Learn to Digitize traditional art work in Affinity Photo for use in surface pattern designs | Jenny Veguilla-Lezan | Skillshare

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Learn to Digitize traditional art work in Affinity Photo for use in surface pattern designs

teacher avatar Jenny Veguilla-Lezan, Latinx Designer & Illustrator

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

8 Lessons (44m)
    • 1. Introduction

      4:08
    • 2. Course project and tools needed

      1:42
    • 3. Scanning in your artwork

      3:49
    • 4. Removing the paper background

      8:26
    • 5. Isolating and recoloring

      8:33
    • 6. Creating the Repeat

      9:38
    • 7. Exporting and Testing

      6:12
    • 8. Course Outro

      1:03
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About This Class

Are you an artist or illustrator that works in traditional mediums and are interested in surface pattern design? Do you perhaps paint with watercolors or gouache or sketch with color pencils and want to learn how to translate your art work into the digital medium for commercial use as surface pattern repeats? Well, in today’s class I am going to walk you through how to digitize traditional artwork and translate them into surface pattern designs using Affinity Photo on the iPad. Working with traditional mediums doesn’t mean you have to always create your repeat by hand and in this class I will show you my process for taking traditional artwork into the digital realm that still keeps its handmade look! 

Hello everyone! If this your first class with me, welcome! If you are a returning student, welcome back! I am Jen and I will be guiding you through this creative course. I’m a freelance graphic designer, illustrator and educator based out of the midwest and I run Bella + Sophia Creative studio. If you want to learn more about me, check out my youtube channel: The Freelance Life. There, you will get a behind the scenes view of the work I do as a creative freelancer and educator  as well as access to a huge library of additional free tutorials relating to art, design and illustration. I am a huge advocate for sharing knowledge in accessible ways and I have found online courses and places like Youtube are great places for this and help me to connect to a diverse group of people looking to learn and grow. 

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In today’s class, we are going to be exploring the creative place where traditional art meets digital art. While I often work digitally, I do enjoy watercolor and other traditional art mediums like paint, graphite and color pencils. When you work traditionally by hand, you can still translate those pieces of art to a digital format for easier access for any commercial projects or projects that require digital files. Creating surface pattern repeats is a fantastic way to do this. We will go through the process of scanning artwork, prepping it for use in a repeat pattern, how to create the pattern in affinity photo, exporting your final file and some of the ins and outs of the affinity photo app. 

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If this is your first time taking one of my classes relating to surface pattern design - Definitely make sure you check out my previous surface pattern design courses - I have a variety that cover everything from basic level topics that walk you through the entire process of designing from concept to final pattern to more advanced classes that explore building specific types of repeats like half drop patterns and even specific styles like quatrefoil designs. While this class is focused on using the Affinity apps on the iPad, I also have courses that walk you through the design process using the desktop affinity apps on a computer.

What the class is about

In this class, I will walk you through my process on how to create a repeating pattern from traditional art - in my case watercolor work - using the Affinity Photo app. I will first grow through preparing my art work for use in digital formats. We will then go through tips for scanning your artwork to make it easier to isolate your design elements, the scanning process keeping in mind artwork size and dpi, how to clean up your artwork and the process for isolating your design elements. We will also review exploring color variations of your artwork. Then we will begin to build out the repeat pattern using the design elements in affinity photo. Finally, we will test and export the final for for use with print on demand sties like spoonflower.

Make sure to check out the class resources for some helpful tools you can utilize while working on your class project. You can also check out inspiration over on my surface pattern design Pinterest board:  https://pin.it/2ZCvupW 

If you want to see some of my design and illustration work - you can visit my website at: www.bellasophiacreative.com and you can also find some of my surface pattern work over on Spoonflower: https://www.spoonflower.com/profiles/bellasophiacreative 

Tools needed 

iPad with Affinity Photo installed

Apple Pencil or stylus

Scanner and computer 

Premade art work in a medium of your choice on non textured white paper

Who the class is geared toward 

This class is geared towards anyone interested in learning how to translate their traditional or analog art to a digital medium and create repeating patterns with them in Affinity Photo. Whether you are a beginner or pro, this course will go through all the steps necessary to bring your traditional art work into the digital space.   

