Learn to Paint a Wooden Lettered Sign and Give it an Aged “Antiqued” Finish | Jennifer Paige | Skillshare

Learn to Paint a Wooden Lettered Sign and Give it an Aged “Antiqued” Finish

Jennifer Paige, Teacher and Maker from Maine

Learn to Paint a Wooden Lettered Sign and Give it an Aged “Antiqued” Finish

Jennifer Paige, Teacher and Maker from Maine

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7 Lessons (47m)
    • 1. Introduction and Supplies

      6:28
    • 2. Preparing your Sign

      3:51
    • 3. Layout and Chalking

      9:19
    • 4. Painting and Aging

      11:00
    • 5. Bases and Wax Finishes

      8:36
    • 6. Wrap it up

      2:55
    • 7. Bonus clip: Stain vs Wax

      5:07
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About This Class

In this class, students will be lead through my process of painting wood, laying out the letters for painting, and finishing off the sign with an aging process to give it an antique or vintage finish.  

For this class, you will need:

1)a piece of wood for your sign

2)Flat Paint

3)Stain and/or Antique Wax

4)Chalk

5)Printer to print you words 

6)Sand Paper or Sanding block

7)Wood Glue, if using more than one piece of wood

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Meet Your Teacher

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Jennifer Paige

Teacher and Maker from Maine

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Related Skills

Fine Art Creative

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Transcripts

1. Introduction and Supplies: Hi, I'm Jennifer Paige. And welcome to my skill share class. This is my second skill share class. And this one is on painting wooden signs and giving them a aged look so that you end up with a what I would call a ventured sign. And my first class was done on printing pictures on tissue paper and then applying them toe would or campus. So if you didn't catch that class, go back and take a look at appreciate it and I will be publishing some more classes, hopefully in the next coming weeks. So let's get started on this one. I am going to show you the supplies that you're going to need. And first off, let me just say that the best thing about what I'm going to show you is that yes, you're using wood, but you don't need any power tools, everything that I'm going to show you. You can get at a craft store or Home Depot, and they'll cut it for you. And the first thing you're going to need is would. So if you already have a piece of wood, feel free to use whatever you have the project. I'm going to show you and lead you through was done on a piece of birch plywood quarter inch thick, four inches wide, 12 inches long, and I got it at my local craft store. This piece of wood cost $2.29 very, very affordable. And I also use a base piece that I put my sign on. And this is what I used. Its three age, three eights inches thick, and it's six inches wide, 12 inches long, and this piece costs $3.99. So you can see for, you know, this is $4 basically, and this was 2 29 so under $7 could make your own son. Now, if you want to go a little bit bigger, I go to Home Depot and I. Yet these pieces of wood I get it actually, in a four foot comes four foot long. Get my little cheat sheet here. It's quarter inch thick, 5.5 inches. Why, and four feet long and I cut it in half. I have a power saw, but you can use a handsaw or you can have Home Depot cut it. So this is two feet and you can see this is one of the examples I wanted to show you. You can either put this on the wall as is or can get a bigger piece of wood to put behind it for a base, just to give it a more finished look. I'll show you a couple examples of those as well. So here are some examples of other pieces that I've done. This is a peace sign that I did using a just regular piece of would that I had laying around. You can see it here in black could notice that you can see kind of through some of the black there, which is good. This is another favorite of mine that I've made actually many of and sold and given away because I love the state of Maine. And here is I did a bunch of joy signs at Christmas time to sell. So here, a couple of different versions, you'll notice just one has the letters all painted in, which is a little different from the other ones I've done. And here is a piece that I made for a gift, which was done on a piece of old wood beginning. This is what I'm gonna lead you through showing you how to do. Is this love sign right here? The other supplies that you're going to need are some joke. Outline new letters before you paint them some paint now paint you, you're going to want paint for the background. So, for instance, some black paint for this. Either I just use a flat paint from the hardware store, or you can use a acrylic paint as well. I would just make sure that it's flat paint, not glossy at all. Your I want a gloss for a vigil, consign. And then you're gonna need some stain for the background. If you are going to stay in the