Learn Video Editing with Premiere Pro for beginners (2016) | Jordy Vandeput | Skillshare

Learn Video Editing with Premiere Pro for beginners (2016)

Jordy Vandeput, Filmmaker and Youtuber

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21 Lessons (3h 54m)
    • 1. What to expect from the course

      2:29
    • 2. Introduction

      2:50
    • 3. A digital video file

      9:09
    • 4. Start a new project

      6:58
    • 5. The user interface

      14:49
    • 6. Customize your workspace

      11:39
    • 7. Import and organise clips

      14:43
    • 8. The timeline

      19:04
    • 9. The toolbox

      19:14
    • 10. Video effects

      14:52
    • 11. Working with transitions

      8:38
    • 12. Design a title or text

      15:24
    • 13. Create an animation

      16:41
    • 14. Tips and tricks

      12:58
    • 15. Color correction

      10:04
    • 16. Audio mixing

      15:04
    • 17. Export your video

      12:04
    • 18. Adobe typekit

      8:30
    • 19. Application settings

      8:11
    • 20. Adobe dynamic link

      7:57
    • 21. Conclusion

      2:12
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About This Class

Click here for the updated class to the latest version of Adobe Premiere Pro

Make better video and join the world of professional video editing in this step by step Premiere Pro course. 

DO YOU WANT TO MAKE BETTER VIDEOS?

  • Make things that others can't. Let your videos shine with custom effects and animations that make it look professional.
  • Don't limit your creativity! Learn all the buttons, understand the interface and known how things work in Premiere Pro.
  • Learn as you go. This course teaches you a good fundament. The idea behind it is that you can learn advanced things by yourself as you edit videos in Premiere Pro.

My name is Jordy Vandeput and I'm a professional video editor.

  • I've been teaching Premiere Pro classes since 2006 in various online and local schools
  • I've edited commercials and promotional films for BMW, Belgacom, Isola and more
  • I've had an intensive 2 year online instructor training at Envato
  • I've had over 3 million views across Youtube and Vimeo where I host various tutorials

From years of experience in teaching Premiere Pro classes, I have developed a method that teaches the fundamentals very fast. Many books and other classes sometimes show things that are not important and forget to explain stuff that IS IMPORTANT.This is a waste of your time, while you could have learned other things.

WHAT WILL I LEARN?

  1. We start by organising and importing our footage. You have won half the battle by doing this right.
  2. Next we dive instantly into the editing. You will learn a professional workflow here.
  3. As we're editing you will learn more and more tools from the user interface. Each button will be explained and used for practice.
  4. Then comes the fun part where we'll create effects, titles and custom animations.
  5. Finally we'll finish our video with color corrections and audio mixing to export the video with the best quality settings in a small file format.

FAQ

I have Premiere Pro CS6, can I follow this course? Sure you can! This course has been created to get you started with the fundamental features that came from older versions.

Will I be able to create explosions and crazy visual effects after this course? I'm sorry to let you down, but no. Premiere Pro is a cut and slice program. But it's the core of the video editing process. Visual effects lay on top of your edit which is done in other applications and then brought to Premiere Pro.

Do I need a fast computer? As you will learn the basics you don't need a fast computer. But it will make editing much more pleasant once you can playback your footage smoothly.

Must I have video footage before I can take this course? Nope, I've made it easy for you. In the course attachment you can find the same video footage as used within the course. There's no copyright on it, so feel free to edit those clips and share it online!