Meet Your Teacher

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Jenny Veguilla-Lezan

Latinx Designer & Illustrator

Teacher

 I am a Chicago-born Latinxer (I'm a proud Puerto Rican and Mexican American) millennial, an educator, and a freelance creative with experience in graphic design, digital media, illustration and surface pattern design. I am also a mother of two  who is in on a mission to reach all the creative goals I've set for myself while trying my best to be a positive influence on the world.

I have 10+ years of experience in the fashion and creative marketing industry in both the corporate world and teaching as a professor in Higher Education. I am working on building course offerings that bring people a new perspective and opportunity to take your design and art to a new level.  I am pushing for continued growth, running my indi... See full profile

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Transcripts

1. Introduction: Are you an artist or illustrator that works in traditional mediums and are interested in surface pattern designs. Do you perhaps paint with watercolors or Flash or sketch with color pencils and want to learn how to translate your artwork into the digital medium for commercial use as surface pattern repeats. Well, in today's class, I'm going to walk you through how to digitize traditional artwork and translate them into surface pattern designs. Using Affinity Photo on the iPad, working with traditional mediums doesn't mean you have to always create your repeat by hand. And in this class, I will show you my process for taking traditional our work into the digital realm that still keeps its handmade look. Hello everyone. If this is your first class with me, welcome. If you're a returning student, welcome back. I'm Jen and I will be guiding you through this creative course. I'm a freelance graphic designer, illustrator and educator base out of the Midwest and I run Bella. And so V0 creative studio. If you want to learn more about me, check out my YouTube channel, the freelance life. There you will get a behind the scenes view of the work that I do as a creative freelancer and educator. As well as access to a huge library of additional free tutorials relating to art design and illustration. I am a huge advocate for sharing knowledge in accessible ways. And I found online courses in places like YouTube are really great places for this. And it also helped me to connect to a diverse group of people looking to learn and grow. In today's class, we are going to be exploring the creative place where traditional art meets digital art. While I often work digitally, I do enjoy watercolor and other traditional art mediums like paint, graphite, and color pencils. When you work traditionally by hand, you can still translate those pieces of art to a digital format for easier access for any commercial projects or projects that require digital files, creating surface pattern repeats is a fantastic way to do this. We will go through the process of scanning artwork, prepping it for use in a repeat pattern, how to create the pattern in Affinity Photo, exporting your final file and some of the ins and outs of the Affinity Photo F. If this is your first time taking one of my classes relating to surface pattern design, definitely make sure you check out my previous surface pattern design courses. I have a variety that cover everything from basic level topics that walk you through the entire process of designing from concept to final pattern to more advanced classes that explore building specific types of repeats like half drop patterns and even specific styles like quadrupole designs. Well, this class in particular is focused on using the affinity apps on the iPad, I also have courses that walk you through the design process using the desktop Affinity software on your computer. So what is this class about? In this class, I will walk you through my process and how to create a repeating pattern from traditional art. In my case, watercolor work. Using the Affinity Photo app. I will first go through preparing my artwork for use in digital formats. We will then go through tips for scanning your artwork to make it easier to isolate your design elements. The scanning process, keeping in mind artwork size, and DPI, how to clean up your artwork and the process for isolating your design elements. We will also review exploring color variations of your artwork. Then we will begin to build out the repeat pattern using the design elements in Affinity Photo. Finally, we will test and export the final print for use. Make sure to check out the class resources for some helpful tools that you can utilize while working on your class project. You can also check out inspiration over on my Surface Pattern Design Pinterest board, I'll include the link below. And if you want to see some of my design and illustration work, you can visit my website at www dot philosophia creative.com. And you can also find some my surface pattern work over on Spoonflower by just searching Bella Sophia creative. 