Learn to Paint Realistic Butterflies and Beetles in Watercolor | Ludwine • nivdul | Skillshare

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Learn to Paint Realistic Butterflies and Beetles in Watercolor

teacher avatar Ludwine • nivdul, Watercolor artist

Watch this class and thousands more

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

21 Lessons (1h 11m)
    • 1. Welcome to my Class

      2:05
    • 2. Class Project

      1:58
    • 3. Supplies

      3:35
    • 4. Let's Observe Your Subject!

      3:28
    • 5. Drawing Tips

      3:20
    • 6. Getting ready: Painting Setup

      0:50
    • 7. Warmup Exercices: Chromatic Circle

      2:45
    • 8. Warmup Exercices: Useful Techniques

      2:00
    • 9. Butterfly • Color palette

      2:19
    • 10. Butterfly • First layer

      3:30
    • 11. Butterfly • Add layers

      5:14
    • 12. Butterfly • Final details

      5:12
    • 13. Moth • Color palette

      2:19
    • 14. Moth • 1st layer

      4:24
    • 15. Moth • Add layers

      4:20
    • 16. Moth • Final details

      4:55
    • 17. Beetle • Colors palette

      3:18
    • 18. Beetle • First layer

      3:49
    • 19. Beetle • Add layers

      4:42
    • 20. Beetle • Final details

      4:43
    • 21. Conclusion

      2:02
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About This Class

This class will show you how to paint realistic insects using watercolor. In this beginner-friendly class, you will learn techniques and gain tools to turn butterflies, beetles..any insect that you like into realistic watercolor paintings!

With nearly 1.3 million species described and existing today, insects constitute the largest part of animal biodiversity, and therefore an unlimited source of inspiration!

Because of my fascination for little things and details, I quickly dived into painting butterflies and beetles when I started watercolor.

In this class, you will learn all the techniques you need to paint realistic insects in watercolour:

  • Choose the right materials for our purpose,
  • Train your eyes,
  • Mix colors and create a color swatch ​​palette
  • Use the watercolour layering technique,
  • Work with wet-on-dry and wet-on-wet techniques,
  • Add texture to your subject,
  • And capture the details to give a 3D and realistic aspect to your insect !

We will be using butterfly, a moth and a beetle as examples, but all the tips and techniques shown can be used on various topics such as plants, flowers, fruits, vegetables, animals… or even portraits.

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For who?

All levels are welcome, this class is beginner-friendly

It is especially designed for anyone who likes details and who wants to learn the techniques used in botanical and scientific illustration using watercolor.

What else?

So make yourself comfortable and get ready to learn new watercolor skills in a fun and relaxing environment!

I’m looking forward to seeing your final creations!

Check out the other Art classes on Skillshare

Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

Ludwine • nivdul

Watercolor artist

Teacher

Hi! I'm Ludwine, a watercolour illustrator and teacher based in Spain.

 

You wanna know something funny about me ? I haven't always been in the artistic field, in fact I first started as a software engineer. 

I don't know if it comes from my science background, but I’ve always loved precision work, it soothes me and allows me to escape from my daily routine.

My scientific eye will focus on practical things, and capture reality in all its possible aspects, and more particularly in utmost details. 

 

I came across a lot of beautiful butterflies and other insects during my various trips in the past few years. Then I discovered the pleasure of re-creating the insects that fascinate me, through the very gestures of painting ... See full profile

