Learn to paint with gouache // Beginner guide to gouache | Sandra Ruberto | Skillshare

Learn to paint with gouache // Beginner guide to gouache

Sandra Ruberto, Artist & Illustrator

Learn to paint with gouache // Beginner guide to gouache

Sandra Ruberto, Artist & Illustrator

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16 Lessons (1h 34m)
    • 1. Intro & Hello!

      1:43
    • 2. What is Gouache? medium overview

      2:37
    • 3. Materials & supplies

      1:44
    • 4. Paint brushes: what to choose

      3:19
    • 5. Watercolor papers: what to choose

      3:52
    • 6. Paint quality & Color selection

      7:18
    • 7. Exercise: Mixing

      5:33
    • 8. Exercise: Flat wash

      10:48
    • 9. Exercise: Blending

      8:58
    • 10. Exercise: Layering

      5:31
    • 11. Intro to: techniques exercise

      3:36
    • 12. Technique: Flat & Linework

      10:30
    • 13. Technique: Wet on wet

      4:34
    • 14. Technique: Blending & Layering

      19:20
    • 15. Maintaining your supplies

      2:31
    • 16. Class project & Outro

      2:08
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About This Class

Welcome to my Skillshare class about gouache for beginners!

Gouache is a very versatile medium that can be used in different ways to achieve different styles, so in this class we will practice painting with gouache to gain a better understanding of this medium and to get more familiar with it!  

In this class that I recommend for beginners and who is new to gouache but anyone can join, I will share the most important features to know about gouache.

I will go through to the art supplies suitable to use with gouache: what kind of paint brushes, watercolour papers and which colours to choose to get started with gouache. 

Then we will do different exercises to practice mixing, painting flat washes, blending and layering. To get more familiar with the paint consistency and to help you gain a better understating of the medium!

With a final exercise where we’re going to paint together a playful illustration with some vegetables and fruit, to try different painting techniques and see the different styles you can achieve with gouache! 

I hope you will enjoy painting with gouache along with me during this class! 

Meet Your Teacher

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Sandra Ruberto

Artist & Illustrator

Teacher

Hello there! My name is Sandra, I'm an artist and illustrator based in Switzerland specialised in flora & fauna illustrations.

I'm also an online content creator where I upload videos about my gouache illustrations and art tutorial over my youtube channel, sharing my knowledges regarding different aspects of art mediums and more.

If you'd like to connect with me and see more of my work, you can follow me on Instagram or check my Youtube channel !

 

 