background like this, this and you're also gonna need stain for the aging process. If you don't have stain at the crowd store, you can get antique wax, which I really like. I just started using this a couple months ago, and not only does it give a nice aging process, but it also seals it, Um, and you could buff it and it gives it a nice, smooth finish, and I really like the look of it. The beauty of stain is that it will give you a little bit more variety in the choices that you have also in how dark you can get it in spots a little bit, a little bit more versatility in the wax, but your choice and use whatever you have. And then, lastly, so would blue. If you're doing two pieces together like this, you're gonna want some wood glue to apply the top to the base. So that's it for supplies, and we're ready to get start. 2. Preparing your Sign: so the first thing I want to lead you through is just preparing your pieces for your lettering. So in the introduction, I talked about having a small piece and then a bass piece. So both of these are gonna need to be either painted or stained so that you can let them and then put them together and finish. So a couple of thoughts on the basis this is a stained piece with a brown stain and then a gray staying on top. And as you can see, I just it around the edges, mostly because I know that this is going to cover up the middle. So I didn't do too much about the middle. And if you'll notice, I intentionally left some extra splotches of stain and tried to make it as uneven as possible because I want this piece toe look old. And the other thing is, is when you do this, don't forget to do the edges because edges air gonna show when you hang them on the wall, and that goes for the top pieces. This is another piece that I did with stain, but this one has a dry brush, a white paint on top and again you can notice a dark spots. I tried to make it a little uneven and swatch e, and then I sanded it a little bit down to make it again. Look old. This piece is white paint, with some stain and or wax applied. I'll show you later in a video that part of this has wax, and part of this has seen just to show you the difference. But that's going to be an option. And then as faras, painting the signed piece of it, either by using the a little piece that I showed you or the bigger piece four foot piece that that I had cut in half. You can paint this base of any color. I tend to use black law just because I think it looks old. And a lot of the older signs are really basic in colors. So this has a flat black paint on it, and this one has two layers of paint. I did black and then I let it dry, and then I put a rat on top of it, and what I really like about this is that you can see the black coming through the other option that you could do that give you a very similar look would be to stain first, let it dry and then paint, and you get this stain showing through just like the black pain is showing through on this . I like the layers on, and I think it it as a nice aging effect. When you add the lettering on top and then age all of it together, it makes for a very nice look. So those are my ideas on getting your pieces of wood prepared before you do the lettering? The next video, I'm gonna start with how I do my lettering, and then we're gonna paint them, and then we're gonna change. 3. Layout and Chalking: So I have some pieces here ready to get going. This is my base for those one. And it is the six by 12 inch birch plywood that I got at the craft store. That's a half inch thick. And I'm putting a black piece of, uh, this is a four by 12 quarter inch so you can see that it's a little thinner on the top. And I stained the bottom the base and painted this black. Now, you do not wanna worry about anything being perfect because you want it to look old. So as you can see on the stain piece, I intentionally left some of it like that, and I'm gonna rough it up a little bit when I finish on again. Same thing with the, um, black paint. Don't worry about if it's evenly covering, because you're gonna mess it up, uh, with the sandpaper and some stain in the end. So what I want to show you is that we're going to lay out what we're going to paint, um, on our sign and for this one, I am doing love. So the trick is to try to get it laid out, obviously straight but evenly spaced. Uh, and if you're really picky concerned, you can measure it. I liked eyeball it because again, it's supposed to be an old hand painted sign and doesn't necessarily need to be perfect. So I like the way that looks. Next step. I am going to take chalk just regular Creole a chalk, and I'm going to move these. I'm gonna put them back, obviously, but I just want to see make sure that the size of the letters were were a nice proportion. I am going. Teoh, take this chalk and color in me at line of the letter. You don't have to do anything more than the outline, but don't worry about if you do more nice and evenly coated. Shake it off. Now here's Here's where, um, you don't