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Transcripts

1. Welcome to my Class: [MUSIC] Hi, I'm here to share my tips and a set of techniques to paint realistic insects using watercolor. In this class, you will learn how to paint butterflies, beetles or any insect that you want in a realistic way. I will cover three different types of insects so that you can train and apply the technique several times. Each insect come with a different level of difficulty so whatever your level is, you can take and learn something from this class and challenge yourself. I will especially show you how to train your eyes, how to mix your colors, and find a color palette, but also how to use the layering technique in watercolor, and how to add texture and the last details to have that realistic aspect. For your class project, you will have to create your own insect. It can be an insect of your choice or one of the quick topic I will cover. This class is great for anyone interested in learning how to paint realistic insects using watercolor. This class is totally beginner-friendly. I've added some warm-ups exercise so you can train before realizing your own insect. Now a bit more about me. I am a French watercolor artist, and I've been teaching watercolor in London and then in France in several years and I just love it. I've always been fascinated by realism in art. I just love to capture the details, observe my subject, and when I started traveling a few years ago, I came across so many beautiful insects that I just wanted to paint them. Here I am today to teach you how to do realistic insects using watercolor. I'm very excited to see all of this with you. I'm looking forward to seeing your beautiful insect and I will be here sharing with you all the way. 2. Class Project: Welcome to your project class video. Your project is to paint a realistic insect using watercolor. You can use an insect of your choice or pick one of the three component I will use in this class. A butterfly, a moth, and a beetle, and you will find the reference photos in the Project and Resources section. They come with a different level of difficulty. If you are a complete beginner, I recommend you to start with the butterfly, and you can continue with the others. In case you pick your own image here are some tips. Because we want a realistic result at the end, I recommend you to select a high-quality picture. Another important thing to paint an insect is the volume. To get that make sure that you can easily identify the light and the shadow areas on your image. Now, let's have a look at the various steps of the painting process. First, take your time to observe your subject. You can [inaudible] draw it or trace it. Then you need to work on the selection of your colors. Now you're ready to apply the first layer, and depending on your subject you will need to add more layers to bring the volume. Finally, the final details. Once you've done, you can share your final project in the gallery so I can give you my feedbacks. You're welcome to also share the intermediate step of the process and/or the insect you've been working with. If you have any question, please feel free to ask me in the description section. I will be happy to help. Now, it's time to get ready and get your brushes. I'm looking forward to see your beautiful insect. 3. Supplies: When you work in details, watercolor painting, it's very important to have the right materials. I see many students with the wrong paper and then it's very challenging for them to have the result that they would like. In this video, I will go through all the supplies I use so you can work in the best condition for this class. The first thing to consider is the paper. You will most likely have to add several layers to build a volume. It's important to choose a good-quality paper that will not be damaged by this process. I recommend you to paint on the 100 percent cotton paper. I personally use Arches paper and I love it. Then you can use between the hot-pressed paper, it's smooth and it will dry quicker, or the cold-pressed paper, and because of the texture, it's more tricky for details. If you're a complete beginner, I would say use the cold-pressed because you won't have to rush to apply your techniques. Of course, you need a set of watercolor paints, and if you can, it's better to use an artist or professional quality because they provide more intense and more vibrant colors. I use mostly professional-quality paints by Winsor and Newton, Sennelier or other Schmincke. But you can use other brands. You can use either tubes or pen paint. Another thing is you don't need to have a lot of different colors. A basic set with 12 or 10 colors already gives you a lot of possibilities. You need two or three brushes of various sizes, especially one with a fine point for the details. They must not be too soft, otherwise, you won't have a good control of what you're doing. I also really like using a wide brush. I use it to remove some extra paint or to create visual effect and then some additional materials. HB pencil to draw the outlines. I really like the kneaded eraser to lighten the outlines. Some tracing paper if you don't want to draw your subject by hand, two glasses full of water. One you want to keep it with clean water. A kitchen paper to adjust how much water is in your brush. A white mixing palette or plate in ceramic or porcelain. Plastic palette are not that good because the paint doesn't mix well on it. Of course, a piece of watercolor paper to test your colors and mixture before using them on your painting. It is very important because the color usually change when drying. Optional some masking fluid to protect areas from paint, such as white areas. You will find a complete list of the supplies under Projects and Resources section. See you soon for the next video. 