Transcripts

1. What to expect from the course: I remember the first time I opened Adobe Premiere Pro, and it was a disaster. So many buttons and windows, I didn't knew where to start. Sounds familiar? Well, no worries. Now, I'm here to help you with that. Hello there. My name is Jordi, and I'm a passionate filmmaker and teacher. I've been giving Premiere Pro classes for many years on various platforms, and today, I am proud to present a new online Premiere Pro course to get you started. My goal is to give you the best learning experience, and make you understand a very solid fundamental core of the editing application as fast as possible. We'll start with setting up our workspace, and learn the mechanics of user-interface. After that, we'll dive into the basic editing techniques, with the help of the toolbox. Next comes the fun part, where I'll teach you how to create awesome effects, transitions, titles, and even custom animations. After you get the hang of that, we'll dive into audio mixing, to get the balance right between your music and speech. Finally, I'm going to teach you how to export your video with the best quality settings possible to share your awesome video with your friends. I've got many things covered in this course, and we'll do it step by step so you will have the best learning experience, and be able to follow everything along, but learn Premiere Pro fast. All the demo files used in this course are also available and are free to use in any of your future projects. Getting Started with Adobe Premiere Pro is now available at cinecom.net, and after you've taken the course, you can participate in a small exam, and if you pass, you will receive a certificate, which you can add to your portfolio. As the cherry on a pie, all my students will benefit from a personal support to answer all your questions. Become a professional video editor, and start with Adobe Premiere Pro today. 2. Introduction: Hey everyone, first of all a warm welcome and thanks for purchasing my Premiere Pro Course. My name is Jordy and I have a video production company called Cineco, we make commercials, corporate films, and other advertising films. Besides that, I've always been teaching my experiences from the film industry. I have put up a website called CINECOM.NET, where you can find all my courses and ask for support if you have trouble during this course. The most important thing for a student is to learn something fast, that's not always so easy to do, since it's even more important to understand a good fundamental basis of Premiere Pro. I have taken these to things in account and made a very good balance in learning fast versus getting a good fundamental basis. After this video, I have 19 more lessons that will cover the important things step by step, you're able to follow along with the project files which you can download. Now, this introduction video is to get you prepared for the course. We'll start off with some boring things in the beginning but it's very important to understand this information. You can skip it, but you then definitely bump into trouble that will direct you back to the first lessons so bear with me. I've done my best to explain everything as easy as I can. Now, Premiere Pro is a professional application, don't expect to learn it in one day, even though you could watch the whole course in a day. But I suggest you to watch a lesson into then practice what you've learned, while you are testing out your new skills you can watch that particular lesson again until you get to hang out of the new techniques that you've learned. It's quit stake weeks or even some months to fully understands the basics you will learn in this course but here's the great part, I'm about to teach you in a way you will understand the fundamentals so well, you should be able to explore the advanced tools by yourself and that is what makes this course so interesting. That was my advice to you before we should start on this course. I am very excited and I thinks you are too, so let's get started. Thanks for watching this introduction, now follow me to lesson number 2, where I am going to teach you the fundamentals of a digital video file. 3. A digital video file: Hey there. My name is Jordy for Cinecom.net, and a welcome to my course. In this video lesson, I am going to explain to you what a digital video file actually is, and how we have to read it. For some people, this lesson might get a little boring, but it's very important to know this information as you will bump into these things once we are going to start in Premier Pro. A digital video file. We've all seen that somewhere. If you've ever downloaded a video to your computer, you end up with a digital video file. But also if you take your video camera and film something, it's then storing a digital video file inside your camera. Usually, cameras record their video clips to an SD card. We can then plug that SD card into your computer and drag those digital video files to our hard drive, where we can then preview the clips that we've shot, or import them into Premiere Pro for editing. Such a digital file has a certain extension, such as.mov or.mp4,.mts, etc. Now, that refers to the wrapper or the box which holds the actual video. Now inside that box, we can find more things than just the video. Usually, we also captured sound. We think it's baked into the video, but that's just us looking at the box. Inside that box is a separate file. Now this box can also hold other things, like time code, subtitles, multi-language tracks and so on. For a beginner's course, most of those things aren't important, but I would like to take a closer look at the video clip inside that box. First of all, what is a video clip? It are actually some photos, lots of photos next to each other. If we preview those photos fast enough, we have the impression that something is moving, or like we like to call it, a video. Now there have to be enough photos to move fast enough in order to get that impression. We talk about a certain amount of photos or frames per second. We can start tricking our minds to belief that we see a moving picture at 12 frames per second, but it's not so fluent, and therefore this cinema has doubled to 24 frames per second. But that's only for cinema projections. If you live in Europe, then your camera probably shoots at 25 frames per second. If you live in the US, your camera will shoot at 30 frames per second. Now this has some history behind it, which I'm going to spare you. But originally, it comes from the electricity frequency where the old CRT televisions worked on. But nowadays, we usually view videos on the internet or LCD devices, so you're basically not bound to the frame rate anymore. But we mainly all still work in 25 or 30 frames per second, depending on where you live. Now each of these frames can be seen as a photo as I've told you before. That means every photo is a full captured image. This is a technique called progressive. Progressive is something we're seeing every time now. But it hasn't always been like that. In the older days, cameras would usually capture in a technique called interlaced. The problem back then was that the electricity frequency in Europe was 50 Hertz or 50 cycles per second. Since our old CRT television also worked on that frequency, we actually had to send a video signal to it at 50 frames per second. But the cables and transmission hardware weren't able to send so much frames at once, so they invented the interlaced technique, which means that each frame was a half photo. It would send out 50 half photos per second, which combined were 25 photos per second. Now the frames were not just cut in half, but many strokes or lines were visible off that frame than the next frame that followed had the other lines filled in, combine them together and you have one photo. Now this interlaced technique is something we don't use that much anymore. But still many TV stations work that way, and many cameras out there also have the option to capture with interlaced. But I advise everyone to capture in progressive, so you won't end up with a distorted video where these lines get visible because you exported your video with the wrong settings out of Premiere Pro. That is the story about progressive and interlaced. Now let's take a look at each frame individual. As with the photo, your video also has a certain size. This size is defined by a width and a height, not in centimeters or inches, but in pixels, that one little dot which contains the color information. The bigger the total amount of pixels, the less we see them. Here is an example of an image which only has a few pixels. We can clearly see which color each pixel has. But if the amount of pixels would increase, we end up with a beautiful image where we can't tell which exact color one particular pixel has. The amount of pixels in the height and width is called a resolution. We talk about standard definition if the resolution is pretty low, like in the old television days, and we talk about high-definition or even ultra high-definition if the resolution is bigger. A typical high-definition or HD resolution is 1,920 pixels wide and 1,080 pixels height. But we also had the very popular HD resolution of 1,280 by 720 pixels, and of course, the bigger the resolution, the sharper the video will be. We have learned three parameters that defines a video clip, the frame rate, the scanning technique and the resolution. These are the three things which everybody shall talk about if they wanted to define a captured setting or any video file. Now it's pretty long to write down 1,920 by 1,080 progressive, 25 frames per second. We only write down the height of the resolution. For example, 1,080 or just 1080, followed by either progressive or interlaced, which we only write down the first letter from, so we got 1080p now, and finally the frame rate, which is just going to follow the words. We end up with 180p25. Some other examples could be 720p30 or 1080i50. That is how we talk about a digital video file. You will see these same things popping up in Premiere Pro, but also in conversations or labels. These are the most common and turns to communicate to another film editor. That was it for this video. In the next lesson, I'm going to teach you how to open up Premiere Pro and start your very first project. Thank you very much for watching. 4. Start a new project: Jordy here for a CINECOM.NET, and welcome to my course. In this video lesson, I'm going to teach you how to open up Premier and create a new project. Now, before I'm going to lunch premier, I'm first going to show you this folder right here, which can be found on my desktop. What I'm going to open up this folder which goes by the name of Bike Ride, you can see that I have several clips in here. Now, all these clips can also be found within the course attachments, so that means you can also use these during this course and worked perfectly along. Now what I'm going to do is create a new folder and bring all these clips inside of that folder. Just right-click and say New Folder. Give it a name, like for example, clips, Russia's a video footage it doesn't matter. Just something where you feel most comfortable with. I'm just going to name it clips like that, and I'm going to select all the video files now except for the folder, and drag all those video files inside to that folder. Right now I have a folder named, Bike Ride, and in that folder, I have a folder named clips, and it's right in there, we can find all the clips. Let's close this folder now, and let's open up Premier. I've got Premier installed right here in my dock. Just click on it, and that will open up Premier to bring you to the loading screen, and after that'll be complete, you will see a nice welcome screen. There we go. Now inside this welcome screen, you have basically got two options. On the left side right here, you can open up a recent project, or browse your finder to locate a project on your hard disk. Now, normally you should see a list of project files right here. But because I haven't created any project file yet, this space is currently empty. Therefore, what we're going to do is create a new project, which can be found on the right side, and over here you can find the button, new project. Just click on that to create a new project, and that'll bring you to this window right here, where Premier Pro is going to ask you for some information to create that project file. The first thing is a name. Let's call it Bike Ride. Just name it something where you are currently working on, so bike ride in this scenario. Next is the location where the project file is going to get stored. By default, this is going to be your documents folder. But what we can do is press on "Browse" right here, and what I'm going to do is, I'm going to locate to my Desktop. There we go, and open up that Bike Ride folder right here. Going to double-click on it, and say it "Choose", there we go. So inside that folder, my project file will get stored. Then below that, we can find two taps, the first one is general and the other one is scratch disks. Now let's start with the general tab. The first option that we can find right here is the mercury playback engine, GPU acceleration, and when I'm going to open up that drop-down menu, you can see that we have two options. Now, basically what this means is that we have an option to render all the graphics because we are working with video graphics right here inside Adobe Premier. We have the option to either rendered those on the processor, which is software based, or on the GPU, which is working on your graphical cards. Now, in this first option, everything is going to go much faster. If you are able to select this option, definitely make use of that. If you are running on an older PC or Mac, you don't have the option to select that option, and then you will have to use the software only which is CPU based. Now since I do have that option, I'm just going to select this. Then below that we can find three more options. The first one is how we would like to display the video format, and the next one is the audio format, and finally, the capture format. Now these are things which we can always change afterwards, even as well the video render ends playbacks right here. Now, because this isn't so important, I'm just going to leave this out, and just we going to leave it at default settings. The next thing that I want to do now is head over to scratch disks over here, and right here we can find some locations again. The captured video, captured audio, video previews, audio previews, and project auto saves. Now some of these might sound familiar like the project audio saves. You can select a time span, for example, every 15 minutes, Premiere Pro has to auto save my projects, because the software can always crash and we don't want to end up in hours of work that just gets lost because of that. These projects will be saved on a default location, which is the project's location as you can see. Users silicon desktop bike ride, which is this folder right here, which I have also selected from my location, and as you can see, all the rest is also being storage right there. But what are those things? Video previews, captured audio. Well, we first have the captured section right here, captured video and audio. Some cameras have the ability to connect via a cable to your PC or Mac, and from there you can select to transfer the video and the audio as well to your Mac or PC. Now, this is something that was being used in the older days with those tapes, where you had to play back the video on your camera and at the same time capture it in your editing suite, and the information being captured right there will get saved on this path right here, same as their project as you can also see right here. You can also select a new path if you want that with the browse button. Now, so this is clear, but what are the video and audio previews then? This is something that I'm going to show you later in this course. It's something pretty important, but again, these are settings which we can change after we have created the project. For now, we're just not going to mind what those things are, and what I'm going to do is just press on, "OK" and that will open up the interface of Premier Pro. Now you might be a little bit overwhelmed right now because of all these buttons ends menu state you can see in this user interface, but nowhere is I'm here to help you with that, and that'll be for the next lesson where I'm going to teach you all the things we can see in the user interface. Thanks a lot for watching. 5. The user interface: Jordy here for cinecom.net and welcome to my course. In this video lesson, I'm going to teach you how the user interface mechanics works within Premiere Pro. Now, before again, I'm going to open up that application, I first want to show you my folder again so right here we've got Bike Ride which we have seen in the previous lesson. When I'm going to open up that folder, you will now see that project file within which we have chosen in the previous lesson when we were creating that project file. Now, also, and besides that, you will see this folder right here, which says Adobe Premiere Pro Preview Files. Now, while we were creating that project, we have seen in a tab called Scratch Disks that we were able to choose the location for the preview files and the capture files, etc., so that is this folder. Now, it's not a huge problem if you delete this, but it's always better to keep it with your project file, because all the cache files are being stored in here. That means you don't have to re-render everything again if you bring this folder with you. More about rendering and preview files later in this course. Now, besides these two things, you can also see that I have created a folder which goes by the name of Music and Photos. Inside that folder, Music, you can see that I have an MP3 file in here, and when I go back and open up Photos, you can see that I have two beautiful pictures in here which we can also use inside Premiere. Let's open up Premiere now. I'm going to close this folder and from my dock, I'm going to launch Premiere, like that. When I'm going to see the Welcome screen right now, you will see on the left side that we do see a recent project file because we have created that in the previous lesson. Right now we don't have to create a new project, we can just open up an existing project from the left side right here. Just click on that, and that will open up that project. Now, as you remember from the previous lesson, we didn't do anything yet so this is the clean interface as you will see it if you create a new project. How does this user interface work? Everything inside Premiere exists out of windows. Those windows can all be found within the menu right here, and below here we can find a huge list of all the windows that are available. Now, some of these are checked as you can see, like the Audio Meters, the Program Monitor, the Project, Source Monitor, etc. That means that these panels are active on this very moment. Where are these windows? Well, let's go back to our user interface. I'm going to close this menu. These windows can be selected by just clicking on them. You can see that a blue line appears around one of these windows. Now, if you are seeing yellow lines, well, no worries then, that just means that you are using some older updates within Premiere, but it works exactly the same. The name of each window can be found in the top. Right here you can see Project: Bike Ride, that is the name of the project that we have created. This right here is the project window. What you can also notice is that this blue line is going around this tab. that means we can find behind that also different windows like the Media Browser, an Info window, Effects window, Markers, History, etc. But let's not go too fast now. I'm going to go back to my project window because we're going to start with this. Because the Project panel is the most important panel within Premiere. This right here collects all our information, all the items that we need to edit. Now, these can either be video files or photos, audio files etc., but that could also be generated items. Generated items could be, for example, a title. We don't have to create a title separately, for example, in Photoshop, no, we can create titles right inside Premiere Pro. It's also a professional applications so we expect the software to be able to do that, of course. But more about that later, just remember that this panel right here or window, collects everything, all the data. Let's just do that. There are different ways to import our media and one way is just by double-clicking in this panel, and that will open up a window as you can see. That allows me to browse through my finder and to locate my video clips. Let's start with that. I'm going to open up my Clips folder. From here, I'm just going to select several of them. For example, I'm going to select this clip, this one right here, and you can select multiple clips by holding down your Command key on your Mac or by holding down the Control key on your Windows PC, and by doing that, you can select some more clips. Next, we're just going to press on import and that will import them, as you can see here, a loading bar into your project. Right away, we can see that they are being collected inside this project panel right here. Now, we can start editing on those clips, which brings me to the next important window. One way to view one of these clips is by just hovering it with your mouse. By going from the left to the right, you can somehow play these clips as you can see. But there's a better way to view it more accurate and that is by opening up this clip inside the Source Monitor. There's a very easy way to do that, just double-click on that clip as you would open up any other file on your PC or Mac, there we go. Now, you can see that a new window is getting active, and that is the source window. You can see that by the name right here. As the name says, the source window is always going to show the source. The source is the clip that you have imported inside Premiere. Now, many buttons now came available. Now, no worries about that, we're going to take it step-by-step. Most of these buttons will be for in the upcoming lessons. For now, we'll take it easy and we'll start with some of the basic controls. Right here you can see this blue dot and this represents your play hat. That means, we are currently seeing a thumbnail, a freeze-frame of a certain points in that clip, which lays right here. Now, this is just working exactly the same as in any media player, whether that is QuickTime, VLC, Windows Media Player, etc. In all of those applications, we have a timeline or a time indicator, which is this whole bar right here. When I'm going to scrub through this time indicator, you will see that I can view this clip. Now this is one way of doing it. Another way is just by pressing on the Play button. Again, these are things that we should be familiar with. The Play button can be found right here. Just press on that and the clip will start playing. Press again on it and the clip will stop playing. You can also press the spacebar on your keyboard like this and that will play the clip, press on it again and that will stop the clip. It's that easy. That is one way of viewing your source clips. But we aren't editing yet. To start editing, we have to create a timeline first and inside that timeline, we can start doing editing. The timeline can be found all the way on the right side over here. As you can see also here the name it says timeline. Inside that window, you will see Drop media here to create sequence. Now, a sequence is a timeline. Don't get confused here between a project and a timeline, because we can create multiple timelines within one project or multiple sequences, it's the same. Again, we have multiple ways to create a sequence, but we're going to go by the easiest in the beginning now and that is just by dropping a media inside this window. So let's just do that. I'm going to go back to my project panel right here and drag any of these clips inside this window of the timeline. Just select it and drag it all the way to here and as you can see, my cursor now has a plus icon. That means it will add it to the timeline and it'll create a sequence. I'm just going to let go now. There we go. A lot of information was added to the timeline window. But also inside our project panel, you can see a new item now. Now you might be thinking, well, did this clip duplicate or what happens here? Well, actually no. This right here is the sequence or the timeline. It will always show a thumbnail or a preview of what's going on inside that sequence, just the same as with clips. Because we have dragged in clip number 4 inside that timeline, it automatically gave that sequence the name clip 4 as you can see over here. But we can very easily change that name. Just click on the text itself, there we go, and now you can change that name. What I'm going to do is I'm just going to make it easier and I'm going to name this sequence. There we go. You could also name this bike ride or edit number 1 or draft edit, etc. That's up to you. Now, you might come to a problem where you accidentally closed your sequence, and we can do that. If we head over again to our sequence, the timeline over here, we can see on the left side of the name this little X icon and that will close the timeline. Let's just do that. As you can see now the timeline is again empty. It will ask you again to drop media in here to create a sequence. Now you might be thinking here, "Damn it, my sequence is gone. All my hard work now is just lost." But no worries. That timeline or sequence can still be found inside our project panel, which is right here and the only thing we have to do is just double-click on it, there we go, and that will open up the timeline or sequence again. Now, there's one more thing that you have probably noticed, and that is a second monitor popping up. Now this right here is the program monitor. The program monitor will show the video feeds coming from your timeline. That means when I am going to use this blue dots right here from the timeline, which is somehow the same as this blue dots right here, the time indicator and I'm going to move that to the right side. You will see that only this window here or monitor is going to show information. To explain it very easy to you, this monitor on the right side will always show what's inside the timeline and the monitor on the left side will show anything from the source or the project panel. We can only open up individual clips in here. That means I can double-click on this clip to show that in the source monitor or I can double-click a second clip to view only that clip. But when I'm going to add multiple clips to my timeline right here. Let's just do that. I'm just going to drag in there we go, another clip inside my timeline. You'll see that I can now view multiple clips inside the program monitor. If I'm going to scrap in my timeline, there we go. It has now cut it to the second clip. Now as for the program monitor, we can again see the same buttons to play our clip with this play button right here or we can also use the spacebar on our keyboards. There we go. Now, as you can see, every window has its own functionality. We've got a source monitor, a program monitor, a project window, a timeline window. But we've got more things like a toolbox window right here. These are tools that we can use to edit our videos inside the timeline. We also have audio meters on the right side. Maybe you have seen them moving already. When I'm going to play my clip inside the timeline, let me just do that, you will see these audio meters going up and down and you can also hear that in the audio. I'm going to press Pause again. What else can we find? Well, we also got some Effects Controls all the way on the top left, right here. When I'm going to open up that tab, we can actually control the effects that we're going to add in here. We also have an audio mixer, we've got a metadata, then down below that we've got a media browser. Now this is another way to import