2. Course project and tools needed: So when it comes to this class in the project that we're going to be working on, the tools that you'll need will be an iPad with Affinity Photo installed, an Apple pencil or stylus of your choice that works with the iPad, a scanner, and a computer, and then some pre-made art work in a medium of your choice on non textured white paper. So who is this class geared towards? This class is geared towards anyone interested in learning how to translate their traditional or analog art to a digital medium and create repeating patterns with them in Affinity Photo, whether you're a beginner or pro this course, we'll go through all the steps necessary to bring your traditional artwork into the digital space for your class project, we will be creating a seamless repeating pattern using the traditional artwork that you created by scanning and digitizing in Affinity photo, you will want to select artwork that is on clean white paper without much texture to ensure that it scans easily, we will clean it up. I slaved the art, and then go through the process of designing a repeating pattern with it using Affinity Photo. While I will be working with watercolor pieces, you can apply the steps that we go through to any medium of your choice. Once you complete your project, you can submit the following to the course project gallery to share with your fellow classmates and myself. So when it comes to your deliverables, when you're ready, upload your final repeat pattern to the project gallery. That's it. You don't have to show any before or after is unless you want to just share your final artwork. And repeat form can upload it as a JPEG and it can be as simple as that. I'm really looking forward to creating with you today. Let's get started. 3. Scanning in your artwork: After we've created the artwork, what we'll wanna do is scan it into our computer and want to make sure that we scan it in at a high-quality. And the biggest thing that I would suggest is making sure that you utilize in non textured or minimum or very lightly textured white paper. This is going to make the cleaning up process basically the removing of the white background so much easier when we're working in the Affinity Photo app on your iPad. So I'm gonna go into my printers and scanners. I already have my artwork inside of my scanner. So I'm going to have to go into that specific machine and then select scan. And then I'm going to hit open scanner. And it's probably going to have a preview of what I had before in there or it's going to scan whatever is currently in there and this is what I have. So I'm just going to select these selections and just delete them. And then I'm going to go into my scan mode and just double-check all of my settings. I want to make sure I'm at color and I want to make sure I'm scanning it at the highest resolution I can I don't think you're going to need a 1200 DPI. I think 600, anything between 300 and 600 is going to be really nice. But say you are creating something for a print on demand website that is going to be extremely large, like a wall hanging or a bedspread or something like that. Then you might want to scan in at that 1200 resolution. So I'm just gonna go with 600. I'm not going to touch anything else. And then I'm gonna make sure I scan to a specific folder. So in this case, I have a folder for this course that I'm just going to scan it into. And then I'm going to select that. I want to make sure I scan it, named the scan. So we want to make sure I name the scan and then you can select a JPEG, tiff, PNG. Any of those are going to be high-quality. If you want a really, really big file, you can scan in as a tiff or JPEG 2000. Pngs are really nice as well, but I'm just going to scan it in as a basic JPEG for right now. And then you don't have to do any type of image correction at this point. And then just drag over the specific area you want your scanner to focus on using your mouse. And then you can adjust the placement of everything and make sure all of the elements are included within your your selection. And then hit scan and it's going to take a little while. And once it scan, it'll save it directly into your folder that you've selected. I have two artworks that I'm going to be utilizing. So I'm going to scan in that second one now. Now that everything is scattered, we can X out of our scanner and then we can just go into our file to double-check that the scans are in there. When I look at my first one, looks good. And then the second one is in there as well. So novel we'll wanna do is take these files, select them. You can either email them to yourself if you're not working on a Mac or use something like Dropbox or Google Drive. But I am working on a Mac and I can AirDrop my files to my iPad. So I'm going to right-click them. And I'm going to select share, and I'm going to select AirDrop. And then the options I have for my AirDrop, I'm going to select my iPad. And then it's going to share that directly with my iPad. And it's going to be loaded onto my system. 4. Removing the paper background: Now that we've sent our scanned image to our iPad, it should show up with an your images files. So if you go to your photos, anything that was scanned and sent will show up here and these are my most recent scans that I sent over through AirDrop. So what we're gonna do now is clean them up. So the easiest way to do this is to open it up in Affinity photo. So I'm going to select Affinity Photo and launch it. And then while we're here, you may see your gallery. If you've never used Affinity photo in the past, you might not have anything here. I use this a lot for courses and for freelance work as well as my old surface pattern design work. So what I'm gonna do is go to this upper right-hand corner, and I'm going to select the little plus icon. Once I've done that, this new gallery can it pulls up and what I want to select is open from photos or import from photos. Open import from photos. It's going to give me all of these options. I'm going to select recents and I'm going to select from the actual files that I set myself that I scanned in. So I'm going to select this bunch of floor, the bunch of flowers that I created. And it'll show up on my screen like this. And what we're gonna do is basically remove this white background so that we can just isolate the floral themselves. So it's actually a lot simpler than it would seem. And