Learn Perspective in Procreate - One-Point Perspective | The Artmother | Skillshare

Playback Speed


  • 0.5x
  • 1x (Normal)
  • 1.25x
  • 1.5x
  • 2x

Learn Perspective in Procreate - One-Point Perspective

teacher avatar The Artmother, Professional Art Teacher and Artist

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

19 Lessons (2h 46m)
    • 1. Introduction

      4:22
    • 2. Your Project

      6:50
    • 3. Perspective Basics RECAP

      5:51
    • 4. One Point Perspective

      3:32
    • 5. One Point Perspective Practice

      13:07
    • 6. Project 1 - Furniture - Inspiration

      3:28
    • 7. Project 1 - Furniture - The Sketch

      13:49
    • 8. Using the Brushes

      5:15
    • 9. Project 1 - Furniture - Painting

      13:05
    • 10. One Point Perspective in a Room

      4:28
    • 11. Project 2 - Room - The Sketch

      15:35
    • 12. Project 2 - Painting the Room Part 1.

      5:27
    • 13. Project 2 - Painting the Room Part 2.

      10:10
    • 14. Project 2 - Painting the Room Part 3.

      10:31
    • 15. One Point Perspective in Landscapes

      7:09
    • 16. One Point Perspective in Landscapes - Practice

      14:36
    • 17. Project 3 - Streetview - The Sketch

      16:30
    • 18. Project 3 - Painting the Streetview

      9:58
    • 19. Final Thoughts

      2:17
  • --
  • Beginner level
  • Intermediate level
  • Advanced level
  • All levels
  • Beg/Int level
  • Int/Adv level

Community Generated

The level is determined by a majority opinion of students who have reviewed this class. The teacher's recommendation is shown until at least 5 student responses are collected.

543

Students

29

Projects

About This Class

Welcome to the „Entering Space – Learn Perspective in Procreate“ mini class series. In each mini-class we are exploring a type of perspective. In this class you will learn how to apply One Pont Perspective to your work.

One point perspective is the next step after understanding linear perspective and the basics, like placement, size and color usage, so I definitely recommend to take at first the class that explores these, namely: Entering Space – An introduction to Perspective in Procreate.

However, this class can also stand alone – you will be guided through simple, easy and practical exercises to be able to apply the knowledge – you will draw a furniture, a room and a landscape in one point perspective.

The class is perfect for total beginners and more experienced artists can also take away someting from it. It is a great choice for anyone who is not yet incorporating perspective in their art or they are stuck at a level or they are  just not confident enough when it comes to perspective and don’t really understand the „Why?“- s. Adding space to your art might be intimidating, but in this class we will go step-by-step and dismiss all your fears.

It is crucial to at some point add space to your art. If you want to depict 3D objects, at a level, shading alone will not be enough. Learning how to get the right orientation of these objects, the right angles and placement, will make you more confident while illustrating and and will make your artworks look more professional. By the end of this class you will have a skillset that you can rely on anytime in the future.

We will use an iPad and Procreate to complete this class, but other digital programs, like Photoshop can be also used. 

The class comes with 10 worksheets  a completely new Brush Pack and 6 color palettes.

This mini-class series is unique - there is no other course or program like this out there. These mini classes break down a complicated topic to digestible bits and doable projects, they combine basic theory with professional tips and a step-by-step instruction by which you learn by doing and apply the newly gained knowledge right away. After completing the class, you will be ready to add space to your art, how amazing is that?!

So, are you ready to dive deep into one point perspective? Let’s get started!

Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

The Artmother

Professional Art Teacher and Artist

Teacher

Welcome! My name is Alexandra Finta - a passionate artist, a happy mother and an enthusiastic teacher - in short The Artmother. I am a professional art teacher with a Masters Degree in Art Education with years of experience in teaching in person and online. As an artist, I am creating in all different kinds of mediums from acrylics, watercolors, graphite and digital. I have years of experience in graphic design and photography. 

For more info check out my website here: www.theartmother.com

Follow me on Instagram and Facebook:)

I am very passionate about helping very beginners to explore their artistic abilities and to build their confidence in creating art, so I&... See full profile

Class Ratings

Expectations Met?
  • Exceeded!
    0%
  • Yes
    0%
  • Somewhat
    0%
  • Not really
    0%
Reviews Archive

In October 2018, we updated our review system to improve the way we collect feedback. Below are the reviews written before that update.

Why Join Skillshare?

Take award-winning Skillshare Original Classes

Each class has short lessons, hands-on projects

Your membership supports Skillshare teachers

Learn From Anywhere

Take classes on the go with the Skillshare app. Stream or download to watch on the plane, the subway, or wherever you learn best.