your footage inside your project. We've got an info window, we've got our effects library right here, we've got the markers, history, etc. If there's anything you can't find in here, the only thing you have to do is just head over to Window and select your window from here. Because it could be, for example, let's just close this again, that I have accidentally closed my Effects Controls. For that I'm going to open up the Effects Controls window from here and I'm going to select this little button right here next to that Effects Controls name, and that will open up a separate menu. Now from here, I'm able to close that panel or window. Once I do that, I have lost that window. Where are my Effects Controls now? Well, no worries. You can always go back to Window and just select your Effects Controls from here. If I can't find it, right here it is, Effects Controls. I'm just going to click on that and that will bring back my Effects Controls window. It's that easy. That brings me to the end of this lesson. Thanks a lot for watching. In the next video lesson, I'm going to teach you how to customize this user interface and how to save that for later use. 6. Customize your workspace: Hello everyone, Jordy here again for Cinecom.Net and welcome to my course. In this video lesson, we are going to take a closer look at the workspace. In the previous lesson, we have seen that each of these windows right here have a different functionality. These different windows are part of this whole frame or actually the workspace, and that means that we can actually change the position of these windows, we can also close these panels, change their size, etc. Let's take a look at how we can do that. First of all, whenever we are going to stand on the outsides of one of these frames, you can see that we have now a different cursor. That means we can actually drag these windows smaller or bigger in this direction, but also below right here, as you can see. We can do that for any panel that there is, like also the timeline, etc. Let's say for example, that you were organizing your footage inside your project panel right here. At that point, you might want to have this panel a little bit bigger. What we can do is just drag that a little bit bigger like that and now we have a bigger workspace inside the project's panel, but that's not the only thing that we can do. We can also grab these panels, for example, the project panel or anything else, and just drag that from the title right here to another place. As you can see, Premiere Pro will help us with that to position that new panel. One way of doing it, for example, right here in the Timeline panel is leaving it in the middle. By doing that, you can see that with this blue area right here, which indicates the position where the Project panel now is going to get located, and that indicates that it's going to be positioned at the same spot as where the timeline is. That means that we're going to get two tabs. Let me just do that. I'm going to release my mouse now, there we go. Now you can see that in this window or panel right here, we now have two tabs, the Timeline and the Project panel, which I first had on the left side, but there is more that we can do. I'm going to grab this Project panel again, and I'm going to drag it now to a different position. For example, on the left side right here, now that will not create a second stuff, but we will be able to view these two panels next to each other. Let me just release my mouse again and now you can see the Project panel on the left side and the Timeline panel on the right side. This is something that we can do with any of these panels. Also the Audio Mixer right here, I'm just going to drag it and I'm going to drag that below this area right here. There we go. Now I've got the top area which holds the Media Browser and info, effects, etc, and below that we've got the Audio Clip Mixture. Let's say that we would like to focus on the video editing and not so much from the other things. What we can then view is also close these panels and we can do that with this little icon right here next to the name of the window. When I'm going to click on that, you will see some options for that window. One of those options is to close that panel. There we go. Now the Audio Mixer is gone and we can do that with more of these windows. We can also go to History, I'm that using that, so I'm just going to close that panel, as well as the Markers, just close it, Metadata, that doesn't say much to me so just close that thing. Effect Controls, that's something for later on. At this point, I only want to cut my videos, etc. That way you can create actually a workspace that suits you the best. Some of you might be thinking why am I learning this already, isn't this something more advanced? This is something that I see in my classes all the time, where my students are messing up their workspace. That's the reason why I find this very important to understand in the beginning of a course, because now you understand how these panels work. Let's say that you have accidentally messed up your workspace, no worries then. When we head over to the menu up here and select "Window", we can head over to workspace over here. From here we have some different options and one of those options is to reset the current workspace. Let me just click on that, and that will ask you whether you are sure you would like to reset this workspace, and we're going to say "Yes", that will bring everything back in your original state. Now, let's say that you were creating the workspace that you like the best. I'm going to move some panels like that, I'm going to drag my Project panel up there, I'm going to close the Metadata like this, and this here's a workspace that I like best, but I have also accidentally closed my Effects controls. There we go and I didn't mean to do that. What we can do is go back to Window workspace and reset that whole workspace, but on the other hand, I also don't want to do that because I have put so much work in creating this workspace right now. The only thing I need back is that Effect Controls Window. Well, very easy to bring only that panel back. Just head over again to window, we're not going to go into workspace now, but we're going to take a look down below here. This is something that I've also shown you in the previous lesson. From here we have access to all the available windows. From here we can select that "Effect Controls" back, just click on it and you will see it will get added again to your workspace. I'm going to customize my workspace even more. I'm going to drag my toolbox all the way on top right here, and I'm going to make that a little bit smaller. I've got my tools right here and the Audio Mixer is something I would like to get between here. There we go. I'm also going to make this a little bit smaller like that. This right here is a workspace that I feel good about. I would like to save this workspace because maybe I'm going to mess this up later and I always want to come back to this workspace. What we can do is head over to Window, go to workspace, and from here you can say "New Workspace", and that will actually save your current settings. I'm just going to click on that and that will ask you to give it a name. Let's just name this Jordy, like that, and I'm going to press "Okay" now. This here's my workspace, now let's say that I'm going to mess up this workspace. I'm going to close the Info panel right here, close that panel, I'm going to move my Effect controls right here, and I'm also going to close the Timeline like that, and also the Source panel right here, I'm just going to move that all the way down here. Right now, my interface or workspace is messed up, but no worries because we have saved the previous workspace that we have created, remember that. For that, we can just go back to Window, workspace, and from here you can see that Jordy has been selected, and that means we can reset it back to that workspace. For that would just press again on "Reset Current Workspace", which is Jordy. When I'm going to click on that, we're going to say "Yes" again, it will restore itself again where you can see the Info panel, remember that I closed that one, I also dragged some panels up here, but that is again reset now, so everything is fine. Let me go back to that window menu right here. I'm going to select workspace again. Because from here you can see that we have some more options, all these options right here are actually pretty sets. Those are workspaces that were created by Premiere itself, which you have access to. For example, you are going to do color correction on your videos. Then you can just select that workspace, which has been created by Premiere Pro, and they think that that is a good workspace for doing color corrections. Let me just click on that. There we go. Now the interface has changed to do color corrections. These don't give extra tools or anything, the only thing that we're selecting right here is a different orientation of all these windows. That's the only thing, don't expect new things to pop up when you choose one of these. Let me get back to "Window" right here, go to "Workspace", and you can also select something else, for example, "Audio." We're going to master the audio right now. I'm just going to click on that, and now we have a workspace that suits the best for audio mixing. Again, Also here, this is a workspace that has been saved under the name of Audio. That means whenever I'm going to close some panels, like the Effect Controls right here, I'm going to move the Project panel to there, I'm going to drag the Program Monitor all the way down here, etc. At any point, I can just go back to Window, Workspace, I've got audio selected, so that means when I am going to say now "Reset Current Workspace", it will ask you, "Are you sure you would like to reset audio?" "Yes". Now the Audio workspace has been reset again to its original state. Now the last thing, I'm going to go back to Window, Workspace, I'm going to select my Workspace again, Jordy. I'm actually not such a huge fan of this workspace. I would actually just like to delete it because it's taking up some space in my menu right here. From Window, Workspace, there we go in this menu. I would like you to delete Jordy from here. To do that, we just press on "Delete Workspace", like that. I'm just going to select from the drop-down menu, "My Workspace". But, hey, what's going on here? I can't find Jordy within this list. The reason for that is because currently I have Jordy, the workspace Jordy selected, we can only delete a workspace when it's not active. I'm going to press "Cancel" for now, and I'm going to go back to Window, Workspace, and I'm just going to select the basic Editing workspace. Now I'm going to go back to Window, Workspace, and I'm going to say "Delete Workspace". When I have this one selected, I open up the drop-down menu, now I can delete that Jordy workspace. As you can see, the normal editing workspace is not available right now because I've got that one selected. Select "Jordy" and press "Okay". When I'm going to head back to Window now, workspace, you will see that that workspace is no longer available, and that's it about working with your workspace. We have seen how to customize one, but also if you mess up, you can always find your missing panels right here from the Window menu, or you can also just go to workspace and reset your current workspace to set everything back to default. In the next video lesson, I'm going to teach you how to import your footage and how to organize your clips, which is something very important. Thanks a lot for watching and I'll see you in the next video. 7. Import and organise clips: Jordy here for Cinecom.net and welcome to my course. In this video lesson, I'm going to teach you how to import your footage inside Premiere Pro and how to organize your clips. I think this is a very important step. Now I'm going to start with repeating something that I've already showed you previously in this course. I'm going to open up this folder right here, the bike ride folder. Inside there, what can we find? You've got the project panel, we've got some folders that Premier needs, and it's right here we've got to three custom folders: clips, music, and photos. Let's open up the clips folder. Right here we've got nine clips which we are going to use throughout this course to work with. Again, you can also download all of these attachments right here. I'm going to head back. Now right here I've got a music folder where you can find one mp3 file in, Carefree.mp3, beautiful music as you can hear, that all the credits goes to Kevin MacLeod for this beautiful piece of work. This is a royalty-free music file, which means you can use this as long as you mention Kevin. Let's go back now and let's check out the photos folder right here. Inside here we can find a photo of our beautiful actress, which you will see more in this course, and next to her is the child of my sister. Besides that, I also got a picture of a pigeon. Well, no further comment about that. Let's go back now and I'm going to close the bike ride folder, and I'm going to launch Premier Pro now. There we go. It'll open up the loading screen and it will bring me to the welcome screen as well. From here we're going to open up that bike ride project again, just click on it. Now we don't have anything yet in this project. It's a clear project. We're going to start with importing our media. In one of the previous lessons we have seen that we could import our media by just double-clicking in this panel right here, in the project panel where we are going to drag in all the media that we're going to work with. But there is a different way to import your media. One way of doing that is just by going up to the menu, say "File", and select "Import". That will open up the same window as you can see right here, as you would double-click in this panel. From here, I'm going to select all the video clips. You can just drag a selection as I just did and then just say "Import". That will import all these video files as you can see. They are now added to the project window right here. Now let's enlarge this panel a little bit so that we can better see what's going on in here. Like this. There we go. We've got all the clips inside here. Now currently we are in a thumbnail view. That means we can see a thumbnail of the video and when I'm going to hover my mouse over it and we can somehow play these clips. We've seen that previously in this course. But there is a different way of viewing these items inside this panel. That is in a List View. We can select that down below here. Currently you can see that the icon view as active and next to that we've got to the List View. When I'm going to click on that, you can now see all the clips in a list. Next to those two buttons, we are able to zoom in or zoom out to make these icons look bigger. Let's just drag this slider right here, and now you can see that the icon is getting bigger and bigger each time. We can also imply this to the Icon View. So let's go back to the Icon View like that. Let's again use that slider right here to zoom in into those clips, like that. Now we've got some giant thumbnails. Another way of zooming in or out is by just using one of these buttons right here, which says zoom in or zoom out, which will make the slider go in steps as you can see if I click on those buttons. Let's go back to List View. There we go. I'm going to make this smaller again so that we got a clearer view of what we have inside the project panel. Now inside the List View, we are always able to arrange these clips the way we want by just clicking on the column name. If you have ever worked with Excel or Numbers, you know that we have columns and rows. These are columns right here, and these are rows. We can make these columns bigger or smaller, but we can also click on them to change the order. Right now I'm ordering it's on the name and it starting from clip 9 all the way down to clip 1. If I click on it again, it will start from clip 1 to clip 9. I think this is pretty clear. Now we can also find more information in here, like the frame rate of these clips, which we have seen previously in this course, what this is about. We've got the media start and media ends. That means this clip starts from zero seconds and it will go to 30 seconds. That means that clip number 1 is 30 seconds long. When I'm going to use my scroll bar right here and scroll to the right, you can see that we've got more data, also video in and video out point, which is something that I'm going to teach you in the next lesson how that works. We've got the total video duration, some video information like the resolution, which is also something that we've seen, and the audio information, etc. These are all columns that we can sort the clips on. Let's, for example, go back to media duration. I would like to sort all these clips on that. Just click on that column, and now you can see that the first clip is the shortest clip and the last clip right clip right here is the longest clip from this column. Now let's say that we are viewing this in an Icon View, let's just click back on this button right here, how can we sort these clips right now? Because I don't have these columns right here. Well, very easily. For that we can find this button right here which says Sort Icons. When I'm going to click on that, you can see that we can sort these icons on all of these properties. One way of sorting this is by the name and when I'm going to click on that, you will see that all my clips now in ordered again on the name: clip 1, clip 2, 3, and so on. That's all about sorting your media. I'm going to go back to List View to have a better view of what we all have inside of the project panel. Now what we want to do is just as in our folder on our desktop, we want to make sure that these clips are inside a folder. For that, let's create a folder inside the project panel. We can do that very easily with this button right here, a New Bin. Just click on it, and that will create a new bin inside the project panel. You can give it any name that you want. Let's just give it the same name as I have in my Finder, clips. Now that I have this folder, what I can do now is just select all the clips that I have and drag them inside that folder. There we go. Now I can just close this folder or open it back up. The same thing goes again for in the Icon View. There we go. I've got this very big folder icon now, and when I'm going to double-click on it, you can see that this folder will open up and I can view all my clips within. Now as this is a window, I can always close this again, no worries about that. It works actually the same thing as your Explorer or in your Finder. Lets go back to that List View. There we go. I'm going to close the folder, clips. What I want to do now is import some more things because we also had that music folder and some photos. Now, another way of importing your clips is by just dragging your clips in. For that, I'm just going to drag my Premiere window a little bit to the left so that I can see my bike ride folder right here on my desktop. I'm going to Double-click on it to open up that folder. There we go. From here, what I'm just going to do is Select these two clips at the same time, music and photos and Drag those two folders inside Premiere like that. That will import those two folders. There we go. I'm going to Drag my window of Premiere back to the right side. There we go. As you can see, Premiere Pro automatically recognized that those were folders. Inside the music folder and photo folder, now when I'm going to open up these, you can see that I have my items dragged in there. I've got my carefree.mp3 file, there we go. I've got my two photos right here, which I'm also able to import. Now, as you can all see, I am working with folders in here, and that is very important. You must organize your footage all the time inside Premiere. If you were not creating these folders, after a while when you have much photos, much music files, as well as many clips in here, is going to get a big mess in here and you don't have a clear view of all your items anymore in your project panel. That's the reason why you have to create folders and give them a name and put the correct items in those folders. Now these were all items that were imported like the clips that I've shot myself, the music that I have downloaded, and the photos that I've created myself. Now, this is one group of a type of item. I'm going to close these folders now. Another group are generated items. These are items that you didn't create, but Premiere Pro created them. A good example would be a title file. We don't have to create the title ourselves. Now, we can just create that inside Premiere. That means Premiere is going to create that title file. Now, where can we find that title file? Well, down below here inside the project window, we can find this button which says, "New Item". When I'm going to click on that, you can find a whole list of items that could be generated by Premiere itself. One of those things is a sequence, and this is something that we have seen previously in this course. Now, one way of creating this sequence or timeline is by dragging our footage inside the timeline panel right here. But, we can also just create a sequence from this New Item menu. Let's just do that. I'm going to click on that. That will open up this menu right here, where I have to choose which type of sequence that I want. Now, you might be thinking, this is a window that I haven't seen yet. The previous time when we were creating that sequence, I only had to drag in that clip and my sequence was created. Well, the reason for that is when we are going to drag a clip to the timeline panel right here, Premiere Pro is automatically going to take a look at the source clip, which settings that clip has. That is the frame rate, the resolution, etc. It's going to create a new timeline or sequence from that clip. But if we are just going to say, "New sequence", Premiere Pro doesn't know which kind of sequence he has to create. That is something we have to define within this window right here. A good reason to create such a sequence in here is because you would like to create a different kind of video as your source material. For example, you have recorded your video in HD. That means a resolution of 1,920 up to 1,080. But, you would like to create a video in an SD format, a standard definition format. The standard definition format has only a resolution of 720 pixels by 576. When we are going to drag our HD footage inside this sequence or timeline, you will see that we are somehow zoomed in or we are also able to choose which part we would like to show from that huge HD video file. But be careful with this. I only advice to create new sequences by using this way if you know what you're doing. Let's quickly go through what we see here. First of all, we've got sequence presets, which is selected right now. Then from here we can select different kinds of sequences or timelines which are preset. Like for example, the DV-PAL, which is a standard definition in PAL or NTSC, which is something that we've seen previously in this course or also DSLR or digital SLR. You might be filming with a DSLR camera, which is one of these photo cameras which can film as well. From here you can select if you have recorded an HD, you can open up the 10 ADP folder. From there you can select a sequence that you would like to work in. But you can also head over to the settings tab right here. From here, you're able to customize the sequence the way you would like. You can define the frame size, you can define the pixel aspect ratio, the frames per seconds, the audio sample rate, etc. But this might get a little bit more advanced to some people. But if you are an adventurer, definitely check this out and just play in it. The best way to learn is just by experimenting. Let's say that you have set your sequence the way you want, then down below here, you can give that sequence a name. For example, Bike Ride Sequence, there we go, and then just press "OK". Now, you will see that that sequence item has been added to your project panel, which holds all the items that you need to work or to create your video. Now, when I'm going to head back to that New Item menu, you'll see that we have some more options, like also here, the title, but that is going to be for later in this course. For now, I would like to thank you a lot for watching. In the next video lesson, we are going to take a closer look at the timeline right here. 8. The timeline: Hey folks, how are you doing? Jordy here for cinecom.net and welcome to my course again. In this video lesson, I'm going to teach you how the timeline works and how we have to add our clips and cite the timeline. Now, before we are going to start with that, I'm first going to create a second sequence. For that, I'm going to head over in my project panel right here, I'm going to click on the New item button. From there I'm going to select sequence. That will open up this window right here, which we have seen in the previous lesson. Now, what I'm going to do is I'm going to create a type of sequence of which I know is totally different from my source clips right here in this folder. For that, I'm going to head over to DV-PAL right here, and I'm just going to select the standard 48 kilohertz. Now, this is a standard definition timeline which I am going to add high definition clips inside. Let's see how Premiere is going to react on that. I'm going to give it a name as the sequence and I'm going to press on okay. There we go. Now, you can see that a second timeline or sequence has been added to my project's panel, as well as here on the right side, you can see that I have two tabs right now. One is the Bike ride sequence and the other one is the SD sequence. Now, let's add a clip inside the SD sequence. I'm going to open up my clips folder from here and I'm going to drag in, for example, clip number 7 inside that timeline. Look what happens right now. Premiere Pro is going to warn me that the source clip does not match the sequence settings. Now, we have two options. We can say, well, change the settings of the sequence so that it matches the source or don't do anything, just keep the settings as they are. Now, if you ever see this message, you'd want to choose change sequence settings unless you really know what you're doing here and that you have created a different type of sequence with a purpose. In any other situation, just press change sequence settings. There we go. Now, the sequence has changed its settings. We can also see that when I'm going to head back to my project panel here, and I'm going to take a look at the SD sequence, I'm going to scroll a little bit to the right side so that we can see the resolution right here, video info, and you can see now that the standard definition sequence has now been set to a high definition sequence. What I'm going to do now is I'm going to select the bike ride sequence over here, and I'm going to delete it because I'm not using that sequence. There we go. I'm going to rename the SD sequence since it's not any more standard definition. What I have to do is just click once on the name itself and that way I can change the title of it. You know what, I'm just going to name it a Bike ride sequence again, like the other one, which I have deleted. There we go. Also right here now you can see that the name has changed. Let's start back from the beginning. I'm going to select this clip in the timeline and I'm going to delete it because there is a better way to import your footage inside your timeline. I'm going to open up the clips folder within the project panel. From here, I'm going to open clip number 7 inside the source monitor so that I can see what is happening in that shot. Once it's open, I'm going to play this shot and let's take a look at it. In the beginning, you can see that the camera is shaking a lot. It's only since this point right here where this girl is coming in into the frame and it's at that point where we want to use this shot. Now, one way of cutting out that