4. Let's Observe Your Subject!: When you work on detailed watercolor painting, it's very important to take your time to observe your subject closely. In this video, I will share some tips that I use, and we will observe the three examples of the class. Take your subjects and let's have a look at them. Let's have a look at the first insect, the Cithaerias pireta. This butterfly looks very unreal for me, that's why I picked it, I find it very beautiful. As you can see, the wings are transparent, and you've got a very nice pink of the bottom wings. There are many lines, and I see mostly browns and dots, so the black dot, and a little white dot in the middle. In the pink area, you can see that it difuminates, so we are going to use the wet-on-wet technique for that. Otherwise, the lines are very clear, so we are going to work on dry surface to have that effect. Now, let's have a look at the arctia caja. For me, it looks very symmetrical. It's mostly browns and orange. Here are going to work on that. There are also a lot of texture on the head, and the body, and on the bottom wings, so we're going to see how to do that too. The white is not exactly white, it's a very, very light brown, and we will see how to do that. Finally, you can see that the light come from the left, so you get some shadow on the left part of the body. It's important because it's going to help you with the contrast and to give the volume. One thing that I do to identify this shadow and the light, is to put my picture in black and white. Finally, the passalidae. I picked that one because it's mostly black. We are going to work on grays, black, and white tones, which I think it's a really interesting exercise. You can see that the light comes from the left. You have mostly black on the right part of the insect and different grays on the left. There are some textures on the body, so we are going to see how to do this. There are a lot of little hair on the legs, and on the head. To summarize, really take your time to observe your subject. It will help you to build the color palette, but also for the drawing part, and then the painting part. Something that I really like to do is to leave my insect or my subject one or two days alone, and then I come back, I look at it again, and I love it because each time I discover new details. Take your time before you start the next step. 5. Drawing Tips: [MUSIC] In this video, I will show you what to draw and why? You will see that it's going to help you with the painting part. We will have a look at the three examples of the class. Let's get started. Take your subject. [MUSIC] Now that you have closely observed your subject, it's time to draw it. You can draw it by hand or trace it. [MUSIC] Drawing the variation of colors when they are obvious and well-defined will help you to remember where to apply your colors. Here, for example, I have drawn this line to mark the difference between the two brown. [MUSIC] In watercolor, we usually keep the white of the paper as being the color white. Some artists use whitewash at the end, so it's really up to you. Personally, I prefer keeping the white because I find the result nicer. This is why I always draw the white, of very light area, to not forget them when I paint. [MUSIC] You need to define the size of your drawing. To define that, think about the details. How are you comfortable with fine lines, small dots? Also, how much of the details do you want to paint? It will help you to draw your subject at the right size. I personally changed the size. I always try to be as close as possible as the real size, but sometimes, it's too difficult because of the details I will have to paint. [MUSIC] If you work with dark colors, they must be intense. But with light color, not too much, because keep in mind that once you put watercolor on your pencil line, you won't be able to remove it. To lighten my outlines, I use the kneaded eraser. I just press it on the paper so it doesn't damage it. If you don't have such an eraser, I recommend you to have one. I find it very useful. [MUSIC] If you picked the reference picture of this class, this is how your drawing should be at the end. Draw as many details you can see to help you to apply your colors, and don't forget to identify the light or white areas. I'll see you in the next video. [MUSIC] 6. Getting ready: Painting Setup: Being organized with your workspace is important before you start painting. In this video, I will share some tips. If you are right-handed like me, this is always best to place the materials. On the right, the paint, water, the piece of paper to test your mixture, the kitchen paper, and on your left, the subject. If you use a real insect it will be on your left with some light to illuminate the subject. For left-handed people, it will be the reverse. Make yourself comfortable, and let's go to the next step together. 