want to get ahead of yourself because you want to make sure that once you've got the chalk that that layout you started with probably should have left these on is where you want them to be. It was just a little bit. I think that's pretty good. That down a little now this l is the one that has the chalk on it. So I'm just gonna put piece of tape here while I do this. And I am going to take a pen, do it. Could be a pencil. Could be a pen. And I am gonna Tracy outline of this letter. Hopefully could see this doesn't have to be perfect. As you can see, I'm finding doing it messy. But I'm doing it hard so that I can get the chalk outline, um, on the piece of wood and it should show up pretty well because it's black paints the great Chuck, and the chalk is just gonna wipe off in the end. So don't worry about how pretty it looks. You can see I'm making a mess with my pen here. Thing you want to make sure you're getting are the nice curves in your letters. If you're a few later has occurred and then take it off and you can see the outline. So you're gonna do that with all of your letters. And again, don't get ahead of yourself. Um, and find in the end that you're spacing is off. But if you do, um, take a damp cloth and white the chalk off and I'm start again. I say these letters once I use them and write down the size of them what I used it for so that I don't have to recreate them and find the font and find the size. So I am going to go ahead and do that for all over the letters. All right, you go. It looks like this piece didn't get this edge. Do you know, it looks like I didn't get it with the chart, so I just tried that. And you couldn't reach shock it and put it back on, but getting it lined up, it's a little tricky getting it in the right spot, So looks good. Define the line so I can see them. Where you gonna paint? Inside. So the chalk out so I can be a little messy. Whenever I do the truck, I just put the letter next to it. Second, keep the font consistent. All right. All right. So that's how you lay it out and do the chalk on the next video. We're going to paint the letters in 4. Painting and Aging: Okay, so now we're going to paint in the letters. And for this particular sign, it is, uh, on black paint. So I'm gonna use white paint on top of it. I buy my paint by the court because I do quite a few signs. This is just a flat enamel, uh, ultra white plane. Um, paint has not been tinted. It all didn't need to to have any extra thing. Don't the hardware store. Also, by, like, the artist's loft brand at the craft store. I buy it in the big thing because I use so much of it. So I have, um, some different brushes here, if you could see him that well, but I use a small kind appointed one, maybe a larger pointed one. And then I didn't like this nice little flat one, uh, for the straight lines, like on the L. Now, remember what I said? We're gonna try to do this and not be perfect about it and way want to be inside the lines in the chalk lines, but we're not going to paint it all in. And the hardest part for me is knowing when to stop. So going to do this. Everyone's going to do it differently if you want to paint the whole thing in. By all means, do it. I like the look and you'll see in a minute what I mean when there's a little bit that looks like it's worn off, usually somewhere in the middle, you see like that is not, um, not filling in evenly. I'm gonna leave that extra there. We do like to try to get the edge is defined as much as possible, but they can doesn't have to be perfect. You're gonna do yours different than I do mine. That's the beauty of making your own sign is that it can look exactly like you want. And again, just like the way that you can wipe off the chalk. Uh, if it's not lined up, If it's not, you know this. It doesn't come out the way you want. Don't you start painting and you don't like the look of it. You can't. What I would do is sand it down a little bit with some sandpaper sandpaper block and then, um, paint over it with black paint and start again. So it's pretty forgiving project. Um, I am gonna leave that once it dries a little bit, I will wipe the chalk off just to see if there's anything that needs to be filled in. But I am going to do this and, uh, speed this video up for you. So you after painstakingly watch me paint this all, but you can see kind of the techniques that I use and how I create the lines. But don't Philip completely in? All right, The last step. It's a two step process where we're going to sand this up a little bit, get a little bit of thes. Any sign that's with the pain thing is a flat pain, so it doesn't have a shine. But, um, I also like to just get a little bit of that extra paint. There's spot that you want to take a little bit off and make it see how it's a little rough here. Make it look a little bit more uniformly worn off in that section. I can see that if you san too much up, go back then with paint. Don't worry about taking some of the black off here. I try to do a couple of