead and just kinda D saturate that out a little bit more. Maybe to make it look a little bit like that. I don't know. I feel like I can get a little bit of shine on here. It's up to you how you want to handle it. I kind of like a little bit of oil lot that's going on here. Kinda looks cool. But let's see if we can just, I'm doing an experimentation here where I'm just going to add a fill layer. And I'm going to turn off all the channels except roughness. Let's see if we can get a little c, little bit of a shine back into this. Some specularity works a little bit better. So now let's go ahead and turn that off. Let's go back into the folder that it's in and simply add a black mask and just simply choose her spots where we want that to be. So let's see, make sure I'm up here on the left-hand side or is our polygon fill? Let's just go to our properties and change that to object mode. And if we do it here, it's going to affect the whole area which you know, hey, that's kinda cool and all but like to actually, since this is part of a certain area and there's no individual UV shell. We're just going to have to paint this in here. Now I wonder though, we drag this to the top. Looks like it's not being occluded for everything. So I can just simply paint it this way. Or better yet, I can do an object fill on it now. All right, we'll do a UV chunk though. We can kind of see everything's kinda filled in that way. We could probably get away with something like that. So we could do something like that. See if we can now look into or stylized. Maybe I want to make this a little bit more blue in here. See if we can just make it a lot more blue. Same thing with the curvature is go ahead and mess around with our correct curvature. And some like that. Maybe. Now it's up to you where you want to take it probably worked with some like that, so it's a little bit more consistent with colors here. So once we have that taken care of, but we'll just go ahead now and just finish off with the belt. And like before the belts is going to be a pretty simple one. We're just going to double-click on there, make a new folder, Double-click on and make change the folder name to just call an adult. And for here, nothing too crazy or insane. On here. I can just go with steel Dark Age for something on here. You want to go. Leather pieces is interesting. Kinda just shopping around is what I call it just shopping for. What might be an interesting color to work with here. Fabric. Burlap wouldn't look very good. So we'll just keep going through your I could see what that does. Rough dark, secret damage. It looks like they're little bit too bumpy. But take that off, maybe we can get ourselves a little bit of a cool look here. Start off with creating a steel Dark Age on to this one. I like how that works. Black Mask on to folder. So it's covering up anyone's bring back. Everything is visible. Like so. Okay. And then let's see if we can work with something like make a little bit of a I'm working with the fabric baseball hat and I'm putting that above steel Dark Age. I'm going to add a white mask. And then I'm going to add a generator and then click on a generator and work with mental edge where see what that gives us. Kinda cool. Let's see if we can invert that. That's not too bad, but there's some areas I'd like to keep a little bit saying. So let's edit this generator. Again. You can't paint directly on a procedurally generated mask, so we have to click on the procedurally generated mask and paint. And now with that selected, we can kinda go through and paint in some areas which we kinda wanna see. Another thing we can do is we can just simply change the opacity and make that a little bit easier. So I might be a little bit to about one area. It's not like a primary texture in spot that that will do just fine for me. So now we're gonna move on to the next section, which is going to be the sash. And we're going to finish off with doing the shoulder armor here, which will be our finest and most challenging one free to experiment with. So with that said, sit around and stay tuned. 16. Texturing out the Sash: Okay, so let's continue in this video now we're going to go ahead and move on to the texturing of our sash here, which is going to be the next part here. And it's going to be a fun one to do. We're going to work a little bit now finally, with some emissive effects to help establish our look. And also do some different fabric, smart materials to help establish what we're looking for here. So to get started, let's just go ahead and I'm going to begin with noticing that this has different normal mat or the normal map has kinda given us some different areas to work with. So like for example, this is a very different, could be a very different material from this. This can be something that's shares in common properties with this. There's just a lot of different things here. So we're just gonna kinda mess around and have some fun here. So to begin with, let's just work with creating a new folder. We'll call this folder sash. And let's just do, I like to always go steal dark age because it does a great job of contrasting with the curvature map to accentuate everything. So while. And then I think what I'll do is I'm gonna go with the fabric. Baseball hat has a nice little very strong contrasting normal map. So we have a little bit of fabric here. So let's go ahead and just see if we can just have this now all break into just only affecting the sash here. So since they are all in the folder here, Let's just draw out a black mat or a mask that only entails this area. So let's just go ahead and select or tool, select our mesh fill. Make sure the values switch to white. Got that setup. Let's go ahead and add a generator so we can shine some of the marriage, some of the steel Dark Age material into here. So I'm going to choose a generator this time. So we'll start with adding a black mask. Click on that mask, right-click on it. And then I'm going to add a generator. Now nothing really looks like it's changed all that much. So let's first of all add something into this generator by clicking on it. Click on Generate are under Properties. And let's choose middle edge and see how we get. So not bad, but we need to invert this, see some real hair. It's a little bit better. But I would like this to be a 100 percent cloth. I'd like to cover up a lot of areas. So let's go ahead and paint this mask so that it only affects areas here, here and everything in the back. And then we'll leave the rest up to the edge where here. So to begin with, it is a procedurally built-in mask and using a generator, as we've said over and over again, you can't really paint anything on here with that. You can only paint normal masks. So we have to left-click on that mask that is procedural. And then add down here a paint. And then we can now paint our mask and then we can do it here. We can do it. Isolates select, or we can do it right here in the, the UVs are, or that you've seen right here. And that for me might be the easiest way. Now I'm just gonna kinda go through just paint it that way. May even block everything out here so that it looks a little bit more contrasting and different so that everything on below is shining through completely. Just go and paint that all back in. A little bit off here. Let's just go ahead and just paint strip. Like so. Same thing here. So like that's part of it right there. Switch around the back here. Let's cover this up. So again, like so. And then I'll just kinda swing around here. Uvs, make sure I got a good light. Oh, whoops. Let's do that. Switch that back. This whole area here would be a sort of burlap looking cloth. Basically wanted to read in any way, like it's a hard surface material, but instead it's cloth. Now, we're just sort of accentuating this. We still need some folds around here. Now it's starting to look a little bit more like a cloth, but now we still need to. We put this. Still need something to help out all this with some wrinkles. So we can manually put this sin, we can put some manual wrinkles in. I'm going to probably use a quick little procedural process to do all this. And I'm going to do something that is fairly someone new, it's been around but this in, we're going to use a denim washout. Now. Denim washout, if we click on it, you can kind of see it gives us a couple of wrinkles. What I like is I like the wrinkles that it kind of stretches out at. I just show you where it looks. It kinda generates its own wrinkles, which is kinda nice. And I think that's what I wanna do for this. But there, I don't really need all the other stuff on here. I just need the areas that are wrinkles on here. So let me go ahead and click through here and find out what is it that I like? More than likely it's going to be the folds. So I'll just go ahead and tear everything else down. I don't need the color. I don't need the discoloration or anything like that. Really, what I need is just the folds. You can kinda see we're getting that right there. So let's go ahead and add a black mask on there and see if we can paint in just the folds. Kinda give ourselves a little bit more interesting look. Sure it doesn't screw around there. We could paint in just folds and some of these other areas. You can feel free if you want to change the color or anything like that. It's up to you. Maybe I like it over here to be a little bit to open a different color. No, that's fine. Kinda nice little contrast between all of this. And if you wanna kinda go through and kinda bring something down here as well. So it kinda looks a little bit more like what it should. So little bit muddied out here. So let's just make sure we kinda go through and make sure everything is kinda broken out. So we got that taken care of if you want to you can, you know, don't commit to black if you don't like to. This is again all experimenting. If you want a different color, go through the fabric, baseball and manipulate yourself a different color. Maybe wanna do something like a dark red or something like that. You know, you can do that. Nothing wrong with that. So I'm just going to go ahead and finish this off now with the painting in some amiss of effects, just kind of like right on here and we'll be moving on to the shoulder. So what I'll do is I'll just create another fill layer. And I'll turn everything here off except for the emissive channel, which I'll go ahead and change right now. Maybe something like that, maybe something a little bit like so. And we'll add ourselves. So black mask. And what I'll do is I can just kinda go through here and maybe just go through and just simply do a nice little strip and do and I'm just holding Shift to go through there. And then I'll just kind of and I have little pond just kind of painting and chopping and cutting away with everything here. Like a butcher. See you making good use of the whole holding down shift key. So it looks a little bit easier to read. So now that we have that taken care of, we can, uh, if you want, you can work a little bit more into just simply maybe work with the emissive intensity if you so wish. We didn't really, and it's not really shown because we didn't go through enable our active effects, which is over here. And of course, when you do that, make sure that you're going through and messing with your glare. Like to always work with bloom for my shape. But that helps a lot there. So now that we have that taken care of, we're going to finish off by doing a couple of things. We're going to work now on our disks. Get that texture doubt and we're going to do the same thing. We're going to just work with some emissive textures. And there weren't to see if we can do some adjustments between the two. So we can have two varying degrees of myths of attack, texturing balloons without having to rely on our PDR settings by manipulating and all through our passive channels. So our emissive opacity. So that will make more sense as we get through. But with that said, we finished that out. We're now moving into the disc next. So stick around and stay tuned. 17. Detailing the Nodules Discs: Okay, welcome back. In this video now we're going to work on texturing these little disks here. And like before, we're going to add some emissive effects on some of it. So let's go ahead and get started. Now. I'll just go ahead and like always will create ourselves and other folder. And on this folder we'll drag in a smart material. I'm choosing cobalt just as my choice. And that makes everything weird. So let's name this folder, disks, disks and nodules. And let's just add ourselves a little bit of a black mask on there. So next thing we're gonna do is we're just going to go ahead and do our selection polygon fill tool. Go over to the Properties here, and we're going to choose mesh and bring in through the mask. Some of these areas, make sure you have a white value. Nose. Go to the back here. Sometimes I have to double trick, double-click them. All right, so now we got all that. Let's just go ahead and we're going to be doing two things. We're going to mesh this in. We're going to meld it in and combine it in with a, another smart material. And we're going to just be painting a missile effects on here all day long. So Let's get started. Now, I'm thinking I'll choose plastic, armor glossy and just see how that kinda overlays over the bottom area. So let's just do an add black mask, had a generator, and let's choose a metal hard edge surface. Kinda looks a little off. So let's invert that by clicking under the generator and hitting invert. That helps a little bit. But honestly, I feel like we could do a little bit better. Sometimes I just want to test out some smart mask since we haven't tried that. And while maybe stained. Let's try that out just to see what that looks like. It's little bit slightly better suit where you can see what that looks like when IT that is inverted. And it's not so bad, it's kinda has a little bit covers up a little too much. If you ask me, we go through the whole process, we can kinda see a little bit on what something looks like when you combine it. See what that is inverted. Yeah, it's kind of an interesting color, but I'll just go ahead and just work with what I had previously. That's just me just sort of having some fun. We're wearing, going through and experimenting. So I'll just go back to my original process where I just added a generator and I chose metal ledge where now I'm just going to work, work around with the parameters under Metal Edge where. So let's start off by maybe working a little bit more of that curvature. Wait, let's work a little more into grunge amount. Let's just really smooth itself. So it's probably yeah, so like that. Where contrast. Let's see if we can place a little bit onto their mom. Just sort of messing around right now. Just looking for a fun parameter. You're looking for a fun change in this, Let's see if we can blur a little bit of that. Luther contrast when we go that far. Yeah, It's all right by me. So we've got ourselves a little bit of a start off. So now the next thing I'm gonna do is I'm just going to add a new fill layer above all of it. And I'm just going to disable all the channels here and just work with an emissive effect similar to what we did before. Except this time around, I'm just gonna kinda add a black mask and we're going to be covering up everything here. And we're just going to start painting out all the dots. So probably to give you a better idea, we added a black mask with switch into paint mode. Lets, you will probably have an easier time doing this on the the UVs than actually going through the model itself. So I'm just going to paint something, kinda shrunk it down. And then hit X. And I'm just going to kind of make some small little circles and forget to change out your spacing. For this one. This is probably going to be a pretty important one. And we're just gonna kinda work a little bit of a like, little kinda thing now, all of this. Now you may notice that when we do this more and more scrutiny, when we do this more and more, we lose that glow. So what we're going to have to do is kind of readjust the settings of the shader emissive intensity in the effects as well. Now that's also going to affect what we do in other areas as well. So let's kind of when we get our chance, kinda go back and adjust opacity through the boy and shapes, so okay. And, uh, work with Mayor and I just see basically me just working with the fill layers here. Kinda. I'm just drawing in some glows. Like so. Do the same thing again. Hold Shift, hold Shift and right-click to scroll, kinda horizontal over. Whoops. Just add in some dots in here. Alright, we got a whole bunch of fun little disks to go through. Excel will fill a little bit tedious. But is it pays all pretty well. Once you get it all looking right? It does require a little bit of a game of patients. Here's one down here. And then just simply make it a little dot, making draw size a little smaller, and just switch it into neat negative Black value by hitting the X and just sort of fill in in the spots. Right? Three more to go. And just make it a little leg a little bit, a small circles like that. Not hidden F key and accidentally never helps. Two more to go. You can kinda see how they update like that in the 3D model. One more left, right? So now that we got everything kinda textured in there, one thing we can always do is we can go into our shader settings and we can really crank up the emissive tensity. Then go back into our display settings and go through our make this slightly wider, go through our glare, and really crank up some of the values. Now as you see right there, you're going to come across things where like unwanted glares here are going to happen. So if that happens, you know, just don't be afraid to go through the sash again. Check out the emissive channel that that's on. Make sure you label it a moon misses. And go up to our channel right up here and do some adjustments. You can just kinda, kinda adjust the levels there. Same thing with here. If this feels like everything is black or like, let's say this is the one that's a little predominant. You can just kinda course, correct? I mean, yeah, they're all on one layer. But what you can do is you can kind of just single that one guy out since it has the most surface area, that's why it's getting the most glow. You can just sort of just hit control D or duplicate the layer. Kinda turn that off for a second and make that guy disappear. And then go through this guy. And we can just go ahead and mask out everything so that it's just this main one here. Like so. And then we can just simply control the emissive of this one guy so that, that guy is just being affected. Then we go back in here. And it's still two predominant. You can just kinda bring it in like so. You can go into our shader setting. Then once again, we can recruit, link everything back up again. Through glare. Didn't know why I'm on there. Just simply goes through glare, go through luminance. And you might need a little bit more surface shader areas, but little bit more glare on there can help. But you will have more control over that. My need to do a little bit more surface area coverage to really nail out that Claire, but you get the picture that you can cause like Use, put different emissive effects on different layers and control their behavior through the opacity channel here. So like right here would be right about here. And then for the sash, bring that even further down to right around here. So just kinda keep that in mind. We're going to have probably keep it's still at its default because I don't wanna go too far into it. And stroke and so forth. Stroke, we go. So let's go ahead and ring. Msbu shooter do or display. Back to this. Was that shoulds always a fun one to work with. There we are. All right. So now that we got that taken care of, The only thing left in the midsection to work on is going to be the funnest one. We're going to work on this shoulder armor piece here. And they weren't and do a quick breakdown on how to get the pants. Now the pants is going to be sort of like an easy way out to help you emphasize some of the more important smart materials that are more recent to come out to give you a good grasp on it. So it's just going to expand on what we did with the sash. So with that said, stick around and stay tuned. 18. Texturing Out Shoulder Armor: Okay, so let's get started. In this video, we're going to finish up our midsection map up here. And we're going to finish up with some a little bit more fun similar to how we did it in the end of the beginner level section, where we're going to kind of combine some of our smart materials inside of other smart materials to give you a little taste of fun hair. So we're going to start off by doing our shoulder armor piece. So let's go ahead and just add a folder and just call that folder shoulder armor. And then I'm just going to once again just kinda go with the old probably start with glass film dirty because I like how that kind of has a little bit of a sheen that works, plugs in some of the ambient occlusion to kind of break up some of this. That's kinda fun. So let's go ahead and make a mask. So, so this is inside that folder. Let's go ahead and add a black mask on that folder by hitting right-click, click on that folder, go over to the left where it says polygon fill, go over to the right where we are. We can just do Nashville or UV chunk. You can also hit right-click and do it from here if you want. And let's just bring this in that. So now we have our folder all set to go. Let's just see if we can create sort of like an underlying texture like a hexagon. Well, fiber, fiber that stick like material. Little translucent nature. So I'm going to create some hexagon pattern, and I'm going to do that from scratch. So I'll click on there and I'm going to hit Fill Layer. I'm going to call this, fill, this layer hex. And what I'm going to start off by doing is I'm just going to make this start with sort of a gray texture. And I'm going to hit black mask on there. And when I click on that mask and add fill as a modifier to this mask. Now, when you click on the mask and then you right-click and add a modifier. Everything you do pertains to just that mask, not to here. So let's go ahead and go through our procedural textures. We're choosing procedurals because that's where our repeatable textures are. And we're going to go with them. Let's see. I'll do hexagon border. We'll grayscale everything out. Now as you can see, what that did was that filled in, affected the fill of this mask in a repeatable manner. So it's masking out now everything that's on the Fill Layer. So let's change the attributes of this by clicking on that hexagon border. Let's click on Scale and see if we can make that pretty tiny. Something like that maybe. And that just kinda gives us a little bit of something fun to work with here. And we can work with maybe making it a little bit more metallic in nature, perhaps, something like that. My help. So now that we got that, let's go ahead and add another smart material that kinda cover over that or glaze over that. So we'll use plastic glossy. Yeah, I think we'll go with plus to some a little bit drier. Look here. Something like that. And pretty basic, easy to establish even with a fill layer. So I'll probably just do some like just change this to a red, maybe something like that. You feel like a desaturated red. And then let's go ahead and see if we can kind of blend this in to get some of our hex and glassy film dirty to see through here through us fund mask. Now, I can go ahead and just add a smart mask and we can just pick your own smart mask if you want. There's no wrong answer here. It's all just having fun and experiment team basically, like I can just go ahead and choose this one. This is kind of a fun one here I choose to stain surface. We can kind of mess around and see. That's one we want. For example, you know, after you choose one, go to the parameters, and then just simply start messing around with what you see. So like right here, seeing something that's kind of fun. It's a little bit interesting to me. I, I find that kind of a unique looking scenario. We can also, if we want, do some fun things like, for example, what if you wanted to maybe use some other smart