Transcripts

1. Introduction: Welcome to the entering space: Learn Perspective in Procreate mini-class series. In each mini class, we are exploring the type of perspective and in this class, you will learn how to apply one-point perspective to your work. Throughout this class, we are going to go through three different situations or scenarios, how you can apply it to your work. We are going to go from small to big. We are going to illustrate a piece of furniture, a full room, and a street view. You will be carefully guided through the theory and practical exercises. So no worries, you will be all set for a successful class project. Hi, my name is Alexandra aka The Artmother. I'm an artist, illustrator, online educator and my passion is to teach complicated art topics to beginners. One-point perspective is the next step after understanding linear perspective and the basics like placement, size, and color usage. I definitely recommend to take the first class from the series Entering Space: an Introduction to Perspective in Procreate that explores these. However, this class can also stand alone. If you missed that class, don't worry, you can get back to it later and continue with this one. We are going to go through the key points in a recap video, but if you want to go deeper into them, visit the class for sure. This mini-class series is perfect for total beginners and more experienced artists can also take away something from it. It is a great choice for anyone who is not yet incorporating perspective to their art or they are stuck at a level or are not confident enough when it comes to perspective. Adding space to your art might be intimidating, but in this class, we are going to go step-by-step and make you ready to use the knowledge in practice. It is crucial at some point to add space to your art. If you want to depict three-dimensional objects at a level, shading alone will not be enough. Learning how to get the right orientation, placement, angles will make you more confident while illustrating and make your works look more professional. By the end of this class, you will have a skill set that you can rely on at any project in the future. Basically, no prior knowledge is required to take this class. I'm going to use an iPad and Procreate so a working knowledge of the program is recommended. However, I'm going to go really step-by-step, comment on everything, leave notes here and there so that you can easily follow along. You can take a class in different softwares like Rita or Photoshop, or even traditionally, because this theory apply to all surfaces and mediums where you are translating the three-dimensional world to a two-dimensional surface. But if you use these other mediums, you will need to adjust the stats for yourself. The class comes with cool resources. You will get 10 worksheets, a completely new brush pack, six color palettes, and also my sketches that you can modify and use if you need. This mini-class series is unique. There is no other learning program like this out there. These mini-classes breakdown a complicated topic to digestible bits and doable projects. They combine basic theory with professional tips and step-by-step guidance. After completing this class, you will be ready to add space to your art. How amazing is that? Are you ready to dive deep into one-point perspective? If yes, let's get started. 2. Your Project: Welcome. I am so happy to have you in the class. In this video, I would love to talk to you about the structure of the class, the project for this class, and the resources that come with the class. At first, I designed his glass in a way that it slowly builds up your skill of applying one-point perspective in different scenarios. The main point of the class is creating the sketches themselves. However, we will create free full illustrations together. You will create the sketches with my guidance, and you are free to paint or illustrate the artwork in your style or in a way that you like it. I am going to show you how I illustrate it and you can follow me as well but, basically, I will love you to make art works that are yours. The projects that we are going to create will make you to think from small to big. We are going to illustrate a piece of furniture, a complete room and then a street view. Before every project, there will be a theoretical video which explains the application of one-point perspective, then comes a little practice video where you'll just roughly practice it, decomposition, and then we are going to create a sketch and then paint it. We are going to do this three times in the class, so this is going to be a bit long and heavy, but you'll really enjoy because these projects are totally fun. You can find the resources in the projects in Resources section below the video when you are in a browser. I also included a resource list to make sure that you have everything. In the resources, you will find a worksheets I have created. They will be used during the videos and they will include everything I created during the class, so all my sketches and layers, etc. They are not necessary to complete the class. You can just follow the videos and create an empty canvas for yourself and create notes or your sketches. Don't restrict yourself to these worksheets. I also created a completely new brush set with a liner, a shader, a shaper, a texturer as detailed brush. You will have all the function brushes you need to have. Feel free to use these brushes during your projects. Again, you are free to use your own favorite brushes as well, and you are free to use them in the future too. I'm also including six color palettes specially picked by me, and named by me. Also, you are free to use them and you are free to change colors in them. These are just resources to help you, don't feel like obligated to use them or to restrict yourself or limit yourself with them. Regarding the sketches, I am providing my sketches to all of the projects. This is a hub for very beginners. I don't want you to copy everything I do. I will love you to modify these sketches if you are not confident enough to create your own sketches. Modify them at least, but I would be most happy if you would create artworks from scratch following my videos. Maybe it will be in a way that you first modify my sketch and create an artifact from it, and then later, you try it on your own. In my opinion, the most important thing is to enjoy the process and learn with