7. Warmup Exercices: Chromatic Circle: In this video, I'll show you how to do a chromatic circle, and let's go. I really like this exercise, the chromatic circle, because it helps you to discover all the mixture you can do with only three colors. If you haven't done it before, I really suggest you do it, to take some time to explore your mixtures. I think it's going to help you for the next step. In my palette, you can see that I have several yellows, reds, and blues. You need to choose one of each. For this exercise, I decided to pick lemon yellow, magenta, and deep cobalt blue. Now, let's draw a circle and divide it into 12. It doesn't have to be perfect. Mine is clearly not as you can see. I start painting three areas with my primary colors, and I leave three empty areas between them. Now, I will mix some yellow and magenta in equal quantities. I add more yellow to create new colors closer to the primary yellow. I continue with more magenta to create an intermediate color between the previous galore and the magenta. Now, you can see the graduation from yellow to magenta. You will have to repeat this process with magenta and blue, and with blue and yellow, to complete the chromatic circle. To summarize this exercise, you have to choose three colors, yellow, red, and blue. Then you have to draw a circle and divide it into 12. Finally, you will apply the colors red, yellow, and blue with three empty space between each of them. I encourage you to repeat this exercise. Feel free to explore with all your yellow, red, and blue of your palette. I hope you have enjoyed this exercise and I'll see you for the next one. [MUSIC] 8. Warmup Exercices: Useful Techniques: In this video I introduce some quick exercise to get comfortable with the technique that we will use to paint our insect. It will help you to gain more confidence before we start painting our subject. Here we want to have a nice moist and uniform color area. There are two ways to do it, starting with some clean water and then adding some paint, or applying the paint directly on a dry paper. I suggest you try the two ways of doing the flat wash. Now let's do a gradient. I first start with some paint, rinse my brush, remove the excess water, and extend the area with clean water. You might have heard about the wet-on-wet technique, so here we go. To get to disseminate effect you will have to add colors to the wet. Because the yellow wash is still wet, you can see the red spots spreading. To summarize, you will have three small exercises to do. The first one is the flat wash with clean water first, then on a dry surface. The second exercise is the graded wash, so you paint on a dry surface and then you extend with clean water. Then finally, the wet-on-wet technique, you paint on a dry surface and then you add some spot of another color and let them spread. 9. Butterfly • Color palette: Hi. In this first video, we are going to work on the cithaerias. I picked this butterfly because you're going to have to work with the wet-on-wet techniques. It's a perfect way to practice this technique, and it's also a good exercise to work on fine lines and fine details. Take your brushes and let's get started. I take a small piece of paper to test my color. I'm going to try some of my color directly from my palette. This is the opera pink, some alizarin crimson, and also the quinacridone pink, some sepia, burnt sienna, burnt umber. Trying to find the right color will help you to have the realistic aspect at the end. Here, I'm going to go with the alizarin crimson because the opera pink is a bit too bright. For the brown area, I'm going to use the sepia, the burnt sienna, and burnt umber, and I will also add some touch of black. It was the first step for the cithaerias butterfly. Take your time, test your different colors from your palette, try some new mixtures. We can also use the chromatic circle to help you to find the right colors. I'll see you in the next video. We are going to work on the first layer and add the lightest tone that we see on the butterfly. 10. Butterfly • First layer: [MUSIC] In this video, I'm going to show you how to use some of the techniques that we have seen in the warm-up exercise, especially the wet on wet technique. At the end of this step, you should have paint everywhere on each layer of your butterfly, and something very light, which is normal. It's normal that is not really beautiful at this stage. Take your brushes and let's get started. First, I look again at my butterflies and we're going to work by areas. But before starting, you will have to add some masking fluid if you have some. It's optional. It is for the little white dots that you see. You can use a brush, but I personally use this element. I don't really know the name, but it's like plastic based. [MUSIC] I start first with the top wings. Remember the exercise that we've done, so you can either add the water, so that's what I do. I add the water and then my mixture, it is some burnt umber, or you can use directly the mixture of burnt umber. You can see that it's very watery. It's a lot of water and not that many pigment because you want something very light. [MUSIC] Then I do the same on the bottom wing, I add some water. I see some pink on the bottom wings. It's going to be a lot of water with a little bit of alizahine crimson. I add some pink and I let the pink spread in the water. This is the little exercise in the warm-up exercise, the number 3 that we're using now. [MUSIC] Now we are going to work on the body. It's the same. I'm going to do the first layer, and to help to pull the volume, I'm going to use different colors. It's between the burnt sienna, the burnt umber, and some sepia, because you can see that there are light area on the body and darker area. [MUSIC] I hope you