part of the reason why we wanted to make sure we use the non textured white paper is going to make a huge difference and you'll see why in a moment. So in Affinity Photo, before we remove the background, we need a practice image so that it's easier to remove that white background. And what we're gonna do is play around with the contrast by working with adjusting our levels. So on the right-hand side in our studio menu here, the fourth option down on the right-hand side is our adjustments studio. So what we'll wanna do is go to Levels and select it. And then you'll get this little pop-up at the bottom. When we're here, what we wanna do Is bump up our black and bring down the white so that it kind of creates this really nice contrast between what is color on the screen and what isn't that. So I'm gonna go to this black option here, click on it and you can either click on it and enter something manually or you can just click on it. You can drag your stylist right or left. And you can see already that it starts to increase the overall saturation of the colored portion of the artwork. So I'm just going to increase this just a bit. I think 10 will work for me. And that I'm going to go down to the white option and I'm going to click on it and I'm just going to bring it down by dragging left just a bit. And then I'm gonna go back to black again and just kind of bump that up a little bit more so that these little like splatters that I have that might be kind of hard to see on screen, are easier to see in the overall color. Once I'm done with that, I can just tap into my screen, select any of my other tools, and then I can click on adjustments and it'll pull it back in. And what you might want to do, depending on what this does. Once you've played around with the contrast, if you notice that it's taking away a lot of like your texture, which I don't think it's doing that to mine. But what you could do is go back into your adjustments again and go back into your levels and you can adjust your gamma. You can just kind of drag it left or right to kind of increase or decrease the overall texture that you're getting within this art here. Once you're done with that, you can just click on your adjustments so it'll pull it back in. And then we can just select our arrow tool in the upper left-hand corner. And now what we can do is go and actually apply a filter that will remove this white background very easily. Now that we're done with editing the image so that we've bumped up the contrast. What we wanna do is go into our layers studio and then we're going to select it. The icon looks like a set of stacked papers, so we're going to click on that. And then what we wanna do is select both our image as well as that adjustment. So we're going to click on the adjustment and then we're going to drag right on our image and it's going to select both. And you'll know they're both selected because they're kind of highlighted in gray. Then what we wanna do is group them. So we'll select this little icon that looks like a puzzle piece. And it's going to group these together. And then what we'll do is go into our filter's menu. And what we wanna do is scroll all the way down until we find the filter that says erase white paper. So we're going to click on that. And it's gonna give you a little pop up that that image was rasterized. And that's fine. We want that because it's going to basically flat and that adjustment layer and your image layer. Then what you'll see is if you zoom in really closely, It's remove this white background. I'm gonna do a little drop in with a screen recording of my screen here, just so that it's a little bit easier for you to see. Once you zoom in, you'll see that the background has been deleted and all that's left is a gray and white grid. What we'll wanna do though, before we're done is basically this will leave you with a really nice image, but I always suggest double-checking to look for any kind of stray marks or any gray marks that aren't needed. So what I do is I'm just going to go into that pixel layer, just making sure it's selected. And then I'm just going to zoom in and with my eraser tool, which is on the left-hand side, what you erase brush tool. I'll go in and I'll zoom in and I'll just double-check to see if there's any DRE marks if I don't want to have and their overall, this has been really nice. But there are still a few little bits that you might want to clean up. What's nice is that with the Apple pencil, I feel like it makes things a lot more convenient, but it makes things a lot easier when you're going in and cleaning up these little stray marks just because it's it's I feel like it's easier than using a mouse. So it gives me a lot more control over over what I'm cleaning up and where. And then you can adjust the width of your brush by going into this pop-up menu at the bottom and where the width is, you can just click on it and drag left to decrease or drag right to increase. And I just make it a little bit smaller for anything that's really close up that I need to get right next to the painting with. And then I also like to just increase my brush and just do the edges just in case. And that is it. Now our background is clean. We've isolated our image from that white background and I'm just going to add a layer here just to kind of showcase what it'll look like with a different color behind it. So I'm going to go into my layers and I'm going to select plus, and I'm going to select a pixel layer. And then I'm just gonna go to my rectangle tool here on the left-hand side, I'm going to go into my color studio on the right-hand side, pick a new color. And then I'm going to make a shape behind this. And if your rectangles in front, no worries, just click on the rectangle, drag it. And you'll see now that your image has been isolated from your paper. You can see now that the white background has been removed, all stream marks have been cleaned up and you just have the painted portion. And now what we can do is basically use this to create a repeating patterns. 