that. If you are too much fearing yourself to create something from scratch, don't put yourself into an uncomfortable situation. But if you feel creative, I totally encourage you to step outside your comfort zone and create something beautiful that is really your own. With all these worksheets, brushes, color palettes, and sketches, you will be set for a successful class project. I am really excited about them. I always love to look at your artworks, because you are so creative and you blow my mind. At first, I will allow if you would build up your class projects continuously. If you have the first artwork, upload it to the project gallery and then update your project, with the artworks, with the process photos, anything you would love to share, I will be happy to read them and react to your creations. I am personally giving feedback to every project that comes in. Student projects make across a whole, so I would really love you if you would contribute to the class with yourself. When you are sharing your artworks, make sure to tag me @theartmother on Instagram and on Facebook as well. You are also welcome to share your artwork in The Artmother's Online Artroom Facebook Group, which is an exclusive community for my students, and you need to answer the questions to get in. Make sure to follow me here on Skillshare so that you get notified about the latest classes and my announcements and updates and follow me on social media, on Instagram and Facebook for the same reason. When the review books pops up, I would really love to hear what you think about the class. Please give a little time to give me a review. It is such a great reward. I think that's it for this video. Let's move on to the next one where I'm going to give you a little recap on the entering space and introduction to perspective in Procreate mini-class episode. If you have taken that class, you can skip that video, but I think it would be good to just do a little recap on what we have learned. I'll see you there. 3. Perspective Basics RECAP: I dedicate this video to a quick summary of the key points from the first class from these mini-class series, as we will need to apply them in this class as well. That class was called Entering Space, Introduction to Perspective in Procreate and we were exploring linear perspective. The first thing we have learned is that in drawing, we have to translate the three-dimensional world to a two-dimensional surface and there are some tools that help us with it. At first, shading is what helps us to give dimension to the shapes we create. For example, if you have a circle and we shade it, we get a sphere. But when talking about perspective, we are not talking about this kind of a dimension. Perspective is about the placement, size, and orientation of objects. The tools perspective uses is the horizon line and the vanishing point. Let's talk about the horizon line. The horizon line is the line between the sky and the land. But basically it can be any line that divides the ground from the space above it as well. What we need to know about the horizon line is first, that we can influence the position of the viewer with the placement of the horizon line. For example, if we place it lower-end image, we become the part of the scene. If we place it higher, it gives the illusion as if we were looking at the scene from above. Then the second is that things that are closer are drawn lower on the image. In a greater distance from the horizon line and also the opposite. Things that are further away from us are drawn higher, so closer to the horizon line. Just take a look at these two dots. This is smaller and closer to the horizon line, so it appears like in a distance and this is closer to us. Can you see that? It is further away from the horizon line and it is bigger. Also, this is the golden rule of perspective, that things that are closer look bigger than things that are further away. Take a look at my hand or my ring. It is closer, it looks bigger. Then I put it far away and it appears smaller. There was another rule we have learned regarding color. Colors closer to us appear darker, more saturated and warmer than colors that are further as they get cooler, paler and brighter. As I already told you, we were exploring linear perspective, and in linear perspective, we only have a horizon line, so we haven't dealt with vanishing points yet. This linear perspective is great for a simple, stylized scenes where there aren't any 3D objects like buildings. Let's just take a look on the simple scene we have created in that class and also how it can be applied to a more complicated illustration. This was the little scene we have created and let's just take a look on the rules we had. This is the horizon line and we don't have a vanishing point, just a horizon line. Things that are further away are closer to the horizon line. As you can see, the bunny and things that are closer to us are further away from the horizon line. Take a look at the colors, things that are closer are darker and they get paler in a distance. Also things that are close, they are bigger, so this little bushes or rocks, are drawn this big because they are close to us. As the horizon line is placed this low, we are part of the scene. Now let's see this illustration that I have created to a different class. It is the same exact built-up or composition of the scene. We have a horizon line here. We have the colors getting paler at the background, which creates the illusion of depth. This unicorn mama is drawn lower from the horizon line. She's closer, she's a bit further away. He is a bit further away, also this bush, so you can really see the distances by drawing these elements closer or further from the horizon line. Another tool that helps us with perspective is a vanishing point. It is a point of disappearance on the horizon line, and we didn't have it in the linear perspective. It is going to be introduced in this class. There can be several quantities. Obviously, we have one vanishing point in one point perspective, two in two point perspective, and three in three point perspective. We are going to explore these last two in other classes. As you can see, with the vanishing point, we have a three-dimensional object and the sides are running into the vanishing point, which helps us with the orientation of the objects. But we are going to discuss it in the next video. All right, I think we have gone through all the principles that we will need to keep in mind during the process. See you in the next lesson where we will start our journey with One Point Perspective. 