spots on the inside not just around the edges so that it looks like it's been warmer. Quarters are gonna get sanded. I don't have to do all the corners, and you don't have to do that family. But I like Teoh. Definitely get is thing turn and distressed as possible. This is just a sanding blocks that I'm using by the hardware store. All right, take that paper towel that I used before. And I hope you can see the distressing in the corners. So there we go. And then the last step is to use a stain. Uh, I have a men wax would finish. This stain is called provincial to 11. Uh, I like it because it's dark, but its not too dark. So we need to do that and a phone brush, and I'm going to use a paper towel, wipe off any excess, and I am going to wipe this on, and I'm gonna try to do it in an uneven fashion. Although I do want all of the white paint to get stained because you can see that it discolor zit. That's where the aging piece of it comes in. Not only is it, um, not painted perfectly but it sanded and distressed and then stain. You assume I've only dipped this paintbrush once in the stain so you can see you only need a tiny bit. That's why I only have this is very small. Eight hours can that I've had for quite a while and then I'm gonna wipe it off. Totally changes a look of the sign I love how the just a little bit makes from turning white to that off way with the steam is, uh what creates the old look. And then what I do is I go through and I just put a little extra stain in a couple of spots . You can even go, you know, not just on the letters, but across the whole whole thing. And then, uh, just kind of dab it a little bit. What? You want to be somewhat in consistence and, uh, you know, do do whatever do whatever you want. There's no system to it, but you can see how it gives each letter a little. A little extra dimension doesn't have to be a lot. Keep going back and taking some off some more back in. But you can see that very well, but that's what it looks like, and it's all stained. Lastly, I just want to show you that I finished this piece off with some clear wax and you'll see that it gives it a little bit of uniformity in the shine, so you don't notice the stain marks quite as much. The wax seals it without making it super shiny, so it's still got a somewhat of a flat finish to it. But it makes it more uniform. It's one of the finishes that I think makes it complete and a little bit more professional . 5. Bases and Wax Finishes: So what? I just want to show you here. Real quick is how different backgrounds and front pieces can change the look of what you're doing. So I have this piece here that I had showed you. I did brown stain, and then I did some gray on top of it. Had this piece has stained and then a little bit of white paint on top of it. And this is the black He said I did, um she can see how it looks there, and then you can see how it looks there. But I also want to show you like a red layered. This has black in the background, red on top and probably sand that down a little bit more. But so you can see how it looks there versus the black, kind of like the black on that one. And then how it looks on their and then the third option, which I'll doing a little bit, is doing a painted piece for the base. I want to show you a blank base piece that I'm going to use again. Just got at the local craft store all pre cut, so you don't need to do anything. I am going to paint this white that I'm gonna sand it down and put some stain on top of it , similar to the way that I do the top piece. But because it's all white, um, it's going toe age pretty nicely with the stain and be random and sanded. Remember, when you're painting these pieces because they're supposed to look old in the end, don't don't fuss too much about getting it's even, like covered, because you want to look Warren in spots. So once the stain is applied, if there's any gaps where the paint hasn't been applied to thick, um, the stains gonna take in those thoughts a little bit more, which is going to make it look warn. So I am going to finish painting this. Let it dry, and then I will be back with some sanding and staining. Once it's dried, you can see that I didn't billing all those spots, and as it dries, it will be a little uneven, which is exactly what I want. And I like to use thes waxes to seal the wood, and you can use the antique wax, which will give it an aging as Well, there's clear wax, white wax, and then the antique wax. I'm gonna use antique white wax on this white piece. Okay, So here is the base peace with the white paint. I'm just gonna do a quick little sand on it, especially getting the corners just like digging into random spots. Sanding block. It's kind of Well, uh, they used a lot. We're meeting weather than a little, uh, So And, please, then I'm gonna show you two options. One is this antique wax. It's going to seal it. And agent, it's very dark brown. The other is just using a brown stain. This is a provincial men wax, which they use a