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Transcripts

1. Intro & Hello!: Hi there! My name is Sandra, I'm a Swiss artist and illustrator. And welcome to my Skillshare class about gouache! Among all the traditional mediums, Gouache is my favorite because I love how versatile it is and how it can be used in different ways to achieve different styles, I've been using gouache for over eight years for my works, so I'm very excited to share with you everything I know about gouache! There is a lot to cover about gouache, but in this class that I recommend for beginners and who is new to gouache but anyone can join I'll share the most important features to know about gouache to get more familiar with it! In this class, I will go through the art supplies suitable to use with gouache For example, what kind of brushes, what kind of paper, and which colors to choose to get started with gouache. Then we will do different exercises to practice mixing, blending and layering to get more familiar with the paint consistency and to help you gain a better understanding of this medium. With a final exercise, where we are going to paint together a playful illustration with some vegetables and fruit to try different painting techniques and to see the different ways you can work with gouache . Gouache might be intimidating to use at first, but if you find the patience to learn it, you can do so many things with gouache and the results you can achieve can really paid of your efforts! So I'm very excited to have you here and let's get started! 2. What is Gouache? medium overview: First of all, let's start from the beginning. So what is gouache? Gouache is an opaque water based paint. It's referred as opaque watercolor because of the similarities to watercolor in regard of ingredients used to make the paint and being both water based medium. Which the paint can be reactivated with water once dry. However, gouache paint is much thicker than water colors. It has a heavier density that it makes it more opaque so it can be layered and it has a much higher covering power. Other features of gouache is its velvety matt finish, fast drying time and ability to be reactivated with water. once dry. So you can re-wet your dry paint on your mixing palette to reuse the leftover paint as well as on your art piece, if you want to rework a particular section of a finished painting. So gouache is a very versatile and forgiving medium that can be corrected in ways that watercolor doesn't really allows. It can be used with different techniques to achieve difference styles. Gouache can be watered down and use it thin similar to watercolors, and it can also be used more thick and be fairly easily layered. It can be worked both dark to light and light to dark, and add highlights. Similar to acrylic. So gouache is commonly compared to watercolors and acrylic, due to some of their similarities. And we could say it's a mixed between the two mediums. But unlike gouache, acrylic paint can't be reactivated with water once it dries, and gouache dries a lot more matt than acrylic, and it's much more opaque and covering than watercolors. So gouache still has its own features that differ from the other two mediums. and its strength definitely lies in its opacity, capabilities and matte finish. It's worth mentioning that there are certain brands, like Holbein or Turner that produce acrylic gouache, which is similar to the traditional gouache as the paint dries matte, but it behaves much more similar to acrylic because the paint can't be reactivated with water once dry. But in this class, we're going to work with traditional gouache. 3. Materials & supplies: So here are the materials you will need for painting with gouache in general: Gouache paint, watercolor paper and paintbrushes, which I'll get in more details about these three shortly. Then, one or two jars or cup of water. I recommend to one for cleaning your brush and one clean water for mixing to avoid mudding your colors. Then, a mixing surface to mix your colors. I personally prefer using ceramic plates instead of plastic, as on ceramic the paint stays more pulled together and ceramic can be washed easily. And reused again. And last, some kind of tissue paper or towel to clean your brush and regulate the amount of water on your brush. I personally use a cotton cloth that I can wash it, and reused it again. And I find both towel and ceramic plate to be a more sustainable options, as they can be reused infinitely. For some of the exercise for this class, I'm going to use some washi tape for creating the grids, but the tape is optional. You can draw them with a pencil, but you will need a pencil to sketch the fruits and veggies we're going to paint for the final exercise. But before we get started with the exercises, I would like to touch on what kind of paint brushes, paper and gouache paint and what color you will need to start with gouache, which for me they are important informations to know. So I can recommend you the best supplies to use with gouache! 4. Paint brushes: what to choose: So let's start with paint brushes. So what kind of paint brush you should use between natural and synthetic brushes? It's a personal preference, but I personally prefer and I would recommend synthetic brushes when using gouache, because they carry less water in their bristles, so you will have a greater control of the paint and over your water content when painting. And brushes come in different sizes and types such as flat, round, filbert, rigger, You name it ahaha. For more bold strokes and for painting big areas of paint quickly, flat brushes are nice to use for that, which can also work for details and be used for painting thin lines. While for more controlled and precise strokes, I would recommend round brushes with a pointed tip. Which are the brushes I personally like to use. Then for painting details, I would recommend a smaller brush like a small round brush, or even better, a small brush with long bristles such as rigger or liner brush, as they carry more paint in their bristle, so you can get going with the line much longer and keep it one fluid motion. While I find small brushes with short bristles more suitable for miniatures work, although you can achieve thin lines with any round brush as long as the tip in pointed. You just have to pay attention on the pressure you put on your brush because the more pressure you apply, the wider the marks gets. But if you like to paint details like me, having a rigger or liner brush is very useful and much easier to achieve thin lines. And definitely, other type of brushes can be used. that will depends on the technique you like the most. The general idea to keep in mind when choosing your brushes is to get smaller brushes for painting smaller areas and bigger brushes for covering large areas, so that you don't have to drag the paint with a small brush to cover a large area. To get started, I would recommend two or three brushes in different sizes like a small brush between size 1 and 3, one medium brush between size 6 and 8, and one quite big brush between size 9 and 10. But if you plan to paint larger areas, definitely go for a bigger size. So feel free to add more sizes and type of brushes to your materials. When it comes to paint brushes, they definitely don't have to be the most expensive brushes you can find, as long as they are workable and you like them, it'll all right. But I would recommend a brush that is no too stiff and not too soft either, something in between. For this class and we'll be using both flat and round brushes in different sizes. But just use what you already have, without the need to go out and buy new brushes. 5. Watercolor papers: what to choose: Gouache can actually be used on different materials and surfaces, because the paint mostly stays on the surface, but it does perform its best on paper. When it comes to paper unlike brushes. I would recommend to invest in a quite good quality paper if you can. It doesn't have to be the most expensive paper you can find, but some paper will help achieve the result you want, and they allow gouache to perform to its full potential. But first of all, there are different type of papers you can choose from. Between cold press, rough, or hot press paper, the choice is up to you, depending on what you prefer working on and depending on your painting style. I personally prefer using cold press paper as the surface is no to textured and prevents the paint from sliding around too much like a hot press paper would do, since hot press papers have a smoother surface than cold pressed paper and it retains less water. And in my opinion, gouache can be trickier to master on the hot press paper, if you are not very familiar with the medium and the paper yet. While a paper with a rough surface will be very textured and has the best pigment and water absorbance where the paint is grabbed on the surface better than a cold press paper, but it doesn't allow much detail works. My art style is defined by details so a cold press paper is suitable for my painting style, so I find cold press paper ideal for gouache and for beginners. But the choice is really up to your personal preference. Then when painting with gouache, the weight of the paper is also an important factor to take into consideration. The general idea to keep in mind when choosing the weight off the paper is that, the thicker the paper, the easier time you will have to work with gouache, as heavier paper are more sturdy and withstand better water and paint absorbance, to minimise the chance of your paper from buckling when wet. Ao a lightweight paper will mostly buckle when applied a lot of water on the surface, which will leave (make) you washes to dry uneven and you will have a difficult time laying down gouache paint overall. So if you're going to use lots of water, opt for a thicker paper. But if you're going to use less water, you can use a thinner /a more light-weighted) paper. With gouache ideally you want to go 300 grams in weight or higher, especially when used a lot of water. But I wouldn't recommend going lower than 250 grams. Even if you're just going to use gouache more thick, you will just have a better result with a more sturdy paper. it doesn't have to be a watercolor paper, a mixed media paper will do a great job as well. And some artists even use sketchbooks but with a quite heavyweight paper. Especially if it's just for practice painting and quick painting session, you definitely don't need to use the most expensive paper you have. Save it for the future once you're more familiar with gouache and for a painting you care about the result. For this class, I will be using Arteza cold Press 300 grams watercolour paper as this is perfect for practice paintings and withstand quite well water absorbance. 