5. Isolating and recoloring: So when I turn off the background now and then I'm going to go into this layer. I'm gonna do one last thing before we start to actually build the repeating pattern. I like to do is just work with what is on the image. So if I don't want this background like this shape, the square shape of this. So I'm going to isolate this out by going into my selection. First I wanna. So in your upper left-hand corner, you'll have your photo persona. And if you click right next to it, that is your selection persona. And you can get your lasso tool. So I'm gonna select my free-hand Lasso tool. And the one I'm going to do is just select around my artwork. It doesn't have to be perfect. I just don't want to have that square background. So I'm going to select around this artwork using my lasso tool. Once I've selected it with my lasso tool, what I'll do is I'll go back into my Affinity Photo Persona, and then I'm going to go into my three.menu here. I'm going to go down to pasteboard and I'm going to select cut, and it'll cut that out of my background. And then I'm gonna go back into that three.menu and then I'm gonna go to Paste Board and then I'm going to select paste and I'll paste it back in. And then you can delete anything that you don't need in terms of what is popping up in your layer. So I have this stray kind of blank layer. I'm gonna delete that. And I'm gonna go to my pixel layer. I'm going to go back into my selection persona and then just tap anywhere on my screen to de-select. And then I'll go back into my photo persona. And what you'll see now is you have a nice cropped image with just your pixel selection. And then what we'll wanna do really quickly before we begin to actually create the repeat is duplicate this layer a few times. So going into your Layers panel, select pixel. And then you'll wanna go to your three.me and you're just going to duplicate it two or three more times. The color is going to get darker. That's okay. You can just turn those layers off by uncheck marking them. And now you'll have additional layers that you can kind of break apart using that lasso tool to help fill in the center. Once we start building our pattern, click on the layer that we're gonna be working on. So what's nice is that you can rotate your art board in Affinity Photo, just take your two fingers and then you can rotate it left, right and reorientate it on your screen. What I like to do is remove anything that I that I don't think I'm going to need or cut pieces that I think will be beneficial to use by themselves. And then we can always go back to one of the copies for the full on, for the full outline, for the full piece. So for example, I have these two yellow dots here that I was going to create another far out of. But what I think I'm going to do is just move them to just strategic areas on this art board. So I'm going to go into my selections personam, and then I'm going to select my lasso tool. And I'm just going to freehand last or these. You can delete anything that you don't want. But I want to use this so I'm just going to lasso around them. And then I'm going to go into my three.menu and I'm going to go into pasteboard and then I'm just going to select cut and you'll see it removed it. And then I'm gonna go back into that three.menu, go into my pasteboard and select Paste. And then I'm gonna do the same thing with this other one here. So go back into my selections persona, just tap out to de-select that original selection and then I'm going to select this next one. Go back into my Affinity Photo Persona, and then also making sure I'm on the correct layer because what you'll notice is that we've cut and paste that anything out of this original artwork is going to create a new layer for it. So I'm just gonna go back to that original layer. And then I'm gonna go to my three.menu, and then I'm gonna go to the pasteboard and I'm going to select cut. And then I'm gonna go back to that three.me go to pasteboard and select paste and it'll paste it. And then you'll see it's created these two additional layers. So I'm going to tap on my layers panel to pull it in. And then I'm just going to select my selections persona to de-select everything and just tap anywhere on the screen to de-select that and then go back into my photo persona and select my move tool. And you'll see already that those elements, if I click on them, they're separate items and I can move them around. So I think I'm just going to move this one over here. And then I'm gonna take this one and I'm going to move over here. And they kind of like the way this is setup. So what I wanna do now is just select all three of those layers. And then I'm going to click on the first and then drag right to select the next one, and then drag right again to select the third layer. And you'll see that everything is all selected because they're all outlined in blue. And then I'm gonna go into my Layers panel. I'm going to select that little puzzle icon. It's going to group everything. And then what I want to do also is rasterize it so that it's one flat keys. And this is what we're going to be working with to start creating the repeat. What I'll do is I'll just go into this little stacked paper icon and I'm just going to select Merge Visible. And it's going to merge all of those elements together. But it's also going to make, it's going to basically make a copy of it. And that merged