enjoyed this first video to do the Cithaerias. Don't forget to take a picture of your work. You can send it to me so I give you some feedbacks and we are going to add more layers in the next video to build the volume. [MUSIC] 11. Butterfly • Add layers: [MUSIC] I'm happy to see you again to continue to work on our butterfly. At this stage, you have something quite flat. I will show you how to add more layers to it. We are going to use again the wet-on-wet technique and also use some fine lines to add details. Take your fine point brush and your normal brush and let's get started. At the end of this video, you should have a painting like this. I'm going to start with the top wings. Here I just add the colors, the brown colors that I see. I directly work on the dryer face, because I don't want the pigment to spread. In my case, I use the burnt sienna and some burnt umber and little bit of sepia. Something important, if you want the pigment to spread, you must add water first. Otherwise, you can work on dry surface directly. Because I work on details, I use a smaller brush here. Those fine lines are not easy to do. You can't see it on the video, but I really place my hand on the paper so I'm stable, and I have a better control of my brush. For this type, maybe try first on a piece of paper before you start doing it on the real painting. [MUSIC] Now it's done. I have done the same on the left top wings. We're going to work on the bottom wing. It's the same but this time I use different colors. It's with the alizarin crimson, so your pink, red color, and some sepia. Yes, for this step, take the smallest of the finest brush that you have. You don't want to add too much water on it because you want something very clean and fine. If you have too much water on your brush, you might have too large line. [MUSIC] At this step, I have finished all the lines. It takes some time, it's okay. Now I'm going to add more layers. I can see that my wings are not as pink as it should be. I'm going to add a layer of pink. I water the area, and then I do the same. I add some pink on the wet and I let the pigment to spread. Now it depends on what you have done on the first tape. Me I had to accentuate this area, but maybe you won't have to. [MUSIC] Now I'm going to work on the body because you can see that it's very light. I'm playing with the sepia to accentuate some area and to give the area effect. I'm using the fact that there are still some water on my wings. You can see that some pigments have spread from the body, which is perfect. It gives this area effect that I want. I still work with the fine brush because I'm on details. [MUSIC] Here, I remove some of the pigment because I didn't want them. To conclude at the end of this tape, you should have something like this. You can see that color wise we are pretty good. But there are some areas that we need to accentuate again and there are still the black dot missing. [MUSIC] 12. Butterfly • Final details: [MUSIC] Congratulations and at the end of the first insect, the cithaerias, you should have something close to this. Here we are at the last steps, you should have your final piece at the end of this video. We are going to work on the final details. First, I'm going back to the body. I'm going to add some texture on it and accentuate certain area because some are still too light. I use a very fine brush for this process because I really work on details. Mostly use sepia and black and as you can see, I do some spotting. It is like some small spots to create some texture. I use also some water so the pigment spread. I'm going to work on the right wing now. I'm adding some fine lines that I can see around the wings. It's quite challenging and a bit distressing because you need to be very, very precise for this step. Take your time, make yourself comfortable, be stable with your hand, place your hand on the board, on something stable. Because I find this area not dark enough, I'm adding a bit more burnt sienna and burnt amber and a bit of sepia. I do the same for the bottom wings, and I find this very interesting because sometimes it's difficult to stop. The more you going to observe your butterfly or your subject, you're going to see new details. It's always tempting to continue but at a certain point you have to stop. What I do is I take pictures, it helps me to have some distance from my work. I just leave my butterflies or my subject to rest for an hour or 30 minutes and I come back and look at it so I can see what is missing. I'm doing the same on the left part of the butterfly. Now we are going to work on the really last details. I'm adding those little fine lines that you can see, it's very light, it's settled. But once again, if you want to be realistic, you have to consider those little details. Now it's time to remove the masking fluid, if you have used some on the right side I remove it with an eraser, you see. I got my white or you can use some white pencil, whitewash or white water-glow in tube is going to make the work. This is the end, don't forget to stop at a certain point and take some distance from your paintings. I hope you enjoyed the class and please share your work so I can give you my feedback. If you have any question, feel free to ask and I'm looking forward to see your beautiful butterflies. [MUSIC] 13. Moth • Color palette: We are going to work on this insect now and it's a bit more difficult, but it's still okay, if you're a beginner. This is the final painting, so you should have