4. One Point Perspective: In this lesson, we are going to explore one-point perspective. We already made it clear that you need a horizon line on your drawings. If you have one vanishing point on this line, you will get a one-point perspective. This type of a perspective is typically used for images of roads, railway tracks, hallways or buildings viewed, so that the front is directly facing the viewer. It is not for more complex drawings where the front side of the object is not facing us, but it is in an angle. The vanishing point is always on the horizon line and you can place it anywhere on it. Generally the horizon line represents our eye level, so the place we are looking at objects from. One thing I have introduced to you already is the thought that the horizon line is the line between the sky and the land, and it is true, but we don't always have sky and the land when we are looking at, for example, furniture. Basically, the horizon line is our eye level. I'll just turn on this. On this image we have some cuboids placed in different positions to the horizon line. You can see that objects that are placed below the horizon line look as if we would look at them from above. The cuboid that crosses the horizon line, looks more like it is on the level of our eye, and the one placed above the horizon line looks as if we would look at it from below. If you take a look at this cuboids, their front side is fully facing us, and all side lines are running into the vanishing point. I will show you. The front is facing us and all the side lines are running into the vanishing point. But what about objects that are not cuboids? I have created some alternative shapes that have a different front base. These are some alternatives, a letter, a triangle, a cylinder, and a heart. The same applies to them. They are also geometric shapes. One of the most important realizations in drawing is that everything can be broken down into basic geometric shapes, and by realizing this we convert with proportions and perspective more precisely. In this class, we are focusing on real basics and easy application. But these theories apply to more advanced creations as well, for example, to objects that are not necessarily perfect geometric shapes like this, but more organic or complex. In this video, we explore the basics of one-point perspective. Let's move on to the next one where you are going to practice by drawing some cuboids and shapes, so see you there. 5. One Point Perspective Practice: In this video, we are going to try out one-point perspective in practice. We're going to draw some cuboids and a 3D letter. Turn all the layers apart from the horizon line and vanishing point and create a new layer. The process I'm following when drawing things in one-point perspective is that I start with drawing the front. To help us with it, go to the wrench button and hit Drawing Guide. You can go to Edit Drawing Guide and see what tools we have in Procreate. We have the perspective of drawing guide where you chose Perspective and hit on the Canvas and you can place the vanishing point. But we are going to use this tool later. Choose the 2D Grid, and that will help us with drawing the front of our cuboid. Hit "Done", and I will just make it a bit bigger so that you can see what I'm doing. This layer is going to be the front of our shapes. I will choose white and choose 6B Pencil from Sketching. I will start with drawing a cube somewhere or anywhere. It can be a rectangle as well. I will use these guides to help me to draw these front size. Its lines will be horizonal and vertical now. This is the front. I will create a layer below it, and this will be my guideline layer. I will choose a light orange for it so that you can see what I'm doing. What I'm going to do is to connect the edge points of this shape with the vanishing point. I'm just going to use the quick shape function, which means that I draw a line, hold down and it will straighten, and gets really straight lines. Now I have the guidelines. Now I will go back to this front layer, choose white again, and decide on the dimension. Now, these lines will follow the line of the front shape now. I will draw it like this and this. It has to be parallel to the horizon line. Now I will create a top layer to define the shape. I will choose a pink color for it, and I'm just going to redrawing. This will help you to understand how this works. These are side lines of this cube. Not 100 percent perfect, but we are now practicing. I will turn off this and I have a nice cube. Now let's do another one. Go to this front side layer, choose white again. Now let's try rectangle that crosses the horizon line. It will be as if a building, for example. I'm drawing it like this. I will go to the guideline layer, choose this orange again, and I will connect these two edges with the vanishing point. Now, am I not connecting these two because they will not be seen, if that makes sense. I will go to the front layer again, choose white, and decide on the dimension of this building. As you can see, if I put my line here, this building would look like longer. If I put this line here, it is a thinner building. Again, I go to the top and try to define the shape again. You don't need to do this stuff. But this is really just for you to understand how these shapes really look like or forms. Maybe that's a better expression. Now if I turn off these, I have a nice building here. Obviously, if it is a building, you cannot see the line behind it. Now let's try something more complicated and let's choose a letter. Let it be the letter of your first name. I'm Alexandra, so it will be a three-dimensional A letter. I will draw a letter. Why isn't it showing? I will turn it on. It will be a bit more complicated because we will have angles here as well. Make it a geometric letter. If it is too complicated for you now, you can leave it. This is just to show you how to create dimension in a more complicated shape that has like as if holes in it. I will go to the guideline layer, choose this orange and connect. I needed to own this layer and connect these edges with the vanishing point. Now I will connect these two points as well, this is too thick, because we can see through them. Go to the front layer again, choose white and choose how deep or how big