material on here? You can do that as well. Like, let's say plastic. A fake leather. You can maybe dropped that in just to see what that makes it look like. If you want to, you know, there's nothing wrong, no wrong answers here. You can kinda, just kinda see like what will happen when you put something in here. Or maybe you wanted just kinda turn off plastic glossy. You'd kinda just get a look at what something looks like in kinda just see like that. And I'll, again, I'm encouraging as many of you to kinda go through this and try to experiment as much as you can. So now that we have that establish, one thing I'm probably going to look at is I'm going to look at the rapidness of here and maybe tweak that to be slightly specular. I want a good specular contrasts between what's underneath here. And that probably will maybe something like that, maybe yeah, something like that. Don't forget to have fun with these fill layers and just start changing your color scheme, having fun with it, you know, doing what you love to do. You know, if you wanted it to be that color, That's cool. I'm choosing read because it could use a little red here. Maybe go with slightly darker, desaturated red. Maybe, you know, there's no end to how much you can have. I'm gonna do one more thing on here and I'm just going to add a little bit of dust just to have some fun on here, just to kind of break it up and make this a little bit more interesting to look at. Now as you notice, the desk right now doesn't scale very well. So we got to go through the colors and kinda make them match up to what we want to see here. If you want these colors to actually be seen, they're just kinda like small adjustments that kinda just pouring out everything. So in theory, you can do the same with dirt as well if you want. But again, dirt's a little bit more of a you can kinda see, it's a little bit more crazier. So you're going to have to go through some of the blending modes, combination of blending modes as well as working with some of the dirt on here. There. Fortunately, there's not too much that you have to work with except maybe just clicking on the main layer here, looking at some of the gradients, like down here. And working with something like like a black tone versus a secondary plaque tone. And then after that, it may still be two p-values. So let's turn off height. Let's turn off normal, because we don't need that. And let's just do a very subtle blend of everything that we see here. So maybe we'll start with this. Maybe we won't go through metallic stir with lower end of the metallics. Let's go through the roughness. Really be subtle with the reflection. Roughness. Think of just who or who could just turn it off like that. Height seems to be pulling apart and I want that to be turned off. Completely. Normal map. Here we go. Whoop was plentiful on there. Alright, so like if we can kind of see, there was more to work with on dirt to if you want, you can just kind of have some fun just to kind of grunge it up, multiplied up. And I just want you to experiment with everything we see now the lower the opacity you might need to go little bit higher. Base plastic just to kinda see what that looks like. Kinda see the dirt a little bit better when we turn that color up. So just a little bit more to what you want to see where we go. So we've got ourselves a little bit more of a texture now on here, and That's going to be the conclusion to this section here. Now, we're going to go ahead now and move on into the next section, which is going to now be about just work in the pants and it's going to be pretty easy one it will be a fairly quick one because there's a lot less to texture than there was in the jacket. So with that said, have fun and cigarettes and stay with us. 19. Quick Texturing Pants: Okay, so let's continue. In this lesson, we're going to start working on our lower section now we finished up our midsection. Just one last thing we're going to go through. Just real quick fourier just in case you, just to kinda give you an extra tidbit finishing touch. One thing I always like to do is I like to create an overarching fill layer and call that A0. And it's just going to, I don't need any of the other channels, but just color. What I like to do is just turn off all the channels except color, and then just maybe go through my texturing, find the corresponding texture a right there, and simply drag into there. And then once again set the blend mode to multiply. That just kinda helps with just given a little bit more of a pop in everything or a little bit of contrast. You can do that a couple of times if you want, but just wanted to show you that. So moving on, we're going to do on the pants section here Next. And it's going to be a very simple one like we started off before. We're, what I, what you see here is I want to create a material for this area here that shares with maybe like the edges that go right here. And they don't want to have a separate material that shares in these areas. So that's what we're gonna do first. So let's go ahead and get started. First thing I'll do is I'll bring in smart material and I'm just going to go ahead and just bring in a mask. And, you know, in theory you could actually just, I'm completely fine with that, but I think that looks pretty cool right off the bat, like a pair of black pants. But let's go ahead and see if we can do a little bit more. And I'm going to add a black mask. I'm going to switch over to my selection over here, up here. And then I'm going to switch into polygon fill and just fill everything up. So now that my mask is designated, I can move on. So let's see. What I'm doing right now is some Create starting off by creating my fill layer, my material for this area. And I'm using fabric mask, fabric baseball hat as my starter. I'm gonna go ahead and add one more in here, plastic or glossy, and thought that was pretty good. And we'll just blend these two together through a mask generator. So we're going to blend that. Left-click on the mask, right-click then on the mask at generator. Let's try a new curvature. Like kind of him married to the idea. Working with the cubes me, want to look in the forums, pose, truth be told, uh, kinda like the other one, like the hard edge one, but now will work just fine for me. Okay, so now that we have that, it is a procedural generated of process. So we have to go through and add a modifier to this in order to continuously edited some more. So I'm going to right-click at paint. And then I'm going to switch into paint mode. And I'd like this all of these areas to be sort of like a burlap working into sort of the texture mode here. And then maybe the stitching to be the stitching be something like that. And then we'll just do the same thing. Like so. And that shouldn't be fine, just fine. All right, so now that we have all that established, all that we want, we have this underlying texture. Let's go ahead and establish some work here. So for that, I want you to be more self-aware of that fabric. Denim. I think it's a good opportunity for us to start practicing manipulating different attributes to get different outcomes. Now it kinda gives us what we already want except the color I'd like to be a little bit darker. So let's go into this fabric and start manipulating it. So for this one, we have to work in two different places to manipulate color. First, we have to start in the denim base. Maybe I'll make that a little bit desaturated, darker. And then the other one is main fiber structure and that one's also got to go down a little bit more. So it was something like that. Okay. Now once we have that, let's go ahead and mask this off so that it's only being shown through these three sections and not the entire area. So we'll go ahead and add a white mask. And I'm going to click on that mask and we'll start by first getting rid off those trims. Here. Let me go and just click that off. And then let's switch into paint mode. And just start painting some of this stuff off. Like so. And once you kinda look at all of this, kinda think it's a bit dark for this. If you want, you can always just make the denim just a little bit more darker underneath. And I'll probably end up doing that myself. And that's why I love Fill layer so much is because, you know, you don't have to commit, can make a mistake or you're wrong or off on the color. Kinda change that. So let me work with that and see if we can. Let's start with here. Let's make this darker blue and then let's just go to our database. Make that darker as well. All right, Let's continue working on that mask so we can get some of these other areas taken care of. So let's see here. Whereas if you're having trouble seeing the lines, Let's just turn down the opacity of the pants. She's also something we can do to affect sort of like the look of this if we feel anything's to prevailing. Because if you can't get this dark enough, you can just turn down the opacity of the base color and the bottom layers will shine through. Mm-hm. And I was just experimented. All right, so now that we got our pants sort of routine doubt and taken care of, we're pretty much done with that. You can kinda see it wasn't that difficult to do. In fact, it was a pretty quick, easy process. Like I say, denim has this like process of just making it, things like really, really easy. I don't go figure on this one. I, that's smart material works really, really well. So kind of take that into account when you're setting everything in. So next up, we're just going to go ahead and finish this map off by doing the socks and the shoes last. And then we're going to work into the next map. So with that said, stick around and stay tuned. 20. Texturing Shoes Out: All right, So let's continue in this video now we're going to just go finish the lower section off by working on the lower parts here. And just do some quick assign, assigning of some smart materials to our shoes and socks here. And then after that, we're going to move into the hair section, which is going to be a fun one. Coming up next. So let's get started. Let's first off, get into our lower leg section, texture set lists map. And then we're going to go ahead and just sort of create again, like we've always done, just create another folder. And let's start off by dealing with the socks here. Feel free to experiment again with all sorts of different fabrics and then manipulating the parameters. But one that I like the most for the socks, it's always been this nice little fun, stretchy texture right here. It's pretty interesting of fabrics, synthetic dots. We saw that worked out pretty well. So I'll just go ahead now and just go up to the folder. Just going to call this folder socks, like so. And I'm just going to mask it out by adding right-click on it at black mask, gonna go to the left here and select my mesh fill and change to mesh fill over here. This is again our polygon fill that we're using. And we can just sort of click on it as long as we have a class of value and we'll have our SOC set up there. So feel free then to go through, change out. Maybe some of the socks, maybe two more, darker gray like so. If you want to work with anything else, go through, checked all the different layers, see what affects y. Like if this is the dots of fill layers to the surface detail indicates dot's kinda mess around with that. If you want to see, if you want to change the scale, you can take a shot at that by just clicking on the mask. Click then underneath the mask to the circles can change the scale of the dots. You might lose a little bit of detail. So I may just keep it like that right now because as you zoom out, you kinda lose it anyways. So moving on, let's just keep rolling along if you also lose some of the darkness here. Remember, we did this at the end of the midsection map. We can do it again. We can just simply click on a fill layer that control over arcsin everything. We can turn off high roughness, metal and normal and go through our textures to find the corresponding ambient occlusion map, we can just use an ambient occlusion to kind of bring out some more shadows. We can do that. Make sure you're choosing the right one is we baked out three ambient occlusion maps. So, and then just drag and drop into the base color and then set its blend mode to multiply. And then we got something like that. You can also add a little bit and can either turn it on or off to see how well it affects everything. It kind of does some things for us that we like. It's a little bit too pronounced in the shins. I'll take it like that. We'll just add white mask. And I'm just going to mask out the shins for now. So once we do that, let's just go ahead now and just finish off with putting real quick. Touch on to the shoes here. We don't have to do anything too crazy. It's not our main subject piece here, but we can just do some real quick and easy here. So I'll make another folder and I'll just call that folder shoes will start off with something like style I well, let's say, Well look into Rubber Baby, first of all, rubber tire just to see what I want. Maybe I want something on the soles of the shoes here. And then I'll just drop in, stylize right here to kinda go over. And then let's create a mask over all this. So let's go ahead and go up to our folder above at a black mask. And again, if I'm going too fast, again, pause, rewind, pause, rewind. Please do that is very essential that you take advantage of that. So let's just go ahead and kinda go through everything. So now we have a folder that is pertaining everything. But right now the leather stylized, it's covering up everything on the rubber tire. So let's add another mask. This time I'll just add a white mask. It can be black or white and you're still going to have to do just as much. Let's change. If I do mesh fill, it's going to do the whole model. But I see the UVs are somewhat segregated, so I can take a shot at UV chunk as my selection approach. We can do mesh fill here. So, so here we can do that same concept up here, like so. Now let's look at this. If you feel like you need to change anything brown, for example, to something a little bit more cooler. Now you probably have to do two things. Let's go back. I'll open leather stylized. Go to my base color to begin with. Just kinda slide it around and go through a whole bunch of different places. Might do a same thing. Brown seems to translate the best. And just keep the shoes a little bit dark. And we saw what we did on the zipper. We have a zipper here. So one of the best smart materials to work with is still dark because it creates a nice little ambient occlusion. And that, so we'll add a black mask. And this time, you know, it's part of a normal maps. We got to manually get in there and painted in. So let's just add a black mask and cover it all up. And we'll just paint in all those details again. Like so. So that's kind of a little bit of a crash in there. If you want, you can also paint some of this stuff in here. Like so. You can also paint a little bit of this stuff in here. You know, you just get creative, have some fun. We're getting to a point now where we kinda wanna see more individual texturing go through here. So kind of bear that all in mind. See a little bit here. Maybe you want to put, if you want to put some sort of a massive effect on here, you can do that. But we're just gonna kinda leave the shoes right now as is. We're not doing too terribly much with them. But it's up to you how you want to get creative. Kind of leaving that one open-ended for you because we kind of want to see you build on what you've learned so far. And we're hoping to get some screenshots like we've given you demonstrations. How did make this kind of texture in this kind of cloudiness? Now we want you to kinda read, duplicate that, and maybe do something fun down here. And the same way that you did up here, you know, we're, we're hoping that or maybe you like this kind of material. Well, we kind of would like you to now think about how you can work with this and make it look like that down here, we would really like to see some screenshots so we can share with people and get other people inspired. That was kind of what our consensus was. When we did this, we wanted to get more interaction with the students to see if we could just get them to be tested a little bit more and, and get them to be a little bit more engaged into the course. So that's why we're doing that. Same thing with the emissive here. I can maybe to be doing just a little bit of the metal, but if you want, you can actually go through and maybe instead of mel, you can do some sort of a mission effect like we did with the dots on the disks for the mid section. This is the more kind of, again, doing a little bit more of a minimalistic amount of work in the lower end because we kind of want to get you to find your own creative text string out output, I guess is the best way to explain it. So keep that in mind. And we want you to, like I said, grow beyond the course and think beyond the course to something fun. So with that said, we're not, believe it or not, we're not we're going to come back to the shin. The reason we're not doing the shin right now is because we want to build a skin material up here first and then copy it and then read distributed across all the others. And we get the best demonstration of our skin. Using the face as the model instead of just a strip of skin, like the shin as the model. So bear that one mind. So like I said, we want you to have fun. We want you to be experimenting now. We want you to build off of what we kind of went through. So just please, please have some fun. And once you're ready to move on to the next lesson, which is going to be about hair, will then take it from there. So with that said stay grounded, stay tuned, and good luck on upping the bar right up here. So. 21. Going Over Hair Cards: All right, So welcome back. In this video. Now, this is an important one for you to listen to in this video because it's important to get some closure. We're talking about hair now and we're going to talk about hair and Substance Painter. So we're going to have to deliver very important contexts to you about hair and what the expectations that the student has with this course so that we are all on the same page here. First things first, we're going to talk to you about where substance painters limitations are in regard to all the types of hair. Typically when you're making hair, there is usually one, three ways you can make hair. You can do hair pretty much stylized, similar to what you see in Ford night with their hair where it's kinda clay and solid and usually it's sculpted through Z brush with a normal map or maybe hand painted manually with just a simple diffuse map. The second way is it can be done in a sort of a dynamic solution with a 3D software. So like X Gen with a spline based software or maybe fiber mesh with ZBrush where you know, you only see the results completely with a render shot, for example. The third way that it's done is done through alpha cards. Now, alpha cards are usually done for game art, just like the first way with the sculpting and stylize. And they're basically flat strips of cards that pretty much have a alpha channel in the texture imbedded into them that is telling that which is transparent to be seen and unseen and then that which is solid to be seen. So give me an example. We're going to basically be working with the alpha card method in substance painter because unfortunately Substance Painter doesn't have any other form of hair creation system like fiber mesh or X Gen. So alpha cards as being only way that it can get through. So with that said, you're going to need to have textures created typically before you begin texturing hair. In addition to that, you're going to have to have our polygon car polygon planes or alpha cards, hair cards, if you want to call them more specifically, set up on your model to begin, if you're looking to do something with it in Substance Painter. Now, it's very common still to be working with generating these textures in different softwares. It's very common to be working with setting up all the hair in a different software in fact. But we wanted to make this so that, you know, you had some sort of a solution to translate over into Substance Painter, everything that you made. Let me go ahead and just first of all, give you some examples of what we got. Remember what we had before with the transparency, everything just kinda covered up our face. I'm going to go ahead and turn this on right now. And you're seeing it a little bit different than you saw before in your previous lessons. That's because you have alpha cards plugged in and textures as well plugged in. And if you, it may not look completely perfect. But if we hit render right now, we can kind of see something that is a little bit more identifiable then closer to hair. Now again, these are all essentially flat polygon planes, strips that are just kinda being plugged in with the opacity. Now that's not going to make too much sense, but let me go back into my other area. By the way, that was Ira. And let's go down to the shelf here and I want you to kinda fixate yourself to this viewing area. And I'm gonna put my mouse over some of the textures that you're going to be importing in. First off, we have a thin strand alpha, and we have the color version of that same thin strand as well as a shadow version for that help you with some specularity. And once again, we have a different strand that's more of a wide strand, as well as a sort of a color shot of that. And once again, sort of a shadow version. Moving on, we have the same thing. It's going to be sort of like a swirl strand. And we have the color of that, wants, it wants to update. And then we move into a shadow version of that same strand. And lastly, we have sort of a strange off to the left strand. And we got to the Alpha version and then the shadows string version of that. Now, don't think in your mind, you, you're looking at that and you're probably thinking, oh, let's see, there's three sets of four. So you're telling me we have to export 12 textures to make hair work for alpha cards? No, not at all. We're putting all our textures into fill layers basically. So like I said, this is all more importantly about things like how shall I say? This is more about how to translate what you've created in other 3D softwares into Substance Painter. Again, Substance Painter does have currently some limitations when it comes to hair. And it is regrettable. And in fortunately, you're going to have to be open to the idea currently, as it stands right now, to create either hair textures in a different software or create or reuse Alpha hair textures from a another source. Now, again, when we supply you all of these textures, they're yours to have these textures you can reuse for anything that you want. You can reuse them as many times as you want. Now we're going to go over a two things. Now this is the important part. Two very important things. We're going to talk to you about how to create these textures. Again, it's not a mandatory thing for that. It is not mandatory for you to create these textures because again, this course is about learning Substance Painter. And we are creating these textures with a different software. So don't feel that you have to learn how to do this in order to proceed forward in the course. Because again, we give you these textures, whether you have the software to create them or not, so not mandatory on how to create these textures. If you want to skip it, please go on ahead. That's fine. The second thing we're going to teach you, and that will be more mandatory to learn is how we bring these textures in and how we plugged them into a fill layer and readjust them to each UV shell as we've laid at. And again, we'll talk about more about that UV shells and how they correspond when we're creating these textures. So keep that all in mind. Feel free again if you need to skip the creating the textures part because if you don't have the software for ZBrush or Maya, that's fine. Those are the two that we're going to work with on making these two. But if you do have the software, you're welcome to check it out. But we include those videos so that it's easier to follow in contexts when we're setting up the hair. Like I said, over and over again, I do apologize that substance painter does not have a spline based dynamic solution of creating a really nice realistic hair like you see in Maya with Arnold or really nice spline based dynamics solution of hair creation system that you see with fiber mesh. And we don't see very much of that in Substance Painter, It's more to working with texturing things that are typically more solid. So we wanted to just kinda be open with you. That is a limitation unfortunately, with painter. Hopefully they'll come down a road and just kind of update that, maybe on how to create like some sort of editor for hair creation, that would be great. But we just got to work with what we got. So, so keep that in mind. So with the next video we're going to start off with, we're just going to do a demonstration of how we create some of these hair strands that you see before you, how we export them out. We'll be using ZBrush to export them out. We'll be doing some examples of this. And then from there we're going to show you how we repos them and replace them in Maya. And then after we get everything set up in Maya will show you how to rearrange the UVs to look like this and how we correspond, all of the textures we made to fit each incorrect, match, each correct UV shell properly across. So with that said, it's going to sound a little bit crazy, a little bit complicated, but it's actually not as complicated once you get into it, don't let this stuff intimidate you. Just take it one step at a time. Watch carefully, watched slowly rewind, and you'll be just fine with it. So with that said, stick around and stay tuned. 