first piece is by dragging this clip into the timeline and cutting out those first seconds. But there's a better workflow within Premier Pro. What we can do is work with in and out points. Let me show you how that works. I'm going to head back to my source monitor right here because it's in this spot where it all happens. I'm going to scrub back to where the girl is coming in into the frame. It's at this point right here where I want to have my shot to get started. Now, if you want to work precisely, you can use either one of these two buttons right here. One of these says step back one frame, that means to the left, and the other one goes to the right or go forward by one frame. Once you have found your point in time, you can set an end point or a start point. You can do that with this button right here, which says Mark in. Now, you can either press on this button or you can also use on your keyboards the button I from end points. Once you have set that point, we can scrub forwards again until a particular point where you think this is enough for this shot. From there, we are going to set an out point at this position. We can do that with that other button, Mark out and the button on our keyboard is the O. There we go. Now, we have made a selection from that whole clip. This selection right here has a total duration of four seconds, which I can see on the right side right here. The time indicator on the left side indicates where my playhead is positioned and function of the whole clip. Now, once we have selected a piece from this clip, we can now add this to the timeline. One way of doing that is by just taking the image from this panel right here and drag it all the way to the timeline like that. Now, you can see that in my timeline, when I'm going to play this clip, then it will start beautifully from that point and that it will end after four seconds where I have set my end point. I'm going to delete this clip from the timeline again, just select it like that, right-click on it, and say clear, and it's gone. Another way to delete it was by using the delete key on your keyboard, which is pretty obvious. I'm going to set my playhead from my timeline back to the beginning like this. Because we can find some buttons in my source monitor right here, and those are in this one right here, the Insert button and the Overwrite button. There are these two buttons which can help us to insert this clip into the timeline. I can either click on it like this and that will add to clip to the timeline, or I can also use the comma key as you can see when I'm going to hover this button. When I press the comma key, there we go. Now, the clip has been added twice to the timeline. We can add this as many times as we want to. I'm going to delete that second clip again from my timeline. I have it selected now, and now I will press the delete key on my keyboard. There we go. It's gone. This right here is the timeline. The clip that I have added into the timeline now looks pretty small. We would like to zoom in into it. For that we can use this bar below here. Now, pay attention to the timeline indication. As you can see, it starts at zero seconds, which is pretty obvious, and the timeline will go all the way down to almost two seconds of visible area. Now, this is a scale that we see here. Once I'm going to zoom in by using the outsides of this scroll bar right here, just move it to the left, you will see that, that time span is changing. First, it was two minutes and now we have a time span of 30 seconds. Now, the reason I'm telling you this is so that you understand that this clip is not really getting longer in time, now we're just zooming in on the timeline. We can always zoom out again or zoom in like this. This right here is the clip that we have added to the timeline. As you can see, we've got two tracks. We've got a video track above and an audio track below. We can get a better visual representation of these two tracks if we are going to open up the tracks. We can do that with this line right here on the intersection of the two video tracks. I can select that and move it up with my mouse. There we go. Now you can see a small thumbnail appearing in that track, which indicates visually which clip that is. Below that, we can do the exact same thing for the audio track. Just move the intersection right here, like this, just drag it open. Now you can see a little wave form right here, which represents the audio. Now, there wasn't much audio going on in this shot, so that's the reason you can't see much of the waveform. Now this clip right here can be selected, moved to the right side, moved to the left side, etc. We can also move it to another track. You have to see this as layers. For those of you who have already worked in Photoshop, we can also find layers in there. That means we can move this clip up to another layer like this. Again, we can open up this layer if you want to and we can do the same thing for the audio track like that. Now, the reason we can do this is because sometimes we want to show different things at the same time. That means we've got a music running in the background as well as a voice, somebody is talking to the camera, maybe we've got some sound effects in the backgrounds and so on. At that point, you already need three audio tracks so that the viewer can hear all those three sounds at the same time. The same thing goes for the video and you have already seen that multiple picture frames inside one canvas. They've done that by just moving these clips up in two different video tracks. Let's bring the video back to track number one, as well as the audio. I'm going to move my clip all the way to the left side to have it started from zero seconds. Now let's open up a second clip. I'm going to head back to my project panel right here, and I'm just going to open up clip number 8, which is a follow-up of clip number 7. There we go. Again, I'm going to scrub through this clip at a certain point where she's going to start right here somewhere, and I'm going to set an endpoint. I can either do that with this button over here or press the I on my keyboard. There we go. I'm going to play this clip right now until a certain point, where she writes out the frame, and it's at that point where I want to set my output. There we go. I press the O key on my keyboard. Now again, what can I do? I can drag this whole frame here inside my timeline, but I can also use the Insert key. Now, I'm going to do something here. I'm going to move my play head in my timeline in the middle of this clip. Now, when I'm going to say insert, the clip will be inserted at the point where my play head is positioned. Now because this play head is currently in the middle of my existing clip, clip number 7, it will actually break this clip into two pieces to make room for the other clip because that is what an Insert means. You can also see it at the icon a little bit. Let's press on that button. There we go. As you can see now, my first clip here has been cut into two pieces, so it will stop somewhere around here, then it will cut to that next chart over here, which will play the whole clip. After that we can see the second part of the clip number 7, which was cut into half. You can also visually see it in the thumb nails of the clips. Now, let's say that this was a mistake, then you can also undo your actions. One way of doing that is by going up here, say edit and undo, or the most common way of doing it is just by pressing the Command Z for the Mac users already Control Z for the Windows users. Let me just do that. I'm on a Mac, so I'm just going to say Command Z, and my action has been undone. Now let's take a look at this second button right here. The second button says overwrite. We can use that action as well with the dot key on our keyboard. Though, as the name says, it will just overwrite. It won't pay attention to anything you have in your timeline, it will just start adding the clip in your timeline from where the play head is positioned and from there, it will just overwrite anything in its path. Let's do that. I'm going to press on the overwrite button, there we go. Now, we have cut off a piece from clip number 7 because clip number 8 came in place there. Now let's undo this action because this was something we didn't want to. I'm again going to press the Command Z key. We also have other tracks, as I've mentioned before. We've got video track number 2 right here, and we've got audio number 2 over there. Now by default, these clips were added in video track number 1. The reason for that is because the output was set to this track. The output can be found right here on the left side, you can see it right here, V1 and A1, which stands for video and audio. This is the input of the track. Now what we can do is, we can move this input to a different one. For example, to video track number 2. Let me just do that. I'm going to drag this all the way up here. There we go. As well as for the audio, just drag it to audio track number 2. Right now, the default input is now set to video track two and audio track two. When I'm now going to press the overwrite button, you will see that it will beautifully be added to that track, and it will no longer touch the other clip since nothing comes in it's path. Let's do that. Press overwrite and there we go. Clip number 8 has now been added to that second track. Since it's not passing anything from track number 1, we won't delete anything from it. That is how the timeline works. Now, we can find several more important buttons within this timeline. I'm not going to cover all of them, but I will show you some of the more important ones. Like for example, this one over here, the Snap button. Now this is a function where you are going to move your clips around in your timeline, and they will snap to each other. Sometimes that's very useful, so that you won't cut off a piece from a clip that you don't want to, or where you're not going to leave a gap between them. Let me show how it works. I'm going to select this clip right here, clip number eight. I'm going to move it to the right side, there we go. It's now and go to bring it back to track number one. Right now, when I'm going to move this clip, you will see that it will snap to the other clip, snap, their we go and you can also see that. Now at this point, I don't have any gap between these two clips, and I didn't cut anything off from that clip. Now, when I'm going to unselect this function, snap, there we go. Now you can see that it's not selected. When I'm going to move clip number 8 and around now, it's not being snapped to that clip anymore, so I'm not really sure if there is a blank gap between it or not. At this point there is, as you can see over here in my program monitor, but also when I'm going to move it's too far, you can see that I can overlap it to the other clip. If I'm now going to let go, it will actually just cut off a piece from clip number 7 again to make room for clip number 8, which I was moving around. That is what this snap function is doing. I'm going to set it back to on, and I'm going to move my clip number eight back to track number 2. Because we can find some more interesting buttons on the left side over here. Now, each track can be steered with some functions. If you are going to open up these tracks even more, you can see that we can find more functions or more buttons within these tracks. Now, some some these will be for lecture in this course. The only thing I want to focus on now is the I icon right here and this lock icon over here. Therefore, I'm just going to drag it smaller again, so that we don't see too much information like this. Now first of all, the I icon, and that will actually just enable or disable that track. Currently on this track, clip number 8 is active. What I'm going to press on this eye icon, you will see that this track is no longer enabled. That's why I can no longer see anything anymore from that track which holds clip number 8. But I do see clip number 7 because clip number 7 is on track number 1, which is enabled, as you can see over here. Now, you can always enable or disable this anytime by pressing on that icon. Then last is that Lock Icon right here. Now currently, we can just move the clips around as you can see. But when I'm going to lock this track by pressing on that lock, you can see now also visually, and when I'm going to select this clip, I can no longer drag it around because this track has been locked. Also a very handy feature for if you don't want to mess up your edits in a particular track, of course. That was basically how the timeline works. You have seen now that we can move clips around, how we can insert our clips, a good workflow of working with that in and out points, and some functions from the timeline panel. In the next video lesson, we are even going to take a deeper look inside the timeline because we are going to use some of the tools right here from the toolbox to manipulate our clips inside to the timeline. By using these, you will also understand how the in and the outpoint works better. I'll see you all in lesson number 8, and thanks a lot for watching. 9. The toolbox: Jordy here for cinecom.net and welcome again to my course. In this video lesson, I'm going to teach you how the tool box works right here inside Premier Pro. For that we first have to add some clips to the timeline. I'm going to open up my clips folder again from my projects panel and I'm just going to double click on any of these. Let's start with clip number 2, double click and it's opened up in the source monitor right here. From here again, I'm going to set an in and an out-point. Some are right here, right before the action. Set an in-point with the I key on your keyboard. Scraps and further on the end of the action and set an end point or an out-point. We have seen that we can add this clip to the timeline by using one of these two buttons or by just dragging this whole picture right here into the timeline. But there's a different way because for example, I don't want the sound of this clip. What I can then do is also drag only the video from this clip and we can do that with this little icon right here and you can see the tool tip coming up there, drag video only. That means we can actually just drag this icon, the video track only to the timeline. There we go and now you can see that only that piece has been added to the timeline. We can do the exact same thing as well with the audio. This right here is a little wave form icon which says drag audio only and so we can do that. Just drag that icon to your timeline. Now, we've got the video and the audio separate. Let's say that you would like to view the audio from this clip. Currently, we can only see the video and hear the audio. But if you would also like to see the audio, you just have to click on this icon. Don't drag only click and now you can see the waveform of that audio from this clip right here. If you want to go back to that video view, just click on the video icon. I'm going to go back to my timeline here and just select everything that I have and I'm going to press on the Delete key so that it is gone, because I would like to have the video and the audio. I'm just going to press the Insert key from here. Let's take a closer look at the toolbox right here inside Premier Pro. The first thing we usually want to do is zoom a little bit in more on the timeline and we've seen in the previous lesson that we can do that with this scroll bar right here from one of the outsides. But there is a different way of doing it and that is by using the zoom tool from the toolbox right here. To select that tool, just click on it and that will change your cursor, as you can see, to a magnifying glass with a plus sign inside. I'm just going to click inside my timeline now, we will zoom in, as you can see. If you would like to zoom out, we have to hold down the Alt key and by doing that, I'm holding down my Alt key. You can see visually that my cursor has changed from a plus to a minus sign inside this magnifying glass and when I'm going to click now, you can see that we are zooming out. But let's zoom back in. I would like to get my normal arrow again, so that I can select this clip. For that we just select the arrow tool or the selection tool from my toolbox. Click on it and we've got arrow tool again where we can select clips with. Premier Pro is all about cutting and slicing clips and one way of doing that, is just by taking the razor blade tool from the toolbox and that one can be found right here. All of these tools also have a short key on our keyboard and you can find those short keys by just hoovering over these tools and next to it you will see here, the laser tool on the right you can see that C key on our keyboard. Let's do that now, I'm just going to press C key and you can also see that's appearing in our cursor. There's a red line through our cursor and that means we cannot use this tool on an empty space in track number 2. We have to hoover our clip and as you can see now, the tool has gone active. When I'm going to click on a certain point now, you will see that we will actually just cut this clip in half, there we go. When I'm going to grab my selection tool now again, I can move these two clips separately around. I have cut them into two pieces with razor blade tool. Maybe we were cutting out that last piece because we didn't need it. What we can then do is select it and press the Delete key on our keyboard. But a different way of cutting of a peace was by just selecting the outsides. You can see that my cursor is changing also right now to a red arrow. When I'm going to click now, you will see that the outside has been selected and once this is selected, we can actually just drag it bigger or we can drag it smaller. That will do the exact same thing. We are just cutting off a piece from that clip or we are bringing something back that we have cut off before. In reality, what we are actually doing is just moving our out points from the source monitor right here to a different position. You have to understand that we are never cutting out a piece from a clip to just throw it away. Though, every time we are using any of these tools or working from here or inside the timeline, we are always creating in and out points. Let's continue on moving those in and out points. We have seen that we can take the in or out point with our cursor like this and move that to the right side, to move that endpoint. But this leaves us with a gap between these two clips. When I'm going to press Command Z or Control Z to undo my action, what I can do is actually take the ripple edit tool from here, and I'm going to hoover my clips. In my cursor, you will see that this arrow is not red anymore but yellow. When I'm going to select the endpoints from this clip and drag that one smaller, it will actually also delete the gap between it as you've just seen. Let me just do that again and take a closer look to what happens to this clip. I'm making smaller and it's closing that gap. Let's take the selection tool again because what I'm going to do now is, I'm going to add some more clips to the timeline. I'm going to select the second clip that we have here and delete that so that we don't have duplicated clips within the timeline. Intellect select some more clips. We were working on clip number 2, so let's now just head further with clip number 3 right here. Just a little bit further where the action is going to happen and that is somewhere right here, set an endpoint a little bit further where she is moving and set an outpoint and insert this into the timeline. Let's drag it now, there we go. Also to track number 2, I'm going to head now to clip number 4 and from here also just select an in and outpoints. Let's drag this one now to track number 2 above clip number 3, somewhere right here. Since clip number 4 is on top of clip number 3 and you have to see this as two papers, we can only see the paper whose laying on top or just like here, we can only see the clip whose on top. Whenever I'm going to play this inside my timeline, you will see that clip number 3 will get interfered with clip number four because that one is actually on top. Let's take a look, there we go. We are now seeing clip number 4, while clip number 3 is actually still active but I think that is pretty clear. Let's take a further look inside our toolbox. What we can find, are these two tools the track selection tools and when I've got one of these selected, you can now see that we've got two arrows. That means that at a certain point where I am inside my timeline, I will select anything from that point. When I've got my cursor right here after clip number 2 and I'm going to click. I've got everything selected in my timeline from all the tracks from that point. When I'm going to stand over here, I'm also going to select clip number 2 with it. There we go, as you can see. Now, let's say that you only want to select the clips from one track. What you will then have to do, is hold down your Shift key and once you have hold down your Shift key, you now see that we only have one arrow going to the right side. When I'm now going to click right here, you see that I only have selected all the clips in this track. When I'm going to move a little bit backwards and start from clip number 2, you will see that I have now selected also that clip with everything inside that track. We can also do that on track number 2 and so on. That that is the only thing that this tool does, it helps us by selecting clips. The other tool here in a toolbox works exactly the same but then to the left side. Let me just select that for a moment, there we go. You can see the arrow is going to the other side and it works just exactly the same as you can see. For the next tool, I'm going to delete everything in my timeline and to be sure that I have everything selected, I'm going to take my selection tool that track selection tool and start from the beginning. I'm going to click and I'm going to press Delete on my keyboard and now I'm sure that I've got everything deleted in here. I'm going to take my selection tool again and move my cursor to the beginning. What I'm going to do is I'm going to take a clip where there is some faster action into it and if I'm right, clip number 6 should hold that. Yes, indeed. So right here you can see this girl biking through the camera frame. I'm going to start from this point and I'm going to press the I key to set an endpoint and O key right here, where she's just leaving the frame. I'm going to press the comma key from my keyboard to insert that into the timeline. There we go. When I'm going to play this clip, you will see it running at a normal speed, but it's going pretty fast. Now to set this to a slow motion. We've got a very nice tool for that. We've got the rate stretch tool right here inside of the timeline. The short key for that is the R key on our keyboard. Once I've got that one selected, I can now just start from one of the outsides and just drag that clip longer, as you can see. In this case, I am not moving the out point, I'm actually making this clip longer in duration, so that means it will go in slow motion. Let us play it right now. Look at that. Beautiful slow motion. You can also see that indicating right here inside the clip, 41 percentage. That's the actual speed now of that clip. Of course, if I'm going to drag this clip smaller as its original, it will now fast forward. Let me do that again. Look at how fast she is. Amazing. Enough with the rate stretch. Let us delete that clip, and now let's select a new one. We haven't seen clip 9 yet, I think. Let's set the end point from here, where she is coming in into the frame and an out point somewhere right there. Also again, drag that into the timeline. There we go. Now the next tool that I want to show you is the slip tool right here. Now we all know that we have set an endpoint and out point. Let's take a look at that. In the beginning, we can see her just coming in into the frame. On the out point, we can see her somewhere here near the sign. Now when I'm going to use this slip tool, as you can see, I'm actually going to move the in and the out point. The clip's position and the length of the clip will always stay intact. But when I'm going to move this, now I'm going to select a clip on here, and I'm going to just scrub to the right side or to the left side. Let us do that. I'm going to start right here and drag to the right side, and now you will see two clips up in my program monitor. The left clip indicates the beginning position or the endpoint, and the right clip indicates the out point. So that means first we were starting somewhere in this position. But let's say that I want her out of the frame to start. So somewhere right here. Now that means also the out point will change because we are not changing the actual duration of this clip. I'm just go to let go now. When I'm going to go back to the beginning of this clip, you will now see that you will start out the frame, and she will come in. Since she has started a little bit earlier in this shot, the clip will also end a little bit earlier now, because again, we're not changing the duration here. We are only changing the in and out point. Let's take a look at a better visual presentation. This is our clip and we have set an in and an out point. So the actual clip that we see in the timeline is only the purple highlighted piece. The other information around it is still there, but it's not part of the clip inside the timeline. Since that information is still there, we can make it appear anytime. With a slip tool, we can move this selection. So as you can see, the clip length stays. But now in this case, the clip will start and end earlier. Now for the next tool, I am going to take my arrow tool again and I'm going to delete everything I have in my timeline again. From my project panel, I'm now going to add some more clips to it. I'm going to drag number 2 into the timeline. There we go. I'm going to select clip number 3. There we go, and finally I'm going to select clip number 4. Also here, there we go, and I want to zoom out a little bit more in my timeline, so that we can see all the three clips in here. So clip 2, 3 and 4. Now with the slide tool over here, when I've got that one selected, I can again move one of these clips around. The best visual representation is, if I'm going to use the middle clip over here. Now when I'm going to move this clip, either to the right or to the left side, you will see that the connection between these clips will always stay. Let's do that. I'm going to take clip number 3 and move it to the right side, and now I'm going to let go. As you can see, clip number 4 is now a little bit shorter, and that's because I was overwriting it with clip number 3, and clip number 2 has now gone a little bit longer in duration because we had to fill up this gap. Now the only thing again, what we're doing is clip number 3 will always stay intact. Nothing will change with it. We're just moving that clip around. But clip number 2, its out position or its out point is changing because it was attached to this clip. The endpoint from clip number 4 was also changing because it was snapped to clip number 3. Let me do that again. I'm going to move clip number 3 even further, like this. What's this? Suddenly I cannot move my clip any further than that. How does that come? Let me just let go here. At a certain point, and you will also see that with this little triangle over here, we are on the very end of the clip. When we are on the end of the clip, we cannot move our out points any further of course. Now later in this course when we are going to work with transitions, we are going to bump into this problem again, and you will see how we can fix that. Now it's not such a big problem. We just have to know that we cannot move this clip any further. That it ends right here, and that's it for the slide tool. Now we've got one last tool and that is the rolling edit. For that, I'm going to take my selection tool first and I'm going to delete the first clip from my timeline. I'm going to select these two clips and move them to the beginning. So that we only have two clips in the timeline now. Now let's take that rolling edit tool and we can find that one right here, rolling edits. The short key for that one is the N key on our keyboard. Once I've got that one selected, I can now make a selection between two clips. We have seen that we can actually drag clips longer and smaller by just selecting the outside. But what we are doing right now with the rolling edit tool is select two points at the same time. So that means I've got the outpoints selected from clip number 3 and I've got the endpoint selected from clip number 4. So when I'm going to drag this to the right side now, I'm making clip number 4 shorter and I'm making clip number 3 longer. Again, the only thing that is happening here is changing the in and the out points. It's that simple, and that's it for the toolbox within Premier Pro. We've got two last tools in here, as you can see. One of them is very easy to explain, just the hand tool. Once you've got that one selected, you can just scrub to the left or to the right side. But since it's sometimes easier to just take the scroll bar down below here, I just suggest you use that one. So basically we are left with one last tool and that's the pen tool. But that one is for later in this course when we are going to do some audio mixing. Now I've got one last advice for you, and that is to practice a lot on these tools. In the beginning, you will see that editing will go very slow because you're having much trouble with these tools. But you will notice that after a while, once you get the hang of these tools, editing will actually go much faster, definitely for when you know all the short keys to those tools. So watch this lesson a couple of times to understand how each of these tools actually work and just practice a lot with them. In the next video lesson, it's going to be much fun because we are going to take a look at the video effects within Premier Pro. So stay tuned for that and thanks a lot for watching. 