something like this at the end of this class. We're going to use different techniques that we have seen in the warm-up exercise, such as the wet-on-wet technique, but also the flat wash under graduates. With this insect we're going to go further with your practice in watercolor. Get your brushes and let's get started for the first step, the color palette. Let's try to find the right colors for this moth. I'm using a medium-sized brush, and I'm trying different colors from my palette. I'm playing with the raw sienna, burnt sienna, burnt umber, some sepia. I add some water to see how the color looks when it's very watery. Now I'm going to try to find a nice orange. I'm using the vermilion red and some Azo yellow, and I will use some black. I'm quite happy with the colors I found. For me, it looks very close from the actual picture. But you don't have to use exactly the same colors. Just try new colors, try new palette, make some mixtures. Think about your chromatic circle and try to find the best colors. At the end, you should have your little piece of paper with all the colors that you would like to use, and take your time. Try different mixture with the red and yellow. I'll see you for the next step, the first layers with the lightest tones. 14. Moth • 1st layer: [MUSIC] Now you get your color palette, and it's time to add the first layers. We are going to add paint on any area of the mouth, and it's going to be light. Don't go too dark because you can still add new layers if it's not dark enough, but if it's already dark, you won't be able to remove the paint. Take your brushes, let's get started. [MUSIC] Now I'm going to start with the top wings, so I add some water first and then I add my mixture. It is some sepia with a lot of water. You can also just apply your mixture directly on the paper and work on dry surface as we saw in the warm-up exercise, so it's all up to you. Actually in this step, we are going to add a first layer on each element of the moth. It's going to be the lightest tone that you see. Here some yellow. [MUSIC] Now I add the orange on the wings. It's my vermilion red plus my azo yellow. It doesn't need to be perfect, is just the first layer. We are going to add more layers later. If you have some mark or some lines, it's okay, it's really not a problem. Now I'm working on the head, so I'm using two brand, the sepia and the burnt umber. You can see that I do like little spots to create some textures. [MUSIC] Now I'm going to work on the bottom wings. I can see some yellow around the black spots, so I'm adding the yellow now. [MUSIC] Now, I'm going to add this little line that I can see under top wings. It's not like a perfect line, that's why I do the zigzag because it's not regular and I use some black. It's a bit repetitive, but it's good because it allows you to practice the technique several times. [MUSIC] Now I'm doing the spots. I'm using the burnt umber. Once again, it doesn't need to be perfect at this stage. It's okay if the color is not perfectly uniform because we are going to work on it again and add another layer. One important thing is, if you're not sure of the colors, test first on the paper and it's always better to be lighter than what you actually want because you can still add another layer on it. But if you go out straight away is going to be difficult because you won't be able to remove the paint. [MUSIC] This is the end of the first layer. At the end you should have something like this. It's perfectly fine to be light. Don't try to have too much pigment straight away. We are going to add more years later, and we're going to build the volume in the next video. [MUSIC] 15. Moth • Add layers: [MUSIC] In this step, we are going to work on the area sect that you can see on the body and on the wings, and we are going to add some details to help to understand the volume of the insect. Take your brushes, let get started. [MUSIC] I start first with the head, and I use the stippling technique. You can see that it creates some texture and some fine lines. [MUSIC] I change the position of my brush to create some textures. [MUSIC] Now I'm using another brush with a fine point, and I'm using my favorite brush, the bright brush. The bright brush is very useful here, because it helps me to create some texture. I put some paint first, and then I use the bright brush to extend the paint and quite little dot. [MUSIC] I come back now on the wings and I add a glaze of paint, because I found it was a bit too light. [MUSIC] On the bottom wings, I'm trying to work on the volume. You can see that there are shadow area and lighter area, so that's what I'm trying to do. I use the technique that we have seen in the warm-up exercise, the gradient. I put some paint first, and with another brush, I extend the area with water. Basically I have two brushes, one with the paint, and another one to extend the area with just water and it creates a gradient at the end. [MUSIC] Now I'm going to work a bit on the body, and I'm going to try to reproduce the heavy effect. [MUSIC] I think it won't work if you use a too small brush, because you want the heavy brush. You see that I change a lot. I work on the head and then on the wings, and then I come back to the body. That's something that I really like to do. I prefer to work on various area, because when I work on the area, it change the way I see the others area around. Now, I work on the wings. Now I'm adding some details on the wings, so some fine lines that you can see. It's