22. Making Hair Strands: Okay, so welcome back. In this video now we're going to be doing a creation of our hair textures. We're going to be making some hair textures. Again, this is not a mandatory part because again, this requires other softwares to create them as Substance Painter doesn't have any hair texture creating software built into it or any sort of dynamics, spline based simulation for hair like Maya has for x gen or in our case with this example, it's going to be fiber mesh from ZBrush. Now if you don't have the software, that's all right. But if you do, you can, you're welcome to follow along. We're doing this demonstration mainly to help you with the contexts of order and how our hair, and while it's not a 100 percent necessary, we're showing you how we take the hair and bring it into Substance Painter to plug in if you don't have the software's again, we give you the software or sorry, we give you the textures. So let's go ahead and begin. First thing I'll go ahead and do is I'll bring up my ZBrush, which I have already. Just going to go ahead and click on light box and take that off. The one thing I'd like to start before anything is his phone gonna make some textures. I'm going to make them square. And that means I need to go up to my document up here and I'm just going to click on that. And I'm going to click off of Pro so I can change the dimensions. So it's 2048 by 2048 and I'll hit recites like so now it doesn't look like it's resize completely and that has a lot to do with it being zoomed in. So let's go ahead and come up here to where it says zoom in, hold left-click and just drag. And you can kind of see a shape like that. So now I'm just gonna go ahead and click on little tool here and just go into clicking a claim. Left-click, drag that into my Canvas, hit the T key and I'm going to hit make poly mesh 3D also change the mat out over here to something easier to see and hit Command and to clear all that. Now, we go through here and if you hit F a couple of times, you can kinda lose your piece. So just make sure that that's centered properly. So now that we did that, Let's go through fiber mesh. Let's go ahead and just turn on preview. And that's just going to kind of give us a preview of our fiber mesh keeps disappearing on us. And that's just because it's being projected in dynamically or not dynamically, but it's being instance projection. It's not an actual set of splines yet. Let's change the color so we can see it a little bit better. And now I'm just going to mess around with some of the settings. I don't need to necessarily have that many fibers. Maybe something around the vicinity of that lengthen might go something a little bit longer. And coverage like something like 13. And I'll change my segments so up to 12 and that's just how many, like insert edge loops around each fiber. All right, So kinda have something like that. Let's go ahead and zoom out. And I'm just holding left Alt left-click, then releasing left all while still holding left-click to have Zoom. So that's kinda of establishing our fibers. But what I'll do now is I'm just going to kind of turn preview temporarily off. Hold down spacebar. Turn my draw size up a little and hold down control. And left-click drag a mask. And then I'm gonna kinda bring the mask in a little bit like that. So we've got something going on. So the only thing left for me to do here is work with some of my length. Here. We could probably go with a little bit of a long length, maybe something like that. And I'm gonna do a quick little BPR render up here. And yeah, I guess I can work with that. So now that I have a set of hair, I can just go ahead and hit Accept. And I'll say yes, and that's just convert a sub tool for me up here. I don't need that plane, so I'm gonna go ahead and take that off. So now I got myself a set of fibers to work with. And I'm going to be used in BPR up here to kinda give myself a preview of those fibers. So let's start off by creating some of our fibers. So now we're going to create four different patterns here. And those patterns are going to be like basically four different strands. Like for example, this is a thin strand here that we're going to do and probably just do a couple more. If stare and I'll probably do like a default wide strand and maybe like some kind of a swirl. And then we'll show you how we export the maps out for those. So but that said, let's just go ahead and I'll, for my first one, I'll make the thin strand just so you can have a little bit of an idea. Now, if it's going to be four different types, Let's go up to R sub tool and hit Duplicate three more times. And turn the visibility of them all off except the first one. Let's go through this now. It's just going to hold Control Shift. Then slip and left-click drag. Still holding, left-click down, I release Control Shift and hold left Alt. Turn it red. So we can kinda have a little bit of a thin look. And we're going to use our modifiers in ZBrush to kinda manipulate all of this. So let's go to our army. Let's go to Geometry, modify Topology and hit Delete Hidden. Do quick little BPR SQL are all still good. Looks like we're all still good. So now I'd like to maybe work around this, have some fun with it. Let's try working with some of the groom brushes. What we're going to use groom brushes in ZBrush and we're going to show you how to work those, and we're going to show you how we combine them. Modifiers in ZBrush that deformed things. So I'll hit B. And if I hit G, you can see pretty much all are grim brushes. We'll start off with something basic like groom lengthen. Lot of people tell you don't use the grim brushes, but honestly, I kinda like him still. And maybe something like that. Yeah, Something like that. Right. So it's a little bit kind of like that. And then after that we can just have a little bit of fun with some of the other green brushes. So let's try groom spike. So where we can find that we'd be G, S, I think it is. I just have some fun. Take a couple of practice Zhuangzi and kind of see like how that kind of has a little bit of a little bit of fun here. 2y1. No, go ahead. And I'm just kinda just doing a stripped down and then just kinda holding Shift to smooth it. That's got a little bit of a tear there. Gotta be careful when you're smoothing these out. And you've got to also make sure do BPR connected in any flat pieces that are kind of blowing up, right? Maybe something like that. And then we'll just go ahead and bring up the W key. I'm just going to click on that center button right there, that upside-down teardrop. Now I'm going to click on that transform type or that cog icon. And I'll work with starting off with taper. And I'm going to just taper the top here. And I'm gonna go ahead and tape or the bottom. It doesn't really do too much tapering, so you might have to do it a couple of times on the bottom. Or if you really are in a hurry, you can use the pinch rush to help you out. She almost tempted to use, but I'm almost done tapering as well. Hit Accept. Now after we've done a couple of tapers, let's just go ahead and do a twist. And we can just kinda see how it kind of falls into place here. All right, Let's just go ahead and hit Accept. If we kinda look at it and do a quick little BPR render, we can see a little bit more of a result would get in, get in a little bit better of a look here. So that's okay for me to work with. So on. A little bit easier. Yeah, that works for me. So that's gonna be an example of just how you can just kind of get something done with hair really quick. I might be tempted to kind of work something out here, maybe just do little tests. Bpr is just to see how and looks on there. Just to make it a little bit more interesting, like a couple more strands. But that's going to be our first one. So let's go ahead and turn that on. We're going to call that one R thin strand when we export it out. Let's go ahead and go to our wide strand. And I'm just gonna go ahead and hit Center on there by hitting W, then hitting this x teardrop. This is an easy one. This is just simply doing a taper up here, then a real taper up here. So I'm pretty frequent easy. And then LET, except that's going to be a wide string. And then we can just kinda go through that. Think of it like the strand that fills up some volume. All right, so this one's going to be a little bit more similar to what we did in the first one with little less steps. We'll start off by making it like our wide strand with a taper above and a taper below. And these are all like anime type of spike go COO like hair, this Cyberpunk character. So that's kinda what we're doing. We're doing different variations of spikes for this particular one. And we'll do one thing different here. We'll hit Q and then press B. We'll do groom spike. I mean, my rooms spike. Do a couple practice swings and see how that looks. We can just simply do maybe like a twist. I'm sweet, get so little bit. So let's go ahead and lengthen it like that. Quick little BBR. You get something like that. Hair a little bit. And then we'll do the last one, which is our straight. Now this one's probably going to be our most decorative and most used one. It will be the fourth hair strand. So what we'll do is, is that we'll just go through and just kind of bring it in here. And then we'll just go ahead and we'll start off with a little bit of a taper. Just a little bit. Same thing as before. So this time we'll kinda do a little bit of stroke with the groom's spike. Or it's kinda like that a little bit. What I'm thinking also, as I'd like to do a little bit of a groom length and so I can kind of pinch something off here. So maybe groom lengthen. Just doing some really super quick stuff. That's all. All right. For this, again, you see how that looks link and then we'll do a spike up to the side. Kind of like that a little bit. Let's see if we can move a little bit. If you want to change it up and maybe add a twist to it. And you can always do that. We can see how that looks sort of like another type of hair strand or you can do and it's a nice little decorative one if you have to hit our twice to get the scale of your function down so you can make it a little bit longer. You can do that too. So you can kinda make your own hair strands. So now we're gonna go over just real quick. Before we leave. We're going to just do a real quick setup for rendering. So to do this, we have to go back to our documents. The first thing I'm gonna do is I'm going to go all the way up to our documents, which is also backup here, don't forget. And I'm going to find out where this block back is. I'm going to hold left-click down and bring that in and just set that to black. We're going to take order to set that to black. I'm going to take my range. I'm going to set that to 0 and I'm going to set the center to 0. And so everything that we should have should now be visible for us. Try to get it zoomed in as you possibly can, out to breaking. And then lastly, what I'm gonna do is ongoing to sweat my material to just for color here and save myself time. I'm just going to hit a normal Archie, normal map because I kinda like the colors on there. And I thought it was kinda need to kinda matched into the theme I was looking for. Kinda just right. So we get a little bit of a hair strand like this. So it looks a little bit pixelated slightly. It does. I can assure you it does have a tendency to smooth out when you set the settings a little bit higher. Let's go ahead and go up to render. And I'm just gonna go through and check in everything that I need. A0 is probably one thing I'm going to have. Talk to you about BPR passes in a second here. And if you enable ambient occlusion, then you can go to the BPR and then start messing around with all the things like wearing rays and things like that. Super sampler is probably going to be another thing, anti per anti-aliasing that you want to kind of crank up, subpixel, a tiny leasing render quality. I always set that to seven. Let's see, render property. I'm just going to turn that to about nine and keep in mind, this is all going to jack up on your your render properties or your render time. So kinda bear that in mind. So once you have everything that you have, again, you can just kinda do one more quick little Render. And again, what I did was I kinda just focus more on anti-aliasing and details quality and sub picks, quality maxed out just so we can get some a little bit easier. And once you've gotten all of that taken care of, go to where it says render passes. And what you're gonna do is you're gonna basically for each hair strain you do this for, you're going to be exporting three maps. The first one is a composite. And then you're just gonna kinda click on it. I like to choose a TIF for my choice. And you can call this one, for example. This is scraping off the left I call in, it's going to be my fourth hair card. I'm going to call it BPR hair straight. And then I'm just going to put the number four on there because it's the fourth one I did. And so you would then just say beauty than at the end of all of that. So here, let me show you hair, strand, stray, beauty for and you would just simply export that out like so. And then you could just go to where it says, find the shadow one, find that one. Maybe just click on that to save yourself a whole bunch of things and just simply call that one spec. Then make sure you set it to tiff and then just hit save. And then finally the most important and Alpha here, the most mandatory I should say, is the alpha channel 1. This is the one that you need for your transparency of your hair cards to work. You need to export this one out and just click on that and call that Alpha. Change it to tip. So now you're gonna do basically what I did in all of these. For each strand. Again, if you don't have any of them, that's okay. Let's quarter right. We're just going through all of this for contexts and how it adds up to going into Substance Painter. So no one gets kinda lost. It's not this course is about learning Substance Painter is not about learning ZBrush are making hair or anything like that. It's about learning Substance Painter and unfortunately, Substance Painter doesn't have a workaround for dealing with hair unless it's like clay hair, for example. Or hair like you see in Fortnite where it's all stylized or something like that. Otherwise. This, the next one up that it can take is alpha cards. But you have to work with the alpha cards and creating those textures and different softwares. And that's what this is just helping you with contexts, not mandatory to do all these things because again, we give you all these textures anyways. So with that said, what I want you to do is I want you to go through a few are wanting to stick around. And when she does go through, do a render, just make sure you set it to the right material. Make sure you are exporting out three jpegs. And alpha are three jpegs when you hit BPR. For example, an Alpha and a beauty and a spec or shadow map I should says is here when you go under BPR pass. And then from there we'll kinda show you how it plugs into Maya. And so stick around and stay tuned. 23. Hair Card Construction: Okay, welcome back. In this video now we're going to talk to you a little bit about our hair card constructions are polygons strips that we're seeing all over here that are covering up pretty much half our head here. Now. Then the last video we talked about how we made textures in one software for ZBrush. We're going to talk to you about how we created the polygon models of polygon planes strips in a different software because we found it a little bit easier to do in Maya. So what we are, if you did everything correctly, assuming you did have the software. If not, that's okay. But if you can kinda see, I made a folder called thin strand where I had three textures I exported out. And you can kinda go through and see every folder has pretty much three textures of beauty, a spec, and a short outlook or beauty, a shadow map and an alpha. And I chose tiff format for all of them. So now what we're gonna do is we have another course where we talk about things like how we export a high res and a low-res out of this exact same character to another, to a software or how to prep it to export it out. So that's kinda where we pick up. You don't have to necessarily do that. You don't necessarily have to have that because again, we give you the model, but I'm just going to bring this in here. And this is the default T-pose of the same character cards. Now, as you can see on here, I kinda already have all the cards kinda placed. But I want you to kinda imagine for a second if you can. I'm just going to go ahead and turn that off. That these cards don't exist for now. And what we did is this, we kind of export it out, sort of like a base mesh of our model. And it still needs to be you bead down the road. But after that we made for polygon cards strips above. And we labeled those strips. And then more importantly, we grouped those strips. And finally we UV those strips before we even duplicated the strips into what you see here. So what I'm saying is this. So like for example, what I did was I did a Create Polygon and went through plane. And I've just simply brought it back up here and hit the W key. And then switch into E or E and J to kinda shift, snap it. And then we click on the modifiers. And for now let's just kinda leave. It's just sleep. The vision widths to one. Maybe I'll change it to something like that. Then finally, I'm going to bring up my UV editor because it doesn't need to be UV. And what I did was I simply assigned a new material on there and I called it just the Fong. And keep in mind, I'm working on Maya L T, so we don't need to have the full version of Maya for this. And I'm just gonna go ahead and name the transparency transparency test. What I did here is just simply the RP. And now that I've kind of scaled it down, all I'm gonna do is just simply bring in through the color channel and click that checkbox would click on a file. And then I'm gonna new nib. I'm just going to go through my image name. And I'm going to go through and find my folder that says Herr renders on here. And I'll just choose something like I can choose anything, but I'll choose strafe strand. Again because this is the color that I chose for the channel. I'm just going to choose that. Let's go ahead and remove these guys and like so. So if I hit the six key, you'll see our model. Now it's a little bit thin and it's a little bit off. And that has a lot to do with UB still not really being properly you bead. So if you want, you can just sort of bring up your UV editor or UV senator and then just simply go through and hit unfold. Just to kind of bring it up again. I'll probably have to hit Create. I think actually you can just hit Automatic. Then it doesn't like to play with you, then we can just do this, which I kinda like a little bit better. I forgot to delete history when I did the unfold because I didn't do a responsive UV. So now that you get that, let's go ahead and just simply click on the UVs. Make sure that they're properly scaled so that they look a little bit, something like that. So I'll do this one more time now. And this time I'm just gonna do something with transparency. And I'll just go ahead and choose the same file again. And you can see that transparency brings in our file like so. So now that you do that, the next thing you're gonna wanna do is you're going to want to go ahead and I would say probably duplicate this and bring this across and then assign a new texture and then make that a bomb. And then make sure that's a different texture because you're going to be put in all the textures and different places. So like for example, this one, It's going to be the same concept as before, except we're going to go through and we're going to do is choose our hair render. Of our second hair render. We're going to call it hair render, wide strand. And we're going to choose our beauty. And then transparency file. Bringing everything back in. I'm just kind of reloading everything here. Let's choose our alpha. I don't need to be using the shadow for any of this. So now you have something here. Now, I want you to do that for all the next two strips. So you're going to then duplicate that, go over, assign a new material, plug textures into that, and so on and so forth. If you want, you can help yourself to like, for example, we want to kinda make sure we're labeling our textures like hair strand. One thing you want to go through and you want to kinda go through and just kind of keep track of everything hair strand to then OR Y and so forth. So you're gonna wanna do that then for the rest of the other two textures. Now I just kinda want you to kinda see what we're doing. Now, this is the next important part that we want you to do. After you've done all of that. Once you to left-click on here and just hold and press Command G because we want to group these and do that for each and every single one. Just hit Command G and just group them. Now, why are we doing that? Well, let me go ahead and bring up our other transparencies. So let's just get these guys out of here. This is sort of our full set of transparencies. I did a little bit more work as you can see him. And you'll also notice I kind of curved them out a little bit more so you don't necessarily have to have them flat. Now, the reason we group these is because if we hit the up key, we can see all the hair strands that we have here and also all the UVs are being selected as well. If I go through, I can select them all the UVs for this one. And that allows me then to reorganize the UVs, like you see here. Alright. So go through again. You hit the up key, kinda go through, hit the up key. You can see all the UVs and you can kind of just kinda Shift-click to see where your adjacent UVs are. And you can. Select the UVs, hold left old, right-click to Shell, and just kinda hit the R key and just scale them in like so now you're losing all your hair texture. But that's again okay because we're going to be plugging, reassembling all her hair textures that we made that we plugged into. We're going to scale them in two different locations and Substance Painter. So that's probably the main idea of how all that worked works. You can kinda see that like this last one, hair strand four is our most used one. So to kind of recap, this is also why we numerically labeled our hair strands 1234 in the hair renders folders because again, we have four strips here of UVs, 1, 2, 3, 4, and plus all of these UVs, which are sort of like the UVs of these corresponding volumes spots right here. And we're going