this letter will be, I will make it thin. Again, I'm drawing parallel lines also to decide. This back part will be parallel. I will try to catch this linked at the back as well, and here as well. I will redraw it at the top layer again. This is a great practice to understand how these lines work. I will turn this off. I have a three-dimensional letter. I missed a line here. Maybe like this. I have a three-dimensional A letter. Well, your task is to draw at least these three shapes. You can try out a cuboid from the top as well. Above the horizon line to see how you can see it as from below, if that makes sense. What I want to show you now is a bit more advanced, so you don't need to do this. I just want you to understand how this works with shapes that don't have a geometric base, but a round base, for example, a mug. I will turn this off now and create a new layer. I will draw a circle here, hold down, edit shape, circle. Now, this circle also has lines inside. These are the diagonals it has inside. Try to identify the middle point of this circle, so you can draw these diagonals of it. Now you have a middle circle. I will again create a guideline layer below and choose the orange, and I will connect this middle point with the vanishing point. Now if I go to the circle, as you can see it is not 100 percent perfect, so it will not be that perfect, but to understand how ellipses work in space. I will select this circle and hit Distort, and what I need to do is to distort this circle in a way that this line stays horizonal, and this line will run into these guideline. It is a bit of a play. I have an ellipse now. This line runs into the guideline and this line is horizonal, and I will duplicate it and put it here. Now, I will need to make sure that this line stays vertical and go back to the guideline, and again connect this middle point and distort this upper ellipse again so that it runs into this guideline. But it has to stay this big. Something like that. As you can see, this ellipse is a lot smaller than this one, because in this eye level, we can't see the top that much. What I'm going to do is to choose the white again. I will just connect this, not perfect. Anyhow, I will just put this here and create a top layer and redraw it so that you can understand what I meant by this. I need to turn this over. I have a mark. This ellipse is a bit bigger than this one. At this eye level, I can't really see the top and at the horizon line it'll be just be a simple line. This was just for demonstration to see how this would work with an ellipse. You really don't need to do this exercise. Just started with the cuboids because that is a beginner level. I just wanted to show you how this would work with an ellipse. Well done. Now we have practiced one-point perspective on some geometric shapes. Let's move on to the first project of the class and draw a piece of furniture. 6. Project 1 - Furniture - Inspiration: Are you ready? In this first project, we are going to create a piece of furniture in one-point perspective, but before we start, let's see some examples from real artworks in which it was applied. The first thing I want to point out is that applying one-point perspective doesn't necessarily has to be complicated. Applying it just where it is necessary in a simple illustration can already make your artwork look professional and believable, and also it doesn't necessarily has to be applied perfectly. Let's take a look on the artwork of hebe studio. I just found her on Instagram and her artworks look incredible. Take a look at this furniture, the angles of the shelves change with their level, the sides run approximately to the same point, giving us the illusion of doubt. I love how simply it is solved. You can see the room itself was kept stylized without any further application of perspective, for example, on the floor, apart from placing other objects in different distances from the horizon line. Now, let's take a look on the wonderful artwork of poopikat. I love her style, check out her other artworks as well. Now I would only allow to focus on the door, this lovely house has. Can you see? By drawing the door with the top and the bottom sides running towards each other, she simply created perspective. If we identify the vanishing point approximately, we can see that most of the lines, for example here. Let's say this and this side of the door runs to this point and vanishing point is approximately here. You can see that these lines, for example, on the window seal follow this direction, but it is still not overdone. Basically what I want to say is that you don't need to over-complicate this. You can start applying one-point perspective to your work with baby steps and also keep it simple. All right, I hope you're inspired now, I I'm. What we are going to do is to draw a piece of furniture. I'm going to design a completely new one, and we are going to apply the one-point perspective to it. The front side of it is going to face us. In this project, we are going to use procreates built in perspective tool that you can find in Canvas and drawing guide. I will show you in a second, but we are going to also draw the horizon line and vanishing point for an easier workflow. Okay, so I think that's all. See you in the next video where we're going to start, right with Project 1. 7. Project 1 - Furniture - The Sketch: Let's do this. The first thing you need to do is to go to the Layers and turn off the layer of the worksheet and turn on the examples. I have created two sketches for you that you can use for your project. There will be the sketch as well that I'm going to create in this lesson. Just take a look at this. This is a furniture, this is a drawer. I have placed the horizon line here and placed the whole furniture below it, so all the lines are running into the vanishing point. The process is the same as I described it in the cuboid when we were drawing them. I designed the front and then selected these edges and connected them to the vanishing point and then decided on the dimension of the furniture. Now, here at the door, I have placed the horizon line here, I have the vanishing point in the center, and I have placed the door over the horizon line. As you can see, this is facing me and the door is open to the inside of the space, so it is running to the vanishing point as well. You can do this and any kind of furniture. Now, I am going to design a completely new one based on