10. Video effects: Hey, folks, Jordy here for cinecom.net and welcome again to my course. In this video lesson I'm going to teach you how to work with effects on your clips, and that has barely one of the most exciting things within Premiere. Now, effects can be manipulated inside the Effect Controls, which we can find right here, Effect Controls. Now, this window here will tell us that we don't have any clip selected, as you can see right here, so what we have to do is select any clip from the timeline and right here you can see that I have clip number 8 inside the timeline. Just click once on it to select it and that will bring up several properties or parameters within the Effect Controls. These are default values. Now, for a video clip inside the timeline, we have a video track and an audio track which we have seen previously in this course and that's also the reason why we have two categories in here. We've got Video Effects and we've got Audio Effects. Now, if you are going to drag in a photo inside the timeline, let's just do that right here. We've got photos. Let's add this pigeon to the timeline, there we go. When I'm going to select the pigeon now, you will only see video effects and that's pretty obvious because we don't have any audio track below that. I'm just going to delete that photo again and select my clip number 8. Now, here inside the Effect Controls, we've got three options here for the video effects. The first one is the motion category and we can open that up by pressing on this little arrow right here, which we'll show you all the parameters inside the motion property. For example, we have the parameter position, and the position has this value right here. That means when I am going to change this value by just clicking on it and typing in a different value, for example, 500 and press the Return key on your keyboard. You will now see that my clip has changed position and that's because I have also changed the value of the position. Now, an easier way to change this value is just by standing on that value and as you can see, my cursor also changed to two arrows and that means I can either go to the left or to the right side by just clicking and dragging and yeah, you can see I'm changing this value, but at the same time, I can also visually see better what I'm doing with the position. This implies for the horizontal position and the other value will take care of the vertical position, and that's basically it to changing these parameters. We also got scale which we can change. We also got the rotation which we can change, and so on. Now, let's say that we are changing something here and that we would like to reset it back to its default value. Now, we could reset each parameter individual by clicking on this "Reset" button on the right side of each parameter, click on it, and now your rotation has been reset it to its default value. But we can also reset the whole group of motion by clicking on the "Reset" button of the motion and that will now resets the position and the scale at once, or just everything within. Now, if we take a look at the motion property, you can see some sort of an icon on the left side of that and that actually indicates that we can change some of these values within, visually inside the program monitor. Now, for the opacity, we don't have that option, so let's take a look at what that actually does. Now, to activate that, the only thing you have to do is just select the category by just clicking once on it on the motion and right away, you can see some guidelines inside the program monitor. These are guidelines that we all know if you have ever worked with a photo inside Microsoft Word or any other application, you know that we can use these guidelines to change the scale of that clip. We can change the position by just dragging it around and if we are going to stand on the outside, you will see that my cursor now changed to a rotation tool and now we can also rotate that clip and that's one way to visually change these values in here. Let me reset that again by clicking on this button and I'm going to collapse the motion. Because I would like to show you the effects library where we can find more effects and actually effects that do something more than just changing the scale and position and those things can all be found within the Effects library. Down below here, the Effects window. Now, right in here we can find several folders. We've got the Presets, which I'll come back later on in this lesson, we've got Audio Effects, Audio Transitions, Video Effects, Video Transitions, and finally, the Lumetri Looks. Now, the Lumetri Looks are actually effects that are coming from Adobe SpeedGrade, which is an application to make color corrections or color gradings on your video edits. Now, these effects are pretty limited, but I will come back onto it later in this lesson. For now, let's open up the Video Effects folder and once I've got that opened, you can find several categories in here. We can find an Adjust folder, Blur & Sharpen, Channel, Color Corrections, and so on. Let's open up one of these categories, for example, the blur and sharpen. Now, from here we can find the actual effects and let's take, for example, the fast blur effects. The one way to add this to your clip is just by dragging this effects right here from the library to your clip, or you can also just instantly drag it to your Effects Controls. Let's for now just drag that to your clip itself. There we go. Now, you can see that this effect has been added to the Effect Controls. Now, we don't have that icon right here, which you can see the motion in front of the Fast Blur so that means we have to change the values inside here. We can do that visually in the program monitor. Now, again, these things work exactly the same. We've got a parameter, for example, the blurriness, and we can change that value. Now, let's just change that, for example, to somewhere around 40, right here, and right away you can see that parameter take effect. Now, let's add a second effect to that clip and I already know the name of that effects, which is going to be the Roughen Edges. For that, I can just make use of the search engine of the effects library. Just click on it and type in Roughen and already when I typed in Rough, you can see Roughen Edges popping up right in here, and just drag that to your clip like that, and right away you can see the effect being applied right here, at least a thin edge around our clip and if I'm going to scroll down, insights may affect controls, you can see some more parameters popping up in here. Now, we'd say just play around with these and see what they do. For now, I'm just going to increase the border so that you can see the effect a little bit better. Now, with the Roughen Edges, we can again see now that we have that icon next to it, and that means when we are going to select the Roughen Edges, we can also visually change something in the program monitor and you can also see this asset here popping up. Now this will only work with the offset's parameter inside the Roughen Edges. That's the only thing I can visually change in here. If my computer now is going to be a little bit more faster, you can see it work more in real-time, but that is also a problem. My Mac is having a lot of trouble to render these two effects, the Fast Blur and the Roughen Edges in real time. I'm going to place my play hat in the beginning somehow, and I'm going to play this clip and you can see that it will have much trouble to actually play it. It's already hanging right there. Now, one reason here is because I have set my program monitor, the viewer, to full. That is the playback resolution right here. We can lower that too, for example, a one-fourth. Now, the renderer will only render one of the resolution of the clip, which will make the playback to go much faster. When I'm going to play this clip now again, you will see that I will be able to play the clip more smoothly. Now, if you are still having much trouble with this, you can also pre-render your clip, and that means that Premier Pro is going to save this clip to your hard drive and play it from there so that your computer doesn't have to real-time render these effects anymore. You can also see that with this red line above my clip that I have added effects to it, and that Premier is going to have trouble playing this back in real time. Now, very easy to render this clip, just press the return key on your keyboard, and that will open up this box right here and right away, you will see that Premier is actually writing or saving this clips to your hard drive. Once it is done, take a look at this red line right here, it'll then turn into a green line, which indicates that that clip has been rendered, and now it will smoothly play back. All right, folks. Now, when it comes down to the order of the effects right in here, it's very important to know how this actually works. The first thing that we're doing here is adding a fast blur onto the clip, and the next thing that we're doing is adding a roughen edges on top of the fast blur on top of the clip. Now, when I'm going to change the order of these two effects, and I'm just going to collapse these two effects so that you can see it a little bit better, I'm going to drag the roughen edges now above first blur and look inside the program monitor what is going to happen. What we are doing now is we're adding a roughen edges effect to our clip. On top of that, we're adding a fast blur on the roughen edges on the clip. That means we're also doing a blurriness on the roughen edges effect, as you can see. Sometimes you're trying to create something by mixing different effects, but you have trouble to actually accomplish what you're trying to look for. Then try to change the order of the effects because sometimes that will drastically change things. Now, let's say that we have created something awesome here. The roughen edges, the fast blur, this just looks amazing in here. Now, what we can do is save these two effects for later use. We are going to select the effects that we would like to save. I'm going to select Roughen Edges and hold down your control key for the Windows users, or the commands key for the Mac users to select multiple effects. I've got these two selected now, right-click and say, Save Preset, that will open up a dialogue box. From here, I'm going to give it a name, let's say, Jordy's Preset. There we go, and now just press "OK". Now, where can we locate this preset? Well, inside the Presets' folder. But first, remove the search keywords by clicking on this x right here. Now we can open up the Presets folder and from here, we can find Jordy's Preset. Let's add a second clip to the timeline, I'm going to open up my Project Bike right here, open up the Clips and from here, let's just say clip number 2. I'm going to drag that instantly to my timeline. If I have this selected now, I'm going to head over to the Effects controls and drag my preset onto it just like any other effect. Right away with the values that I have chosen in the parameters, you can see that these two effects, which I have saved in that preset is now applied onto that clip as well. Now, I'm going to delete these two effects to show you something else. I'm going to head back to my Effect controls and I'm going to collapse the Presets folder because I want to show you the Lumetri Looks. If I'm going to open up that, you will find again several folders in here. For example, the Cinematic folder. Now the Lumetri Looks gives you an option to visually see what the effect will look like somehow on the right side here. Now, we can use these looks just as any other effect inside the library here. Let's take any of these, for example, right here, the Day4Night, I'm going to drag that onto that clip, and now it looks as this was shot during the night. But as you can see in my Effect controls, I don't have any parameters which I can change. For that, we actually have to go to Adobe SpeedGrade to change these parameters. Now, that is for a different course. But remember that you are able to use these looks as a preset. They can definitely be useful to your film projects. Remember, just play around with these effects, drag some of them to your clips, change some parameters, and just see what they do. Eventually after some time, you will find out how they actually work. You will remember several effects like your roughen edges, you will know that that effect exists and you know how your parameters work, and so you are able to create nice looking things within Premier. But folks, keep this always in mind, Premier Pro is an editor, it's very strong in cutting your clips, organizing them in your timeline, but if you want to do visual effects, we need to work in Adobe After Effects. Don't expect too much from Premier when you are going to work with these effects. We are able to mix several effects to accomplish something, but we will always be limited in Premier for that. Also for the audio effects, they just work exactly the same. You can find several things in here to drag them to your clip, change some parameters and just take a listen to what they do. In the next video lesson, I'm going to teach you how to work with transitions. We'll take a look at the audio and the video transition straight in here. Thanks a lot for watching. 11. Working with transitions: Hey, what's up, everyone? Jordy here, your instructor for Cinecom.net, and welcome again to my course. In this video lesson, we are going to take a look at transitions. That means video transitions, but also audio transitions. Now, inside my timeline, you can see that I have two clips. This right here is the first clip, and this over here is the second clip. Between these two clips, we can make a transition. Now, from the previous lesson, we have seen that we can find the transitions inside the Effects window. From here, you can see we've got the video transitions and the audio transitions, but let's start with the video transitions. I'm going to open up that folder, and just like the Video Effects, we can again find more folders in here, which defines a category. For example, we've got 3D Motion transitions, we've got Dissolve transitions, Iris transitions, Page Peel, etc., but let's start with the first one here, a 3D Motion transition. I'm just going to take the Cube Spin for now. Just like Video Effects, you can just drag this transition over to your timeline, but this time not onto your clip, but between two clips like so. As you can see, we've got a selection of where the transition is going to be, just let go and the transition has been applied. Let's play this right now. You can now see that we have a beautiful transition. Now, if this transition might have gone too fast for you, then we can also take the outside of that transition. As you can see, my mouse pointer has changed into a different icon, and that indicates that I can now drag this transition longer, and when I'm now going to play it, the transition will go much slower. Also, the same thing, of course, if you wanted to go much faster. Now, this transition also has some options. We can find those options by making sure that we have the transition selected, and then we can head over to the "Effects Controls". From here, you can see that we have some parameters which we can change. Now, one of the first parameters here is the duration. You can change that either here or also on the timeline itself, of course, as you've seen previously. Then the next option that we have here is to align the transition. If I'm going to open up that drop-down menu, you can see that we can either choose between the Center, the Start, and the End at Cut. Currently, it's somehow in the center, so that means the transition is taking up as much space from clip number 3 as well as clip number 4, because it's somehow in the middle right here. It's not exactly and that's the reason why it's somewhat Custom Start, but when I'm going to select Center at Cut, it's now more centered. Now, basically, a transition is extending the out point and the in point of your clips inside the timeline. You can also see that because when I'm going to set my time indicator right here, which is standing on the transition, but we are already beyond clip number 3, but we can still see clip number 3 right here, as you can see inside the transition. If you are cutting a clip right here, because maybe someone is walking into the frame or something, keep in mind that if you are going to add a transition on top of it, that you could see that person coming in into your video, because we are extending the out point here. The same thing goes for clip number 4, when I'm going to place my time ruler right here. We can find that we can already see clip number 4 appearing right here while we are actually not there yet. So that is what a transition is doing. From here, if we are going to select a different alignment, for example, Start at Cut, you can now also visually see in your timeline that only clip number 3 is being extended to this point somewhere. If I place my time ruler back here before clip number 4, we don't see clip number 4 yet. It only starts right here and ends there. Now, you can also just grab that transition and put it in some sort of a transition where we wanted to. We can find some more options inside the Effect Controls of these transition, but most of them are pretty obvious. For example, the Reverse mode. Well, that actually means that the transition will now go from the right to the left instead of from the left to the right as we had previously. Now, this is all great. We can create these nice-looking transitions, but this is maybe something that we are using a lot. If we have to go to the Effects Controls each time, look for our transition, and drag that to the timeline, it's just too much of a time-consuming. What we can do is set one of these as default, and from there, we can actually link a key binding to it. Let's try that out. I'm going to delete the transition from here in my timeline, just select it and press your "Delete" key on your keyboard. Now, let's select a different kind of transition. For example, the Page Peel. Let's say that we would like to set the Page Peel as the default transition. What we then have to do is just right-click in here and say, "Set selected as default transition." Now, you can see that actually that little arrow which we see at the page turn right here has disappeared, which actually just indicates now that this is the default transition. But now, how can we use this transition with a key binding in the timeline? Well, the only thing that you have to do is select a point between two clips in red, like so. Now, you only have to press the "Command D" for the Mac users and the "Control D" for the Windows users. By doing that, as you now can see, the Page Peel has been set as the transition. When I'm going to play this right now, you can now see a Page Peel transition. Folks, that is how we can create transitions and change some settings of it, and also how to set one of them as default so that we can bind them to a short key for later use. Now, let's take a look at the audio transitions, because that is something that we definitely need in this example. Let's take a listen to the audio. In one shot, we don't hear that airplane, but in the second shot, we do. Now, because there isn't any transition between them, it's a very harsh cut. Let's take a listen to it again. Suddenly, that airplane comes in, it doesn't feel natural. What we have to do here is set a transition which goes smoothly from one audio track to the other. For that, I'm going to close down the video transitions in my Effects window, and open up the audio transitions. Here we can find only one folder, the Crossfade folder. When I'm going to open up that one, we can find three translations in here. Let's just pick one. I'm going to take the Constant fade, for example, and drag that, not between two video clips, but between two audio clips, of course. Just let go here, and when I'm going to play this shot right now, you will hear that we have a more smoothly transition between the two shots, which is going to feel way more natural. There we go. Now, the viewer doesn't feel that hatch gut anymore, and that my dear friends is how the transitions work within Premier Pro. In the next video lesson, we are going to design some texts or titles, and that is going to be very awesome. Definitely, stay tuned for that. Thanks lots for watching. 12. Design a title or text: Jordy here for Cinecom.net and welcome again to my course. In this video lesson, we are going to design some text or some titles within Premiere. Now to create a title, that is actually a generated item from Premiere, and we have seen that previously in this course that we can create such items inside our project panel with the new item button down below, right here. If we click on that, a new menu will appear. From there we can choose Title. Click on it. That will open up a box where we have to choose a name for that title, because the title will actually be a file. Give it a name. For example, Awesome Title and press "Okay", and that will open up the title designer within Premiere. Now, you can see in the project panel down below here that a new item has been added and that is the Awesome Title file. Now from the icon right here, I know that this is actually a still image, so that means we can just drag this item later on inside our timeline. But for now, let's take a look at the title designer. The first thing that you will notice is that we can actually see the image in here from the timeline. That means that the background of the title designer is linked to the timeline. If I will scrub through my timeline here, you will also see that the video will change in the title designer itself. Now, if you want this to be a black background, then just move your indicator here in your timeline to an empty space. The background will turn black or you can also choose if you are standing on your image here on a certain clip inside the timeline to actually hide that. You can do that with this button right here to show the background video or to not show the background video. But for now, I do going to enable that because it is a helpful feature, so that we can see where to position our titles. How can we create a title on here? Well, very easy. With the toolbox on the left side right here we have a tool, the Type Tool, which we can click on to activate, then just click inside the Canvas here. Now, let's select the arrow again from the toolbox, so that we can actually drag this text around and maybe make it larger, like so. We can also rotate it from the sides. These are all things that we have seen and which we are also used to, from working with such things in Microsoft Word or any other application. Now, once we have created this text, on the right side we can find all the properties for that text, so that is the font-family. From here we can choose something else, for example, this Farah text font right here. You can also change things like the font size, or we can also just drag it bigger from the Canvas itself, that is up to you. We can change the aspect. We can change the leading, kerning, tracking, and so on. We can also change the color, because white on a very bright background isn't that readable. I'm just going to change this color to something reddish, there we go. We can also add strokes around it, you can choose an inner stroke or an outer stroke. Let's add an outer stroke, there we go. Now we've got a black stroke around the text. We can also change that color to something greenish maybe. We can also add shadows from here, a shadow onto that text, there we go. Change maybe the size little bit, the spread, and so on. Now these are all tools in here on the right side, which are pretty obvious. My suggestion here is to just play around with these things. These are all things that we see in any other application where we can change the style of any text. Let's say that you are having trouble to create some kind of a text that suits you the best, then you can also make use of the presets and you can find them down below here. These are all presets, or actually pre-styles that were created by Premiere itself. The only thing you have to do is choose one and just click on it. But of course, make sure that you have your text selected, and that will transform it into such a style. Let's just select several of them, so that you can see what they actually do. Now, from the toolbox right here, you can see that we have some more options. You also have the option to create a vertical text. You can also drag in text area or a vertical text area. These are pretty obvious, but there are some things here which might not be that obvious and do pretty cool things like these Pen tools over here. Let me just grab one of these Pen tools. When I've got it selected, I can actually just click once to create a new point, click somewhere else, and hold my mouse button down so that I can drag this out, and by that I can actually create a path or draw lines within the text editor. For those of you who have already worked with Photoshop, they might know the Pen tool and how we can actually create such paths. Just click and drag to define how your line should look. Now the style of this line is currently the same as the texts, but here, again, exactly the same. Take back your selection tool and select any of the presets dials down below here, with your line selected of course. Or you can also change it customly on the right side, with the title properties panel. Now what else can you find in here? We can also create shapes like a rectangle. Click on it and drag the rectangle that you would like to see or we can also create rounded corner rectangles, we can also create circles, wedges, or just normal lines. Now, let's say that we have created this text right here, Awesome Text, and I would like to align this perfectly in the middle. Let me just make that a little bit smaller, like so. Now, in order to align this exactly in the middle, I could somehow try to aim it, but it won't always be exactly in the middle. But for that we have some new buttons. Let