to be plugging in textures from hair strand one. Then here we're going to plug in textures, a hair strand, tooth wide here, we're going to have hair strand. The three swirl here. We're going to have hair strand for strafe off here. So again, that's how we kinda organize the UVs. We first go through. We just center the UVs, kinda like how we do here. We plug in the texture which then because that's centered in there. And then we go through and then just put groups on all of them. So when we duplicate them, we can re-select all the UVs for that. And after that, we go through and duplicate this. As many times. I am places all around to establish our hair cards and such and bringing them in. It's just like a placement game pretty much. And if you have to work with any of the deformers, we my most common deformer is going to be bend, which is under deform. In the modeling tab, nonlinear bend. Just click the tab here. And I can just kind of get a little bend deformer that shows up here. Curvature. It represents how it curves. Conjunction to the angle of this line. As long as it's selected, you can hit the E key and change where the curvature goes, like so. And if you have two more areas that affect the one end or the other, high or low? Well, I kind of click on high and middle mouse. I can kind of tell it not to select here. And if I hit the W key and I can kinda tell it how far to go up, or maybe swirl in a little bit. And then I can just hit, for example, delete history. Let's go ahead and isolate, select this. And if I want this really Corbyn, I can just go ahead and add in edge loop here. Like so. Maybe if I want, I can even double out if I really wanted some geometry to work with here on this particular one because it will do it like a real twist and you just do bend. Curvature. Make sure it's set to the right angle, which is inward. Make sure it's not affecting this side. So we're going to choose the low bound this time. They weren't going to just simply boring this all the way up here. Really affect that. Like so. So now that kind of so we can do something like that. So that's why I kinda like the bend tool because it kinda helps you establish what you want to sort of a nondestructive manner. When you're done, you just delete the history, go up to edit, delete by type history. And then that's that. So basically, I do, I do that quite a few times throughout the whole course. These fragments you see that's just viewport L2, fun stuff. So with that said, that's kinda how we kind of set everything up. I'm going to keep repeating over and over what we did in case it gets lost on everyone because I don't want it. It's a little bit of a confusing process for a beginner to grasp. So again, we create our polygon strip, we UV out our polygon strip. We then assign a new shader to our polygon strip, and that's going to be the shader for our first strand. We then go ahead and then plug-in the texture of the beauty map. In the the color section, we plug in the. Texture for the transparency map in the file so that it can be seen and register out as hair strand. We then duplicate that piece over. And then it's going to be then assign a new material, sign a new texture, rinse and repeat with the color and transparency to the next hair strand over. When you get through all four hair strands, then you go through each one. Hit Command G to group it. Make a separate group. Click on the next one. Make a separate group by hitting command G. Make a second group with Command G. And then the fourth one, you're gonna do a separate group with Command G. After you are finished, def, placing and deforming all your hair cards, we go through and we take the hair cards, each individual hair cards, and we're going to work with this set over here. And we are going to hit the up key to select all the groups that are sharing the same UVs as this. We click on the UV in the UV editor, which can be brought up. Here. We right-click to UVs. We marquee select and we sort of re align them all to match up. Then like that. Then we go into object mode, Left-click on that, it up, hold left shift, left-click, so we can see where it is in conjunction with this UV. And then we go through and hold Command Shift or I'm sorry, hold command, right-click to shell. And then we just sort of scale, make it somewhat similar, like so. And of course they're all going to fall off. That's because they're sharing a texture that's completely large like this will rescale the texture to these UVs in substance painter here and there we're gonna do the same thing. We're going to just kinda rinse and repeat until all the UVs line up horizontally like that. Once you have done that, and the final thing you do is you go through and marquee, select all of them, and assign them into one folder or a one uv, I'm sorry, one shader so that they're all sharing the same UVs in one UV map or one texture set list. And as you can see, there's some extra UVs down here. These are the eyelashes that we also are signing. And this is just some fun UV strip that we kind of put for the area here to do some nice little fluoresce or wires that we're going to work with on emissive effects. So That's just going to be down the road and the head section. So that's just what we did. That's how we did it. We then hit F5. We made sure that we had labeled our map, our shader transparency map. And then we just simply export it all of it out. Trying to think if there's anything I forgot when I told you this, but looks like that's just about it. Now, there's a lot of different ways that this can be done. Another very common way to do this is to not take any hair into substance painter instead just simply, Wow, just merely work in substance painter first with a bold character and then bring the character into a 3D software. And then you can finish your hair there if you want. Which is a very common tactic. I don't do it that way because I'm not working with the full version of Maya with its Arnold render system, which is probably my favorite render system. But again, it's also the most expensive because who has 300 bucks a month on them. And so we're just going to kind of show you how to get something accomplished as a workaround that we can give you. Like, It's not a very common thing to have a workflow where you can actually translate in the pipeline hair textures in the Substance Painter, most of the time you see hair textures being done as the last stage in another 3D software because Substance Painter doesn't really have much of a pipeline for hair creation. I'm sorry, alpha hair creation. So with that said, in the next video, we're going to now pick up with the assumption that you have the hair textures which are in your resources folder. And we're just going to show you how we hook those hair textures up. So with that said, stick around and stay tuned. 24. Assembling Hair Textures: Okay, so let's continue. In this video, we're going to show you how we import our textures in it that we made and how we combine them with an imported model with our UV map that we made from Maya or any other 3D software that you can do the equivalent of as it's shown right here. And how we line our textures up with what we have here. So this is what we should be at no matter whether you have other softwares or not. So as you have Substance Painter and the resource folder with all the textures of the hair strands. That's pretty much all these textures here. You should be just fine. So to start off with, we're going to try to get all these textures from all these folders into Substance Painter. We're going to try to line them up into the UV map of the transparency map and then make some tweaks from there. To start off with, let's just try to keep it simple. Let's click on our texture set lists, which is transparency map. Let's go ahead and make it fill layer and just call that fill layer thin strand one. So that means that it's going to be this UV shell here. So let's just go ahead and find our folder for that and bring that in. And let's just go ahead and just select all of them and drag and drop them all into Substance Painter. Now I already have them in here and I have my Textures tab here because that's where I want them to be. Defining. Basically, just go through and set them all to texture so it can just be a little easier. And I'm going to say Project is Cyberpunk girl, and then you're going to hit Import already did so I'm just going to hit. So with that said, you should just have these three folders right here are three textures. So what we're going to go ahead and do now with that is, is we're going to start off with dragging and dropping. Make sure you also, in case I've forgotten, make sure you have an opacity channel. So if you haven't go through texture set list, hit the plus sign, make sure you choose an opacity setting. I already have it there, but look for opacity here and click on that so that can be turned on. Make sure the blue box is there so you can turn it on. Let's go back into our layers again. And let's just start dragging and dropping some stuff. So let's just start with the thin strand. Let's just make the base color that you kinda see it kinda pop up right there now as it pops up. But one thing that you notice is, is that this strand is kind of, it's, it's repeating as you can see. So one of the first things we're going to have to do is go up to UV, unwrap and hit None. So it doesn't repeat. So it's just one strand, like, so. You'll notice that when we dropped this texture and we got this little flat square, this square represents the texture and how we can move it around the uv space. So let's just go ahead and just simply position it right now to the proper coordinates of the first UV shell. So we're just gonna kinda line it up like so. And as best as you can, make sure it's centered as well. And once you do that, Let's go down to the opacity channel and look for our opacity or our Alpha strain. It should be just that black and white one. And we'll just go ahead and put that in. And now you should see the opacity suddenly change here. So that's pretty much the basics. We have two more channels we got to manipulate. One's going to be color and the other one's going to be normal. But the last thing we're gonna do here is I'm just going to go ahead and click and add a black mask on there. And just go through the selection tool and make sure that it's just this area that's being covered up or I'm sorry, occluded to VC. So now we're gonna kinda do the same thing again. And this time we're going to just go through and call this wide stirring and two. And then you're gonna go ahead, go through and import the wide strand. Two folders. Just drag and drop into here. I already have, but again, don't forget, set them all to texture, set to project Cyberpunk girl. I already have. So now you see I have three textures here and we're just going to kind of drag and drop. We haven't touched the shadow yet. We're gonna get to that in a second here. But let's, we'll just kind of go into that a little bit later here. So what I'll do is I'm just going. Go ahead and just drag the base color in, and I'll drag in the outgo or into the Opacity channel and everything goes clear as day looks a little bit off. Well, let's set it up now this is strain two. That means that's this UV shell set to repeat, apparently. So we know what to do there. Now It's just this area. Can even make it a little bit thinner. Feel free to. And now that we have it all set up like that, let's just add a black mask on there. And let's just go ahead and just make it so it's only seen that area. All right, moving on to more dilemma. Let's go with swirl strand. And again, you're going to drag them all in. You already saw me do it twice so far. If you need to, you just go find your swirl strand, drag them all in, bringing them in, set them all to texture, set to current projects, Cyberpunk girl. And let's look for them. Look kinda see there, write all three across here. So let's bring in the base color, and let's bring in the Opacity. And I'm sorry, the alpha. Again, it's all weird looking. So let's go ahead and turn off. First of all, none. And let's line it up to the third UV shell here. Links up. And we right-click add black mask. And let's bring it back in. One more to go. And that's going to be this one. And that's our fourth string strife. So you're already seen what I do. You're already seen me imported in. I'm just gonna go straight to it this time. We're going to call this one. And let's go ahead and line those up. Base is in there, and alpha is in there. We haven't touched our shadow yet. I am aware. Switch our unwrap to none, and let's line it up to that fourth. So you can kinda see it starting to kind of line up. It's starting to kind of register. But it's also kind of like all over the place a little bit like a smooth sheen of specularity. So let's go ahead and add a black. Most good, forgot to do that. Let's just make sure that everything's so if we kinda hit the the, the piece, we're kind of starting to get everything kinda lined up. But, you know, look at the light. Pardon me? If he just kinda looks like it's kinda straightway are long. They're like it's a kind of a like up flat plastic Xin that's going on there. So that's where we want to kinda work with something on the specularity. So I'm gonna do two things here. If you go to the roughness and kinda go all the way across to kind of fix that problem a little bit more. So it is a little bit easier to read with the texture. Now the thing that you can do is, is I, I kinda like to do this. Is I like to take the shadow map and plug it into the metallic area. Kinda gives a little bit more accentuation in certain areas. And then the roughness map to kind of kind of block out any like negative spots in the Alpha where it's invisible yet it's still shining with specularity. So I'll just kinda go through all those and just do that real quick. So roughness again to be the Alpha and till it's going to be the metal. Wide strand is going to be roughness. Now, this isn't the official way to do it. This is just like a quick hacks way to do it because there are things that we can do and are immensely deeper that I could go into. I don't want to, because this is kinda like a beginner's crash course in hair. But one thing I always like to do is get a very subtle soft form of ambient occlusion, invert the map and then use that as a sense of. Popularity kinda get some strands specularity going across, but it's a different, it's like an advanced course tutorial and Substance Painter. And I don't want to really go to teeth. That would probably frustrates some people scratch their heads. All right, so let's go through roughness. Like so. And then let's go through and just put a metallic in there. And we kind of take a little bit of a shot into our hair. Looks a little bit better. Suits. So we'll go a little bit of a can't really see too much. Quick little BPR render on there. You can kinda see the hair starting to translate a little bit more. So some tidbit, little things to consider. Hair in Substance Painter is not perfectly flushed out. There are still like rendering issues that it has. Like certain shades, shadow issues that we run into on here that are just kind of just horribly new sensing. But we get ourselves a little bit of an idea of how it works when we, when we want to take it to a different 3D software and that's always something that's pretty good. I always like to use substance painter in conjunction if I'm using another renderer like marmoset or Arnold, this is a good place to take it real quick. Just to kinda see, Hey, this is what it looks like. If you can make it look this good here, then, you know, you're on the right track and making it look good in a software like Arnold, where you are going to have a lot more options for yourself down the road. But like I said, these are hair cards. The best kind of hair you're ever going to see is probably hair that is dynamically simulated through a spline based system like X gen in Maya, or even a fiber mesh or max is equivalent, which were, I know for you. But, you know, that's just sort of the breakdown of hair for you. So this has been sort of like the quick rundown. Again, you were probably if you were expecting hair to be done solely in Substance Painter, unfortunately, that's just never going to be how it works, ever. Right now. Substance Painter just doesn't have a built-in hair construction system. That's why we're going through all these different softwares in here. All I'm doing right now is just showing you the translation of bringing hair in through with, when it comes to dealing with alpha cards, with everything you are learning. Otherwise, aside from that, you can easily come to a conclusion how to do hair texturing at this point with fill layers on a stylized form, a pair, not a problem whatsoever. So that's kind of where we are with that. Let's see. I'm going to go ahead then in the upcoming, in the upcoming section we're going to now kinda finish up our last area, which is going to be the face. You'll notice again, we have eyelashes and we haven't touched that and that's because we're going to be doing that in the next lesson or next section. And we also have this weird little strip. And again, that's part of this UBI here. And we're just going to maybe do some quick wool fiber mesh show strands to help you out there. So with that said, stick around and stay tuned. 25. Applying Makeup and Eyebrowls: Okay, welcome back. In this video we're going to go ahead now and work on our head. And like all the other maps, we're going to start off pretty easy and we're going to take it up two little more higher difficulty towards the end. We have skin to work with. And I think that's going to be one of the last things we do in this section. But for now we're going to do easy stuff and just kinda build our way on, build upon that. So the first thing that I'm gonna do in this video is work on adding a little makeup in eyebrow color onto the lips and a little mascara on the eyes. You notice I have some alpha cards for the eyelashes we'll touch in the lab when we get into the eye here, but let's go ahead and get started. So first thing I'll do is I think I'm going to turn everything off so that we have a little bit to work with here. And from here, I'm going to go ahead, just take a quick look at our render. That's about right. Here. We're getting a little distracted by the bloom, you know, feel free to go through and turn off the active hope, activate the post effects under the Display Settings. So you can see things a little bit better. So let's go ahead and go into our layers and add a fill layer on here. You should say, well, the first thing so she do is deleted anything. Sometimes a weird little quirk is to drag something on here and then add a fill layer to get a fill layer going there. Sometimes it doesn't like to work. So I'm going to add a fill layer and add a folder. And I'm going to title that make up. And then I'm going to set the material parameters of this folder or a makeup. So you can choose whatever makeup you want. Maybe you want to do red. Maybe you wanna do something a little bit on the dark purple. I kinda like that. Maybe you want to work with the metallic. It's kind of a cool thing to kind of choose your own makeup like that. Let's see. Maybe get sort of like a waxy look. I'm sure there's a smart material to define that. That might be what we can start off with now. So let's go back up to our folder. I'll call this make a base. Let's right-click on the folder at a black mask and then just start painting what we want. We're not going to be working with any of the mesh fill because we're going to be painting directly on the model. No UVs, no individual models, just the model. So we can do that here. Or on the eye. Your choice. Sometimes it does work a little bit easier if you're doing it in the eye, or at the very least to give yourself a head start. But there really is no such thing as a wrong answer where you go. If you see it. Kinda painting often you can always mask this stuff off. Or if you want to go a bit further than that, you can just simply just do a geometry mask to take this off. Going to go ahead and now is the shift key to kinda get some smoother strokes. And it's pretty subtle process. So all of this. Oops. Now normally if you're in T-pose, you can go ahead and feel free to hit the symmetry if you want to kinda get yourself a little bit more of an easier process, easier result. Little bit too much red. We want to see where it goes. One thing I will say is, don't feel like you have to get the eyeliner perfectly. On this one. We're going to be making adjustments on the fly. We're going to have to go back and look at something and say, you know what, the eye line or so little to prevailing here. Don't try to get it. Don't try to get yourself into a mode of thinking. You gotta get it just right, you know, how you want it. You can just make something that kind of works. So right now all I'm treating this out as is sort of like a sort of like a base starter that I'm going to have to go through and do my fun little work visions on. So we're just kinda getting that set up. Let's go ahead and do the same thing with the lips. Might just be easier to kinda go through, put something in there. And then we'll just go back and we'll kinda, and yet I'm just holding Shift to draw that line l. It's a little bit like playing a game of who were doing a coloring book a little bit on this. But really getting a little meticulous in not trying to go outside the lines. Alright. And it's a little bit of what we'd got. Let's see. We can risk a little bit more room here. This image, something like that, can get us started. So again, this is a fill layer. You don't like what we see. We can always kinda just go through, maybe look with a little bit more red if we want or anything like that. You know, we have that freedom. Don't forget to re-update your mask to make sure the ring isn't being affected. That I'll just go ahead and sort of finish off with doing some eyebrows. Make a folder for that. And we'll just go ahead and make that a fair. We'll start off fairly low. Run here. You do some with roughness around there. And why a black mask? Now and once again, we can just go through and paint eyebrows. It's up to you how you want to do this. You know, you can go through and check out some of the procedurals on here and maybe look for something in your shelf to help you out. You know, I I haven't tried this one in a while. I haven't really I'm not really sure how Kyle's brushes algebra preset would handle something like this, but you can always try a little bit and kinda works a little bit. But one thing I can do is just kinda bring it in like so and then may be something like that. It was worth a try. Should've known that one won't work. So we can try a whole bunch of different brushes on here. Let's see if we can look for something. Let's see here maybe one of the fur brushes might be a nice one to use work with. Some reason it messes with my alpha a little bit. To get that back. Choosing a brush really hurts us. Everything center, alignment, blue, set or it's at hardness. Kinda just working through all the parameters so I can get a little bit more looking view. That's a little bit lazy. For me. I need something that's a little bit stronger. To crepe. All this fun, fun stuff. Gotta find ourselves. Have good brush on here. Here we go. Probably will. This will work. When you go through all these brushes, feel free to kind of go through and make sure to go through the the properties and just kind of make sure they're in line with everything that you want. Don't be afraid to kinda go outside and make your own adjustments. Truth be told, this is going to already kinda cover up a little bit. Let's go through we can go now a little law, smaller terminal and then just turn the opacity. And so we can no really spend too much time doing the whole hand painted because we've been doing a lot of texturing of through smart materials. So this is a little bit of a different stroke. I'm just kinda turn down the opacity to us to smudge so I can kinda have a little bit of a blend off here. I have some a little bit like that. You can work with just sort of ham pain, something on there. And we'll go through and write off these two guys. Here. We are. And again, we're going to go ahead and try to do the same thing a little bit over here. Now, if you want to, you can just sort of go through hit shape. Let's go find our shape. Take this off, check our Alpha. Delete type in shape, bring in our Alpha. And we're going to have to go through and make sure we have the right setting here. So let's go back out to opacity being that Let's go through size. Or I could probably just go through this way. So little bit hard. So let's just go ahead and adjust the softness. It's a little bit like that. Legged, so we may have to go through and make some adjustments on here down the road. And that's quite all right. Just kinda want to make sure that we establish shorter like a foundation or a mascara. Yeah. Right. Lastly, we can just go back into doing one of the first again, sort of go through and do a paint onto here. Again, we can use any of the fibers to get what we want out of it. So we're just establishing sort of like a mask on here just to get some stuff in here. You know, if there's anything more you want to do on here, for example, maybe you want to make another fill layer, and this time you want to make it about roughness and maybe add some specularity to it. And then, or I should say add some weak specularity to it. Like something like this a little bit. That kind of contrast cell with the 0 specularity from this. And just sort of paint on here. You know. You can do that. Feel free to add a whole bunch of things if you want to on here. All right, so that's going to be sort of like our first. We'll start off with, well, I had a quick little smart material for these newer with springs I think, maybe cobalt. My work with those, we're going to be reused in that texture quite a bit. So let's see. Here. You're here and here, and here, and here she's got enough in those warnings. So, so we've got a good little head start that work behind of kind of going to layer upon, build upon. And then as we progress, what we're going to move on to next is we're going to see if we can create sort of like a synthetic texturing skin for you. And then we're going to show you how we kind of align all of that all the way through and then work on some of the back face material, the hard surface here, and go to eyes and then finally skins. So with that said, stick around and stay tuned. 