the inspiration I've got from the artworks that we have seen. I'm going to turn off these examples again. You can use these front painting part or you can just use them as a reference for creating a new one. You can modify these drawings or you can design new one. I'm going to create a new layer. What I'm going to use as a help is the drawing guide, again, the two degreed at first. The first thing is to decide where the horizon line will be. I'm going to choose a color, choose the 6B pencil, and just place the horizon line. I'm going to just place it here, so hold it down to make it straight and choose a point for your vanishing point. I will keep this layer turned on and I'll create a new one. Choose black and keep the 6B pencil because I'm going to just sketch. I will start with the front of the furniture, so we need to decide on its main shape and draw it. I will create a furniture that is crossing this horizon line. I'll make it bigger like this. I'm using this two degree to help me. This is going to be the bottom. I got really inspired with the artworks we have seen, so I thought that it will have an arc at the top. But you, again, don't really need to do this. Just make it simple. Now that we have it, we need to define these edges that will run into the vanishing point. So I will create a new layer below this catch, choose my orange, and choose these guidelines. I will connect them to this vanishing point. Now, I will duplicate this front. Select it, make it smaller, and decide on the depth of this furniture. How deep these shelves will be? I will make this a bit smaller and make sure that these dots are on these guidelines. This technique will help you to understand the dots and to define the back of the furniture. Now we have it and I will turn it off and turn off the guidelines as well. Now what I'm going to do is to go to this front and choose black and the 6B pencil and start to design the whole front of the furniture. It will have a bit of an edge like this. Yeah, it will have some legs. I love this rounded shapes. I'm going to make it smaller. It will have a cardboard like thing at the bottom with some little doors and I'll add these handles to it. Now, this is the little fun design work. I will make this top straight so that I have an easier job. Try to work with straight lines as much as possible now because it will make your work a lot more easier. I will make some decorative elements to the top. I will add a flower here and some spirals that I really love. Now I will place some shelves. The shelves, I'll place them here. Have again, these rectangular shapes like as if it was wood so it has a thickness. I will place another one up here. Now I have the design of my furniture and now I need to add daps to it. I will turn on this back. Now we can try out the perspective guide. Go to Canvas, Edit Drawing Guide, and hit Perspective and click on the vanishing point that you have decided on. You can change the color of these guidelines so that you can see them as much as possible. Set the opacity to maximum, and you can set the thickness as well so that you can really see what is happening here, and you can really see all the lines that are running into this vanishing point that you can obviously move around. Hit "Done". Now actually you can continue. You have the front, you have the back. We will erase from it, because we don't see the back all the time. What I'm going to do is to select the 6B pencil, go to the front. Let's create a new layer for this sidelines, so that we don't mess up this sketch. Now, when these lines are not exactly running into the vanishing point, you can just simply help yourself. Here is a joint or an add that I want to connect with the vanishing point, so I just do so and then erase from it like this. Let's do this on the other side as well. I will erase from it like this. Now, I will connect vertically these two lines. Now, let's do this shelf. As you can see, as we are about the horizon line, we are connecting these lower joints with the vanishing point. Let's go to this shelf. I'm connecting this line, not this one because I will not see that, I'm connecting this lower points. Again, I will erase from it until this edge. This is the side. Again, I am going to connect these two. Let's do this shelf. I can just simply connect. Now as we are below the horizon line, below the eye level, we can see the top of the shelf. Again, I am connecting this upper joint with the vanishing point and erasing back from it. When you will have the eye for it, you don't need to connect, you will just see the direction these shelves have to go. Again, you don't need to be perfect with this. Your lines don't necessarily have to be precise. When you will have the eye, you can just make it more freely, just dry it out. I will see the top of this cupboard thing as well. I will connect it, but I don't want to go that much there because I will need to erase from it and I don't want to. I will just keep the direction and make it as small and connect again this too. We have shelves. What do we need to do is to erase from this back part and select a layer of this back part and erase what you cannot see, for example, this one. You and I cannot see is through these shelves. At the bottom, I don't see this. Now I have a wonderful furniture. Can you say that? Was it too complicated? I can see that this line is really not nice. I will merge these layers together now. I will just select them and merge them and now I can adjust that a bit. It is not vertical. Something is wrong, but it doesn't matter. This is just practice again. You don't need to do this complicated furniture, it can be something easier. Now I will just turn off the drawing guide and turn off the horizon line with the vanishing point and voila. It looks incredible. What do we need to do now is to spend a little time on adding details. I will put something on the shelves. Let it be free so you don't need to apply now one-point perspective or anything. I will put a little flowerpot here with some flowers. Maybe, I don't know, I will put a radio here. I know radios don't look like this now, but let it be a vintage radio and some books. I will erase from this and place some books and maybe a picture. I will place a little rock below it. I love to create these rounded rocks. Amazing. You don't need to continue with the room itself, we are just going to put a color behind it, and we will have complete