me just place that back somewhere out of the center. Down below here, we can find those two buttons. You've got one button to align it vertically in the center, click on it, and now it's perfectly in a meter vertical. The second button will center it horizontal. By clicking on these two buttons, we are now sure that the Awesome Text is exactly in the center of our Canvas. Now, while designing a text inside it's [inaudible] you might bump into things where you want to position this text, which we have created first above the rectangle, which we have created later on. Now what you can then do is either select the text already rectangle and just right-click on it. Now, I've got the rectangle selected. From here we can say arrange and we can say bring to the front, which will make sure that your rectangle will go all the way to the front and you just have to see this as a stack of papers. For the people that work in Photoshop, they know how Layer Mask work and this case is exactly the same, or we can also send it to the back, or we can also send it all the way to the back, or just one position backwards, though in this case, when I'm going to say, Send all the way to the back." You will then see that the rectangle will go behind the text. That is how you can arrange all the elements inside the title designer. We can also select multiple elements and drag them to a different position. With all of them selected, you can also rotate them both at the same time. Now, let's see what else we can do in here. What I'm going to right-click on an empty space in this canvas, I can say Graphic, Insert Graphic and from here, we can actually browse on our computer to a certain photo. Right here I've got Jordy.png and what I'm going to select this photo and say Open, it will actually be imported inside the Titler of Adobe Premiere. It's again here, this here was a transparent photo and it's taking the style that I had selected. Also here on photos, we're able to select a certain style. Let me just select several of them so that you can see what they actually do. Again, the same thing. We can also apply a custom style on it if you work here on the right side. That my dear friends is how the Titler works within Adobe Premiere. Once you are finished with your title, the only thing that you have to do is just close this window. No worries, all these things are being saved in real-time. Right here, in the Project panel, I've got my title. As any other clip inside my project panel, I can now just drag it over to my timeline, either on top of my video clip, as you can see now, or also I can drag it next to that clip. But now you have to keep in mind that the background is of course, going to be black because we don't have any other video track below it. Now, if you would like to change something of this title, the only thing that you have to do is double-click either on the clip right here inside your timeline or on the title file in your project panel. Let's just do that, double-click on it and try it here, now, you can make the adjustments the way that you would like to. Now, let's assume that this creation here is so awesome and you would like to save this for later use. You can then save this as a template and that is very easy by just clicking on this button right here, that will open up the templates. Then to save this as a template, you have to go to this button on the right side here, this menu, click on it and say, Import Current Title as Template. That will open up this window to give this template the name and let's name this, Awesome Template. Press "OK" and it's now added to the user templates. Press "OK" and when I'm now going to delete everything in here in my title designer, I can now recall this template by going back to the Templates window, select a template that you have saved and press "OK". And there we go. The saved template has appeared back. Now, let's close this Titler again. What I'm going to do is I'm going to drag this awesome title above my clip and make it a little bit shorter so that it fits the clip that I have down below. Now let's say that this is a movie edits and on the end of that movie, I would like to have these rolling credits of everyone who worked with me to make my film. Let's create a new title. I'm going to go back to the new item button down below here and say Title, and I'm going to name this, Ending Credits and then just press "OK". Now from here, we actually have to say to Premiere that this is going to be a rolling texts and for that, we have to go up here to this button to the role role crawl options. Click on it and we're going to say that this title type is not going to be a still image as we had created first, but it's going to be a rolling title. We'll go on to say that it has to Start Off the Screen and that it has to End Off the Screen so that the text will roll in from below and roll off the screen above here. Press "OK" and now let's take a look at that title clip inside the project panel. You can now see that the icon has changed to a movie file, so we no longer have a still image now. That means the text that we'll input in here will actually be a little movie file. Let's do that, I'm going to take my Type tool, click in here, and let's give some credits; Directed by Jordy Vandeput, which is my name, Edited by You, that's you. Lets say one more thing, the Colorist, which is the guy who actually changes the color or does the color gradings of the films and the colorist is your best friends. There we go. Let's style this a little bit better now. I'm going to select all this text in here and I'm going to align this in the center with this button and that will actually center the text. Now these are just normal buttons as we can find in any text editor. Then next, I'm going to highlight some text in here. The Directed by here can be in a bold, also the Edited by can be in bold and Colorist has to be in bold. There we go. Now we can see a little bit better of a difference between the function and the name. Then once you are done, you can just close this title and drag the ending credits inside your timeline. What I'm going to play this now, you will see that the text will actually roll from below to above. Now, if this is going too fast for you, let me just zoom out a little bit more on my timeline. You can actually drag this clip longer and that will make sure that the text is rolling slower because it will always start off the screen and end off the screen. The time that it needs to do so is something that you can define by just dragging this clip longer or smaller. When I'm now going to play this again, you will see that the text will go a little bit slower. Of course, if you want to, you can create a wall of text in here. That's it for designing a title. You know how the Titler works now. My suggestion here is to play a bit with the settings on the right side. Let me just open up this title again, so on the right side here, the Title Properties, they really speak for themselves. You try to play with the settings and find out what they all do I want to thank you a lot for watching again and in the next video lesson, we are actually going to animate some stuff inside Premiere. I must say that, that was one of the things that I was thrilled about most when I was learning Premiere for the first time. So definitely stay tuned for the next lesson. 13. Create an animation: Jordy here again, your instructor for cinecom.net and welcome to my course. In this video, we are going to create an animation. Again, as I've said in the previous lesson, it's one of the things that thrilled me the most when I was learning premiere for the first time. Let's dive into this awesome technique. We are going to create an animation. That means, for example, make a text go from one point in your screen, go to another point. We can also do this on video clips, photos, etc. Let's start with the basics. I'm going to create a new title. Click on the new item button in your project panel. Say title, give it a name, for example, animated texts and press ''OK''. From here I'm going to type in a title and I'm going to say Jordy, which is my name. Take your selection tool and I'm just going to drag this a little bit bigger like this. I'm also going to center it up with these two buttons. Then I'm going to close the title designer and drag my title from the project panel inside my timeline. What we have now is actually just a static text. When I'm going to play this, you will see that nothing much happens. We would like to animate this text so that it goes from the left side to the right side. Now you have to see this as going from point A to point B in a certain time. We are going to work with time. Let's say that point A is somewhere right here in the time, that we are going to set point B somewhere right there in time. Now where can we set those points? What we have to do is go to the effects controls. We have seen this premieres asking us to select a clip first. Let's select that clip and now we can see some properties in here, and these are all things that we have seen in this course. Let's open up the motion. Our goal is to animate this text from the left to the right, we can do that with the position. If I'm going to change this value, like so, we can already see it's somehow being animated. But this is not something that is being recorded now. Now we're just setting a static value. Actually what we have to do is animate this value right here. To animate made we have to open up a second timeline. That timeline can be found on the right side. If you can't see it yet, like I do, you actually have to show that timeline by pressing on this button right here, which says show or hide the timeline view. Click on it. That will open up a mini timeline. You can also enlarge this a little bit by standing on the intersection of your parameters options and your timeline view here, and then just drag it to the left side a little bit bigger. Now, this timeline does not represent the timeline below here. It only represents, when I've got this clip selected, a timeline of the clip that you have selected. Let me show this to you a little bit better. I'm going to open up the clips folder inside my project panel and just drag any of these clips to my timeline, like so. Now, if this would represent my whole timeline, when I'm at the end of the timeline inside the effect controls, I should also be at the end of my global timeline, which I am not. Now you can actually visually see what this timeline over here represents. While I am moving this time indicator, you can also see the time mitigator moving down below here. That is something you definitely have to understand pretty well. We are ready to start with the animation now. I'm going to delete this clip that I have added and select my text again. Let's start with the animation now. We are at point A now and we would like to save the current position that we are in at now. To save that possession, we have to enable the stopwatch or toggle the animation on by clicking on this icon on the left side of the position. Click on it and automatically, the first point has been saved inside a keyframe. That is the name of this point. When talking about animations, we are also talking about key framing because that is what we're doing here. Next we have to select point B in time. Just scrap with your time indicator to point B, which is further away in time, and now select the second point. We can do that by just changing the value now. I'm going to move it to the right sides. There we go. Automatically again, premiere has created a second keyframe because premiere saw that the value has changed for the position. Since we have the animation enabled, it will automatically create that keyframe. This is basically it. When I'm now going to play this clip inside my timeline, you will see that the text will go from point A to point B. Our first animation has been created. Isn't that awesome? Now this might go too slow for you. In order to make this text go faster from point A to point B, we just have to decrease the time between it. Just grab any of these keyframes and move them closer to each other. When I'm now going to play this clip, you will see that my text will go a lot faster to point B. Now you can see that every parameter has one of these stopwatches. That means that we can all keyframe them even at the same time. Let's also do that for the scale. I'm going to stand on the exact same point for the position in point A here, and I'm going to enable also the animation for the scale. Let's start with a value of somewhere around 50. I've got a keyframe for point A, I'm going to move to my final position right here point B, and increase that value. When I'm now going to play this, two animations will be played, the position and the scale. Look at that. Isn't that awesome again? Now, not only with these basic parameters, but also with the effects inside the effects library. Let's add that fast blur again to our text. Fast blur right here, drag that to your text file. In your effect controls now, we can also find that stopwatch for the blurriness. Again, I'm going to move to my point A somewhere, toggle the animation on, and I would like to start from a blurry texts like so. On the second point here, point B, I'm going to make this zero, this value, so that the text is nice and sharp. When I'm now going to play this, also that blurriness has been keyframed or animated it's now. Let's take this even a step further. I'm going to head back to my project panel, close up my clips folder, and create a new title. Title, and I'm going to name this Next step animation. There we go, press ''OK''. For now I'm going to say Jordy Awesome. I take my Selection tool and I'm going to center it up again in the middle. Close your Titler. From here, I'm going to drag in my title into the timeline. Now I've got two text files in my timeline. The second text is still static because we haven't done any animations on it yet. Now what we are going to do is I'm going to start in the beginning here, open up the motion settings inside my effect controls, and I'm going to set point number A with the position. That is going to be somewhere around here in the corner. Create a keyframe for it, move a little bit further in time. What I'm now going to do is I'm going to select "Motion". Because I had this icon right here so I know that I can visually change its position. We have seen that in this course. I'm now just going to drag my title to a different position. What you could see right here now is the actual path of the animation that detect is going to run through, and we can set another point. I'm going to move further in time and drag this text again to a next point. Look what happens here now. The actual path is bending over here, so that the animation will actually go smooth. Now, this bending curve here is being defined by these two points over here. I can actually take this point right here and define how much that point has to curve. The beginning point has one of those anchors. Just take that and bends that point so that you can select the actual path after animation. When I'm now going to play this, you will see that the text will beautifully follow that path that we've created. So we are able to create multiple keyframe points in an animation. If we are able to visually change the effect settings, then we can also, in most cases, change the animation or the keyframing visually by just selecting that effect. Now let's create a third texts. Again, in my Project panel, click on the "New Item" button and say Title. This is going to be my Third Text. There we go, press "OK." Here I'm just going to say, Third Text, like so. I take my Selection tool and align it into the middle. Close that window, the Titler, and drag in your title into the timeline. Again, we've got one static text. Now, what I'm going to do is select it again, open up my motion and create two keyframes. So that my text starts on the left side, create a keyframe, go a little bit further in time, and create a new keyframe, like so. Now when I'm going to play this text in here, you will see that it actually starts very abrupt and that it also ends very abrupt. This doesn't really feel natural. In order to make this animation go much more natural, we actually have to smoothen these keyframes so that the text will accelerate while it's going. To do so, we can right-click on one of these keyframes, head over to Temporal Interpolation and say, Ease Out. Because the animation is going out from this point. It's not because it's the first keyframe that we have to select ease in, now we have to select ease out, click on that. Now you can also see the keyframe changing a little bit. We're going to do the exact same thing for the second keyframe, but now we're going to select, right-click, Temporal Interpolation, and say Ease In. Because the animation is coming from the left to the right, so it's going in into the keyframe. Again, Temporal Interpolation, Ease In. When I'm now going to play this, you will now see that the text will accelerate slowly and also end slowly, much smoother as before. This is a professional animation. This is what an amateur animation will distinguish what a professional animation. So there is a great tip. For a final example, I'm going to create one last text file. I'm going to say again New Item, Title, and I'm going to say, Title number 4, press "OK". As the text, what the Text tool in here, I'm going to say, Fourth Title, take my Selection tool and center it up in the middle. Close your title designer, and I'm going to drag in Title number 4 next to the Third Text title file. Again, we've got this static text in here. Now with this clip, select this head over to motion. What I want to do now is make an animation, so that my fourth title here actually starts. I'm just going to select the motion somewhere right here. For that, I'm going to define a point number A. But keep in mind your time indicator, so let's start somewhere right here in the beginning of that clip, create a keyframe for the position. I'm going to head a little bit further in time now, select point number B, which is somewhere right here. Now I would like this title to stay there for a couple of seconds and then go to point number C, which is going to be somewhere right here. What we then have to do is go a little bit further in time to the point where the pause actually ends and the title is going to move again to point number C. Right here, we want to create a keyframe with the same value as the keyframe before so that the title will stick there. Now when you create a keyframe with the same value that we already have, we have to click on this button right here, which will add a new key if we are not standing on one, or it will remove a keyframe if we are already standing on that keyframe. Let just do that. I'm going to click on it, and that will create a new keyframe with this value here which I selected. But if I click on it again, it will remove that keyframe. I think that is pretty obvious, but let's just create a keyframe now. Now from this point to that point, nothing has changed, so the title is just going to stick there. What I'm now going to move further, and sign and select the next point somewhere around there. You will now see that when I'm going to play this title; that it will pause for a moment between these two keyframes as they have the exact same value. Pause, and it will move again. There we go. Again, if some sort goes too fast or too slow for you, you can just move these keyframes in here. You can also select multiple keyframes like this pause, for example, and move them both to the left or to the right side. This is something that you have to play with. As an advice, this is something which isn't always that easy to understand. Now keyframing or animating is not so easy if you are a beginner for premiere. I also face this problem where the animation was doing things that I didn't ask for, hence that is normal because this is a big box of information that you're getting here. My advice is to re-watch this lesson again if you are struggling with this technique. Also, give it some time, you will bump into some trouble where the animation won't do the things that you ask for, it's absolutely normal. Then just to try to find what is wrong, try to look at your keyframes, what you're actually doing here. Always keep in mind that you are running in time. You are always going from a point A, which is laying somewhere in time, to a point B, which is laying somewhere in a different time. If you understand that, the process of keyframing will go a lot easier. So that's it for keyframing. I want to thank you a lot for watching. You can also download this project right here so that you have all these type of files here with the keyframe set I have set within this lesson. In the next video lesson, I'm going to teach you some more tips and tricks when it comes down to all the things that we have already seen in this course. After that, I'm going to close this chapter and start with a whole new chapter within this lesson. So stay tuned for the next video. Again, thanks for watching. 14. Tips and tricks: Hello everyone. Welcome to my course. My name is Jordy, your instructor for cinecom.net. In this video lesson, I'm going to teach you several tips and tricks because we have seen the basic things within Premiere. In the next lessons, we are going to go deeper into the application, like for example, audio mixing and we are go to do some color corrections, etc. But before we can actually dive into those things, I am first going to show you several neat things which are very nice to know within Premiere. Let's get started with the first one. For that I'm going to import a clip. From my project panel I'm going to open up my folder clips, and from here, I'm just going to take any of them, let's just say clip number 7 right here, and I've already set an in and out point so I'm just going to drag that clip into my timeline. Now, we have seen that we can take the outsides like so, and drag the clip actually longer or smaller in duration. We are changing that out point in this case. Now, what we can do is also make an extent edit. For that, we can actually just select one of the points, either that is the out point or the in point, just select any of them, and move your time indicator to a certain point where you want this clip to end. Now, what we can do is just drag this clip to that point and it will snap to my time ruler because I've got snapping enabled right here. But what we could also do and for that I'm just going to position that clip back to where it was, with that outside selected now, I can just also press the E key on my keyboard. That will actually bring my edit to that point, and this is called an extent edit. We can also do that backwards. When I place my time ruler somewhere right here and I'm going to press the E key, it will then bring the out point from that clip to my time ruler. Now, this is something that can speed up your editing workflow. So something there you need to know. Now, talking about these short keys, let's go to the menu up here and say Premiere Pro, and from there let's click on the Keyboard Shortcuts. That will open up this box right here. Then right in here we can actually see all the short keys that we can find. For example, let's open up a category here, let's say the Sequence, I'm going to open that up, and from here we can find many shortcuts in it. Like this one right here, Extend Selected Edit to Playhead, that was the thing that we were doing with the E shortcut. Now, let's say that we would like to change this shortcut. For example, do the P key. For that we just select that value here, the E, and with that selected then just press the E key on your keyboard and now we have changed it. But be careful with doing this because Premiere is now warning us that the shortcut P was already in use by Pen Tool. That means when I'm now going to press "Okay", the Pen Tool will no longer be able to get activated with the P key on our keyboard, but it will now work with the extend edit tool. Now, you don't have to worry because, of course, you can always reset these shortcuts back to its default, and that can be found right here inside the Keyboard Layout Preset, and that is a dropdown menu. When I open up that dropdown menu, you can actually see that we can select back to Adobe Premiere Pro Default keyboard layout. Select that and now you will see when I head back to Sequence, open that up, scroll down, that the extend edit tool is now back on the E key. That also means since we have presets, that we can actually create our own preset. Let's say that we are going to change the extend edit to a P. There we go. Now we actually have the option on the right side of this dropdown menu to save this as a preset. Click on it and maybe you want to save this as Jordy, because currently I am the editor on this machine, but we have multiple users editing on this machine. I love to use the P key as my extend edit tool. But let's say that I'm now going to change this to, for example, a U. That's someone else let's say Peter, like to use his extend edits with the shortcut U. Then he can save that as well for his name Peter, then press "Save", and now you can select from the presets dropdown menu either Jordy or either Peter. That is a great tool for if you are working with multiple users inside the same application. For now, I'm just going to select back to default keyboard layout settings and press "Okay". Now, if you still remember one of those first lessons from this course, you have seen that all the clips inside my project panels are actually links to the actual source clips. We can go to that source clip by right clicking on any of these clip. Let's say that we would like to locate clip number 7 inside our Explorer or Finder. Right click on that clip, and in this menu, search for Reveal in Finder. The Windows users will see Reveal in Explorer right here. Click on it and that will open up my Finder with the clip selected, where it is actually linking to. Now, since this clip is linking to that one, we have to be careful. We cannot move this clip or change its name because that will break the link between it. Let's do that. I'm going to rename clip number 7 to 7-1 and I'm going to click away now. When I'm going to head back to Premiere, you will see now that one clip is missing. Because it cannot find that link anymore to clip number 7, because it has now changed names. Now, from this box right here the link Media Box, we can say to Locate and select where that clip has gone to. Say Locate, and from here we can actually browse through our computer and it's already in the correct folder. Now, since I know that I have changed that name to 7-1, I'm just going to select that clip and say, "Okay"; and now the clip has been linked again, but it's source name is now 7-1, of course. If you can't find that window to locate an offline clip, you could also just right click on your clip and say Link Media. Now, at this point I can't link to media because by media is not offline. But if it is offline, you can just select link media to bring back that box. Now, another great thing to know is that we can also replace that footage. If we click on that, we can actually change the source again. From here I'm going to locate to my clips. Instead of selecting clip number 7, I am now going to select clip number 2. Now, when I'm going to do that, I'm actually giving a different source to clip number 7. Now, pay attention to my timeline since I have already used clip number 7, something will happen here. I'm going to select clip number 2 and say, "Open". Right now you can see that in my timeline as well, that clip has changed. This is how video files within Premiere are actually linked to the original digital files on your computer. Now, about the timeline, we have seen that we can drag in multiple clips in it and also to different tracks. Right now I've got clip number 6 on track number 2. Now, I am going to make my timeline a little bit bigger so that you can see what I'm up to here. Now, let's say that we are stacking up some clips. Got the clip number 6 