6. Paint quality & Color selection: Gouache came used either fresh from the tube, but it can be dried in a pan or in a palette and reactivated when needed, which you can directly buy gouache pans from certain brands, or put gouache in pans or in a palette yourself. As a beginner though, I would recommend to get gouache tubes and work with fresh paint, as this is the best way to achieve the highest coverage and highest capacity, which it will be difficult to do so with reactivated gouache.Aand also to get more familiar with the paint consistency from thick to thin, to achieve various degrees of opacity. Moreover gouache, or some colors at least, has the tendency of cracking on open air, so it can even crumbles when put in concentrated density so you might not be able to reactivate the paint well. but since gouache is a water based medium, and the paint can be reactivated with water, once dry you can still reuse your leftover paint on your mixing surface whenever you want! So the paint doesn't have to be wasted. Then, regarding the quality of gouache, in my opinion, I don't recommend the cheapest paint you can find because they are likely to be tricky to use and won't be very enjoyable to work with. And most likely, they won't have a good opacity and covering power, which it will be difficult for layering. And gouache can be a medium where it's easy to get frustrated if it doesn't perform well. However, I don't recommend using the highest quality either, especially if this is your first time trying gouache, and you are still no sure if this is the medium for you. So, in my opinion, a mid range price gouache like, for example, Winsor & Newton designer or Royal Talens (extra fine quality) gouache, which are some of the brands I personally used that have a great quality, will be great. Then, regarding what colors to choose, for a good set to get started with gouache: I recommend to get a selection of limited but different colors of a good quality paint that are useful for color mixing in order to create almost any colors you will need. A must have color is definitely white. It's worth mentioning to get an opaque, white such as titanium white or regular white, which has a great covering power, while if you come across Zinc white, is a more transparent white and it's mostly used to lighten colors rather than to enhance the capacity or to paint highlights. As with titanium white. And if available, if you will enjoy painting with gouache, getting a bigger tube of white can really come in handy as when painting with gouache you will use a lot of white. Tthen I would definitely recommend getting the primary colors yellow, red and blue for a basic starter set, which will allow you to create the secondary colors. The primary yellow is often called Lemon yellow, Cyan will be your primary blue, and Magenta as your primary red. Not every brand will have the primary colors or lemon yellow, cyan and magenta, specified as name, but essentially the primary Yellow is a cold yellow The primary blue is a light warm blue, and the primary red is a cold light red. Defining color Temperatures might be harder to tell due to different factors, as everyone has a different perception of colors as well. So not much for the yellow and blue, but in particular for the primary red, I think it's worth mentioning if you aren't too familiar with color mixing yet, it's important to get a cold red, which gravitates towards the blue tone like magenta or like Alizarin crimson, in order to create purple when mixed with blue, as if you would use a red like for example vermilion red, which has a yellow undertone, when mixed with blue you will create brown instead of purple. Then, ideally you want to have a cold and warm tone of yellow red and blue, to have different color temperatures for your works, such as, for example, ultramarine blue as your cold blue cadmium yellow or mid yellow, as your warm yellow. and vermilion red as a warm red. But among these, I personally don't use cadmium yellow anymore due to its toxicity. But among these 3 examples, Ultramarine Blue is definitely a useful color for color mixing that I recommend to have! Other colors that I would definitely recommend to have in your color selection are some brown, such as yellow ocher or raw sienna as a light brown, brunt sienna as a reddish brown, and burnt umber as a dark brown. And there are other browns that you can find, but having some browns, it will be very useful in color mixing to create earthy and muted color. Another color that can be added to your color selection is black, although for me, black is optional as any color mixed with black will become a lot more dull , and will look more dirty for me at least. back is used to darken other colors, but I usually use brown or a darker ton of the color I want to darken instead of black. But black can come in handy for intense, dark areas on your painting. So to summarize, having a selection of about 10 colors including a warm and cold tone of blue, red and yellow. Plus with some browns, white and black, It will be a great set to get started with gouache to create different color temperatures and make almost all the colors you will need. But depending on your budget as well, in my opinion, just having the primary colors, black and white, will be the basic set to get started with gouache because if you mix three primary colors together, you will create brown, almost black. Then definitely feel free to adapt your color selection and add as many colors as you like, especially if you will end up enjoying painting with gouache! 7. Exercise: Mixing: For the following exercises. A page with the grid layout and the measurements, will be available to download in the resource section of this class, so you can use my same layout for the following exercise we're going to do! The first exercise we're going to practice is mixing to understand how much water is needed to add to your gouache mix to achieve different degrees of opacity. And it's all about finding the right consistency. The ideal consistency for a smooth and opaque gouache mix, is a creamy consistency that doesn't feel too dense but not too watery either. It has to feel fluid on your palette having a visible coat of paint on your brush, but you don't want to have like blob (chunks) of paint sticked to your brush, Otherwise that means the consistency is too thick. And from here, you can dilute the paint further for different degrees of transparency, and the paint consistency will feel more watery, and you can always go back to a thicker consistency by adding more paint. So for these exercise, I prepared a six by seven grid, with dots in the middle that I drew with a pencil. And for each vertical row, we're going to swatch different degrees of capacity by adding water little by little to your gouache mix, to have a better understanding how much water is needed to achieve the degrees of opacity you want. I recommend drawing the dots with a pencil, as it will help showing the opacity and covering power. For this exercise, I'm going to use a flat brush, and I'm going to use primary red, primary blue and some white, and I'm going to mix them together for some of these six rows. Just to have fun with colors and make this exercise less boring and repetitive. But feel free to use the same color for all the swatches, and use any type of brush you want. Okay, that's start! for the first swatch, We're going to lay down the paint straight from the tube without adding any water, which you can achieve the highest opacity. But the paint consistency will feel very dense and thick, and the paint won't lay down very fluid on the paper. There are certain colors that have a denser consistency than others, when used fresh from the tube, but when working with gouache and thick consistency. I always recommend adding even a tiny amount of water to your paint to get your brush going more fluid. And don't worry because it won't affect much the opacity, and that's the second swatch we're going to do, add a tiny amount of water to your color, mix it and lay the color on the paper. And from here, you want to dilute the paint further by adding just a tiny amount of water at a time. As you add more water to your mix, your brush will also carry more water, so I recommend removing the excess of water from your brush. Put it on the side of your palate, so that when we're going to swatch the next colors, the brush won't carry much water and you will achieve a smoother swatch, to better see the degree of opacity. and after, I clean my brush on the towel, so that I'm going to add clean water to my mixture, and it doesn't carry the leftover color, just for a optimised result, especially for these last swatches, as we want them to be very transparent. But by doing this exercise, it doesn't have to be perfect because It's not much about the result, but more feeling and seeing the consistency of your paint, between dense and watery, and understanding how much water you need to add to your gouache mix, to achieve the degrees of opacity you want. Then, for my second row, I'm going to add some white to my color, which I recommend to do as well, for one row or more, as white enhance the opacity. And repeats the same for all the other swatches. If you want, you could dilute the paint further and add more degrees of opacity, But I find doing seven swatches is enough, and you can repeat this exercise as many times as you want! 8. Exercise: Flat wash: The second exercise we're going to do is how to achieve a flat and even wash with different degrees of opacity. One of the feature and beauty of gouache, is its matt finish, with