illustration. You can obviously continue with it if you wish. You can add the floor. You can put some images on the wall, that's totally on you. I'm just going to paint this. See you in the next video where I'm going to show you how to use the brushes for painting, and then we are going to paint it. 8. Using the Brushes: All right, so I have turned everything off and I'm just going to show you how to use the brushes for painting. I will create a new layer and choose a color palette. You have six of them and I will stay with the eclectic boho now. Yeah, it is set as default and choose a color. Let's say I will choose this dark green. Now about the brushes, Go to the painterly brush set and you can see that there's a detail brush, dropshadow smooth, dropshadow hard, rough texture, shader texture and shaper. I will start with a shaper. This is a word I invented. I created a brush for you by which you can create shapes easily. I will create a rectangle, for example, I would create a drawer now. Rectangle. Wonderful, okay? I will just fill it with a color. I will make it bigger so that you can see it. You define a shape, let it be circle or our rectangle and a shape. I will follow a kit and choose shader texture. I will choose a darker color to say that. Let it be this one? Maybe. I will make it bigger and I can add a shading with a bit of a texture to it. I don't like this, make it bigger, lightly I will go through it. It will have a shading, a bit of it. I can add texture as well, or I will add a bit of a texture also with lighter color. To make a bigger variety within the color, it has texture, it has a beautiful shading now. I will create a new layer and create a circle to the middle as well. I need shape, circle, fill it. I will place it to the center. Again, I will alpha lock this shape and do the same by that. I will choose a darker color with the shader texture. I will go over it with a lighter color. I will add the beautiful lights to the top of it. Like this maybe. I will go to this drawer shape and maybe add a bit of a rough texture to it. Let's see how it looks. Yeah, cool. It looks really vintage. I will add to this shape as well like this. Looks cool. All right, and now what about the drop shadow hard? The dropshadow hard is for drop shadow, as it says. You need to choose black for it. It is a transparent brush by which I will go to this base layer by which you can add a drop shadow to it. I will add a bit of a shadow to this bottom part with this hard dropshadow and with the smooth dropshadow, you can create this inclusions where things touch, there will be a shadow I will make it a bit smaller. I will add a bit of a shadow below this handle so that it can be seen. It has gradation already. You can create really nice shadows. Looks cool, and now choose the detail brush. I will choose a really light green for this. I will just simply add wooden texture. I will make it smaller with the wood and texture to it. Lightly. I also wanted to handle just little bit. Okay. Does this, a vintage wooden drawer? You can see how purposefully you can use these brushes. I think it looks pretty amazing. I love these textures. I'm going to apply this painting process today, furniture itself. See you in the next video and let's paint it together. 9. Project 1 - Furniture - Painting: I will turn this off, I will start with that and turn on these catching layer and create a new layer. What you need to do is to place this new layer below this catch and make it opaque so that you can save for it and also make it to multiply in the blending modes, again, so that it is easier for you to paint. Now we are on the layer below this couch, I will choose this dark green and choose the shaper. Now, I will set it to the maximum opacity and start painting. I will just speed this up. What I'm going to do is to fill in the main shapes with color. I have the front now and I will create a new layer for the back and I think it will be, maybe a bit darker color like this, but not that much. I will just choose a darker color, which this colored palette, just keep in mind that you can freely add and remove colors as you wish. I will create a new layer below this front and just simply fill this back. Make sure to have all the shapes well-painted. That it actually follows your sketch, not 100 percent, but it should. Now, let's move to the sides. I will create a new layer for the sides. You can think about the light, how is it hitting? Obviously, this back is darker because there is not enough light coming today. But we decide, let's choose different color, I will choose this one. What I'm going to do is to make this vague and just simply paint. I will place this layer below the back. Let's go for the shelves. I will create again a new layer for the shelves. I will just choose a green, maybe a bit lighter, and just add the shelves. Oops. Maybe layer on the top of the back part. Here, I need to erase this. Here as I see the bottom of the shelf, It will be darker, I will choose, again, a darker color. Looks nice. Let's add texture, what I'm going to do is to Alpha lock all these layers. At first, I will the beautiful shadow to the front. I will choose this darker color as I've done it previously, and I will choose the shader texture and just add a bit of shading to it. Not that, but the front. Yeah. Now, I will add the rough texture, with this light. Wow, this looks great. I love this. Let's go to the back. It is Alpha locked as well, yes, and I will choose this darker green to add texture to it. Let it have the texture as well, but I will go with the shader texture and just add some shadows below these shelves. Fun. Let's go to the sides. I will again add this green so that it is not that brownish, but it has a bit of these green color as well. It has become a bit lighter, but it looks great. Now let's go to the shelves and here they are. Alpha lock them and I will go to this dark part and add that a bit of green there as well. To the top, I will choose this dark brown and the shader texture, and just add a bit darker color there. It looks amazing. Let's try to look at it without the sketch and it looks great. But I will need to add these lines to create a new layer above everything. I will go to the sketching and let's try with the 6-bit pencil. Turn off this one. It looks fine. I will need to add lines here and here so that it's a bit more illustrational. I will create a new layer and add these handles down