26. Creating Synthetic Skin: All right, So let's continue in this video, we're going to pick up where we left off. We're going to create sort of like a synthetic skin that we can kinda use to create, to maybe do some decorative neck tattoo to kinda show she's wearing sort of like a fake skin. So we're going to create sort of like a synthetic under skin that kinda goes through. In this one, we're going to show you how we apply that. So with that said where we last left off, we put some rings around here and kinda just did some basics on the eyebrows. We didn't do too much. We just kinda want to establish sort of like a mask on there for now. So we're gonna go ahead and just get started. We have cobalt damage. I'm going to rename that ring, which is for the earrings here. And I'm just going to create a folder and I'm going to call this sin the skin. And let's just go ahead and get started. I'll start with a base mass, base of something like yeah, we'll try the cobalt damage. And then on here I'm going to probably create, maybe like a Hex of all of this. So let's create a fill layer that's going to continous hex fill layers. This fill layer is going to have a hex pattern on it. And it's gonna kinda overlay on top of everything. Let's see what we can do. Maybe color, not entirely sure on one color just yet. Just to heightened roughness. Alright, so add black men are no, add a fill layer because I want it to affect everything that's just on the fill layer. I don't need a mask necessarily for this one because the mask will be driven through the folder. And let's see, for now, Just now I'm going to work with heightened roughness. And let's see if we can use a procedural to kinda make that look fun. Because that's where we'll plug it in. Oh, sorry. Not height, roughness, I'm sorry. Rough and metal. That's wrong or right. So let's go there. Then do some metal. Looks good enough. Remain. Let's just go ahead and scale that and maybe that's good. Name this dots. And let's see if we can. All I'm gonna do some experimenting here. Let's first off, invert the parameters, just see what that looks like. That kinda looks interesting. Let's see. We can create anything out of that. You can kinda see things somewhat interesting off of that. I'm going to duplicate this and I'm going to turn off the fill on it and turn off the height. And let's make that roughness just a little bit lower. Let's go through the roughness channel. Maybe. You just kinda look around something like that. Kinda work with so little bit about synthetic texture. Kinda gives it a little bit brighter of a look when I do that. Let's now, I said experiments. So let's invert the parameters and see if that kinda gives us that's a little bit overly noisy. I'm not too sure if I want to go with that. It's kinda nice, but again, a little too noisy for my taste. Yeah, that's right. We gotta fill layer on here. That's driving everything. Something like that might actually be a little bit easier. We need to, we can kind of raise everything up a little bit more. Maybe something like that would work just for now. So what I'm doing here is, is the roughness I'm having, I'm driving roughness now through here because I lost control of roughness and metal. In my dots section because I added a fill layer to procedurally generated. So what's going to happen now is, is I'm going to have to work with creating two separate channels here. So I'm going to go through fill layer. I'm just gonna do the same thing, metal or old, just to make it look a little bit nicer. For now, let's go ahead and it's kind of a little bit of what I want. Now. I feel like I need to invert something back just so I can get something because I'm kinda losing the dots a little bit. So let's do some experiment and let's flip the parameters in our dots so we can see it a little bit better, a little bit. It's kind of a me kinda experimenting with everything here and kinda like that. But I feel like we get a better contrast when we take the metal channel out. We can kinda see a little bit more on there. That's actually kind of a nice one. I wonder if I could just simply work with roughness that kinda goes over everything. It's not too bad. Truth be told. I think I like that one a lot more. This one's kind of interesting because it has two different scales applied. The roughness, specularity of it from here is of a different scale than the roughness specularity of the fill layer here. So you get kinda like, uh, a different kinda look here, which is kinda cool of an effect. And I'll have to remember that in the process when doing this again, like how I can make something look a little bit different and more interesting. Because it is kind of a neat look, neat little effect here. And wish there would be a way we could just kind of go through maybe just increase the roughness value. That's kind of a neat look. I think just to kinda has a like a little bit of roughness and search. All right. So I kinda like that. So what I did was cobalt smart material fill. I put in roughness material to have the same hexagon pattern. Important to remember where the scale is, it's at a different place from the duplicated mesh. So I duplicated the next one. It was just a roughness channel. Same thing. But this time around the scale is of a different area. That's why you're getting different looks of specularity going on here. Just kinda gives it a little bit of a different sheen. So you can kind of feel free to mess around with different sort of looks there. The now the metal film, I tried doing a little experimenting with that. That didn't go out very well, but I think I'll still work with a height factor on here that way and turn it all the way low that way. When I now add a black mask to the folder, I can now just paint in a little bit about specularity map that you see that kind of underlays underneath all of this, which is kinda cool. Some that I would say. Please continue to overlay more if you want onto you can add a more to it. Just when I did. If you want, you can add another smart material and just experiment to see what it is like. What is an aisle. If I type in, if I kinda mask in some of this stuff, what does late texts black look like in all of this? If you then set the roughness, right now you can't see anything. But if you kind of take down the roughness, you kinda have a cool looking effect right here. But now what if we also add in like the base color to be different and we either overlay or set it to multiply. It doesn't seem to do very much, but probably say, you know, experiment to find out different blend modes to work with here. Now same thing goes with metallic channel. That's another channel we worked with on all of this. Feel free to go through and just kinda work with trying to find fun looking textures out of all this. Now you can do that would be kind of fun in, I'll just kinda bringing out like a synthetic texture in all of this would be kinda neat. But for now, as it is, I'm made just pause on the black mask and just worried just about this. And what I'll do is just sort of De Kao out some of the neck with what we've made. And we'll see if we can maybe do some texturing around the eye socket and see if we can do a little bit of texturing. That's around the border of the detachable face. So let's go ahead and we'll do that next. So stick around and stay tuned. 27. Creating Overlaying Metal of Skin: Okay, so welcome back. In this video, we're going to go ahead and then take our synthetic skin and make some patterns on the neck. And we're going to see if we can create maybe like a little outline on here as well for our detail, like our little kinda cybernetic augmentation line cut here in the face. So let's go ahead and get started. So now that we have that, we can now click on the mask of the synthetic skin that we've created here. And we can just begin painting. And what I'll do is I'll click on the Mask. I'll click up here into the paint. And I'll choose some alpha on here that I like. You know, you can choose any alpha. Just left-click on there and it'll change to that shape. Then you can kind of in, you can also import your own alpha1 and just drag and drop it into here. Very similar to how we did in the hair texture process. If you want. I like this triangle V, So I think I'll go with that. So I'm going to hold left command, right click. And while holding that down, just drag horizontally. And it's going to be left Command, Left-click instead of right-click, and then drag vertically to give yourself a different look as well. So now we're going to just use that concept and just sort of, you know, we can essentially just kinda dragon and maybe some prints, some stamps of like a synthetic skin piece here. Don't forget to right-click and change your spacing so you get a little bit more of an accurate look here. I'm just kind of basically just kind of stamping this end. Just like that. Feel free to hit X to kind of go through and have some fun with anything. You know, if you want to make like a cool texture, you can. Whoops. Honestly, what I'm doing is just experimenting and just having some fun with it. I'm not really like committing into anything. So far. Maybe do something subtractive in nature here because it's a little bit like that. But let's see if we can do that a little bit easier. Something like that. Maybe. You want to have sort of like a cool little texture that can kinda go through there. So let's go ahead and do the same thing on her face this time. So we can do this here or on the UV map, your choice where you want to take it. Let's go ahead and right-click and scroll all the way down and type in shape. And look for that shaped bell. And let's go ahead and adjust our hardness. See, that way. You can also do it up here in here, but just gonna do it this way. So we can kinda do a little bit of a shape Bell. And we're going to find ourselves masking into here. So let's be careful on that. Let's go ahead and first things first I'm going to hit Save. And then I'm going to click into our mask. And just gonna go ahead and do mask there and invert. So I don't do anything else but just texturing this, let's go back out now by clicking into our mask. And I'm just holding Shift down as I go across here, making sure my space is down on all of this. I'll just keep going through. This kind of tracing the elements along here. See what we're doing here, and see if we can clean this up by subtracting a little bit here. So we got ourselves a little bit more of a synthetic under piece material on here. If you want, you can also do the same thing and we can make an alternative piece. For example, you can create a fill layer. We call this metal piece like metal. Like so. That told us and we can just maybe just turn some color into it like that. Mess with the oh, what is it? I would say metallic. And then we can just do like a dry roughness and then it's kind of overlaying with some bumpiness underneath so we can just hit set to normal, but I don't need to do the all done. And then I can add a black mask. If you want. You can then copy this mask onto this mask. Or in this case, what I'm going to be doing is I'm going to be texturing this side a little bit differently. Different type of mask. All right, so now we do that. Let's just go ahead and finish this here. You can kind of see how much I'm just relying on the the whole holding down Shift and just dragging the straight lines through really helps a lot. So, you know, you can do something like that. You can also, you know, if you really want to, you can work with the like. Let's say I can duplicate the later add a black mask and then maybe go through and copy this mask and then re-paste the mask in. And you can maybe make this side of it also metal. And maybe you want the synthetic skin to stay the same, but you want to, the outer layer to be different. You can do that to see if we can do that. Actually. Right. Here we go. Like so you can do that. You can also just kinda do a couple of other things where maybe you just want to have partial illness to the mask. You can do that as well. There's a whole bunch of things that can be done here, but that's sort of the breakdown of that. So now that you have a little bit more of a firmer understanding to that, we're going to move now into working with creating some textures inside of here, as well as creating some emissive textures. We're going to have fun with this beginning part. So with that said, let's stick around and stay tuned. 28. Creating Mechanical Face: Okay, welcome back. In this video, we're going to now go ahead and start on working the interior of this area and texture some of our water, our, our wires and our face plate here. So we're gonna go ahead and get started with that. And with that said, let's go ahead and turn everything off again and just make sure we're seeing only this, like so. And what we'll do is we'll just go ahead and just simply get started with this back plate area and see if we can do something there. All right, so I'll just make a new folder, call it back plate. And in there I'll draw some smart materials in here to begin with. All go ahead and give myself. Let's just see what still dark does. It's not too terribly bad. Yeah, that's all right. Because it will cover everything up. All right, so I'll start with steel medieval stylized. We haven't tried that one much and it gives a nice little sheen and everything, I think. Then I'll go ahead and go steal paint as well. And then what we'll do is I'll change out the color of the steel painted from a grain to more of a cool blue look like so. And we'll also add a little bit of a generator to this smart materials. So click on the smart material, add black mask, and then left-click on the Mask, add a generator. And then we'll click on the generator below and we'll add metal edge where as her choice. And now it's a little bit inverted. So let's see if we can flip that around. And that's all right. I think we can go with that, but now let's mess around with some of the parameters, see if we can get a little bit more metal to show underneath here. Maybe we need to work a little bit more. That's a little, I'm just gonna kinda basically just kinda work with tweaking parameters, kinda just seeing what they give me. I'm just going to go in through and just try and see what I can kinda build off of with this. Just to have a little bit of fun tweaking things. So it was fun to look at. All right, so now that we got that, let's see what this would look like if we just turn down the opacity instead of the base color so it blends in a little bit more. Little bit, something like that, maybe. All right, so now that I have all that, let's just go ahead and go back to our overlaying folder here where it says Back played at a black mask. And let's just kind of sin2 that area right here. So a quick little BPR renders see if it's coming out. All right. Yeah, I actually can work a little bit. I can make that work. Going to have some nice little tear and who it. All right. So it's got a little bit of a head start to us. So let's go ahead and continue on. Let's, let's go ahead now and work with maybe just a basic steel Dark Age on some of this stuff over here that we see. Just as a test, we're going to try to texture all these areas here. And I'm just going to call these nodules or I don't know what you would want to call them. Segments. Segments, strips. And let's just add a black mask on there. And we'll go ahead and bring them all back through the UV instead of kinda go through and collect all of them, you can just click on that black mask, go through our mesh or polygon fill, choose r. I'll go with UV chunk so I can just kinda drag them across like that. And then there's all the top stuff as well. Let's see if we can bring in all these ovals which represent the UVs of the top of the area. I think I got every one of them. So maybe that one. Okay. So note that it's getting there. And we still need to do these wires here. So what I think I'll do for the wires is I want to have something that's a little bit more contrasting in nature here. So I'll go ahead and for this, the wires will use a little bit of an orange color with some dirt on it. And I think plastic glossy is a good choice for that. We had a black mask over that. And I'm going to kinda go through all the scripts. You can drag in through the strips here. Or you can drive in Dragon through here. Kinda dragging in through here since I know where everything is. No rear graveyard. And that's perfect. I mean, a little bit more of our correct looking strips here. Looks like it's a little bit darker here. I wonder if that's that's the case. I may just want to make my own Fill layer just to kinda work around that. To call that. Or I'll just set a black mask there. And we will just kinda bring some of those big wires in a little bit like that. So we have something that's a little bit more contrasting to these wires. If you want, you can also just kinda click on them. And you can kinda click on every one of them. Kinda just break them up a little bit. Or you can do like a multifaceted amount of wires, like some red, some blue, some grain. That's actually kind of fun as well. Give you an idea. I can just Control D or Command D and duplicate this. Make the wires like for example, more red. This time around and just go through and add another black mask. And this time we can just kinda go through and I can just do some wires like here, for example. Or if you want them to go through something like blue for example, you can go ahead and have some fun and duplicated again with some blue wires. And just add another black mask. Let's see what wires kinda pick from them. We can just stuff, have a little bit of fun with some of it. You know, you can just enjoy whatever it is you want to make on this. So when we get through all this, we're kind of tackling up. You can kinda see all this. So let's go ahead and make one more folder so we can kinda drag and drop everything we've done into this folder and rename this folder and east parts. And we still got to deal with that little texture. Now that's the sky's the limit on that one. You it's kinda like how I was with the shoes. You can go ahead and do whatever you want. You know, if you want to do like to fill layers with one sharing the same color, but one color is like the lighter tone. You can then blend the two with a generator and a curvature. Adding a black mask on the lighter tone and then attaching a generator and then creating slightly like a curvature map that kinda gives some cool Looks. Give you an example what that looks like here. Like, let's see. I'd say like this. Maybe a cool look like that. Then we'll duplicate it. Go to the bottom one. So at black mask and a generator, netted curvature. Or you can add metal edge where you can do something like that a little bit. I think actually village where my work little bit easier. And then finally, we can put them all in here into a folder of its own and then add a black mask and make it only affect just this area right here. And now you can do something like that and then mess around with whatever you want to see happen here. So like, again, don't feel like you need to just leave it like that. You can also just work with having like some fun with some of the The effects of the parameters and the generator. Or maybe you want to see what it looks like inverted. Or maybe you want to see what it looks like without. Or maybe you want to see what a smart material does to it, which is a similar effect. And then change out all the effects to be again, something like a blue effect partnered with like so. Just trying to give you some more ideas of like examples so you can kinda set yourself too. So let's go into curvature and make that a little bit lighter. So something like that can be done. So it's pretty easy once you get an idea where it will eat, wanted to go. Another idea that you can do as well in all of this is try to be mindful of like setting out like a contrast of Howard I say this like different tone colors so that it doesn't blend too much into the background face plate. Like I'm trying to change these a gray so that they can contrast a little bit easier to the the dark green here. So like if I go ahead and do a quick little test, surrender on that. Yeah, that works. A little ride. Let me go ahead and disable the transparency. Oh, I do have transparency to say, well, let me see something here. I'm gonna go do some fishing. Oh, I have to do some about that. See if we can do another render like that. So right now we're kind of dealing with the visual thinking geometry mask issue here. We'll be able to see this a little bit better once we turn off the visibility of what we're seeing on transparency. Think all we need to really do is just sort of a long flight and width is nothing more than a bug. So we got a little bit more of an idea of how things are looking a little bit more. We're getting a little bit closer again, everything here is sort of like just layers upon layers upon layers that we're trying to make things work around here. Just simply layers upon layers. So with that said, you know, you can go anywhere you route. I chose like a whole bunch of different colors. But the thing about fill layers is that you can, if you want, go back and course-correct yourself on the colors. It's not like a paint layer where you can just kind of go through and just commit to one thing and then erase it. You can go back like if I don't like these colors, if I find them, they're just too bright and out of place. I can do some color corrections either with the all the fill layers or maybe I can just go and do one single fill layer that kinda over arcs are across all of this. And just kind of let me see where it goes. You can kind of just have it pertained to just all these fill layers here. You can kinda just sort of bring it down, set it to multiply. And then when you do that, we can just add a black mask and then set it to just affect only like the wires that we have here. Sky's the limit on, or I should say go light wires. See, kinda see what that does mean. Kinda see we have now just with that fill layer, something that blends a little bit more naturally with the let, the thin wires that you can tell they're different colors but they're a little bit more rusted, desaturated, they make a little more sense. Now. You can just have one fill layer, set it to a dark tone black, set the blend layer of that black to multiply so that it blends with those bright colors that are below it. And then set a mask for that dark tone fill layer to only show on the wires. Again, you can do something like that. It's all about experimenting. It's all about understanding masks and things like that. You know, so please keep, keep doing it, keep practicing. So with that said, we got through the face play pretty quick. It was pretty easy. We're all do is I'll just go ahead and collapse that. Where we're going to head into next says I'm looking at this is, I think I might want to work a little bit more with the eyes. I think that's going to be what our next step is. And then after the eyes will do, you're probably wondering what about the emissive affects the fiber wires. We're gonna do that, we're gonna do that when the time comes, when eyelashes come up. We'll pair those two. But right now we're going to work with eyes and kinda show your work for the row and campaigning some quick eyes in there. So with that said, stick around and stay tuned. 