the outcome to achieve flat and even washes, that you can't really achieve with other mediums. Gouache can be used more loose like watercolors, but this exercise will give you a better understanding of paint and water ratio, when painting with gouache! Just a heads up, it might be harder to master it at the first tries, but let's try together! So there are two different ways to approach this exercise that I propose to do. For the first option, The bigger the area you want to cover, the more difficult it will be to achieve a flat wash, because you have to work pretty fast and lay down the paint evenly everywhere. And for this , You will definitely need brushes big enough to cover easily and quite fast the area you are working on. So the first exercise option is to practice painting flat washes over different size areas. , There is another factor that comes in play when painting flat washes more easily, and that's the opacity of your colors. Some colors will be by default more opaque than others. And if you don't know if your color is opaque or not, look for a full square symbol on your gouache tube. Most good quality gouache brands label their colors and will telll you if it's opaque, semi opaque or transparent. So with opaque colors, it would be easier to achieve a flat wash. And on most gouache tubes, you will also find other information such as lightfastness, pigment used, which I won't cover in this class, but I hope to cover in more details in a future gouache class, for more intermediate level. Another tip to enhance the capacity and optimize the chance to achieve flat washes is by adding white to your color. Some colors that are labeled as opaque, might already have white in it. Such as for example, PW6 pigment. So you can check that out on your colors. If you can't find the capacity and pigments labeled on your gouache tube, No problem as for this exercise, I recommend adding white to any color you are going to use, to optimize a good flat wash result. It's also worth mentioning that it will be easier to achieve flat washes if you use a good quality paint, as when using cheap quality gouache, most likely, the consistency will be trickier to lay down the paint to achieve a flat wash. but adding some white, that should help overcome that. So for the first option for this exercise, I drew three squares in different sizes from small to large. I used some washi tape to create these squares, so that I don't have to worry about painting perfectly on the edges, but the tape is optional. And we're going to paint these squares with the same opacity, so you can do these exercise more times and with different degrees of opacity. But the first I'm going to do, is with opaque gouache. I recommend using a light color for this exercise, so you can add quite a lot of white to your color, as it will be easier to see if your wash will be painted evenly. So the consistency of your paint has to be creamy and fluid, and you will need to add just some water to it. In this case, when painting large areas, especially If you're going to mix more colors together, you want to make sure to have enough paint, so you don't run out the color in the middle of your painting session. So a good tip would be to make more paint as you think you will need. As you can always reactivate the paint once is dry. And having more paint on your palette, the paint will also dry slower. Although for this exercise, the color doesn't have to be the same for each square, and you can make more as you ago, as if you're new to gouache, it might be difficult to know right away how much paint you need ,which you will understand it once you get more familiar with gouache. But just make sure you make enough paint, before painting each square. Okay, so once you have your color ready, the key to achieve a flat wash is: you want to load your brush with quite a lot of paint and lay it down on the paper, so that you have enough time to work it and smooth the wash to cover the whole area before the paint starts to dry on the paper. Add more paint on the paper if it's not enough, but make sure to work pretty fast as gouache has a quite fast drying time. Then you want to smooth the paint evenly, all over your area, by removing the excess of paint on the paper, If there is any, and put it back on your palate. You want you layer to look evenly painted everywhere ,so it will increase the chance of drying flat and even. You can add some water to smooth the paint, If it doesn't flow very fluid, but especially when painting opaque flat washes. You don't want to add too much water on the paper, and neither on your brush, as water can affect and ruin your flat wash. But if you add water, work the whole area and as long as the wash is painted evenly at the end, it will be all right. So don't worry if it doesn't dry even everywhere at first, Just let it dry by its own. Achieving flat wash is one of the hardest thing to do with gouache, so it's totally okay if it doesn't turn out flat the first try, just keep practicing and try with other colors as well, or eventually add more white. Once you finish, you can repeat this exercise as many times as you want and try different degrees of opacity. But before you try that, let's move to the second option of this exercise, where we are going to paint flat washes with different degrees of capacity, over three rectangles with the same size on a horizontal row. So if for the first option, we practiced painting flat wash on different sizes. This time we will focus on the different degrees of capacity by painting smaller areas, which should be easier to achieve flat washes. And I'm going to use the leftover paint from the mixing exercise and just top it with some fresh gouache, to have a thicker consistency for the first swatch. So the first swatch we will lay down on opaque wash and the paint consistency has to be creamy and fluid. Also here, make sure to lay down the paint evenly without any excess of paint on the surface, if there is any. Just like the previous option exercise. For the second second swatch, we're going to dilute the paint to lay down a semi transparent wash, so the consistency has to be more watery, but not too much. This is going to be the trickiest flat wash to achieve, as you want to have a good ratio of paint and water on your area, but you don't want to have too much water laying on the surface, or it won't dry even. So as for the opaque wash, try to smooth it out and remove any excess of water and paint with a clean brush. For the third swatch instead, we're going to swatch a flat transparent wash, so the consistency has to be very thin and watery. And once you painted the full swatch, you want to remove any excess of water and paint on the surface if there is any. Which, with transparent washes, you can see better if some spots are more darker and lighter. And if so, you want to have your wash with the same transparency, so with a a clean brush, without adding any more water, pick up the excess paint and water from the surface, and smooth the wash until it's all painted evenly. and that's it! try this exercise as many times as you want and with other colors, and add a bit of white to enhance the opacity and increase the chance to achieve a flat and even wash. But you can try even without adding white. And don't worry, if it won't look perfectly flat at the first try, it might be to the color itself as for example, I always have the most struggles laying down certain blue and red rather than yellow or brown. Just make sure that you're working on a wet surface or it won't dry even, and let this swatch dries by its own, without re-touching the surface in the middle of the drying process, or you will ruin the swatch. There is one trick you can try to achieve a flat wash, if your first try didn't turn out well and even, and that will be repainting the whole area again. So here I have two rectangles that I didn't paint well, so I hope you can see that there are some light spots around, and it didn't dry flat and even. So I'm going to show what happens if you lay down another layer on top. For the first rectangle, I'm just going to lay down the second layer on half of the area to show you that by adding another layer, you will increase the opacity. So if you're going to lay down another layer on top, I suggest to do it everywhere and re-work the whole area, or you will end up with light and dark spots again. And that's what I'm going to do for the second rectangle. And the thicker the paint is on your first layer, the easier will be that you will lift up the paint underneath and it will get mixed with the new layer on top. So it might be trickier to work the area, but trying to smooth it out all again. And this trick should help achieveing a flat wash. But I do recommend to try achieving a flat wash on your first try, as this method might not work every time. 9. Exercise: Blending: The next exercise we're going to practice is blending. There are different ways, youu can blend colors together with gouache, but the 2 types of blending we're going to try, is blending 2 colors directly on paper, and blending three colors by mixing the transition color on your mixing surface. And we're going to practice both ways with thin and thick gouache, on this grid with four rectangles. I'm going to use the primary red and primary yellow to blend together, and I'm also going to add some white that will help to enhance the opacity, for an easier blend, but feel free to use any colors you want for this exercise. I'm also going to use two jars of water, one for cleaning my brush and one clean water for blending, to avoid mudding the colors. And I'm going to use three brushes, one for each color, but you can use one single brush, just make sure to clean it between each color exchange. You can use the brush type you prefer, blending can be done with both flat and round brushes. First, we're going to blend thick and opaque gouache, so we can dilute the paint later with water, for the transparent blend. I put my two colors separately on my ceramic plate, and I'm going to pick up some of the yellow to create the transition color for the second type of blending that we will do later, that you can prepare it now or