right there and click number 4 is going to go to track number 3, and now, I would like to add clip number 9 to track number 4, but there is no track number 4. Well, no worries. The only think you actually have to do is just drag your clip inside that empty space where track number 4 should be. When you're then going to let go, you have created a new track, track number 4. You can keep doing that by just dragging your clip to that empty space and so create new tracks, and the same thing goes for the audio, of course. Now, I'm going to delete all the clips in my timeline since it's such a mess and I would actually like to start over. But now, I've got so much tracks which I'm actually not using. What we can then do is right click on any of these tracks and just say Delete Track, and that will get rid of track number 5. As well for track number 4, if you want that to get deleted, then you say Delete Track and track number 4 is gone. So you can clean up your tracks within the timeline. That brings me to the final tip that I have for you. For that I'm going to open up clip number 1, which we haven't actually worked with yet. That's because Kim right here, my beautiful actress is actually saying something into the camera, so we've got some sound here. I'm going to use that clip. I'm going to drag that into my timeline because what I want to do is add a slow motion to this clip. Now, we've seen previously in this course that we can do that with the rate stretch tool from the toolbox right here, but there's a different way to do that. That is just by right clicking on the clip inside the timeline as so, and then say, Speed/Duration and that will open up a new window. Now, from here we've got some more options. One of those first things that we have to select is set the speeds. Now in order to make it go slower we're going to lower the speed. Instead of a 100 percent which is normal speed, I'm going to set it now to 80 percent. Now, when I'm going to press "Okay" and play this clip, the audio will sound very funny or weird because we are stretching it out. This is something that we've all heard before. Let's take a listen. Hello, my name is Kim. It's cold outside but the sun is shining, so that calls for a bike ride. Yeah, and Kim is not going to be so happy if she knows that I'm making fun of her right now. Let's just fix that very quickly. I'm going to right click on that clip again and head over to Speed/Duration. From here actually I'm going to select Maintain Audio Pitch. That will make sure that the funny voice that she just had to because of the slow motion will get fixed somehow. Now, this won't work perfectly, but it will always sound a little bit better. Let's select it and press "Okay" now. Now, let's take a listen to it. Hello, my name is Kim. It's cold outside but the sun is shining, so that calls for a bike ride. That might sound a little bit better but, of course, it still sounds very weird. Though it might not be dead practical for voices, but it does for a chorus, or footsteps, or doing some kind of an action that has a sound around it. Now, of course, the same thing goes as well for if you want to make this clip go faster. Now, I'm going to add another clip to the timeline because there's one more thing that I would like to show you. This right here, for example, dragged it also inside your timeline. I'm going to right click on it again and head over to that Speed/Duration menu. Now from here instead of changing the speed, I'm just going to say Reverse Speeds and that is one way of actually just reversing your video. Press "Okay" and when I'm going to play this clip now, you will see that our beloved Kim now will ride backwards. Isn't that magical? That brings me to the end of this lesson. Thanks a lot for watching folks. In the next video lesson, I'm going to teach you how to do some color corrections, so stay tuned for that. 15. Color correction: Jordy here for cinecom.net. Welcome to my course. In this video lesson, we are going to do some basic color corrections. Now, let's take a look at the video that I have in my timeline. I've got the first shot, then we've got a second shot, and finally, a third shot of Kim riding her bike. Now one thing you might have seen is that the second clip is a little bit more bluish as the first clip, which is more yellowish or warmer, and the third clip as well. That actually means that we have to do some color corrections on the middle clip right here to make it match the first and the last clip more. What we do is we are going to search for an effect so that we can change some colors. So head over to your Effects library that is the Effect window. From the search engine right here, we are going to search for the Fast Color Corrector, which we can find in the Video Effects, Color Correction, Fast Color Corrector, and just drag that affect over to your clip so that it is added to your Effects Controls right here. Now the first thing that I want to say is that, I don't see that icon in front of the Fast Color Corrector Effect, something that we do see with the Motion. So that means whenever I select the Fast Color Corrector, I cannot change anything visually inside's my program monitor. By the way, it's always good to have your time ruler placed on the clip that you are actually going to color correct, so that you can see what we are doing. Now, let's take a look at this effect. I'm going to scroll down a little bit because there are many options in here, but there are actually just a few options that you need to pay attention to and one of those few options is this color wheel right here. How does this wheel actually works? Pretty simple. You've got this indicator right here in the middle. We can take that, and drag that to a specific color. Since we know that, I'm going to place that back in the middle somehow that our clip is a little bit too cold or too bluish. We actually just have to add the opposite color to it. If we take a look at the color wheel, we can see that on the opposite side of blue, lays yellow, which is a more warmer color. If we are going to move this indicator to that yellow a little bit, you can now see that the clip is getting warmer or more yellowish. If we are now going to compare the second clip or the middle clip to one of the first clips here, you already see that it matches somehow a little bit more. I think we can add some more yellow to it. Just drag that to the yellow side, and compare it again. It already starts to look a little bit better. Now, maybe you are searching here to match your color, but you can't really find it. That's because we've got another option. You don't always have to push it that far into the color here. You can also just push it a little bit towards that color, but just increase the intensity by taking this yellow bar right here, and move that along the slider more towards that indicator or that little dot. That will actually increase the saturation of the color that you're choosing. By playing with these two parameters here, you can somehow try to get the correct effect that you are trying to accomplish. Take look several times at your previous clip, and so you can match it. Now, maybe you are in a situation where I am currently that I still have trouble matching these two clips. If we take look at these leaves, they are beautifully green in this shot, but in that second shot, they are now somehow you washed out the yellow or something. It doesn't look right. I actually want to reset what I'm doing here. It's not looking good. For that, scroll a little bit up, and from the white balance here, I'm going to say, "Reset Parameter," and now it's reset it to its default. What we can do also, is just take the white balance color picker. Click on that "Color Picker," and head over to your program monitor. Because writing here we actually know how to select a point which has to be pure white, and that's also the reason why it's called a white balance. There's one problem, and that is that I don't really have a white points. Maybe you are filming a house or a piece of paper or anything like that, which is white. Then you can use this color picker. But now it's going to be very difficult. Something that we could try is to click on something grayish, and that's for example, the streets right here. Let's just click on that, and see what it does. Already you can see that some yellow color has been added to the clip, but it's a little bit too much. That's because we have actually selected a grayish part, but we are going in a correct way. Maybe we just have to tweak this a little bit more, bring down the saturation a little bit, and look at that. It's starting to come closer and closer to our first shot right here. If you compare those two now, you can see that there is some start to match, and that is how we can correct colors within a shot. Now let's scroll down inside the fast color corrector because there's one more thing I would like to show you, and that is to create some contrast inside our shot. That can be done right here with the Input Levels or the Output levels. We can find a black area in here, a gray area, and a white area. Now these are the shadows, the mid tones, and the highlights. Those things can also be found within our shot. The highlights is, for example, this guy right here, also the back that she has on her bike, also the reflection here at the pole, etc. The mid tones, the gray tones are the leaves, the bushes over here, the street, etc. Finally, we've got the black areas or the shadows. Those are the shadows right here in the bushes, but also the clothes that she is wearing, and also that tiny car in the background. Now below the Input Levels, we can also find the Output Levels, and they worked the exact same way. We've got the black areas right here, and the highlights over there. Now, the input means that we are going to add more of a certain level, and the output means that we are going to extract something from a particular level. From the input level, I'm going to add more black. I'm going to take this little arrow right here, and drag it to the right side to input some more black to it. Take a look at the video image in our program monitor. As you can now see, I am crushing the blacks as I'm adding more to it. Don't add too much, maybe just a little bit like so. Let's do the same thing for the highlights. Bring that to the left side so that we are going to add more whites to the highlights. But again, not too much. Already you can see that we are adding much more contrast in the scene. Now as for the mid tones, which can be found in the middle. We can either bring that to the black areas, which means that we are going to darken the mid tones or we can bring the attitude to white areas which will brighten up the mid tones. Drag that to any size, and you can see what it does inside the program monitor. What does the output levels do? Exactly the same, but then, extracting it. So if we drag the shadows to the right side, we are going to lift the shadows, and create that milky image. But also we can do the exact same thing for the highlights, drag that to the left side. That means we are going to extract some whites from the highlights. Now, if you would like to see the before and the after, you can just scroll up, and right here, the Fast Color Corrector on the left side of that, you can see an fx sign, which is actually some kind of a checkbox. If we click on it, the effect is checked off, and if we click on it again, the effect is enabled again. By clicking fast on it, you can actually see the before and the after. I'm going to scroll back down because there's one last thing that I would like to show you, and that is the Saturation, which we can find above the level section. You can either increase that to add more saturation or add more color. But we can also decrease that to have a desaturated scene, or even if we bring that all the way down to zero, a black and white scene. That is how the Fast Color Corrector works within Premier Pro. This is a basic color correction tool which will help you to get started to manipulate the colors, but also to match the colors more with a previous scene. But of course in this case it's not matching that much anymore since we now have a black and white shot. Thanks a lot for watching folks. In the next video lesson, we are going to do some audio mixing, which is going to be something very neat if you are editing lots of interviews. So stay tuned for that. Thanks again for watching. 16. Audio mixing: Hey, what's up, everyone? Jordi here for cinecom.net, and welcome to my course. In this video lesson, I am going to teach you how to do some proper audio mixing. Now inside my timeline, I have sticked all the clips that I had in here. It starts from clip number one and it goes all the way up to clip number nine. Now let's play back the video that I have in here and listen very well to the audio. Hello, my name is Kim. It's cold outside but the sun is shining, so that calls for a bike ride. Now isn't that one great video edit? Now, there are a couple of things in here. The first clip right hear has some important audio where Kim is talking to the camera. But we also have clips where there is a distraction in the sound. Like for example, this clip right here. It has a playing in the background. One of your last clips right here, you can also hear a dog barking. Now, these are sounds that I would actually like to get rid of. Now one way of doing that is by selecting your clip and heading over to your effects controls. Because from here, we can open up the volume parameter, and we can bring right here at the level of DC bells all the way down as far as we can. Right now, if I now play this clip, we won't hear anything anymore. That is a good thing. But be careful here. By default, the level parameter has its animation enabled. If you don't want to create key frames for the level parameter, you have to click on the stopwatch near the level parameter, and say okay to delete all the key frames and disable the animation. Right now, we can change this value without any key frame being created. Now, take a look at this line right here in your timeline. This line right here is actually linked to the value of the level. Because when I'm going to change this value now like so, you can now also see that line going up. I can either bring this line up and down as you can see, or I can change this value right in here. Now when I'm going to change this line inside my my timeline, you can also seen inside the tool-tip which value that I'm changing the volume to. In this case now it's 2.92 DC bells. Now we can actually choose which parameter has to be linked to that line, and we can do that by clicking in this fx box right here. Right-click in here. Not left-click, but right-click, a menu will appear, and from here we can actually select which parameter has to be linked to that line. We can also say the banner, for example. Let's just select that, the balance. When I'm going to move this line, I'm actually going to change the balance, so where the audio has to come through to our left ear or to the right ear. Of course also that parameter can be found in here, that banner, the balance, there it is. Now this has nothing to do with audio mixing, but of course we can do the exact same thing for the video track. Right-click in that fx icon, and change to where you want to link to your line to. For example, the Motion Scale. Once I've got that selected now, you can see this line appearing, and when I'm going to move this up and down, you can actually see that I can zoom in and zoom out in my clip by just changing that line. Now, this is a lot of work. If we have to change the volume for each of these clips, If we have like 100 clips inside our timeline, it's going to consume lots of time. We're going to do it a little bit different. We have multiple audio tracks. What I'm going to do is, I'm going to grab all the clips that I want the volume to have lowered, and drag them to a different audio track, like so. What I can do now, is control the whole track and say that the volume has to shut right here. Now the controls to do that can be found within the audio track mixer, and that is a different window. We can find that usually besides the effect controls on the right side, here it is, the audio track mixer. Now if you can't found this mixer in your workspace, then just head over to window and from here, select the Audio Track Mixer, here it is, and then select which sequence has to be mixed. Click on that, and then that window will appear. Now let's take a look at this mixer. As you can see, we've got multiple tracks in here as well, and each of them resembles one of the tracks inside our timeline. Audio track one right here, reassembles audio track one in the timeline, and so on. That means if we are going to take this fader, which we all know from those very fancy audio mixers in those sound studios, just bring that down all the way, and now the whole track has been muted because I've done that. When I'm now going to play this, you will not hear anything from the background anymore. Now let me bring the volume of that track back to zero, like so. Let's take a closer look at the timeline. Because we can find some buttons here on the left side. We've got an M and we've got an S, and these are two important buttons. We can either mute the whole track or we can also solo that track. Now if we have multiple tracks in here, and you only want to listen to one track in particular, you can actually say to solo that track. If I press Solo on the first track right here, it's now enabled, as you can see, and I'm going to play my whole video in the timeline. So that calls for a bike ride. You now hear that only that track plays back to audio, but not the other clips in here, and that's because it's soloed. But we can also say to mute a track. We can do that by, of course, just clicking on the M. If I now play my edit in here, we will not hear the voice anymore. But we do hear the sounds from the other clips. So that is a way to control the audio in your edit. We can either do that individual for each clip inside the effect controls. We can also use the audio track mixer to control a hole track or we can either use the mute or the solo buttons right here to steer these tracks. I'm going to lift the mute again for the first track right here because what I want to do is actually mute the second track so that I don't have those distracting background noises from the other clips. Now, that is going to be pretty quiet. What I want to do is add some music to my edit and for that, we can found one in the project panel under music and try it here we've got a music file called Care Free. Double-click on that to open it up in the source monitor. From here, we can again select an in and an out points. Now, I'm just going to take several seconds out of this, let's say 20 seconds, set an out point and I'm going to use this selection. Now, when I'm going to play the video from the beginning now, you will hear that the music is going to be too loud in the beginning. We can't hear Kim so clear anymore because of the loud music. Let's take a listen. Hello my name is Kim, it's cold outside but the sun is shinning so that calls for a bike ride. It's only until the next clip that the music can be louder, but in the beginning, it has to be a lot quieter. So we are going to do some actual mixing now. For that, we're going to take the pen tool from the toolbox. Now, we know that this line right here reassembles the volume of that clip. With the pen tool, we can actually create keyframes on that line. That is how we can use that pen tool. Now we can just do that by clicking on this line. We'll just click somewhere right here on the line of your clip to create a keyframe and we're going to set a value for that keyframe. We can do that visually by just dragging that keyframe down or actually the line. Now, since we only have point A selected now, the whole line went down or the volume went down. We have to create a second keyframe, like so and we're going to push that keyframe upwards. Now, you can see this line going in a curve where the volume is going up right hear. Let's play the edit in my timeline now,. The sun is shining, so that calls for a bike ride. The music is fading in beautifully, but in the beginning, we actually like to heard the music a little bit on background, but she's not so loud. So I just take that first keyframe again and just move that up a little bit and take a look at the tooltip. We now have minus nine or minus 11 decibel. Let's take a listen to it. The sun is shining, so that calls for a bike ride. Okay, it's a little bit better. I think we can move it a little more down somewhere around minus 17 decibels maybe. Let's again take a listen to it. Hello my name is Kim. It's cold outside but the sun is shining, so that calls for a bike ride. That is how we can do an audio mixing. This sounds great and that is how we can do an audio mixing. Now, also pay attention to your audio meters on the write side. I'm going to play it again and take a look at it. It's cold outside but the sun is shining, so that calls for a bike ride You can see that my audio meters somehow hits the minus 12 decibels right here. Now, I'm going to take my normal selection tool again and I'm going to move the volume of Kim voice up like so and play it again. But the sun is shining, so that calls for a bike ride. You can now seen that it goes almost up to minus six decibels. Now, since we are at the maximum of this line, we can only increase the volume by six decibels. We now have to increase the gain. This is not the volume, I'm talking about the gain. If you want to bring it even louder. Now, to bring up that gain, you have to right-click on your clip and search for audio gain right here. Click on it and from the box that you'll see, you have two input how much you would like to increase the gain with decibels. Now, here's a nice trick. Currently, the peak amplitude is at minus 8.5 decibels. So by theory, we can actually increase this by 8.5 decibels before the audio is going to peak. Now, let me show you what peeking is first. For that I'm going to exaggerate and change the gain to 30 decibels. Now, this is going to be way to much. Press "Okay" and take a look at the waveforms in that clip, go to zoom in a little bit. You can see now that my waveforms are cutting off right here and this is because the audio is speaking. When I play my clip right now, you will hear that the audio is going to sound very nasty. It's cold outside but the sun is shining, so that calls for a bike ride. That was awful. The volume or the gain was just too much. I'm going to right-click on it again, head over to audio gain and I'm going to say minus 30 gain, press, "Okay" and the audio wave forms are fixed again now. Here's a good advice. Try to aim your volume two somewhere around the minus six. If your audio is speaking, then these two red lights in your audio meter will light up. If they're not speaking, then those indicators won't light up. But if we set the gain again to high, let me just do that one more time. Set the gain to, let's say 15 now, press "Okay." Now maybe you don't hear it that much anymore that the audio is speaking or being distorted, but we do know that the volume is weigh too loud because we're going to see these two indicators light up right here. Let's take a look. It's cold outside, but the sun is shining, so that calls for a bike ride. This audio is just way too loud. Press ''Command'' or ''Control+Z'' to undo the audio gain action and now the levels are back to normal. This is how audio mixing works. Pay attention that your audio is not going to clip and to make sure to also pay attention when someone is talking, that the music isn't too loud, that we can hear the person clear, but when someone is not talking, you can increase the volume and we've done that by creating keyframes with the pen tool from the toolbox right here. That was it for this video lesson. I want to thank you again a lot for watching and in the next lesson, we are going to export our video. You've now learned almost everything within Premier. There are still many extra features which I'll dive in later in this course, but for now, you known a solid fundamental, you are ready to start editing your videos now. In the next lesson, we are going to export our video so that you can share it with your friends or upload it to YouTube or anything like that. Thanks again for watching. 