29. Texturing Breakdown of Eyes: All right, So let's continue in this video, we're going to start texturing the eyes. Now we got two approaches we can do eyes. One is going to be hand painted texturing and the other one is, well, we got a built-in iris so we can kinda show you what it kinda looks like with by shading in a little bit of the Opacity channel to see an iris that is behind here. So that you can kinda see that difference for all intensive purposes. Though, a hand painted texturing with the way it's going to be rendered, you won't notice too much difference, so kinda keep that in mind. So this video will be about hand painted texturing. Next video where we go over to eyelashes and do a transparencies here and work with fiber glow wires here. We'll see if we can touch real quickly on just kinda showing you what it looks like with a translucent IRA. I that kinda goes through. So with that said, let's get started. So the first thing I'll do is I'll create a folder and all title that eyes and eye in that I'm going to put a fill layer in there and I'm just going to call that sort of like the dark outline around the iris. So dark. I outline. And for that, let's just go ahead and just choose roughness to be probably about there. And we'll choose the color to be white. Now just simple, basic black. We don't mean anything else. And we'll just go ahead and hit a black mask on there for I forget, let's also had something for the whites. But what he likes whites. There we go. Then let's choose something that's like a real desaturated yellow. And we'll add a black onto that. Now. All I'm sorry, we don't need to do that. We'll just add a mask over the eyes and bring in this aisle. And that's probably because we're not dropping them in there. We'll tell them I felt they were in there now. Okay. I'll try that again. Add a black mask. Like so. All right, so now what I got, I got the dark iris outline here with the black mask on there that I'm going to paint in and I have the whites underneath. So let's just go and if you feel you need to just go ahead and do a full and a white, that's fine too. So let's just go ahead and point that in. I'll go ahead and just simply just do a quick little pane. Right-click and make sure spacings down low. And keep in mind, when you're doing this, you might have to go through and do a mask on the geometry mask so that it comes a little bit easier. Oh, like you said right here, it's a little bit not glassy enough. So let's change that. Same with roughness here. We need to get that looking differently. Let's see if we can do the same thing over here. Okay, so, so far, so good. So now let's go ahead and see if we can paint in sort of like an opaque gray that kind of cancels this out. So one thing that we can do for that is is we can just simply just switch out and going, press the X key so it's subtractive. And then when we do that, we can just kinda turn our stroke down to about like 12 or so. And we can just make sure you have a good fall off and, you know, just kinda do a couple of taps on here. All right. Same thing over here now. The same size as the iris and just do one tap. It's a little too predominant. Black. You can always turn the opacity of that down as you see fit. All right, so now let's go ahead and see if we can make an iris color. So I'll double-click and make new fill layer. And I'll just call that iris color. And I'm just going to work with a color on this one. Something like that. Maybe to be like a dark blue. If we can one, we can just click on this mask and just copy the mass. Can add a new black mask and paste into this mask. See if you can just kinda start off there. So turn my stroke opacity all the way back up again so I can just kinda bring something in. And you're not seeing a lot on this one. So I'm going to probably minus a little bit of this more. So we can kind of see a little bit more. It's a little bit there we go. That's a little bit easier to see. Thick also. Okay, so we're making our way in here. So we got a pupil now we got to take care of. That's pretty much all we're going to really meet. And for that, let's just go ahead and just make another fill layer, hole black. Make sure opacities kinda turned up here. And let's just simply bring in something. What's a little deranged. So let's just see if we need to readjust the pupil a little bit more. You can go ahead. You know, you can make the pupil in any location that you want. There's definitely, you know, you're gonna make it right there if you want. So we got something going, we got a good start. Now let's go ahead and call that layer pupil. And then move on to the next Fill Layer. And what we're going to do with this one is we're going to add a little bit of an organ to call it eye shadow. Now, this one, we're not going to do too much. We're just going to have something that's black. And we're just going to once again paint. It's going to be just like the pupil was. And this is a nice little trick for things that are like, how shall I say, things that are a little bit off putting? It's kind of a nice little trick, is, is that you can use eye shadow to reform the shape of the eye and fate, the illusion of a different eye shape. It's a nice little trick. So for now we'll kinda touch base on it when we get a chance. But for now, let's just kind of you can kinda see what I mean right here. Let me go ahead and look in texturing on the pupil. Let's get back into that I show. Okay. All right. Let's see. We can make it myself a little more real estate here, so I can kinda do a slow like that and see if we can taken a couple of practice swings right now. So it's kinda look in a little bit like it, it's almost like it's an eyelash in some ways it's given and given that same kind of look around with the roughness lightly. But kinda like the idea of just bringing it all the way out. Sick. A couple of render shot tests on this. Get our bearings on where everything is. Right now she's looking a little bit like a man, a Kindle and let that intimidate you will get to the skin. All right, so let's see if we can maybe add a little bit more. My shadow just to see. First of all, when we see how much that does. So little too much. What you can kinda tell that this is a little bit more of trial and error. Alright, so we're getting our shapes to look correctly. We're getting our mass to kinda line out. And we can change out the opacity to give this the proper look. For example, you know, you can kinda bring it in like this. Now, I kind of like it though, kind of like the other way. But let's go ahead and do a real quick sort of a fake of the all right, so we've got some. So now what we will do is we can go back now into the iris. And you know, at this point, you can paint in the details for the iris. Like for example, like roughness or I'm sorry, highlights of it and just sort of manipulate it through an opacity of the layer itself. Good example. You can just kinda do something like this to something like this to sentence a little. And then the smallest stroke size unfortunately, so I kinda have to minus it off in order to get something. We can just then turn around and bring that in, you know, as like that. Yeah, there's not really going to be much of a difference in metal or anything like that. And sometimes it just kind of it's nice to see it. Height. I don't think I have the resolution to really make a difference. If you repeat that a couple of times, you can still get some pretty cool-looking effects on here. Not going to put height because we're going to have that covered up. So that's kind of the, the gist of it right there. That's what we're going to be doing. Now again, this all is sort of a accumulative process. One thing that also we have to do is this. We got to think about something like a red for us to kinda put into kind of bleed out some of the whites here. So like making a row quick red color and, or I should say a pink color maybe. And then just kinda added a black mask and then just kinda turn on the opacity down and maybe kind of bringing in a little bit more red into it to kind of dark and add a little bit more. And actually I'm going to bring it in a lot from the sides and do something a little bit similar to what I did with my mum virus. Kinda just bringing it in like that a little bit. And then we're gonna do some very similar to that. But this time I might just go ahead and do black this time around. Just to add a little bit more. So like something like that. Just get started with real quick. So that's going to be sort of like how we get the eyes. I, you know, the one thing I will go on record as saying is this. If we take off the eyes, when we get the eye liner here, we're going to be painting a secondary kind of dark eyeliner, fade in shadow that kind of blends in with the eye. And that's going to be what really kind of gets that little more subtle separation. Going here. See here requires come to look at everything. I think we have a little bit lost. There it is. I was wondering what happened to our iris line here. Okay. Let's go ahead and include all. So we don't get any more of those. So we're getting a little bit closer now into this. Now, again, as I say, we're going to be working with several different things. And one of them is going to be a translucent look. We'll kinda just give you a breakdown of that when the time comes. It's not a very difficult process to get that that look. But when that comes, will show you what that is here and let me see. Yeah, it looks like we own everything we want on this one. Quick little render. She's looking a little bit more like it, a little bit closer. And when we get to the next video we're going to be doing, we're going to be doing is working on those eyelashes so that they make a little bit more sense when they blend in there. And then after that, we'll go ahead and work on finishing up this side of this corner right here, and then work on the skin texture Lasse, and finally finish off with some renderings. So with that said, stick around and stay tuned. 30. Texturing Eyelash Transparency: All right, Welcome back. In this video we're going to now go over making some eyelashes. And if then we're going to proceed on to doing some permissive effects with some wires. And finally, if we have some time, see if we can show you some opacity translucence in the eyes. So it's going to be a patch video here. So let's get started. Now. As we see in the transparency, we do have some strip cards, just like alpha cards for the hair. We have some for the eye lashes. So we can go ahead and rework this now using this principle with one extra concept in mind. Now, we are going to be painting opacity. And we're going to be having that opacity Sion down to a fill layer below that has our color. So let me show you what that looks like. If I make a fill layer and that fill layer is going to be set to black. Therefore, it's covering everything up. And I go inside that fill layer. And for example, take metal height out just for now. And let's see what that gives us OLC also shine it to black. And let's make this fill air only work, show eyelashes. So we'll just go on to this and go to our mesh here and we'll have the whole thing now shine out like so. So now that we have that taken care of, what we can do next is, is we can kind of work with a little bit of wiggle room with maybe some matching of the eyeliner. I gotta be honest, I kinda like black in this case, but we'll see where it takes us. We'll just go ahead and call this I lash color. And then when we do that, I'm going to real quick make a quick little layer into our eye to kind of help cover up this little piece here, the, this where it meets here and in here because this is where the transparency map is, this is where the the eyelashes and that's because there's a difference of specularity. So I want to kind of cover that up. So I'm going to just make a very quick little, little overarching fill layer. And on here, I'm just going to set the roughness all the way chalk to full. So it looks like chalk block. And then set that all the way to black. Like so. And might go with color that is similar to the eyelash. In that case, I might also have to have the eyelash specularity be a little bit more like that. We want, we can paint in some specularity towards the edges here. We gotta have it to blend in a little bit more to where it meets the same direction here. Okay, So let's get back into the head again. And let's go to that fill layer. And then we call that I lash and add a black mask on there. And we'll just go ahead and just kinda work. Or just painting in a little bit of kind of a quick little detour. Kinda went into the eyes. Like, I don't want to keep that away. Maybe you do a quick little fill layer. And there we go. Not yet. Now we got some like that. So let's now start painting in some transparency. So what I need now is to put a fill layer above my eyelash color in my transparency menu. All I need to have is opacity turned on and I'm just going to turn that all the way down. We'll mess with the wrong one here. It should just be opacity. I'm going to call this eye lash 0. And we're just going to go ahead and kind of bring this out like yeah. So may work with what I see over here first. This might actually be a little bit easier. Quickly turn. And so I can see some specularity and what I'm doing right now, I'm just going to temporarily leave it at there. So if the opacity is pretty much going to be invisible, what I'm going to first of all do is crank that all the way to black and add a black mask. Then I'm going to go onto there and go into brush mode for painting a mask. And I'm just gonna kinda paint a sort of a, I'll kinda like a soft fall off a little bit on here. You can kinda see when you do that, you kinda can take away everything. So using that concept, I can kind of turn my head off, paint over. It. Might just go ahead and do it this way. All right. So what I'll go ahead and do now is go through my brushes. So I'm going to choose a hatch brush and just kinda make this smaller, right-click on it. I'm going to change the angle jitter so it's a little bit more in line. And maybe turn down the spacing a little bit. And just simply kinda do some subtracting right now on here. Like we see. And make sure you're holding Command Left-click and wrote a marquee dragging up and down to rotate this. And you're going to kind of see, it's kinda look in a little bit funky and weird, but that's okay because what we'll do then is quickly switch to something like a basic soft. And then we'll kinda go through here again. And we'll just kinda ring in little bit more like that. Through time you re-select the hatch, you gotta remember you're going back in to now it gets a little bit more difficult to see as we kind of lose everything. So if you want, you can bring it a little bit further in. Or you can just kinda bring it in a little bit like that. We do know for sure, but I can see it as it is. A city doesn't do a good job of showing up very well. So once you kinda get what you want, Let's go ahead and just kind of paint back any details that are lost on here. I think I should have made these a little bit longer, but kinda see a little bit of that. And then I'll when you're finished doing all that and it's all said and done, you can just kinda switch back into that mode again. Now we can do the same thing above as well. And that's probably going to be an easier one since the eyelashes are a lot longer. And let's just go ahead and real quick. Because there are a lot longer I have a lot more to work with on subtracting off of here. Using that same concept again, just kinda go through. Might have an Alfa car that's blocking my way on this one. Yeah, I got a card that's blocking me. So if you get a situation where you're having alpha cards, get in the way of like what you're doing here. What we can do is we can go through the process simply by doing a isolates select on the geometry. And that's going to be where we just kind of trick off everything except the the right eyelash. And then go back into it again. And then we can just sort of do our work once more. All right, let's go back again. Soften that out. Those edges taken, cleaned out. Alright. One last one. Keep missing it. There we go. Hopefully. Let's see if we can bring that in. Now you literally, just for more hatching. We're going to do here. So way more than I thought it was going to be. I mean, as far as miscalculation on the on trying to cram in all the other videos, we may have to do a little deal where we have to work with. May have to work on the fiber wires and the translucent eye on the next video here. So apologies on that. But the good news is, is that that is pretty simple to do. And it is not hard at all. Oops. All right, so now we've got some eyelashes. Let's go ahead and get out of that again. So now that we have a little bit of eyelash work that we've done. What we have left to do. And I think what we'll do is we'll kind of work on that as our next video is, we'll go ahead and try to do the sort of like a translucent wires demonstration here. And then we'll do a little bit of work on the eye. So with that said stick around, stay tuned. 31. Emissive and Translucent Effects: Okay, welcome back. In this video, we're going to go ahead and just finish up a couple of more things. Just do a demonstration of getting some glow wires out of this and do a little bit of a translucency around here to have a little bit of fun with the eye, just to show you another way we can do some things. So were we last left off. We left off with a little bit of the eyeliner being textured in. Remember if you need to do anything else like for example, go into the head map and subtract away some of the eye liner so that you can kinda see some of the eyelashes. Go on ahead. One thing I feel like I'm probably doing an update is maybe make some longer eyelashes by making bigger cards so we can have more real estate. All right, so with that said, let's go ahead and finish up this last piece in the transparency map. And we got to eyelash shadows here. So let me go ahead and just drag these in to a folder and call it eye lashes. And now we're going to do the same thing we did over here, just with this. But instead of color, we're going to paint it through as emissive. So what that means is I'm going to add a fill layer. You're in a notice in that fill later, there's no midst of channels, so we gotta bring that in. And to do that, we're going to have to go through textures, set settings, into channel where the plus sign is and add an emissive. And you'll see you in a mess of popup right there. When I turn everything else off except for the emissive. And we're just gonna kinda turn it to all glowy, kinda like that. That's kind of a cool logo as well. But unfortunately, we have to, for the sake of context, we have to keep this somewhat workable to the color. Now, you'll have to turn on your posts effects. Ok, right now that looked much. This is our super say in cyber punk character just so we're all familiar with, we can kinda go through all sorts of haze and just have some maybe though we can do that down the road. If you wanna do texturing, I'd love to see your color, but unfortunately, we're going to have to stick with the Hopi. I feel now I'm giving you a lesser version of this. We're teaching you this to show control and tricks on texturing and substance painter. So to pair for that in mind. All right, so add a black mask on. Fortunately, we're covering it all by now. So let's go through and tried to bring back just this texture here. We can do so with the UBI or the mesh fill. I'll do it through the UVs and we kinda see what we got here is something that we can kinda look at and say, Hey, that's pretty cool. But for now, I'm going to probably go with a color that's maybe something like that. And now that I see what I have, I'm just gonna go ahead and hit Black Mask again. Now it's just like with eyelashes, we make another fill layer and again we put color out and all the other channels out except for opacity, we turn that off. It covers up everything. So let's make sure it only covers up and does opacity to this wire instead. So we add a black mask. And then we go through, and we go through the selection tools. And we can probably just see it update like cell, like that. So with that said, we can now go back up here, go into paint, and then we can just kind of switched to a really small area and paint some effects in here. So it's a little bit hard to see right now on here. And that might be because we have second here. Errors. Might be dealing with in your shoe where we're supposed to have capacity either above that. I forgot to turn that on. So what we're going to keep doing is I'm just going to kind of go through and I'm just going to paint some texture soon. Like so. Don't worry if you hit anything. Just paint some cool textures. All right. So when you have all that taken care of, go ahead and clean up everything you'd accidentally touched and no, like that. Like that. And once you do that, Let's go back and paint a and start having a go underneath these nodules here. So to do that, we'll just kind of make it kind of go through here underneath as you can see. Like so. So if anyone's a little confused about how it all works, again, it works where this opacity is basically governing everything that is being seen through the mists of effect. And we are then below it, we have everything that is invisible. So in the end, only this top layer is going to be visibly seen in the mask is going to be including all over it. So we kinda have ourselves a little bit of fun there. Just a little bit more of an effect process that we can kinda put through. If you want to do anymore pain gene, you know, you feel free to. It's kind of a fun little process. So now that we have that taken care of, do a quick little renders, see all that kind of plays out. And looks. All right. You can kinda see how it kinda adds a little bit of a bloomer or Kuo. Sure, Speaking of low glow to we have what we want loom get back out. So with that said, we have that taken care of. That's how you do the fibers. So we're gonna go ahead and turn that off temporarily. And we're going to go through, we're going to just do a quick little demonstration of the opacity with the head. Make sure to go through your shader settings and you have PBR mental blender. And make sure to go through texture set settings and have an opacity channel for what we're about to do next. So in this one we're just going to simply do a fill layer. And all I'm doing in this fill layer is, is that if we go all the way through, It's just going to go to black. And I'm just going to call this one trans ous. And if I put a mask over, it comes back in like so. And if we just kinda go with a really low