later, because first, we're going to blend two colors together directly on paper. There are different ways you can approach this blend. You could lay down in equal parts the two colors and blend in the middle, but I'm going to lay down the yellow covering 2/3 of the rectangle, and the left. 1/3 with pink. I personally blend colors better this way, but you can try the other way as well. So we want to lay down quite a lot of paint on the paper because ,as we are going to blend the colors together, it's important to work with wet paint and with a wet surface, to have enough time to work the blend to achieve a good blend. Otherwise the paint will start to dry during our blending. So once you laid down the 2 colors, with a clean but damp brush, so clean your brush in the water and then remove some of the water on the towel, so the brush stays damp and it doesn't carry too much water, we're going to blend two colors together, by blending them in the middle and work the blend back and forward (forth), towards each opposite colour. You can add more paint on top on both sides and blend it in the middle, if you need more paint ,and smooth it out until it looks a good blend. And no needs to apply too much pressure when blending, just gently work the blend and back and forth, but it's important to use a clean brush so that you won't dirty your color of the opposite color, each time you go over with your clean brush to smooth the blend, and you don't want to have a dry brush or add more water on the surface, or both will ruin the blend. - Then , for the next blend, we're still going to use thick/opaque gouache, but this time we're going to mix the transition color on your mixing surface and place it in the middle of the blend. And I personally find this method easier for blending colors together, to create a gradual transition from one color to another. You can add more color transition between the two colors you chose if you want, but for this exercise one will be fine. So once you have the three colors, lay down down in equal parts and then as before with a clean and damp brush, blend the colors together, by starting from the middle between the two colors of yellow and orange, in my case, and between orange and pink ,and work to blend back and forth, toward the opposite of each color, until the blend looks nice. - Then next we're going to do the same 2 types of blending, but this time we're going to work with thin gouache, so you can dilute the colors with water and you want to have a quite watery consistency. You can decide to do the following swatches with semi or transparent gouache, but I'm going to do semi transparent, so we're going to follow the same steps. For the first rectangle, lay down the two colors and then with a clean and damp brush, we're going to work the blend back and forth, creating a gradual transition from one color to another. With thin gouache and with more water, it will be easier to achieve a smoother blend, as the water itself blend the colors by its own and do the job for you, unlike we think/opaque gouache that you really have to work the blend. Just make sure to not have too much water on the surface to achieve a nice blend. Then the last swatch, We're going to lay down the two colors and the transition color in the middle, as the second swatch we did, and blend it as before, - and that's it! Achieving a good blend with thick gouache will be trickier than thin gouache, but it's totally okay if it doesn't look perfect, especially on your first tries. Sometimes I also don't get a perfect looking blend, but it doesn't bother me too much, and I also want you to not worry too much about it. And I personally prefer more loose and uncontrolled blend, both with thin and thick gouache. So having a perfect blend is not something I personally look for, for my art. But just keep trying and practice, and I'm sure you will get better at blending! 10. Exercise: Layering: Then the next exercise we're going to practice is layering. The aim of this exercise is to show that gouache can be layered several times, with both thin and thick gouache, and both from dark to light and light to dark . But it has its limits. And this exercise will give you a better understanding on how your water content can affect your layers if you're not careful. So this exercise won't be much about the result, but more about feeling and seeing yourself, how the paint underneath of your layers, can be lifted up, if you're not careful how much water you apply. For this exercise, it doesn't matter what color you choose, for some, we're going to overlay the same color multiple times, but for some, I recommend using colors in contrast of each other, and I'm going to use the leftover paint from the previous exercises, so we can reuse it and we don't waste paint! So I prepared three rectangles where we're going to practice different kinds of layering. Just keep in mind that in this exercise there will be quite a lot of waiting time between each layer application, since we will need to wait for the paint to dry, before applying another layer on top, But I will speed the process during this lesson, so to keep your time occupied do something else or take a break, or try to red-do the previous exercises. So for the first rectangle, we're going to lay down a transparent wash, so you want your paint consistency to being more watery, while for the second rectangle, we're going to lay down a thicker layer. Once you need down the paint, wait for it to dry, . and make sure that both are completely dry, before adding the second layer, or this exercise won't work properly. You can use a hair dryer to faster the drying time if you want. I usually prefer waiting, and let the wash dry naturally. Okay, so once they are dry, for the first rectangle, we're going to apply another transparent wash on top. You can do it with the same color, because this is to show that you can increase the capacity by overlaying transparent layers on top of each other, and you can also change the value as well. If you overlay a transparent wash of another color. It's a very useful technique when you want to be build up the opacity or change the value just in certain areas of your painting, or for example, if your first layer is too transparent, and you want to make it more opaque. While for the second rectangle, we're going to lay down several thick layers on top of each other, and for this one you want to use contrast colors between each other, so I will be using light colors on dark and vice versa for each layer, as it will be easier to see how the colors underneath, can get lifted up and get mixed with your new layer on top, when overlaying several thick layers of gouache on top of each other. To also see that with gouache, you are able to work from light to dark and dark to light. For the thick layers, make sure that your brush doesn't carry too much water, but only paint ,and just add a time amount of water just to get your brush going, or the layer underneath will get easily lifted up. So wait for the second layer to dry before applying the new one, and back to the first rectangle, we're just going to overlay another transparent wash. And for the second rectangle, I'm going to lay down a darker color on top of the light one, and let them dry again. And repeat one more time for our fourth layer. You could keep going and overlay more layers if you want, but you will see that for the second rectangle with thick gouache, the more layers you overlay on top of each other, the trickier will be to lay down the color, as your paint on the layers underneath, starts to get lifted up. So gouache has its limits when it comes to layering, and when overlaying too much high density of paint, there could be the possibility that gouache can crack on the paper. So generally, I don't recommend overlaying more than two or three layers, both with thin and thick gouache, to achieve a good result. While for the last rectangle, I'm going to lay down a transparent wash, but you can do it thick/opaque and choose any colors you want. It doesn't matter because we're going to wait for the layer to dry a little, for not completely, and then overlay another layer on top. And repeats the same more times. But for the last rectangle, choose colors in contrast between each other, so that you see the colors get mixed up. And this is to show you that if you don't wait for the layer to be fully dry and you go on top with another color, the colors will get mixed up and you won't be able to layer colors on top of each other. Okay, that's it! Let's move to the final exercise where we're going to paint different techniques with gouache! 11. Intro to: techniques exercise: For the final exercise for this class, we're going to paint together a playful illustration with some veggies and fruit, to try different painting techniques and to see the difference styles you can achieve with gouache! In the drawing I prepared, there is only the fig as fruit, but I included it because it goes well with the color palette and painting techniques we're going to use! I really have the illustration ready to be painted, that I retraced on a watercolor paper, which as the previous exercises, I'm going to use the Arteza Cold Press 300 grams watercolor paper. I will leave my drawing to download in the resource section of this class, so that you can retrace my same drawing. Or you can copy and draw the fruits and veggies in your style or just paint them right away, without a sketch guideline. , I personally paint better if I have this sketch already drawn, So do whatever you prefer! so the final exercise will be divided in three parts, to keep separate the different techniques we're going to paint. So the first painting technique will be flat and linework for a more graphic style. The second will be wet on wet, for a more loose style, and the third will be blending and layering gouache in different ways. I chose them a subject for this exercise, because I find fruits and vegetables to be very versatile to paint in different styles, which makes them perfect for this exercise! I drew these veggies and fruit on the same paper so we can see the different styles all together, but feel free to paint the different techniques on different papers if you prefer. And these are the materials, I will be using: a mixing surface to mix the colors. I will be using one more plate to keep the different colors separate, as I'm working with small plates, you can use the leftover paint from the previous exercises, but I'm going to use fresh paint so you can see the colors I will be mixing. Then, two jars of water and to keep it beginner friendly and to keep the color selection limited. These are the following colors I will be using: primary yellow, primary red, ultramarine blue, raw sienna and white. If you don't have the exact same colors that's totally fine, just use similar colors to mine. But the color palette we're going to use, is purple, orange, green and beige. So we will need a yellow, red, blue, white and a brown for that. And I will be using three round brushes in different sizes and my rigger brush for the linework. But just having a small and medium size pointed tip brush will do the job. Then a small piece of paper, preferably not a printed paper for something heavier to swatch the colors. And I will show you why during the exercise, and last a towel or something similar to clean your brush and regulate the amount of water on your brush. Arrange the materials around you, for what it's more comfortable for you, and let's get started! 