element will be a pixel layer here in the layers panel, and then you'll still have that original one. So if it looks like your, your artwork got darker, just go back into your layers, the panel and then uncheck mark that group. Before we start to play around with creating this repeat, what I wanna do is kinda run through how you can recolor your artwork. What's really nice is that you can work with the adjustments within Affinity photo. You can adjust the layers, you can invert colors, you can adjust your curves, your exposure color balance on your channel mixer. So there's all kinds of functions that you can work with, right in your adjustments panel. So what I'm gonna do is select my adjustments panel. It's the one with the three dots. And then I'm going to play around with my selective color options. And what you'll see is you can change the colors. You can select which specific colors you want to work with by clicking on your range in this bottom button here, in this bottom pop out here, and then you can adjust based on that, any blues, any magenta has yellows, your black point, and then it'll darken and deepen your color. And then with hs l, you can actually adjust your color ranges completely and readjust your hues and play with the overall colors that you have in your artwork. You can also adjust specific cue. So for example, I'm just playing with the reds here. You can select the yellows and adjust those individually. You can select your greens and just adjust those. So this would be the best option to go through to actually recolor your artwork. I would utilize the HSL, especially because you can adjust the entire color palette at once, or you can just focus on key colors within your artwork. Once you're done, what you'll notice is that additional layers have been added to your layer studio. So you'll want to select those and group that and then merge them once you're done with your color adjustments. So I just kind of increase the greens, adjusted my pinks a bit so that they weren't so orangey, played around with the purples. Just to make everything a bit more vibrant, once we've recolored, will want to group all of those adjustment layers and then select our merge and rasterize icon. And then what we wanna do is select Merge Visible. And then again, it's going to get darker because it basically made a copy of itself. So you can just select that group element if you want to keep it as is, you can just keep it and just uncheck market to turn it off. Or if you don't need it, you get throw it away. 6. Creating the Repeat: And what I'm realizing now is that I made a bunch of copies of the original, which I'm going to keep one I don't need all the other ones. And then I'm just going to make copies of this new recolored one. So I'm gonna go back into my layers. I'm going to select the ones that I don't want. And then I'm going to use the little trash icon to delete them. And then I'm going to, so I'm going to keep one. And also that original grouped like the original layer group. And I'm just going to uncheck mark them so that they're not turned on and I can't see them. And then I'm going to select that final rasterized version with all the layers that have been flattened. And I'm gonna make a copy of that. So I'm gonna select that one and then I'm gonna go into my three.me and select duplicate a few times. And then I'm gonna go to turn these off and I'm gonna select the one I'm going to work with. I'm just going to drag it to the top. And the reason why I'm making copies is so that I can go in and actually utilize my lasso tool to kind of break these apart. If I need to use certain elements to fill out the center of my repeat. And what we're gonna do is actually build our repeat, right? In this art board, we don't need to do anything. You don't necessarily have to build your repeat in a square format. You can build it in a rectangle format and it'll still work the same as like a standard repeat. So that's what we're going to be working with. I'm going to select this, I'm going to resize this just a bit. And what I wanna do is make sure that my artwork is right smack dab in the center of my art board. And the reason for this is we're going to be utilizing an affine function and we don't want any of the art to touch the edges or go over the edges, we just want it to be centered. So what we're gonna do is with that artwork selected, we're going to go down to our filters studio. This is where we found like the race background filter. And what we're, what we want to select is the F BGN function. So we're going to select a field that looks like it's creating a repeat myself, but we're going to do something a little different than just trying to do the standard repeat. So we're going to select a F01 and we'll get this pop up at the bottom. And I'm going to also include a screen recording so that we can see a little bit closer. So at this bottom area here, we'll get this pop up in. Basically, we want to keep our extend mode wrap and what we're gonna do is offset our file on the x and y-axis by 50 percent. So we're going to select offset 54 acts and then you'll see it drags to the top and bottom. And now what we wanna do is go to Offset why 50. And then you'll see it brings everything to the corner and then we're going to hit Apply. And now you see that we have this kind of like blank space in the center and that's why we wanted to make sure we had some copies of the original artwork so that we can kind of like break it apart and fill in this center area to finalize our repeat. What I like to do first before anything is once I get everything to the corners, I like to lock this layer so that I have no issue with it getting moved on, which will in turn cause issues with