setting, there is a polygon model of the iris in here. So you know, if you want you can do some deal like where you can make a little quick blue ish looking piece. And then make sure that affects this piece here. And now we can just simply paint it in slowly and you can kinda see how it kinda updates a little bit. It looks a little clear like there isn't anything there, but trust me, there is. You can kind of see I'm just kind of with a low stroke capacity, blending the front texture in with the back texture. And we do a quick little render here. And we can kinda see sort of like everything kind of falling off in the back there. Now one thing I'd like to point out, and this is something that I might do in the down the road is is that There are some things we can do. We can put like a plane or a polygon plane card in there. Like like an iris one card. We see that. Yeah, I think that's the iris one card. You can probably do something like where we kind of paint this black. And just go ahead and show you what I mean by that. Because I believe I pointed to a polygon strip in there but just made the whole thing black and the roughness just pitch black. And then I added a black mask. And then I just let it go right there. So it kinda seems a little bit something like that. So you can kinda see a little bit more of a Iris looking color kinda go through but that's just for like help you out in case you're looking for something that has a little bit more of a translucence to it, don't seem to have a and that in to our Massu. Then let's do a quick render. Quick. Just getting a little bit more so you can see it easier. So you can kinda see there's like a little bit more of a blend between the front layer and then the back layer. You can kind of do some things. So like for example, you can paint in a some bump detail onto the iris and you can do quite a few things on here. So that's sort of to help you out with understanding and making that a little bit easier. Now, I personally would say that my preference is still to do things hand painted, IE because the way I have the the light in here for how it goes over the hair, you can't really tell the difference between the two unless you're really up-close in, you're like looking at it sideways. And now one of the things that also has to take into account is, is that you're probably not ever going to, You gotta like think about what is the function of what this is going to be doing is your plan to do an up-close render. Is your plan to do a game object. If it's that's the case, then do some texturing, just hand Pain texture the character's eyes. But if it's going to be an up-close render, well then let's plan for some built-in iris that goes behind this gap, the whites of the eye, which scapula can't seem to remember. It's slip in my head. And you just plan for a lot of ways. There's just a lot of ways to model out a character and a lot of different approaches in terms of rendering it out. So all those things you want to keep in mind as you're going through all of this. So with that said, the next thing we're going to do, real quick. I'll just kind of drag a little smart material around that section. The next thing that we're going to be doing is going to be the skin. And that's going to be sort of like our final step. And at this point, feel free to do anything to like, add more to it. Like maybe down the road. I might put like little strips of like little cybernetic looking patterns, kind of like kinda like techno looking patterns coming down from the eye or something like that. You know, all those things you can do. 32. Going Over Skin Base Texturing: Okay, so welcome back. In this video, we're going to talk to you a little bit about skin and get started with skin. This is going to be a little bit more of a challenging one. So be prepared to get yourself into a tweaking mode of light tweaking settings left and right because skin requires quite a bit more finesse and subtlety when it comes to texturing all the way through. And that's going to be very key secret here. Now, this particular skin, we're going to have to make slightly paler and because she's synthetic, slightly less translucent than what I would normally do. But just to kinda give you an idea, skin has a lot of different approaches that you can take with substance painter, I've seen quite a different ways it's done. There's people that don't even work with materials are smart materials. They just go fill layer after Fill Layer, just kinda layering upon, layering upon layering everything. And that might be something we take. A lot of people go on to substance source, which is a pretty easy process. You just click on substance website and you can kinda just get on there and maybe download a skin shader to work with a lot of these skins. They start out you had you do have a shelf full of skins. I don't rely on them too much because they don't give me exactly what I'm looking for right off the bat. And that's a little bit regrettable of because I kind of enjoy just kind of dragging and dropping, but we'll just have to work with what we got here. So to give you an idea, a little bit of what we're going to do. First. We're going to go to where we started with our makeup. And we're going to put start our skin texture and put it kinda underneath everything that we texture. So let's just go ahead and choose. If you want, you can choose sort of like a skin. You can kinda already see how it doesn't really match up. That means you got to kind of do some funneling. And that's partially why I don't enjoy skin so much. If I ever use skin. It would probably be to work with something in the roughness setting values. That probably would be the closest thing I would work with skin on. Just the sort of helped me out. That's about as close as it's going to get for me. So with that said, what I did was I went to skin. I'm going to go ahead and start off with a human cheek skin, drag and drop it all the way to the bottom when I first started makeup. And then I just turned off the color channel and just tweaked a little bit of the roughness to about 0.4. We're going to go ahead and make a folder into all of this and just drop that in there. And then we're just going to add a black mask on there. And I'm going to call this folder skin. And let's reapply everything that we want to see this time I'm going to use UV chunk fill. So I just want this area to be affected and this area here to be affected. So it's these two UV shells. That way I don't have to texture or anything. Let's reopen everything up and let's now rename this smart material, skin, roughness. And what we're going to be spending a lot of our time doing is we're just going to be spending some of our time just kind of working with just tweaking out color in here. So to get started, let's add a fill layer on here. And let's go ahead and turn off all the channels so that it's just the color that we have and I'll just call this color face. Now she's going to have a little bit of a Pale View, pale look, but we're going to see in you're going to see me kind of go back and tweak of quite a few things. So don't expect like a light going straight to it and getting it right. You, you gotta kind of feel your way through here. On some of this, you gotta kinda work your way into getting a color that you like. Yeah, a little bit to red. We can push a little bit, orange a bit. Kind of see what I'm doing right now and just sort of adding in just some basic details. I may, if I don't like my roughness, I can just kinda keep it right now. At if I find it, She's just a little bit too shiny from the skin area. That's fine. I can just keep roughness here for now and then. Drag this above. That's what I mean. You know, you might find yourself making tweaks because maybe the specularity is taking away from the specularity of the augments. This is all just kind of feeling your way through here. So I'm just kind of slowly making our way and it's a little too yellow. It's a very subtle, subtle process, just trying to find skin and making it look right. Alright, so we got a little bit of a start off up here. Now, something that come into mind is that when we're doing all this, we're going to need some yellows and we're going to need some reds for areas like maybe the nose or the eyeball are there around the eyelids were need some yellows for areas where the bone is closer and more prevailing into the skin. So maybe around here or the chin, maybe around the forehead, et cetera, eyebrow, et cetera. And one thing else I like to do is this. We'll see if we can get some ambient occlusion and kind of overlay across everything. So let me go ahead then and duplicate this layer and call this layer my. And let's go ahead and get into a more yellow tone. And don't get I hope I'm not getting anybody into a state of mind where it's like, oh, let's find out what the exact RGB color numbers are now. No, please don't do that just fine. You gotta kinda feel out your pieces is very, very much finesse. And this yellow one is going to be sort of like a black mask, I'll add. And I'm going to go ahead and switch into my brush mode. And I'm going to probably take a look at some of my brushes and see what I can find here. And I'll feel free to go through anything you want to go through dots, you wanna go through dirt, moss you can go through and anything you want. So just have fun with one, turn the opacity down, see what it looks like. I'm gonna go ahead and also turn off everything on here so I can get a little bit more resolution. And we go a little bit more easier. Mankind assume just kinda probably going to work with a little bit of a soft. And what I'll do is just start off with just kinda feel in my way through it. Maybe around here. Put sultan. And then minus way. Just take your time and just establishing some fun places to work with. Just keeping it simple. Now you're probably wondering why again, I'm not using any sort of smart material on this. Again, smart materials on this can be done. But kind of 1. You to get into a mindset of, I want you to be in a mindset a little bit of just learning to texture layers upon layers and fill layers and such. Let's go ahead and now go back to our base duplicated new layer, where more base, we're going to call this our reds. And we're going to do some very similar to bring this all the way down. Make it to something like that maybe. And then we're going to add and again another black mask. It's a little bit low, the stroke capacity. Kinda hear all the clicks on my mouse here. You're going to overlay anything into the yellows. Make sure you do it really subtly. Low. Capacity here. And if you have to experiment with some different shades, you know, feel free to do so. But make sure you understand when you're switching brushes, it's going to change some things, so kinda bear in mind. So we're getting a little bit more into it. See, if you can kate our reds again, if we want. Maybe just at a white mask on here, make this slight go, something like purple. Just to have some fun in breaks things up a little bit more. Lower. Sea level, subtler thing I'm probably going to do. My purples is probably and two reds. You can kinda see again, this is all just like a layering process. You know, what I might try here now as is, I'm going to add a fill layer on here, and then I'm just going to add little bit of spec into this. Or I'm sorry, some, just do a little texturing demonstration here. Let's go ahead and drop in our ambient occlusion in here and set this off to multiply or do I say multiply? Want this to kind of bleed down above, below everything. It's not really multiplying very well because we have some pretty small subtle changes. So we're going to have to I'm sorry. There we go. Now, set correctly. I was in there. Let's go ahead and choose Overlay. Still. Use one I want. And I'm not affecting the ear as you can see. So let's go ahead and see if we can bring that in. The year is going to be ideally read. And we're given it a little bit, starting to kind of look like skin slightly kind of like it, like it's not where I completely wanted just yet. Roughness. Tweet on this one. Then let's see if we can add some more spec. Let's experiment with RSpec here, I'm going to add another fill layer and this is me experimenting just that, find some fun things. Let's drag a texture and our roughness, maybe a procedural texture, something that's noisy. Just to see if we can get something fun out of it. Let's see, we can have that, we can do that, do all sorts of things on here. But remember, don't look at all this like it's just one thing. You can also look at it inversed as well. And then finally, you can try to work with. It's a little bit glitchy. See if we can scale that up. A little too. It's a little too separated through everything so we can't work with that one. Let's see if we can work with someone else. Finds some, we had a fine, sometimes it's a little noisy, but has a good sense of your fractal. Goes in. So little. Once again, a little too messy here. Let's try something with roughness. Roughness is a little bit better, but some will, so it's a little bit to how shall I say it's a little bit weak. Dirt has a good no-no, but condensation, let's work with that. Bringing everything back up. Might need some scaling. It's on the right path, but let's invert a and C with it really does. Oops, wrong blues. Putting them in a little bit more. Okay, so we're getting a little bit of a speck out of that. Probably. Here. We'll get into that a little bit more. Just sort of trial and error. So we can work with something like that a little bit more. Now if we want to either set the roughness experiment to see what it looks like overlaid. And then work with roughness being starting off dry. Given it a little bit slightly still a little too shiny. So Mario's could figure out where it's probably going to have to trickle down the balance here. Because again, this is all like a very subtle, subtle thing. And white mask. Let's go back in here. And that really threw me off. It's a lot. I'm looking at this little spot and I feel like it's a little too like prevailing science. So like I said, don't be in a mode of like that. This is all going to be something that you can go straight right to and figure out right through. We have to kind of go through and do some adjustments everywhere. So let's just kind of muddle through that. This is where it's at. So let's add a, we got our white mask in here. Let's paint it down a little bit here. So that doesn't break it up. Pain it down a little bit here. Let's turn our stroke opacity a little bit higher because we're going to talk a little bit of a patch process here. No, I'm just painting on the mask and kind of covering some of this up because it looks a little bit prevailing, want some of this here. Capacity slightly higher. Again, what we're trying to do is we're trying to go with the synthetic skin here. But need to be a little bit careful how it shines. Make sure that everything is sort of bleeding through. And again, this is all pretty much like very subtle, very subtle stuff. Make some little bit more and kind of see still the specularity is existing. It's just kind of been toned down a little bit. You know, wanted to go to prevailing hunt on here. So we're kinda getting it a little bit translucent, but we're still going to add some more and we're still going to add a little bit more to it. So with that said, stick around for Part 2, where we're going to add some slight variations, slight freckles and stuff like that. So with that said cigarette. 33. Finaling Skin Detail Specularity: Okay, so welcome back. In this video now we're just gonna go ahead and finish up our face by adding just a little bit of freckle kinda fall offs to the red here. And then we're just going to then see if we can take it in, kinda duplicate what we've made across into our hands and our forearms. So with that said, let's go ahead and get started. So for here, we got pretty much everything that we need to. We're just gonna kinda do one more thing and that's just going to be to maybe just add one more fill layer on here and turn off all the channels except for color. And we'll just make maybe like a quick little darker blue or dark little bit of a red. Like a kind of a pinkish red. And I'm just going to add a black mask. And this is just going to have an overlaying effective could try to get some form on here. So what I'm gonna do is I'm going to slick two brushes. I'm going to select dots. Probably going to start with turning my opacity down just to see how that looks. And what I'm doing is I'm just kinda breaking up everything that I'm doing here. You know, it's just as simple as that. Maybe work with a little bit more just to kind of give a little bit of a fall off. Now it's going to seem a little bit prevailing, I'm aware. But that's okay because that's why we minus everything. Because we start with what we want. Then we just kinda lead out like so. And you can kinda see how it just kind of moves and interest gives us a little bit more to work with here. Let's see if we can. I'm just kinda going back and forth between hitting the X key on this. Kinda see how we kinda bring out everything. Let's do that again one more time, but this time we'll do it a little bit more on the nose. Then bring it all back out again. Just to kinda give us a little bit more of a look, a little bit more. And if you want, you can kind of blend that slightly and it kinda give me a, either a look. It's a little bit more freckled out. And if you want, you can just kind of do a little bit of a fall off with the soft brush with a low opacity. So which is kind of blends smoothly into the skin a little bit more. Towards the center here. Kind of see if we can get some of the roads to bleed out. Little bit more like that. So now it's all about tweaking a little bit more. Once you kind of get to a certain comfortable spot here, you know, feel free to go through and just kinda tweak out everything that you like, don't like. This is a very, very basic rundown of skin. You know, I got my reds, purples, and yellows. Now. There's a lot more to it that goes into it right now. But I kinda wanted to keep it to a little bit simpler for you. Let's see reds, reds back goal. Other things you can do is like using this concept. You can kind of bring in some freckle work here. For me. I'm thinking I might do some adjustments on one, her skin to be slightly pale. Yellow, maybe slightly more saturated red. And same with the purple. Because we're all going with something a little bit more on the desaturated side here and make them speckles. All right. So we kinda go on with something like that. So once you have everything that you need, just go ahead and kinda give yourself a preview of everything that you want. Don't get into the mindset. You know, that you can stop if you want to do more. Feel free to do more to this so that you can add a little bit more into it. Also, another habit that is very common is, is that you look at what you see. You might be fine with what you have, but then you might go into render mode and you notice that it doesn't translate to the same thing. If that's the case, feel free to go back and revisit anything. If it feels a little bit blurred in any way. That's again, just has a lot to do with light and angle. You can just kind of refresh back. Now, I've given you the basic layout of this. I'm hoping that it can be a little bit more applied that you will kind of go around and then just kind of reapply what you did and just kinda layer upon it and expand upon it like create some freckle work here using fill layers. We already utilizing the same concept that we do with the red speckle that we did at the beginning of this video. But do it with just like singular freckles or single or little mole or something. In fact, I have a little mole kind of normal mapped out for you. If you want to actually work with that. I want you to kind of not get tunnel vision than this. So now what I'm gonna do is go through the skin. I'm going to go find my, uh, hands and bring this in. Like so. And it's kind of the same way with the with the what Is it? The shoes now, where I'm going to ask that you go through the whole process again. And this time around, I want you to kind of get yourself into the mindset of having fun, trying to expand and build upon what kind of get yourself into the mindset of now, we did this face, show you how we did the face, just like we showed you how to do the shoes. Now we want you to kind of work on your own, the hands so that you got something to practice off of. So again, like you do with the skin speckle, we showed you how we kind of blurred out everything. Kinda do the same thing, get into that. Just sort of tone it down. Once you, you should have an understanding of that. We want you to kind of build off of that. We showed you some of our red speckle, how we did that. We want you now to apply maybe an opposite version where we kind of do the same thing. Maybe you wanted to do dots, but then we want you to kind of do the same thing with over here with a different fill layer. So maybe like dots three or something. We want you to kind of be like, Hey, here's some interesting looking textures here. But they're not on the right color and they're a little bit to prevailing hint. What if I change the fill layer color to a slight pinkish red and then really lower the opacity so that it looks like some practical work. We want you to start thinking outside of the video because at some point we gotta get you to not get tunnel vision. We want you to say, and we want to see these examples also. So purely please feel free to give us some screenshot work we would love. See how you get through all of that. So that's said that's going to be how we handle that. The only thing that's left that I might add in extra is, is that I'm going to probably do a little bit of my own creation. And I'm going to do stuff where I'm going to create maybe like a little bit of red on here and create maybe like a little bit of XML red, just to have some fun with the skin. I'm also going to, since we are still here, I might do a deal where I might go through select a brush, soft brush, and hit into something like o say our augmented skin. And maybe I want to have some fun. Like trying to track through the border of this. Like kinda going through and having a little bit of fun, just trying to bring in a little bit of a border edge here just to like. And then one thing I'll do is is it's a lot easier to do. In what is it? In on the shell of where you're just making a really wide strand. So one thing I'll do now is I'll go through, now that I see that where I want, I'm going to hit X. And then I'm going to refine it to be a lot more of a thinner sort of strand. That's, this is all just basically like cleaning up of the mesh before we go into our final phase, which is going to be which is going to be rendering out what we have here. Irae. So that's going to be kind of like you're next and last phase. And then after that, we'll do a little bit of debt UV demonstration org, I should say. It's a little bit. Let's go soon. Learn. So maybe something like that. See if we can make a little bit of a smaller or more sharp skin tone. Here we go. So maybe you wanna do something like that. These are all just like touch up things to do on here. So once you have all that saved out through, once you've worked with hands, I want you to do one last thing. And that's going to be to copy this folder right here and then go into our lower leg section if you want. And you can kind of reapply the same concept and you can copy folders by hitting Command B. And of course we'll hit a black mass going here and makes sure that it is only the legs that are being affected. So that's kind of breakdown to that. So with that said, what I want you to do is at this point before you go any further, do just some extra final finishing touches. Like for example, maybe you want to do something here with the, the, the synthetic skin creating like a little bit more patches. Or maybe you want to create a little bit more looking like adjustments. Like I see a little bit of work here that needs to be kind of tone down for the skin here. So anything that you want to clean up, just kinda take this time to clean it up. Take any time you want to finesse on here as much as you want to. Full four, we go into our final phase, which is going to be our rendering stage. So like I said, if you want to move around with the lips, make them darker, if you also want to do things like subtract off of here a little bit of the eyeliner of the makeup so you can see slightly more of the shadow map or I'm sorry, the eyebrows. Free reign. You can do that if you want. Just make sure you're recovering. You're doing a good job of all the other areas. Like for example, there's a little bit of a black spot we put in here and we have to kind of go through and find that black spot in the make-ups? No. You gotta go through and find which one that is, that's right there. All right. See you can kinda see a little bit more into the eyelashes. Now. All that is pretty much free reign for you if you want to work with that. Nothing wrong with that whatsoever. So with that said, just keep trucking and we'll see when the last texturing section, which is going to be irae. So stick around and stay tuned. 