lot. So, person, I'm gonna start with the wax. I'm just gonna paint a little bit on so you can see the effect wasted off just the excess. This is to set on dry for 24 hours. Um, and then you profit It is a wax. Keep some spots a little darker than others. And then under the sun, I'm gonna show you the stain, which is going to look similar, but a little different. So, states All right, here we go. Not really doing the middle cause it's gonna get covered. Plus, I kind of like to show you, you know what it started looked like to begin with. I'm just gonna go in and thank you. Four Random. Okay, so there you have it. This is how it started as a white. This is the wax side Needs to drive for 24 hours and then get buffed with a soft cloth or paper title will be fine. This is stained. Um, And if you want to add an additional sealer, you're gonna have to add, like, a polyurethane or something, or you could just leave it, as is I find with the, um, old wood. I kind of like to leave it unsealed because it, um, doesn't have a shiny effect in it. Looks older. So I'm just gonna leave that so wax stain or nothing at all. I think the whites gonna be too two stark, and then you can see how they look. Um, not too. Not too far different. I think it's just a matter of what you have for supplies. And, uh, either one will work and shoot the read pace. I have just to show you. Oh, that looks a swell. So a little bit lighter finish, then this stain piece we have here. So you're looking for something a little lighter? I think that would be a good option. 6. Wrap it up: so to wrap up, I just wanted to show you some finished pieces that I have for some inspiration on your project. Your project does not need to be two pieces together like this, but it certainly can just be one piece. But this is the finished product of the love sign that I lead you through during the class . This is a another option, um, showing the red version on black and this yet because I wanted to show you that this back piece was just painted black and sanded down so you can see a little bit of the warn edges . But as you can see in the middle, it was just a plain he said would to start, and then that will be the finished piece when I glue it together. And then I just wanted to show you I showed you this joy sign at the beginning, and I wanted to show you what it would look like with a piece behind it. This back piece, it was a plain piece of wood. It has some brown stain, so grace stain and some black paint on it. I know it looks messy, but when you put that together and you hang it up. It's just gonna look like an old piece of wood. And again, don't forget to do the edges. So I'm excited to see what you come up with for projects. I'm going to add a couple more pictures onto this off the projects I showed you that I've done in the past. Just person more inspiration. If you have any questions, feel free to put the questions in the discussion section and I will get right back to you so good back. 7. Bonus clip: Stain vs Wax: Okay, So here is the base peace with the white paint. I'm just gonna do a quick little sand on it, especially getting the corners just like digging into random spots. Sanding block. It's kind of Well, uh, they used we're meeting weather than a little, uh, So And, please, then I'm gonna show you two options. One is this antique wax. It's going to seal it. And agent, it's very dark brown. The other is just using a brown stain. This is a provincial men wax what she use a lot. So, person, I'm gonna start with the wax. I'm just gonna paint a little bit on so you can see the effect wasted off just the excess. This is to set on dry for 24 hours. Um, and then you profit It is a wax. Keep some spots a little darker than others. And then under the sun, I'm going to show you the stain, which is going to look similar, but a little different. So all right, here we go. Not really doing the middle cause it's gonna get covered. Plus, I kind of like to show you, you know what it started like to begin with. I'm just gonna go in and thank you, little random. Okay, so there you have it. This is how it started as a white. This is the wax side needs to drive for 24 hours and then get buffed with a soft cloth or paper title will be fine. This is stained. Um, And if you want to add an additional sealer, you're gonna have to add, like, a polyurethane or something, or you can just leave it, as is I find with the, um, old wood. I kind of like to leave it unsealed because it doesn't have a shiny effect, and it looks older, so I'm just gonna leave that so wax stain or nothing at all. I think the whites gonna be too two, stark. And then you can see how they look. Not too. Not too far different. I think it's just a matter of what you have for supplies. And, uh, either one will work and shoot the read piece. I have just to show you. Oh, that looks a swell. So a little bit later finish, then this stain piece we have here. So you're looking for something a little lighter? I think that would be a good option.