going to help to create the volume. Because if you look closely the wings, you can see that there are some shadow and it's not completely flat, so I'm trying to recreate that and I use a very fine brush. [MUSIC] This is the end of the third step. We are quite close of the final result. In this video, we have been working on the texture effect with the bright brush or other type of brush. In the last video, we're going to add the final details. [MUSIC] 16. Moth • Final details: [MUSIC] Hi. This is the last video for the Arctia Caja. We are going to add the last details. It's going to be mostly on the head and we are going to add some contrast on certain area. At least on mine, some areas need to be a bit darker. I'll see you at the end of the video with your final work. [MUSIC] This is where we are. I can see that some areas needs to be a bit darker, so that's what I'm going to do. I'm going to work on the wings and add some dark areas. It's really up to you. Here it will depend on what you have done at the previous step. Maybe it's dark enough, so have a closer look and see if you need to work on the wings again. Maybe not. Also, it depends on the level of details you want to have [MUSIC]. I'm going to work again on the body because there are darker areas like a bit more wet. That's what I'm doing now. I used a bright brush to create some texture. It's really my favorite brush. Now I use it to spread the pigment. It is a bit less defined. I add some hairy effect. You can use another brush to do that. I know that some artists use very fine brushes to do the hairs. But personally, I really like my white brush. [MUSIC] The same techniques, I use the stippling technique to create some contrast on the head because it was a little bit too light [MUSIC]. At this stage, it's not always easy to know when to stop, so take some time, take a picture, leave you painting, rest for one hour or two, come back to it and you can have a new look at it. It's going to help you to identify what to do, if you should stop, if there are some areas that need more work on it [MUSIC]. This is now the finer details here on the top of the head that I can see [MUSIC]. Here we go. It was the final video for this insect. I hope you enjoy it. I hope you are happy with your work. Feel free to ask me any question. Take the picture and share your project with me, please. I'm looking forward to see your beautiful insect [MUSIC]. 17. Beetle • Colors palette: Hi, this is now the time to work on a new insect. This is a better, this is black. We are going to work on monochrome painting, which is very interesting, and there will be many details in that one. If you have done the two first insects, it's perfect because you're going to be able to practice again, the technique that we have seen. If you just start with this one, it's okay too, because I will explain everything in the video. But I recommend you to have a look at the warm-up exercises first. Now we are going to find the colors for the insect. I use this brush, so my middle sized brush. I'm going to test two different black I have in my palette. In my case, I have two blacks, gray, so I have ivory black, and I have the Payne's gray. You can see that it's very different. The Payne's gray is more like bluish. You can see there is some blue inside, while the black ivory is more like a brown. But we want something very black, black. I'm going to try to do a mixture of both colors to see how it goes together. I think it's better. It looks more like a real black now. Try your colors. Usually, you have either a Payne's gray in the basic palette or a black, so you might have the right colors. Another color that I can see on my insect is this colors here. It really looks like the burnt sienna. Usually, you have the burnt sienna in any palette. You find it in the hair here all around, on the legs, at different parts. Before finishing this step, try your mixture, and try it with a different level of water. Add more water to see how it looks when it's lighter. To conclude, I'm going to work with three colors, the ivory black, Payne's gray, and burnt sienna, and I'm going to use the water to make the mixture more watery when it's lighter, and when it's very dark, I'm going to add several layers and use less water. 18. Beetle • First layer: [MUSIC] Now we are going to work on the first layer of the beetle. We are going to add the lightest tone that we see on each part of the body, and we are going to be careful with the white area because we don't want them to have any paint on them. [MUSIC] I'm starting with some black and you can either add water first on the area and then add the pigment or work directly on a dry surface. It's up to you. At this stage, I try to avoid the white areas. It's just the first layer so it can be lighter than what you see. It doesn't need to be the final colors at this stage. [MUSIC] Here, I have lost my white area. Sometimes it happens. It's not a problem, you can still find it again. I use the bright brush to remove some pigment. You can do it when it's not completely dry, but if you do it too soon the pigment will come back. Try and if it was too soon, do it later. [MUSIC] Here the same, I'm trying to keep the white lines in the middle. [MUSIC] I add water first and now I'm adding the pigment and I help them to spread. [MUSIC] Now I'm working on the legs. I'm just guiding the lightest tone that I see. [MUSIC] Now I'm adding the burnt sienna, so this other area part. [MUSIC] This is the end of the