12. Technique: Flat & Linework: Traditionally watch has been functioned by graphic artists and designers to create posters and other art for advertising materials, as this medium is very suitable for this kind of style. Nowadays, gouache is being used by various artists as this medium is very suitable for various type of art. So the first painting technique we're going to try, is flat and line work for a more graphic style, to highlight the matt finish the gouache is known for. So this technique will consist of painting opaque and flat washes with linework, and we're going to try different ways and styles to achieve a graphic look. For the garlic and parsnip, we will painting flat and opaque gouache, for the peas just linework. And for the fennel we will be playing with linework transparency. So the first veggie we're going to paint, are the garlic and parsnip. . my mixing surface I'm creating a pastell beige color for the color base of the parsnip. And with some of that mixture, I'm adding some magenta, which will be the color base of the garlic. So the consistency you want to have is an opaque mix that feels creamy and fluid on your brush. You don't have to use my exact same colors, but you will need a light color for the color base, and a darker color when painting details and line work on top. When my separate piece of paper, I'm watching the colors to find the exact color I want to use. Gouache dries to a different value than it appears when wet and when it's on your mixing surface, usually lighter tone dry darker, and opposite way. So what I always do before laying down the color on my illustration, I swatch the colors on a piece of watercolor paper, and let it dry, to see how the color turns out. And if it's not a color I'm looking, then I adjust the value by mixing more paint, until I found the color I want. . So this is my personal tip, that you can incorporate in your painting process if you wish. And if using the right color is something that you care about, like for me! Just a quick note, I personally don't mix all for my mixture together, I like to leave some of the initial color aside, so that I can always incorporate it later to gradually change the value if I need to. It's recommended to mix all the colors together, so you don't accidentally changed the value, but you can do whatever you prefer. You won't need to make a lot of color, just for these two first swatches, but we're going to use this mixture later, so if you make more, that's perfect. Okay, Once you have your color and consistency ready, we're going to lay down the colors and paint a flat and opaque wash, so you want to lay the color evenly everywhere and smooth it out and remove any excess of paint if it builds up on the surface. So this way you will increase the chance to achieve a flat and even finish. Next, . we're going to mix a slightly darker tone offthe two mixture we just created, and we're going to paint to linework and details on top. So we're still going to use a creamy and opaque mixture. So for this, you will need a brush with a pointed tip. It doesn't matter the size as long as you're able to paint quite thin lines. So once your washes are dry, we're going to paint details on top. If your brushes is carrying too much paint, the lines might result too thick, so you can remove some of the excess paint from your brush and put it back on the side of your palette, so you can paint more easily thin lines. Which you can also outline the parsnip if you want, feel free to paint details and line work as you wish. While for the garlic, we're going to paint linework on top. And here we can play with the pressure you put on your brush, to paint different width for your lines, to add more depth to your painting. - Next , we're going to paint the peas, and for this one, we're going to paint just linework, without any color base. So I'm going to mix primary yellow, ultramarine blue and white together, which, with ultramarine blue, will already create a more natural, muted green. Than just when using just primary blue mixed with primary yellow, but a general tip to create more muted natural green colors, if you like, is to add a bit of brown. And raw sienna or yellow ochre are really nice for that. I personally love working with more muted tone, but feel free to use any colors you want. For this kind of style, It's really fun to play with colors that you wouldn't think to use, but I'm making green because we will need it later when painting the fennel. And also here the consistency has to be creamy and fluid. But first, since I have already prepared to the green, I'm just going to finish painting the top of the parsnip, laying down an opaque wash. Then for the peas, I'll be using different tones of green, Just to have tone variations in my lines, and as for the garlic, for this kind of style, we can play with the witdh of your lines and pressure you put on your brush, so that it looks more interesting and dynamic. This is not really a style I personally use, but this exercise is to show the difference styles you can achieve with gouache. And also finding the style you liked the most, among each painting techniques we're going to paint. And last we have the fennel, First, we're going to lay down a transparent wash. So for this one, I'm going to lighten my pencil lines with a kneaded eraser. I personally don't mind seeing my pencil lines underneath my paintings, as when using thick gouache it will cover the lines anyway. But if I know I'm going to use thin gouache, I like to lighten my lines a little. So for the transparent wash, you want to dilute some of your green mixture with more water and get a more watery consistency, and lay down the transparent wash around the fennel, leaving some white parts around. If you need, definitely use a reference photo, to see where to leave the white spaces. You can decide if to paint the transparent wash more flat or more loose. Just make sure to not leave much water laying on the surface ,so that the drying time will be faster. Once your washes are dry, we're going to paint lineart on top, and this time we're going to play with the opacity and transparency of your lines, and also here, playing with the witdh of your lines and pressure you put on your brush. The finish look might look less graphic, but this is to show that linework and painting details can be done with different degrees of opacity and different tone of color, and not only with opaque gouache. But when painting transparent linework and with a watery paint consistency, make sure to remove the excess water that your brush will carry, as the lines might become too watery, and you won't be able to achieve neat and thin lines. And just have fun, playing with different opacity and transparency for your line work! The last thing I wanted to show, but you don't have to do it, but we laid down the transparent wash first before adding the line work on top because, if you do it in the opposite way and lay down a transparent wash on top of the line work, as you're working with more water, there is the chance that the lines might fade and disappear, which means you have to repaint the lineart again. But that doesn't mean you can't do that, because if you want to re-touch and add more value to your painting, even if it's already finished, you can do it! So gouache is a really forgiving medium ,that can be corrected, and you can retouch part of your paintings at any time. So, for example, if you're not happy with the lineart you painted, or for any sort of imperfection, you can re-wet the surface and remove the paint. This is my favorite thing about gouache, that I'm able to correct things that I'm not happy about. Okay, that's all for this painting style. Let's move to the next technique, wet on wet! 13. Technique: Wet on wet: the next technique who were going to pain is the weapon, What for a Morelos time, The resemble watercolors the finish look won't look exactly like water colors just to clarify that. But watch can be used similarly to watercolors and can be watered down and use it Been for more lose and watery effect. So for this time we're going to paint the radish and onion, and I'm going to use the colors reduced for the previous technique. But I'm going to add some fresh with Charmery blue and makes it in the pink picture as I want to paint both union and radish more purplish and the consistency want to help for this town were being more watery, but we will do both fake and thing more Ficke for the onion and morphing for the rubbish with two different approach to work with the wet on wet technique. I'm also going to put some white on my NICS and service that I'm going toe up on the on your which you will see short lady effect that it will create. Okay, now I'm going to lay down the color and I'm going toe apply quite a lot of paint on the paper and even add some water to it as water will create a