our repeat. If you're ever working on this course in the future and you're noticing that your repeat seems off or jag it for a reason. It could be that at some point this moved. So to deter that from happening, I would suggest let's lock this first and we'll go into our layers studio, select that layer with REP. We can actually rename it so that we know what it is. I'll click on that little three dot button here in the layers studio panel. And then I'm going to select where it says pixel, and it'll allow you to rename that layer. I'm just going to rename this corners and then hit return. And then in this same panel you'll see something that says visible lack solo. What we wanna do is select a lack and we'll lock that in place so that we can not move it. Now we can click back out of our layers panel and then we can turn on our next layer. And this is the layer that we'll use to kind of break apart and use the pieces of it to fill in the centerpiece. So to make things a little easier and less confusing, what I suggest you do is turn off your corner so you just see the original artwork or the copy of that original artwork. And then what we wanna do is I'm going to click on my layer studio, so it pulls it back in. I'm going to zoom in a bit. I'm going to go to my selection persona. And then I'm going to select my lasso tool. And I'm going to start kind of pulling apart pieces that I think will work nicely. And that are also easy to kind of get because there is no overlap. So what I like to do is zoom in really close. And then again, this is why I like doing this on my iPad with the Apple pencil versus say a mouse. It, it just gives me much more control. Being able to use the pencil to outline the different elements that I want to use. So I'm going to outline these flowers and you'll see marching ants around. So what one can do is go back to our Affinity Photo Persona. And that really go to our three.menu. And we're going to select Paste Board and we're going to select cut and it'll cut it out. And then we'll go back into that three.me, select Paste Board and select paste, and I'll paste it in. And if we go into our layers studio here, you'll see that there's a new pixel layer created with just these flowers on it. Now we want to go back to the original layer and cut out any additional elements that we might want to use. So I think I'm going to use this here as well. So I want to go back into my selections, just tap anywhere on the screen to de-select the original selection, and then you can select next element. Once I've done that, I'm gonna go back to my Affinity Photo Persona. I'm gonna go to my three.me, go to pasteboard, select Cut, go back to my pasteboard and then select paste, and then go into my layers. You'll see that new pixel layer is created with just that element. Then we'll go back to the original artwork layer, and then we can select a few additional elements. Now that I'm done selecting all the additional elements, I can go into my layers and I can turn off this original layer. And then we can see all the different elements that we have pulled out from it and selected that I can use to fill in the center part of my artwork. So what we'll want to do now is go into our Affinity Photo Persona and then we can select our move tool. And then you'll be able to select each element individually. And we can utilize this to fill in the center of our artwork. I'm just going to pull all of these to the center. So it's easier to see once we turn on that layer above it. All right, so I'm gonna go back into my layers studio, select my layers, and then I'm going to go to my corners layer, click on it, turn it on so I can see what I'm working with. And then I'm going to move these basically to fill in the spaces that are empty. Just kind of working with it like a puzzle. You just want to keep in mind placement of all of these elements. And then of course, the beauty is that you can sit there and re, reuse these elements. You can copy them and duplicate them to continue to fill in this space. But also keep in mind you don't want to go over your edges here because it will not create a seamless repeat. So whatever you do, just make sure you keep those additional elements away from the edges of your art board. You can have them close but not overlapping. And what's nice is that you can rotate things around. So like I can use this little arm and rotate this flower just the bit. Pull it over here. Take this and pull it to this corner. I think this will fall nicely. I'm going to take this piece of greenery and I'm actually going to keep it selected. And then I'm gonna go to my three.menu and I'm gonna duplicate it and then use it elsewhere. I'm going to select this little flower and then they go into my three.me and I'm gonna duplicate that again and use that in this little space here. I'm going to select this leaf and duplicate it. And I think it'll fit nicely in this little area. And then I'm going to take the little pink like splashes that I have and duplicate those a few times and then move those into key areas to fill up space. All right. And I think I like the way this looks. This will be my completed repeat. 