17. Export your video: Jordy here, your instructor for Cinecom.net, and welcome again to my course. In this video lesson, we are going to export our video so that we can actually share it with our friends or upload it to YouTube or Facebook or anything like that. Now, I've created a edit share in the timeline. Again, you can download this project file so that you can see what I've done. Now, in my edits, I have added everything that we have learned within this course. I have a title right here, and I've also created an animation on that title. I've done a proper color correction on that clip with the off white balance, as you can see it right here, with the fast color corrector. I've also added a transition between two clips, and I've done some audio mixing, as you can see right here. But you know what? Let's just take a look at this edits. Hello, my name is Kim. It's cold outside, but the sun is shining so that calls for a bike ride. Now, these are all techniques that you have learned within this course. This is actually a lot. So congratulations to you. You are awesome. Now really, you are awesome. These are the fundamentals of Premiere Pro. If you keep practicing on all these techniques, you will become a master of Premiere Pro but now let's share this video right here with all my friends. One way of doing that is by heading over to your Menu, select "File", "Export", "Media". Now, already, I'm going to answer a frequently asked question. If I'm not going to select my sequence, for example, the project panel, and you can see that with this blue line around this window, and I'm now going to head over to file, export, I will not be able to select media. What you have to do is actually select the timeline panel that you have created your edits in, and then you can go up to file, export, media. Let's click on that. That will open up this new window. We're writing here that we can choose how we would like to export our video. But I'm going to come back on all of these things later, because there's actually a better way to export your video. Down below here, you can see three buttons, well, actually two important buttons. The third one right here is cancel. I think that is pretty clear, that we'll just close the window. But these two right here, Export and Queue, now, these are important. From this window right here, you can say export, and that will start the process of the exporting right inside Premiere Pro. Now, while it's exporting inside Premiere, you will not be able to do anything else within the application. We are able to say queue. If we place it inside a queue, we are able to continue to work inside Premiere. Now, what the Queue actually will do is bring it to another Adobe application. Now, instead of pressing on this queue button, I'm just going to say cancel. I'm going to launch this application separately. Now, inside my dark right here, we can find the Adobe Media Encoder. Now, this is an application that will come with the installation of the Adobe Premiere software. So if you can't find it, it should be somewhere on your PC. Just browse through your applications and you will find it somewhere. It is installed on your computer. Just click on it and that will launch the application. There we go. Now, once we have this application open, is actually very simple. What we can do is just drag the sequence from the Project's panel of Premiere, and we can just drag that like so inside the queue of the Adobe Media Encoder. Just let go in this window right here, and it's now added inside that application. Now, from here, just press on any of these blue texts, and that will open up that same window that we have seen inside Premiere where we could change all those settings. Now, this is a lot of information, and again a lot of things to explain but Premiere Pro has actually made it easy for us by giving us the possibility to select a preset, and those presets work damn good. I'm just going to press "Cancel" again from this window. I know I've just shown you that window twice and I'm not going to explain it. I'm really sorry for that but now you know, if that window will ever appear, just press Cancel. The presets can be called up from right here. The first thing that we have to choose is the codec. Open up that menu and from here we can actually choose the codec, for example, QuickTime or we can choose the DVD codec, but also the JPEG codec. That means we can actually export our whole video to a sequence of JPEG photos. Now, I've got a great advice here. If you don't know what to choose, just pick the H.264. This is the most common codec used anywhere. It will work on your TVs, it will work on an iPad, It will work when you upload it to YouTube or Facebook, etc. This is the most popular codec so you can actually never go wrong, unless you have a very specific goal, for example, burning it to a DVD. But unfortunately, that is a whole different course. For now, let's just select that H.264 codec. Once we've got that one selected, Premiere, or actually the Adobe Media Encoder, will give us some options or presets that will go with this codec. That can be found on the right side here. So open that drop-down menu, and from here you can find all kinds of presets, like the Android phone or a tablet preset, but if we scroll down, we can also find Apple devices like the iPad and the iPhone, also Apple TV, etc. But we can also export it to a format, but also presets for Vimeo or YouTube. That is a great option. Now, I have to give you an advice here. If you are going to use either Vimeo or YouTube, you are almost always right, and 90 percent of the cases I always export to the Vimeo preset. Even also if I'm going to upload my video to YouTube, or to Facebook, or if I just wanted to put it on my iPhone or anything like that, this is a preset that works very good. You will have a very good quality inside a pretty small file and that is what we want to go for. Now, in the beginning of this course, we have learned how to read these presets. We've got a 720p and 1080p preset. Now, that reflects the resolution of your video file. 720p videos will of course be smaller in size as the 1080p, but 1080p will be better in video quality. Then next to that, we can find the frame rate. Now, for the people from the US, they are typically going to choose the 29.97 frame rate. For the people from Europe, we are usually going to take the 25 frames per second. We also have an almost 24 frames per second option, and this reflects to the cinema frame rate. Now, this is something that you can experiment with. Now, I've shot and edited my video in a 1080p sequence at 25 frames per seconds. You can also see that right in here in my project bell, 25 frames per seconds. So I'm just going to take that preset, click on it and now the last thing that we have to do is set the destination or the output file. Just click on that link, and that will open up a window to select where we would like to save it. Now, where would I like to save it? I'm just going to set my desktop like so. I'm going to name this bike ride, and just press "Save". That is it. Now, I would like to show you one last thing before I'm going to hit the Export button. For that, I'm going to open up that window that you should actually always close. Now, let's say that you are having trouble with exporting your video through the Media Encoder, and you want to do it through this window right here. To select your format and preset, we can also find those things on the right side, right here, the upper right. We can choose the format, which is the codec, from that same list, select the H.264, and from there, we can also select the preset. I've got a Vimeo HD already selected, but you can select any of these other presets. Also, right in you're in this window. From there, then just press okay. Once that is all done, I can now press the play button. That is actually the play to start the queue already render processing. Once I've clicked on that, you can see that everything is going to get rendered. Down below here, you see little status bar, a progress bar. Now, the great thing about exporting your video by using the Adobe Media Encoder is that you can now minimize this window or this application and continue working inside Premiere. That is something you cannot do if you are going to export your video through Premiere itself. Then you will see a progress bar right in here, "Enter Enable to work further inside the application." Let's take a look at the progress. I'm going to open up my dark again right here. How is it going? It's almost done as I see. Now, if you're drinking some coffee while your video is exporting, you could also bring up the volume of your speakers because once your video is done with the exports, you will actually hear a little bell ringing, so then you know that your export is ready. There we go. Let's just close the Adobe Media Encoder now. It's completed. I'm going to minimize Premiere Pro because right here on my desktop, we can see the exported video. Let's open that up and play the video that we have exported. That was it for this video lesson. Again, you are now completely ready to start editing your videos inside Premiere Pro. But stay tuned because as I've said before, there are some more great features within Premiere, for example, the Typekit, which is something new from the Creative Cloud. That's something we're going to take a deeper look at in the next video lesson. Thanks a lot for watching. 18. Adobe typekit: Hello there. Jordy for Silicom.net and welcome to my course. In this video lesson, I'm going to teach you how to work with the Adobe TypeKit. Now, this is not something within Premiere. This actually comes with your creative Clouds accounts. Now, to head over to the Creative Cloud panel, we have to search for this icon. Now, when those users will see this icon in their taskbar right down below here, just search for that icon and click on it, and that will show you this panel right here. Now, we've got four tabs up here and the one that selected now is the apps tab. So right here you can see all the Adobe applications that I've got installed on my computer and of course, right here we can find Premiere where we have been working in the whole time. But if I scroll down, you can see that I've got access to more Adobe applications, which I can install from this window right here from the Creative Cloud. Now later in this course, I'm going to show you how the Adobe's dynamic link works and that's something where all these applications can communicate with each other. But that's again for later in this course, for now, I would like to show you the Adobe's typekit, and that can be found from the asset step. From here, I'm going to open up the tab fonts. Now, currently, you can see that Typekit is turned off. To turn it on, just press on this button right here. Right now, it's starting to synchronize all the fonts that I already have because I've got Creative Cloud installed on multiple machines where I'm logged in under the same account and that is the great thing about Typekit it's synchronizing with your account. So what we're going to do is we're going to choose a font from their library and we're going to link that or synchronize it with our accounts. So let's take a look at the library of fonts that we can choose. Just head over to this button right here at fonts from Typekit, and that will launch your browser, your Internet browser. From here, we have a full library to choose from. All these fonts that we can see writing here can be used within Premiere Pro or any other application from Adobe. Now, on the right side here, we can choose which type of font that we are looking for. Like for example, Hands written, Mono, Blackletter, Decorative, etc. Let's choose, for example, decorative, and already Typekit is filtering from the selection that we have done. Then the next thing that we have to choose is for which the font has to be available for, does it have to be available for the web? Then select that or both, that could also be or for the desktop use. Now, we are not creating a website, we are working within a desktop application, so I'm going to unselect the web use because we cannot use those fonts within Premiere. So make sure to select desktop use. As next, we have an option where the font is recommended for, either for paragraphs or for headings. If you don't select any of these, then all the fonts will be shown. So I'm going to leave it as it is. I'm going to scroll down some more because right here it gets very interesting. We can choose the thickness of the lines used within the font, we can choose the width, the horizontal height, the contrast, and some more things. Let's say that I'm looking for something very thick, then I can just select that and already Typekit is now filtering that for me. Let's do some more things, I want to have very wide characters, so select that, and let's now take a look at the leftovers here. So this here are 12 fonts that we can choose from. Now, currently you can see that Cinecom is in each of these fonts and that's something that we can choose from right here. We can actually input the text that has to be shown as a preview for each font. Let's type in Jordy right here, and now you can see in real-time my name with that font. Now, let's just pick any of these. I'm just going to scroll down, let's for example, say this one right here, the Changeling Neo font. To synchronize this fonts, just click on "Use Fonts." That will open up this pop-up box because from here, we can choose all the types of this font which we would like to synchronize. Though maybe we are only looking for the bold version of this font, then we can deselect regular and now only that type is being synchronized. But I'm also going to select regular for now because I would like to have the whole bunch, and then just select "Sync selected fonts." When the syncing is done or the synchronizing is done, you will see a notification popping up in here for the Mac users. There you go. The two fonts were added to my library. Now if I'm going to open up my Creative Cloud panel and look within my fonts, you will see Changeling Neo right in here, and if I am now going to head over to my Premiere Pro, here we are, and let's create a new text. So new item, title, I'm just going to press "Okay," is just right here is that Window. I'm going to create a new text, let's type in Jordy, and on the right side from the font-family, I'm going to look for in this drop-down menu, for that Changeling Neo. So after the b comes the c, right here we can find Changeling Neo, select that and there we go, we've got the font inside Premiere. As you've seen, I didn't have to restart Premiere Pro because this is a piece from Adobe, it's being synchronized in real-time to all the Adobe applications. Now, there's only one downside to using Typekit, and that is that you don't have these fonts actually on your computer. You need to have an Internet connection to be able to access these fonts inside your Adobe applications. A second downside is that you can only use Typekit fonts within Adobe applications. So we cannot use them in Microsoft Word or Apple Pages, but that doesn't stop us from using these great fonts within Premiere, of course. Now, let me get back to my Creative Cloud panel right here. From my assets now, I'm going to click on "Manage fonts," and that will again open up my browser. Now, right here you can see a list of all the fonts that I'm using within the Creative Cloud, and also from here, we can remove any font, so if you have been synchronizing too much fonts, and your list is getting a little bit messy, you can also remove that fonts. Of course, you can always re-sync it afterwards. So I'm going to close Safari now, my browser, and normally it should get updated now that I'm no longer able to use that font. They you go. So as you can see now, when I now select Changeling Neo again and that's because there is a little error, Premiere cannot find that font anymore since it's not in my Creative Cloud library anymore. But it's still inside this list and that's just a little back from Premiere, but it will definitely be gone up on a next restart. That was it for this video lesson, this is how we can use the Adobe's Typekitt. So also if you are working with Photoshop or any other application from Adobe, then also that thing is great to use within those applications. Thanks a lot for watching and in the next lesson, I'm going to show you several settings within Premiere Pro, settings that will make your workflow go easier, or just stuff that is great to know about. 19. Application settings: Hey folks, welcome again to my Premiere Pro course. My name is Jordy for Cinecom.net. In this video lesson, we are going to take a look at several application settings that will help you with your workflow, or either just things that are very nice to know about. Now, the settings can be found from your Premiere Pro menu, Preferences and right here, we can find all the preferences. Now, just pick any of these, because if you open up one of these settings, you will see in the window that appears on the left side that we can also find those settings. Also afterwards, you can just select any of these. Now, let's start with the General settings. Because, right in here, we can find three great things to know about. That is the default duration for a video transitions, audio transitions, and still images. Now, that means when you are going to add a transition to your clip, it will have a default duration. Currently, for the video that is 25 frames, and for Europe, that is usually one second. Now of course, we can always drag the duration longer or shorter, but if you have to add lots of transitions in your edit, and you don't have the time to set the duration for each of them, then you can also set a default duration right in here. The same thing goes for the audio, but that one has to be set in seconds, and finally, we can find still image duration, which is currently 125 frames. Now, we all know that when we are going to add an image to our timeline, that we can drag it as long as we want. You can see this also as a title file, which is also actually a still image. Now, by default, it's 120 frames, but let's say that you want to create a time-lapse, for example, and you've have taken, let's say, 1,000 photos of a sunrise. When you are then going to add all those photos next to each other in your timeline, they will all be too long in duration per frame. Then we actually would like to set each photo for only one frame so that those thousand photos will play back as a video, so that's a great tip that I can give you. The next thing that we'll go to you on left side is Auto Save settings. Now, Premiere Pro as a piece of software, and we still live in an age where software can crash known then, it's very good to have this enabled, by default, it should be enabled. But we also have an option right here to select the time period when Premiere Pro has to automatically save the project. It's currently set at 15 minutes, but we can also decrease that to five minutes, for example. Now, of course, if you are editing for hours and hours and Premier is going to keep saving those backup projects, your hard drive will get full after a while. Down below that you can say how many versions Premier has to save. Now, these projects are being stored next to your project file. When I'm going to go to my desktop, like so, I'm going to open up the Bike Ride folder, which we know from the beginning of this course, we can find our main project file right here, but next to that right here, we can find a folder named Adobe Premier Pro auto-save, and when I'm going to open that one up, you can see the last 20 saved projects that were auto-saved by Premier Pro, and we can open them from here. If Premiere Pro crashes, you can just open up any of these auto-saved projects right here. Just going to close this window again and head back to Premier. Let's now head over to the next setting and that is the Media tab right here. Now, right here, this is something very important. Premier Pro is going to save a media cache files on your hard drive so that your editing will go faster if it can work with cache files. Now currently, and by default, they are stored within this location right here, as well, for the cache files as for the cash database. Now, it's not important to know what these files exactly are, but you have to know that they do take up some space on your hard drive. Now, many computers these days work with SSDs or solid-state drives, which usually don't have that much storage on them. Like for example, on my MacBook Air, right now where I am working on, I only have 128 gigabytes of storage. My hard drive could get pretty full after a while. What we can do is click on Browse right here to select another location. For example, an external hard drive or a server or anything like that, but know when you are going to store these cache files on an external drive, that editing will go a little bit slower because it may be has to communicate through a USB cable, keep that in mind. But if your hard drive gets full, know that the problem is occurring right here and that you can fix that also. The next thing that I want to show you is the Playback option. Now, from here, we can actually choose to output the video shown either in the program monitor or the source monitor to an external screen. As I've said before, I'm working with a MacBook Air and that is the monitor two right here. But I'm actually working inside Premier on a secondary monitor that I have connected to my computer. Now, when I'm going to select, for example, my second monitor, my MacBook Air monitor, I will be able to output it in full screen what I'm seeing inside my program monitor or the source monitor. It depends on which one you have selected. Now, this is a great thing to know if you are working with a dual monitor set up and it also just looks very professional. Now, let's head over to the last setting inside my Preferences window, and that is the Titler preference. Because right here we don't have that much options, but inside our Titler, we actually see a preview of either the style or the font, and we can choose on which characters that preview has to be shown on. For a style, we can also pick something else. Let's for example, say J0, which comes from Jordy and for the font browser, I'm just going to type in my whole name, Jordy, because right here I can choose up to six characters. Once we have set that, I will now press, "Okay." When I'm going to create a new title now, press to New item button from your project panel, say Title. I'm just going to press, "Okay" now. You can now see in my title styles down below that all these styles are being previewed with the J and O characters. I'm going to create a text with my name, Jordy, select this text and I'd like to change the fonts to something else. You can then see next to those fonts a preview of how it's going to look like with Jordy that I've set within the Titler preferences, so that's it for Premier Pro application settings, some settings which were very good to know about. In the next video lesson, I'm going to teach you how Adobe's dynamic link works. We know that Adobe has multiple applications and they can communicate with each other. It's something more advanced, but it's already something very good to know about if you have maybe interested in also working with Photoshop, SpeedGrade, After Effects, Addition or any other Adobe application. Again, thanks a lot for watching and I'll see you all in the next lesson. 20. Adobe dynamic link: Hello, Jordy here for cinecom.net and welcome to my course. In this video lesson, I am going to show you how the Adobe's Dynamic Link works. This is a feature within Adobe, which allows the different applications to communicate to each other. So we have seen in the previous lesson, if we are going to open up the Creative Cloud App, that we can right here see all the apps that we have installed. Now all these apps can communicate with each other. That means, we can import After Effects projects inside Premiere. But we can also send Photoshop documents to Premiere. But we can also send Premiere Pro to Audition, etc. The great thing about this is that we never have to export or render out our projects. Now we can just take that as we've also seen with the sequence right here, that we actually dragged to the Media Encoder right here. Actually, we were also making use of the Adobe's Dynamic Link back then. But let's take a deeper look at it right now, so that you can see what the power of the Dynamic Link actually is. Right here in my timeline, you can see that I have several clips. Now we can send these clips to another application. So let's do that. We can either select one clip or we can also select multiple clips, and when we do that, right-click on it and right here you can see that we can send it to Adobe Audition or to After Effects. Let's start with After Effects. I am going to say to replace that with an Adobe After Effects composition. So what it's doing now, it's taking these two clips. It's sending that to Adobe After Effects, which is doing right now and it's the first time that I'm opening up this application. So I have to press "Accept" for now and it's now launching the application and it's then going to take the project file from After Effects and replace that with these two clips. That is all being done automatically. So we don't have to do anything else right now, and After Effects is open. Now the first thing it will ask you, is to save that project. It cannot import a project if it doesn't really exist. If it doesn't have a location. So I'm going to browse through my computer. What I'm just going to do is select my Desktop, open up the Bike Ride folder and from here, I'm going to save this as the After Effects Project and then just press "Save." Now it is saving that project file and at the same time, it's importing those clips from the Adobe's timeline, which I have selected. Now let's go back to Premiere. Right now you can see that the After Effects projects has been inserted right here. Now this thing is linked as the name also says, to After Effects and that is all happening in real time. So let me show that to you. I'm going to head back to After Effects, there we go and I'm not going to go too deep into this because this is again a whole different course, but I'm just going to create something very basic here. Just a text. Let's say Cinecom. There we go, just going to drag this a little bigger, like so. This is something that I have done inside After Effects. Now the only thing I have to do now, is go to "File" and say "Save" and that's just saving the project file. Now when I'm going to head back to Premiere, right here, you will now see that also the project file right here is being updated due what is happening inside After Effects. So that is what the Adobe Dynamic Link does. Something very powerful, if you want to take editing more serious, because eventually you want to do your audio mixing inside a different application, your special effects inside After Effects. You recall our corrections inside Adobe speed grades, etc. Each of those applications is way more powerful in its specific way. Now let's take a look at something else. I'm going to right-click here on the first clip, and let's now head over to Adobe Audition. It's then going to again render and replace that as you can see right here, it's now replaced with an audition file. Again, it's the first time I'm launching addition on this account here on my laptop. So I'm going to press "Accept" and it's then going to open up Audition. There we go. It's now imported inside Adobe Audition. Now Audition is not asking us to save it as a project. The reason for that is because it works natively on your audio file. Again, we can make some adjustments right in here. Let's increase the volume. You can also see that at a waveform, there we go. Just save it and head back to your Premiere Pro project and right now if you've seen that flickering a little bit, it's now updated. So the volume is way louder in that clip. Now one last thing, because we have been bringing stuff from Premiere to another application. But what we can also do is bring something from another application inside Premiere. What I have right here is a Photoshop document. I think many of you already know how Photoshop somehow works. Now what I've done here, I'm not a great artist within a Photoshop. But I've actually just drawn out this bird in this picture, this pigeon and I've used this content ware tool, to cut out that pigeon. Now I've got two layers. Where I have a layer with the bird and one without the bird. Now don't mind the bird work right here, it's just an example. So what I can do now, is save this project file and I'm going to save this in my photos folder. Just name it Pigeon.psd, press "Save" then "Okay" and now I'm going to close Photoshop, I don't need that anymore. I'm going to go to my desktop, open up my bike ride folder, open up my photos and right here you can see the psd or the Photoshop document. I'm now just going to drag that Photoshop document inside Premiere Pro and then Premiere will ask me how it should import that Photoshop document. As you can see, it recognizes those layers. So I can either choose to merge these layers, but I have also the option from the drop-down menu, to have individual layers. So when I select that and then press "Okay" you can then see that a new folder has been added and inside that folder, I've got those two layers. What I can do now is take the background, drag that to video track number one and then take the bird layer and drag that up to video track number two, and now they are combined. But now inside Premiere, I can work on each layer separately, as you can see. This is very basically and very quickly how the Adobe's Dynamic Link works. It's something very good to know if you want to expand your knowledge and to learn new applications, then you can communicate with those projects that you are creating. Thanks a lot for watching. This was the last real lesson, but stay tuned because I've got one last conclusion for you left. So definitely stay tuned for that and I'll see you all in the next video. 21. Conclusion: Hey folks. Joined here for cinecom.net and welcome to, unfortunately, the last lesson of this course. I'm going to leave you with a final conclusion to everything you've learned. First of all, congratulations, you are an awesome person for completing this course. You have now learned the fundamentals of Premiere Pro. This is how the application works and how professional film editors work in it. The many techniques I've learned you might come overwhelming. You might still be struggling with some things like many of my students do with key framing but that's completely normal. Try to re-watch the lessons that you're struggling with and keep on practicing. A good tip that I can give you is to make a little short film. It's very hard to practice a technique or a new piece of software if you don't really have a goal. By creating a short film, you have a goal. It doesn't have to be big. You can ask your friends to play in your film, but then you have something to work with and, a goal to finish that short film. If you're watching this course from cinecom.net, then prepare yourself now for an upcoming quiz. If you pass the test, when your results higher than 70 percent, you will receive an official certificate to hang up your wall. At cinecom.net you can also click on the support page where I shall further assist you with all your questions or problems and don't forget to like our Facebook page to stay updated on new courses, news and tricks and tips. Thank you very much for participating in this course and I wish you all the success with Premiere Pro. My name is Jordy your instructor for cinecom.net.