more losing on control. In fact, and that's the finish look and style we're going for. And then I'm going to job on top, some off the white pain. The mix it a little bit, which I find it creates these really interesting effect, this kind of technique we form, or what service. It will take more time for the wash to dry, but the color will blend by their own, thanks to the water, creating this lose and on control effect. If you wish, you can remove some off the excess paint and water from the surface to faster the drying time and next we're going to paint the radish, but it's done. We're going to use morphine in the water, Rick, Wash. So I'm going to dilute the picture on my part by adding more water. Then there is another approach for the what on what technique? Instead of lay down the pain. First you can what the's surveys with clean water first, So I'm going to use my second jar with clean water for these. Then take some off the paint and drop it on the white surface, and you will see that the pain will spread around by its own, which then you can retort the wash as wish. Ideally, you want to wait for the wash to dry before painting the leaves off the radish. But there was the two colors with touch and mixed together in might ruin the Finnish result . But you can go ahead and paints that come doing, and we just make sure to not touch the pink color with migraine and saying for the order leave, I'm going to paint them already but live in somewhat space between each leave, so each live he's painted separately in cars don't get mixed together. So before we go on top 50 days, you want wait for the washes to be completely dry or the detail will fade in the wash and you won't be able to paint the find it days on top like, for example, here you don't have to out the days. If you don't want before meaty days makes everything look better and more defined. This time, I'm going to add both light and dark details on top and add some highlights were white. You can just use one color, but it's to show that quash could be worked both from light to dark and dark to light by adding highlights as well. Okay, does it? Let's move to the next painting technique planning a labouring with puffin and thick quash . 14. Technique: Blending & Layering: The next technique we're going to paint, is blending and layering gouache in different ways with both thick and thin gouache. To make into practice some of the blending and layering exercises we did previously, but including other ways to work with gouache. For the following veggies and fruit, for the leak we will practice blending and fading with thin gouache. For the carrot, we will practice layering thin gouache to increase the opacity, For the pumping and fig, we will practice blending with thick gouache. And for the eggplant, we will practice layering with different layers of paint. There isn't a right order for painting the following veggies, you can paint each veggie at a time, but during this painting process, we will paint different veggies at the same time, to make the most of the color we create at a time, and paint gouache opaque first, to then dilutes the paint for the transparent washes. Ao that we don't have to add more paint and use more than we would need. So the first veggie we're going to paint is the leak, and we're going to practice blending and fading thin and more transparent gouache. But first I'm going to add some fresh gouache on my palette, that I used for the previous techniques, to create a more vibrant green, as my green mixture became too dull, and to get back to a more thick consistency. So before we dilute the color for painting the leak, I will quickly paint the leaves of the eggplant with an opaque wash, and the leaves for the carrots with a semi transparent wash. So while we wait for the washes to dry, we can paint the leak. The consistency you want to have, will be more watery and transparent, so you can add quite a lot of water to your mixture. For the leak, we're going to practice blending and fading thin gouache on paper, so you will need two different tone of green, one light and a dark green, for blending them together. Once you have your colors ready, lay down both the light and dark green and blend them together, working the blend back and forward. I'm going to paint their eaves of the leak behind first, and I'll wait for them to dry, so that when we're going to paint the leaves at the front, the colors won't get mixed altogether, and ruin the blending and fading. While we wait for the wash to dry, I'm going to paint the top of the fig and pumpkin with the green, which at first I wanted to paint them brown, which you can do then create brown later. but let's just use the green that we made. So once you wash is dry, we're going to fade the green into the white of the paper, and still working with quite thin gouache. You can just do a fade from green to the white of the paper, but I'm going to do a color transition from dark to light green, and then fade it in the white of the paper, to practice blending further more. So I lay down the dark green at the top first. Then I placed the light green and blend them together. And then for the fading, I'm going to use a clean and damp brush, to gradually fade the color toward the white of the paper. For each time you pull the paint toward the white of the paper, make sure to use a clean but damp brush, or you won't be able to achieve a nice fading. So clean your brush in a clean jar of water, by removing the pigment on your brush, and remove some of the excess water that your brush will carry on your towel, so your brush is damp but clean. And starting from the green, gently pull the color toward the white and not the opposite way, or you won't be able to create a nice fading. Now that we laid down all the green colours, now we can create orange, and I will be mixing primary yellow and primary red, and the veggies we're going to paint first is the pumpkin where we're going to practice blending thick gouache., making one transition color this time, which I find this blending technique easier to achieve a good blend between different colors. So I'm creating three different tones of orange, from light to dark on my mixing surface, and I'm also going to add a bit of raw sienna and white, to make the orange more muted, but you don't have to do it. So the consistency of the paint has to be opaque, creamy and fluid. You won't need to make much paint, but enough for painting the pumpkin. Once you have two colors ready. We're going to lay down the three colors, the light orange on top, the mid orange in the middle and the dark orange on the bottom. And then with a clean but damp brush, we're going to blend the colors together, starting in the middle, between light and mid orange, and then between mid orange and dark orange and work the blend back and forward. While you work, make sure you are working with a wet surface to achieve a good blend. So you can add more paint on top if you need, if it starts to dry, and use a clean but damp brush, so your brush won't carry too much water on the bristles, for a better blending result. While I'm going to leave the back of the pumpkin white, as I'm going to paint it later. just with dark orange. Blending thick gouache is one of the trickiest technique to master with gouache, and sometimes I also struggled with that, and I don't get the most perfect blend, which personally, it doesn't bother me too much, as I prefer to work with gouache more loosely and have a more bold/loose style for my art. both with thin and thick gouache. And especially when blending gouache, it takes practice to get better at it. So definitely take your time and it's totally okay if it doesn't turn out perfect, at first, once you will get more familiar with gouache, you will have a better control of the medium, and blending will become easier. - Okay, , once you're finished, we're going to paint the inside of the fig. We will be using a mixture of different techniques, and you can use any technique you want. You can paint it more lose or more opaque and flat, or just use linework, or do a mixture of more techniques, So feel free to stylize it in the way you prefer. For me, I'm going to lay down a semitransparent orange wash in the center for a more loose style. While later, when we're going to create purple and finish the fig, I'm going to use gouache more opaque and I will be adding details on top later. This will be a very simple example, but with gouache you can take it in any direction you want and work it however you prefer. Ehere you can mix more styles together, there isn't a right or wrong way to paint with gouache. Just use the technique, and style that you prefer and that suits your style or type of illustration you're painting. . So next for the carrot, we're going to practice layering with thin gouache, so you can dilute one of the orange color with more water to have a more thin and watery consistency and lay down the paint. I recommend to paint a flat wash, so you want to remove any excess of water and paint laying on the surface, if there is any, so that the wash will look evenly painted. Okay, so while wait for the newest washes to dry, And once the leak is dry, we can finish painting the leak. And I'm simply going to add an outline and some details, to define the shape, and you can play with different degrees of opacity for the line work, as we did for the fennel. If you wish. sometimes when you lay down another color on top, that seems dark enough on your mixing surface, it might not dry as you expected and might dry lighter like it happened to me, so you simply needs to mix a darker tone and lay it down again. But at the same time, you can also play with different tone of line work, to add subtle details. Okay, now we go back to the carrot, Make sure the first layer is completely dry before adding the second layer on top. Use the same orange and green color and lay them down with the same transparency as before, as they will dry darker, and will build up to opacity. This is a very simple example, but it delivers well the concept of slowly increasing the opacity, as one of the technique you can use with gouache. So while we wait for the new layer to dry and