second step. At this stage, you should have something with some paint everywhere except from the white area. It's not really nice at all and we're going to build the volume in the next video. We are going to add the darkest tone, so a lot of black, and then we're going to work on the mid tones. [MUSIC] 19. Beetle • Add layers: Now, this is what we have. It's quite flat, we don't see the volume yet, which is normal. This is now what we are going to do. We are going to work on the darkest area. All the black areas that you can see, we are going to add that. Then we're going to work on the mid-tones. Now I'm using some fine brushes because I'm going to work on details and I'm going to work on the black areas first. I'm adding all the black that I see. It's going to be on the legs, but also on the head, and then on the body. It's a long process. It's okay that it takes some time and also it's a precise work already because you're going to have to add fine lines in certain places. Take your time have some break also, and take some distance, take some pictures to see how it goes and everything you have accomplished since the beginning. I'm taking my time for this part, as you can see, it's very fine lines. I'm going to work on the legs. You can see that in their legs there are lighter area and darker area. I'm adding some black on the head because it was too light. Here I'm creating some texture because the line is undefined, it's not perfectly straight. It's like a lots of little spots. I'm doing the same on the head, it's not like perfectly regular. You can work on the area that you want. There's no real method here. It's up to you, you can start with the legs, or with the body. Now I'm doing the black line that we see on the body. Thanks to the drawing, it's easier for me to place them. If you haven't, please draw it first is going to help you. [MUSIC] Now you can see that there is a lot of contrast and I'm going to work on the mid-tones, so I'm going to work on grays in between the white and the black areas. I work on the dry surface and then I'm just adding layers of grays. At the end, you should have something close to this. Now you can see the volume coming up and we're not far from the final result. We just need to add a few more details. See you in the next video. 20. Beetle • Final details: This is the last video, and now we are going to add some details, and you should have something like this at the end. We're going to work on the hair. Also to add some dark in certain areas that need to be dark here. Let's get started for this final step. I'm going to start with the black areas. I'm using a fine pointed brush because I'm going into the details now. I'm adding some black in certain areas because I think it's not dark enough. At this stage, it will depend of what you have. Maybe you won't need to add black on the head or on these areas. Have a look at your painting and try to find the areas that need to be darker. Here I'm adding a few details on the legs. There are some black lines missing. I add some traits and contrast and the black areas. Now I'm going to work on the mid-tones again because my light areas are a bit too light still. So I'm just adding a wash of gray. We are getting close. Now I'm going to try to add white areas. So I'm using the white brush, and I'm trying to take off the paint. I'm adding a small gradient because it was a bit too light. If I want to get the volume, I need to work on the gradient that I see the shadows, and here I had shadow. Finally, I'm going to work on the hair. I'm using Burnt Sienna. You can see the hair on legs and some parts of the body. So this is the last edge. We are very close to the end. Congratulation. It's the end of the third insect. I hope you enjoyed the class. I'm looking forward to see your beautiful insects, so please share your work in the Project and Resources section. I also would like to thank you because it was my first class on Skillshare. So if you liked it, please share your comments. Maybe I will see you in another class. 21. Conclusion: We are now at the end of this class, so congratulations. I hope you enjoyed the class. I hope you learn a lot of new techniques. I'm going to do a little recap. To recap, it will be always the same process. If you want to paint a realistic subject. First, try your colors, and find the perfect matches. Second, you will add the first layer with the lightest tone. Three, you're going to have to build a volume and add layers, add a texture for that. Finally, the last detail, the final touch to have all these little details that make the subject realistic. With those free subjects, we have covered the technique mostly used in watercolor. The wet-on-wet technique and the flat wash with water first, and on a dry surface, you've seen how to create a gradient, you worked with the texture, and create a hairy effect you made. I've tried to [inaudible]. With all the techniques that you have seen in this class, you're now ready to apply them on any subject that you want. It can be other insects or fruits, vegetables, and even portraits. Please share your final work in the project and resources section. I will be happy to give you my feedback. Also, it's always interesting to see the work of other students to see how they approach the subject. If you enjoyed this class, please leave me a comment. I will be happy to hear from you. I'm also on Instagram. You can share your work with this hashtag. Hopefully, we will see two there for another class.