7. Exporting and Testing: Now let's test it out. I'm going to keep it with a blank background so that I can go in and manually change the color of the background without exploiting it with the background, you can add a background if you want. You just have to go into your Layers panel. Select new layer by hitting that little plus icon and just select either a pixel error fill layer. You can select either a pixel layer and add a square and fill that in, or you can just select Full Layer mine just turn black because black was my fill color. But I can update this by going into my color studio and adjusting my color wheel here. And then I can go into my layers and just take that full layer from the top and bring it all the way to the bottom so that it's underneath everything. And then you can see that they'll be a color. And you can just kinda play around with the color of the background to see what works best for your design. I kinda like this light grayish blue. I think it works nicely with the overall color scheme or whatever you'd like just based on the color story that you have in your design. But what I like to do is just export this without a background so that I can just test it as is. And if you ever need something with transparency just makes things a lot easier. So I'm going to leave it as is for unchecking that fill layer. And then I'm going to go into my document menu here and I'm going to select Export. And then in the pop-up here, what I want to select is a PNG. And then I'm going to rename it under the filename by clicking where it says Untitled at the bottom, I'll have my little pop-up for my, for my keyboard Menu and then I can just update this. I'm going to name it watercolor one, and then I'm going to hit return. Everything else on this looks fine. Png for your preset, just use my document format for my pixel format and same thing with my color profiles and then just hit Okay. And then you'll want to save it in a folder that you'll be able to find it easily. I'm just going to save it in affinity in my Affinity Photo folder and then hit Save. Then this is what that final repeat will look like before we test it. So what I wanna do now is go back out into our gallery by clicking the little back arrow. What I wanna do is set up a new page in a larger format so that we can test it out. So once you're back into your gallery view, go to the upper right-hand corner, select plus, and we're going to set up a new file. I'm going to make this rather large just so that we can see what the repeat looks like in full size. And what I wanna do is select new document. And I'm just going to change my dimensions, making sure that my measurements are inches. You can just change it here in this drop-down area. If it's not an interest for you, just change it to inches and then I'm going to do an 11 by 17 size page. So I'm going to go into my width, change it to 11, my height to 17, keeping my DPI at 300, and then I'm going to hit, Okay, and now we have this larger file to test everything, to test the tile to make sure it's seamless. Sso. What I wanna do is select my rectangle tool on the left-hand side here. And then I'm just going to create a rectangle that goes all the way across this page. And then you can change it to whatever color you want. I'm just going to change it to something that's easy to see in that I think will work well with the colors that I currently have. So I'm just going to go into my color studio here and then I can use my color wheel to adjust the colors. Once I'm done with, I can just tap on my color wheel and bring it back in. And then I'm going to duplicate this rectangle. So I'm going to go in making sure it still selected. You'll be able to tell that it's selected because you see this blue outline. I'm going to go into my three.me appear select, Duplicate, and it shouldn't make a copy of this. You can go into your layers, so just double-check and you should see a copy of your original rectangle. And then with that rectangle still selected, I'm going to go into my fill tool and it looks like it looks like a gradient square that's like kind of tilted. So I'm gonna select that full tool. And then you'll see at the bottom, this little pop-up. And what we wanna do is change the fill type from solid down to bitmap. And when you select Bitmap, it'll give you a pop-up where you can access your files so you can just search on your iPad. I need to go into my Affinity Photo file and then I just need to scroll to find my watercolor print. So I'm going to select it. It looks like everything is the way it needs to be. And this is now a seamless pattern. You can increase the size, decrease the size. This is moral like a ditsy floral with the smaller floral elements in the leaves. And it's in watercolor format. And what's nice is you still get all of the really pretty textures and just the feel of the overall style of the texture that you get when you're doing something by hand and you're pulling that into a digital repeating pattern. And you can utilize this as, is. You can take the artwork and use it as a pattern. Or you can also just take that digital artwork and sell it as is if you want it and use it on a print on-demand site and things like that. But this is the final piece. 8. Course Outro: Thanks for showing up, learning and creating something great with me today. I really hope that you found this course helpful and that you're more comfortable using Affinity Photo on the iPad to translate your traditional artwork into digital repeating patterns. I hope you learned something new or a new way to do things that you already know how to do today. Before I let you go though, please don't forget to submit your final project deliverables. So the class project gallery, I'm looking forward to seeing what everyone creates and everyone's final pattern. If this is your first class that you've seen of mine and you want to learn more about me and my work, isn't me online at www. Dot Bella Sophia creative.com. You can also check out more of my courses relating to design and the creative industries, right? And my teacher profile, I will be sure to leave links for some classes that relate to this one in the class description below. Thank you so much for watching and for creating with me today. I'll see you in the next one. Bye.