the pumpkin has dried, we can start adding details and linework. The linework and details can be done in different ways and with any color you want. For the pumpkin, I'm going to use the light orange and pastel yellow to outline the pumpkin and add details, but you can use a darker tone of orange if you prefer, I like both ways, it's just a difference style. So next, I'm going to add details with a light yellow on the inside of the fig, which you can paint the details in a different way. I'm going to paint like doodle, with a continued line, that kind of resemble the texture inside of the fig. Now that the carrot has also dried, I'm going to add another layer of the same transparent color to increase the opacity even more. But adding another layer is optional and you don't have to do it. And once my third layer has also dried, now we can add some details on the carrot, with both light and dark details. But how you'll see, I wasn't very happy with the light details I painted on top of the leaves, so I re-wet to surface again to remove the paint, so I will come back to it later once the paint has dried and I will be adding dark details. Okay, now I can finally create purple and paint the eggplant and fig. First we're going to paint the eggplant and we're going to practice layering with thick gouache but this time without any blending, just flat and opaque layers on top of each other. So I'm going to mix ultramarine blue with magenta and add a bit of white as well, to create a mid purple that is not too dark and not too light. And the consistency you want to have, has to be opaque and has to feel creamy and fluid, , and we're going to lay down a flat opaque wash. So you want to make sure you work pretty fast and lay down the paint evenly everywhere, by applying quite a lot of paint on the surface. So I'm going to use a bigger brush to cover the largest part, and I'm using a smaller brush, for the smaller parts. But you will see that my wash didn't dry as flat as I wanted. It's very tricky to see if you're laid down the color nicely and evenly with dark colors. I could go on top and re-paint the area, which could help achieving a flat wash, But I will leave it like this because we're going to add another layer on top, so it doesn't matter if it's not flat. so while we wait for the eggplant to dry, we can finish painting the inside of the fig, and I'm simply going to lay down just an opaque outline and paint the seeds with purple. And paint the lighter purple on the right side of the outline to add highlights. And next week we can finally start painting the fig. For this one, we're going to blend two colours together on paper, this time without creating the transition color as for pumpkin. I'll leave the choice to you, If you want to practice blending with more thin or thick gouache, I'm going to blend quite thick gouache again, as I will still need the opaque purple for the eggplant. But if you decide to paint it more thin, you can always add more paint to your purple moisture, to finish painting the eggplant later. Or you can take some of that mixture and put it aside and keep it for painting the eggplant while you dilute the other with water, so follow the same steps as we did for the pumpkin, lay down the two colors and with a clean and damp brush, blend the colors together, add more paint if you need, and work the blend back and forth. So while we wait for the fig to dry, the eggplant has dried so we can go back to it. And add the second layer, still working with an opaque consistency. So mix a light purple and ta dark purple on your palette, for adding the highlight and the shadow, which you can use the light and dark purple mixture we made for the fig, or mix a new one, but I'm going to add more paint to make the colors lighter and darker. So with a lighter purple. we're going to add highlight like this, with a quite simple gesture with you brush, and lay down a dark purple for the shadow. Especially now when overlaying another thick layer on top, you want you brush to carry as less water as possible, to minimize the chance of lifting the paint underneath, but you still want your brush to have a tiny amount of water, just to get your brush going. I'll also be adding some purple and yellow details un the leaf. For this kind of technique that looks more graphic, I find that you can really have fun playing with colors. When overlaying thick layers of gouache, you really have to be careful on how much water you applying the surface, or the paint on the layer underneath might bet lifted up and your colors will get all mixed together. And with this kind of technique it might be difficult to achieve a flat wash result, so it's totally okay if the finished result won't look flat. This layering exercise for the eggplant, is to show the gouache has its limits when it comes to layering. And generally, I would suggest to not overlay more than three layers with gouache. Then I will quickly go back to the carrot and finish adding the remaining details. which as you see gouache is a really forgiving medium, where you can correct your mistakes. The one trick I wanted to show but you don't have to do it, if you're blending didn't turn out as a wished, you could repaint the whole area and re-do the blend, but it's going to be more difficult to work the paint and the surface and lay down the paint evenly again, as the colors underneath will get mixed up all together, and the blend might not turn out nicer than before, so as a beginner. I recommend to do it right on the first try if you can, but you can try this method and see what happens. Okay, now that the fig has dries, we can add details and line work on top, and I would be adding darker details and some highlights. And last, the dark purple color I layered on the eggplant at first, it didn't dry out as dark as I wished, so I'm going to make a darker purple and lay the paint again, which in this case, I could add a bit of black or brown to make it darker, But I just added more ultramarine blue and it work. So yeah, that's it! I hope this final exercise was helpful to you to see the many different ways you can paint with gouache and achieve different styles with it. But before we moved to the final thoughts and project for this class, I would like to talk about how to maintain and take care of your supplies, so that they can last you for a long period of time! 15. Maintaining your supplies: The last thing I wanted to share, is how to maintain your paintbrushes and paint tubes so that they can last you for a long time and help you save money as well. So let's start with brushes, the first tip to absolutely avoid. is leaving your brush heads down in a jar of water, that will deform and bend the bristles of your brush. Then rinse your brush during use, as you work, do not leave your brush laying around with paint on it for a long time, or the paint will dry on your brush and that will damage the bristles of your brush. And when you finished painting, Rinse your brush well with water in the sink or in a clean jar of water, not every time, but often rinse/clean your brush with water and soap as well. And work this soap into the hair of your brush, on the palm of your hand or on a clean white mixing surface, to remove as much pigment as possible. Then last, give your brush a good rinse with water to remove the soap, reshape the tip of the hair bundle with your finger and leave your brush to dry on a flat surface. Do not dry your paintbrush upright, because water will seep into the ferrule, which will lead the bristles to spread and loose its shape and the finest of its tip. Brushes can lose their shape and get damaged quicker when deposit of paint builds up over time, so a proper maintenance of your paintbrushes, will not only make them last longer, it will also give you a better finish on your paint job! For gouache tubes instead, make sure to screw the cap back on completely after each use, so air won't filtrate in the tube and let the paint dry inside. We want to keep the paint moist as long as possible, so we will be able to work with fresh gouache and squeeze the pain easily at each use. After several uses, when the paint starts to build up around the lid of your tube. I recommended to scrap off the paint, with a wet towel or something similar, so that you can easily open and close your tubes each time! 16. Class project & Outro: Okay, now that we saw the different painting techniques and the difference styles you can achieve with gouache, for your class project I would like you to choose one of the painting technique from the final exercise that you were more drawn to, and paint other fruits and or veggies of your choice and bring everything together in one single painting! Feel free to paint as many fruits and veggies as you wish, or you can choose the same, or some of the same fruit and veggie from the final exercise, or choose another subject entirely. It doesn't have to be fruits or vegetables. You can paint like plants or objects you find around your home. And feel free to use more than one technique or even choose more techniques together and find your own style to paint with gouache. Because, I want you to enjoy painting whatever you prefer, using the painting technique and style that you liked the best, and you were more drawn to. Because if there is something I want you to take away from this crass, is to see how gouache is such a versatile and fun medium to play with, and you can take it in any direction you want! My recommendation, choose a limited color palette, so choose your objects with the same colors, so you don't get overwhelmed with the color selection. I would love to see your creations. So don't hesitate to take a photo and share your piece in the project gallery of this class, and I will be more than happy to give you any feedback if you need! And if you have any questions regarding gouache or regarding any part of this class, Don't hesitate to ask me and I will be more than happy to help you out! Thank you so much for joining my class. I really hope you found my class helpful and that you were able to gain a better understanding of this medium. So, yeah, I can't wait to see your creations, and I will see you next time, bye!