34. Understanding Iray the Renderer: All right, welcome back. Now we're going to finish our texturing with a going over the basics of our built-in renderer. I re, so if you want to do anything like rendering out a shot and you don't have money or don't have a Arnold money for Arnold. Because that's like $300 or you don't have money for Marmot said, or you don't have spotlight. The one common denominator is, as we always have a renderer built into our substance painter, that you can always fall back on and that's kinda what we're doing here. So to go over that, what we're going to do is we're going to first of all show you how to turn irae on this built in renderer Substance Painter. So what we do is we go up to this rendering camera here, icon here, we click on that. And what that will do is will give us a new editor to work with, which has our display settings and our shader settings, just as we did before. Now, as you can see, we are already establishing a render shot of what we want. You can already see shadows are certain to show. These are all things in irae that are the same and the rules of navigation are the same as well, where you hold left option, middle mouse, you can kinda go through and maybe the hand that character or left option, left mouse, you can kind of go through and just kinda move the character anyway, you see fit here. One thing I'll say I kinda like to do is I kinda like to go through and play with the lighting here a little bit more. And then just kinda go back in IRA and just re-render it. So what we're gonna do next is we're going to kind of go over some of the display, this Render Settings and display settings so we can get everything set up the way we want. Now with Ira, we have Min samples and max samples. So take a look at the, the quality of this. You know, it looks a little noisy and that's because it's only going to render. Let me go ahead and just kinda set it. It's only going to render to a certain point. And that's what max time is. So like for example, if I set my max time to be 1 second, then it's going to say up here, status dumb because it's only going to render out for 1 second. And it's only going to be taking a minimum of 50 samples and a maximum of both 1000 samples everywhere for about 1 second. Now, if I set this to a higher amount, like 12 seconds, it's going to be doing minimum of five samples to a 1000 samples for 12 seconds. And naturally you can change this from minutes to hours if you want. And the next thing that we're going to talk to you about is these two little here, firefly, filter and cause act sample are now the main reason I have both of these on and right now, as you can see, they're kind of, one of them's off is, is because we want to kind of eliminate these little unusual artifacts, that of glowing little specs. We call them fireflies. And typically the firefly filter catches quite a bit, but you need to have cosmetic sampler turned on as well. Override viewport resolution allows us to change the resolution of our width and height. And then of course, if once you're done, you can go through and image and if you put your, your mouse over it, you'll get some more information on all of that as well. So with that said, we're going to now go over all of the settings here that we can have. A lot of this is pretty easy and self-explanatory stuff, but we're still gonna go through IT. Environments settings. One might actually think that the environment settings are about the background, but it's actually more about the lighting. So if you have like sort of an orangeish looking background, you're going to have an orangeish looking lighting in that environment. And of course, if we rotate it around, now, we'll get different results that you'll see. And as a result you'll get a different kind of render, like so. And you can kinda just keep pressing around and looking for something that's kinda interesting in keep doing a whole bunch. But more importantly, if you click on the environment map, you can see a whole bunch of different pieces that we can work with. Like we can work with this one, which is sort of a panorama. And you'll see the environment changes here in a sec. Sorry, I meant to do over the clouds. You'll see sort of like how the lighting goes a little bit differently. Exposure kind of is like how our detailing a little bit more into the thick of it, like the intensity of the environment lighting. And let's see if we could talk to you a little bit about shadows. We didn't do too much on shadows. When we worked with our shading settings. We don't really need them because they're already kind of being compensated. See, what I will like to do is probably turn on clear color and that's gonna kinda eliminate or dome. And what I think I'll do is I'll go with maybe like a blue of some kind. Like so. Mankind get ourselves a little bit of a nice little light blue or turquoise blue. So with that said, we can kind of hold Shift R or dude environment rotation, which does pretty much the same thing. And we can kind of break around, find something that's a little bit interesting, the process we go. So if you want, you can always just kind of experiment with all sorts of different environment maps in colors. There's cave entry forest. You can get some sort of a cool looking Cyberpunk looking like environment out of it. But keep in mind, if you get too much of a predominant looking map, you are going to, it's going to wash away your colors like kinda did there. So this one's kind of thematic to a little bit about Cyberpunk color. So now what I'll do is I'll go through moving on. The radius. I'm going to leave the same. Color is going to be the same, right now, visible who below? Now, what we have next are probably the most affecting areas. It's going to be at the post effects, which right now we only have glare, the temporal anti-aliasing, which is going to drive up render times. And also it's going to make this look a little bit more smoother. And then I don't really need subsurface scattering too much. But we're going to turn this up a little bit more. And then we have our color profile. Now our color profile isn't too much of an issue that the best way to think of it is, is this like it's kind of like a, a filter that kind of goes over the image to kind of give you sort of like an interesting look. Now in kinda see it there. And it's kind of a nice like little touchy can kind of put upon something new. You can feel free to experiment with it. And now, like, I kinda like that one a little bit more. It's a little bit cool of a color. But moving backwards, Let's go back to post effects. Posts effects. The biggest, biggest one you're going to have probably have is something like color correction. And that one is probably going to be one of our more important ones. And you know, the white balance you can kind of work with. You can kinda have a little bit of a cool looking texture like so. And try to do, and you want to kinda experiment with things like seeing what that looks like without the color profile on Sarai. But now let's see what it looks like with different a different looking environment. Maybe you want to try and or maybe just go with over clouds and see if we can get some fun stuff out of it. That's kind of an interesting look right there too. So the skin feels a little bit warm. Let's go into our color profile and sued. We can turn that down a little bit. So it's a little bit more like that. Saturation also maybe why that's also going through something like that. Now the other things that we have is we have depth of field. And depth of field is directly connected with aperture. This is a pretty flat, curved surface. We don't have the focal length pretty high, so it's not really going to have any effects, but it's definitely something that in an earlier Substance Painter course I explained through the helmet. So if you want to check that out, feel free. Kinda gonna do a demonstration with that. Tone mapping is not something I do too much of, but it kinda gives sort of like the overall overall, it's, it's like a secondary version of the intensity of the environment map, but it washes a little bit on out everything. So that's kinda where it goes. Vignette. I always turn my vignette on and kinda put that up to about as high as I can. If I do that, one thing I tend to do is kinda go through and readjust everything to make sure it kinda comes out to look in just fine. We can readjust the the white balance temperature so we can get a little bit more color back in. And it's all noisy, but that's okay. We're going to fix that in a second. And from there on out, we don't need really to do anything else on here. The only other thing I can think of is if you want, you can do some like lens distortion that you're going to have to work with. I don't want to mess with that because it kinda gets a little bit of a distortion that kinda zooms the center and it's not necessary for that. You can go through and mess around with the glare a little bit as well. And then we can just work on remapping all of this, like so. And then finally, to get some better samples, let's crank this up to something. It gives us a little more rendering, wiggle room. So as you can see, I just added some more seconds onto it, like 78 seconds so we can try to get something that's a little bit more cleaner or a little bit cooler if we want. And we're going to work with that. So as this kind of processes through, you just want to go through a couple of things more on with this. And one is going to be export textures. Now as you can see on here, we already went through a crash course of everything that we did when this model, I repeat this to you, that this model is an educational model. So typically we don't have for UV sets to work with. We put for UV sets on there because we want you to learn the software. We put for UV sets on there. So you can have more practice on there. So typically one or two UV sets like maybe a transparency map and then at UB, separate everything else. And if you're doing something that's like more cinematic than Yeah, I can see more UV sets then for that. But just like before we kept it at PBR metal roughness just makes sure that when you go through your template, you're checking that PVR metal roughness out. And it has all the necessary maps that you need. If you're missing one, then check into that. Like for example, we go through, we have emissive, we have height, we have normal contrasts, and we have an alpha channel for our opacity. If you feel like you need to add something more like say like a gray, and then you want to put like opacity in there from the gray scale and then go back into Settings. Do that and you can kinda see it updates like so. So with that said, I kind of would recommend with anything that has an Alpha channel to go targets. And then that way you can make sure to have that usually exports out an alpha channel with that. And bear in mind some other things that PBR metal roughness is, was again, that's sort of like our educational template that we use. We have other templates, output templates for all the textures we go through. I mean, if you look at all this stuff here, we got key shock, he shot nine plus. We've got all these different areas to look into if you are rendering and our Arnold, I would check with AI standard. If you're going with Unity engine, I would go start off with Unity HD. Render. A little bit, I'd probably go with the HD Render, specular pipeline, SUV. If there's anything that gives me roughness, I would love to just work with that instead. And if not, you can just simply add an RGB and then take the roughness and drag into here. Again, if you're working with real, I would work with the ads, start just with the basic Unreal four. And, you know, working with V Ray, yeah, presets for V Ray. How do you know which one to choose? Well, just go to your software checkout the shader, and check out all the channels that the shader requires to make it look like that. And then make sure it lines up with all the maps are going to be exporting out. So that's a good rule of thumb. So with that said this, you can kinda see it's still cleaning up a kind of stock that's because we stopped at 55 seconds. But the idea here is that we want to kinda get rid of all this noise that kind of keeps bleeding in. And now so barrel that in mind, it does take a little bit longer to work with. But after a while, you're going to be happy with the results. Just simply save the render out and, or if you want, you can go to the share. So with that said, this has been sort of the crash course in substance painter. And I hope you enjoyed it. I hope you got some amount of it on how to get some cool looking textures out of this. And I hope you have a stronger foundation in terms of like making something look pretty cool on here. Please remember that the cinematic theme of this entire course is about experimenting and trying new things. So I hope that sinks in very well. And with that said, we're going to move onto a bonus section. We're just going to be about just giving some sample demonstrations of UV to be a little bit friendly to the previous course that we did, where we sculpted this entire character. And we did a pretty step-by-step workflow for that. And so we're trying to give a little bit of something that can kind of translate in from the next translates in from the previous course, the next one by giving this bonus section, like how we prep this model will give you an example of how we set one of the maps up, et cetera. So we'll go through all of that. So with that said, we hope you enjoyed Substance Painter and I'm sorry, I hope you enjoyed learning through Substance Painter in this course. And just like I say, keep texture. 35. UVING Demonstration: Okay, So this is basically like a bonus video footage course, absolutely not mandatory to learn because again, this course is about teaching in Substance Painter and learning Substance Painter. But we wanted to add a little extra bonus video footage of doing some demonstrations of you being in Maya to help with referencing context so that people understand a little bit easier time because we had a course in ZBrush that taught us how to basically create the high res, the sculpted version of this character. And we wanted to kind of work with that to show you like once you export it out the read topologies version that we made, how we can import that in and just go through a process of examples with UVs. Now to help a little bit more with how it translates when we have for texture set lists, what we did essentially was we kinda choke, pick, picked out and chose all the areas that we wanted to be defined as a texture set list. For example, by click off the visibility, we decided the mid section of the map is going to be one texture set. The head is going to be another texture set along with the hands since they share skin. And of course, the bottom layer is going to be its own textures set. So kind of expanding a little bit more off of that. We'll go ahead and talk to you a little bit about textures, a little bit more here. Now, to help out with that, what we'll do is we'll take a look at like for example, just to give you a good reference. The lower section map, it's not enough just to create some visibility layers. Once you defined visibility layers out, pretty much you're going to select all of them and just assign a new shader. And in this case it's a phone we're going to go with and just we're going to name that phone, whatever that texture is. And of course it's going to show up and be defined with that texture up here. So with that said, we do the same thing with all the other maps. Basically, to create a new texture set is basically to assign a new shader. And then that shader, we'll have all the corresponding whatever's within that shader. We'll have all be sharing the same UV texture set list grid. So with that said, let's just go ahead and do a little bit of demonstrations with some UV mean. Now, when we do You being a couple of things we have we set up for kinda bring in our UV editor. And you can kinda just kinda go through and just kind of look at everything from here. If you want shift and command and left-click and kinda create a little bit of a icon for a quick selection. So one of the things I like to do is I like to have a UV editor and I like to have a button where I can pulling up my UV toolkit. And that typically comes in with UV editor. The other thing that I like to have is a cut and sew tool. So something like this. So I'll just hold Command and Shift and just put a cut and sew up here. Remember, alternatively you can just dock it out and just select everything you want here. So one of the first things we do is we take a look at our UVs. And right now currently, these are all UV out. But if you were to just pretend that they weren't or didn't have any UVs. We could just kinda go through and create a new set, set of UBS and that would be the first thing to do. And once you create a new set, you basically select it, click on Create, and then maybe do planar UVs. Now, we're just doing that simply to kinda help you out with understanding a little bit of the process of defining and creating something through. So once again, left-click, create some planar UVs. And then from there, what we need to do next is sort of defined some scenes to kinda coincide here. And that's what the cut and 3D cut and sew tool is. Now one thing that's a little bit difficult, little bit tricky is, is that it's always easy to just some CLI, exist in a sort of Shall I call it a, a object mode tool. So when you left-click on something, you see everything green, you wanted to. That's Object Mode. Right-click over and we can kinda just always go into object mode. And that's usually the most receptive area for 3D cut tool to work in. An addition. And we're gonna go ahead and turn off soft select. Right now, I don't need that. Now once you go into 3D mode, you can just kinda left-click and just sort of see highlights show up. And that's basically as seam. Now it's going to be little in curl. In conclusion, in incomplete, I should say, if you hold Tab and then mood while holding it, move the mouse around. You can kind of create some sort of additional seems. So like that can be very advantageous, like when you're creating a scene here. And if it doesn't fall all the way through, kind of choose a tab in a different location like right here. And then just try and trace it along here to sort from here, drag, drop, and then do a little scene like right there. And in addition to that, I can create some scenes like so. So once you do something like that, exit out by holding down right-click, hit Exit Tool, and then right-click down and hold. For object mode, delete some history. And you know, you can go through and hit the n-fold and you'll get some UV shells unfolded out of all of this. And if you click on the checkers, you can kind of see a little bit more of the shelves, a little bit easier. Now if you want, go ahead and just hold down right-click select UVs. If you double-click on the UVs, you can kinda select the entire UV shell NEP had www1, kinda move him around. And then finally, just hold down right-click. You can just go through and modify layout and layout. We'll kind of lay everything out nice and neat. So we're going to use this concept, this very easy concept to kind of go through and UB everything else out. So we already have done that. We can do just like a quick co, planar. We start here, we can go into object mode, collector, so Tool, and just first of all, go to Exit Tool, hit Q. Sure, everything's there. So let's this time around or just kind of as an addition all kind of turn off that to make it easier. Once we've assigned our scene, Let's go back into object mode and hit unfold. And you'll see the UVs are unfolded. Now once you hold left-click, left-click shift, and try doing that same modify layout again. What's going to happen is, is that it will lay everything out now it's not going to maximize the use of 0 to one textile resolution. But one thing it will do is make the UVs, as you can see, the same size, relatively speaking, as the UV textile borders here. And that's kinda why I like to use layout so that we can equalize the UV shelves in the same proportion. So as you can see, I already did the other leg. And this time I want you to kind of go through if there's any UVs that are intersecting and feel free to just sort of click into the order area here. And you can kinda do, you can kind of see like one thing that I did was I laid out a border all the way across here, laid out a border all the way across here. And then essentially did a border to the back and as well as order in the back there. So it gave me two shells automatically. The socks were just sort of like an easy one. They just kinda chose a little line strip to go down and I laid it down that way. In addition, you don't have to normally use tab. You can also go through and just sort of hold left-click drag. And you can designate your seams out that way as well. For the shoes, you can kinda see where the seams are. Once you're in this UV mode, you can kinda already see where all the scenes have been designated and how we can kinda get through it. Like so. So that's just kind of little bit of a breakdown in the UVs in how we did all of that. So with that said, we just wanted to kind of give you sort of like a little bit of our frame of reference in everything as far as like how you these sort of fit in with everything here and how they match up, like having UV shells here. What we would do then is after we go through you being let me go ahead and give you an example with the head. We'll select everything and turn off the tool. 0 we would do is typically we would just go through, do a modify layout, everything. And then we would take our time starting with, for example, like the biggest and most visibly seen mesh we would put in here and work our way up to, down to all the other meshes and just sort of carefully maximize the space. It's a little bit of a game to try to practice getting all of it to fit perfectly. But, you know, the good rule of thumb is that make sure you do a modify way out just to equalize all the UVs and then just simply drag all the UVs out of the grid and start with your biggest piece and make sure it's in a readable, clean area and work to your next biggest piece. Try to get all your pieces starting from the biggest UV shell into the area and work your way down to smaller areas because that tends to be where you can compromise a little bit in terms of scale if it's not seen very often. So that's just sort of a quick breakdown of Yogi's. We can go, quite frankly, I can go a lot, lot deeper than this Of, but the thing is, is that we don't want to, this whole course was mainly about just going through Substance Painter and given you some direction in Substance Painter, if we see enough commentary and requests, will go ahead and do some more demonstrations through using and modelling and things like that down the road. So with that said, I hope you enjoyed this course and we hope you enjoyed texturing our character. And in please, please, please, if you have any questions or anything, feel free to ask and by all means, share your work.