here. I will Alpha lock them and I will, again, shade the with the shader texture. I'll make it smaller and add a rough texture with this really light green, a smaller version. I will add shadow and below them, so create a layer below them, choose the drop shadow smooth, choose black, and add a bit of shadow. I will add some legs, I will turn this on. Create a new layer for the legs. Yeah, a new layer will be okay. Create a new layer. I will make them this dark. Oops. I will use the shaper for this. Alpha lock it, and choose this light green for adding a bit of light to it. Let's continue with adding, let's say at first, the wooden texture. What I'm going to do is to select the layer of front and create a new layer above it. By this, I will be able to draw only to the shape of the front, I can also create a clipping mask, but I love to do it this way. I will choose this light green and detail brush, and I will just add some fun, wooden texture. I will create a new layer. I'll choose even lighter brush and add these lovely decorative elements. Now I can really continue with adding the things into it. I will just deselect, create a new layer, and choose a different color. I will turn the sketch back on and I will add some orange things. What will be orange? I will choose the shaper or make it smaller. Maybe the flower pot will be orangey. Amazing. How fun, right? I will, again, choose a drop shadow, let it be the drop shadow hard, and let's put it below this picture, and where things touch, we just add a bit of a shadow, whether. It looks great. Maybe to the back as well. I will choose a color for the background and I choose this pink, but maybe make it a bit lighter, more saturated. Yeah, it looks great. I will add the rug. Create a layer below it all and choose the shaper, dark pink. Okay. It looks nice. I'm thinking maybe I will add a floor with this dark color. Let's just try it. I will choose the shaper. Yeah, it looks better now, and I will Alpha lock this and maybe add a bit off an orangey, rough texture, let's just try it. No, it doesn't look good, so choose this and let's go a bit lighter to add rough texture to the floor. Voila. I call this finished. I will turn off the sketching layer and if you miss some lines, or miss some shadows, or objects, just work on it. I think the back of this could be a bit darker, so I will choose the back. I will go to adjustments, hue saturation, brightness, layer, and I will make it a bit darker. I just love how this turned out. I'm so happy with this illustration. It is so eclectic. It was so much fun to create that and I'm sure yours looks pretty amazing as well. Now you know how to apply one-point perspective to a piece of furniture, and you can start building your class project by uploading this first piece to your class project. Now, let's move on to the next level, where we are going to expand our views and draw a full room. See you in the next lesson. 10. One Point Perspective in a Room: Let's open the next worksheet, one point perspective in a room. Before we jump right into the second project where we are going to draw a room, I would love to take a minute to explain how we are going to go during the process, and see some examples. At first, the process of creating a room will be similar to the furniture drawing. However, now we need to focus mainly on main lines and directions. At first we need to define the room itself. I suggest that you roughly follow my instructions during the process, but feel free to solve it your way. Choose the type of room that you like, add furniture that you like, and add details that will make this room yours. We will define a huge cube as our room, similarly as we did with the cuboids, but now we will have only one giant one. We will have a back wall with a window, two side walls with some pictures, a door, and at least two furniture in the room. For example, a wardrobe and a desk, or just a desk and a plant, or a bed, etc. You are free to add more furniture, more details, whatever you like. I just suggest to at first keep it simple to get the grasp of it, and then later work on more complicated projects so that you do not get overwhelmed. Let's take a look on the references. At first take a look at the artwork of Benji Davis. I just found him on Instagram. He's a great illustrator, and this is the illustration I want to talk about. Just take a look at this illustration, so cute and simple, he changed the base room shape to a house shape, if I can call it like that, and the whole room follows this shape. Again, you can use one point perspective only as a guide as nature isn't always perfect. Take a look on the desk here, for example. It doesn't really follow the rules, but it fits the room and the illustration perfectly. The second illustration I love to show you is from itsyadar. If I am saying that right, he's drawing rooms, which is pretty cool, and he is applying one point perspective like a genius. Here are several types of rooms, and I would love to show you the kitchen that I fell in love with. Just a second. Here it is. Incredible, just look at it. How many details? I love how he plays with light too, so your artwork can be this detailed as well. I suggest you take a look at his work. There are several types of rooms, so you can really get inspired. Lastly, I would love to show you an iconic artwork using one point perspective. It is Vincent van Gogh's, Bedroom in Arles. He's using one point perspective in it, and I am sure you already know this picture. I think this is the original one. Again, as you can see, the lines not necessarily follow all the rules, but it is giving a shape to the room, and makes it look really in space. That is our focus. You don't need to go into that detail. Feel free to solve this illustration as you wish. I'm going to follow my own illustration style, which is unperfect realism. But again, feel free to do however you want. Just make sure to follow the base rules so that you understand it. All right, so what I want from you now is to decide on the type of the room, if it will be a kitchen, bedroom, bathroom, and then let's meet you in the next video where we are going to create a room. 11. Project 2 - Room - The Sketch: In the second project, we are going to create a room. It can be any type. I would love to create a place or a spot where you can read books because I'm really into books now, and my favorite spot from my own home is where my yellow sofa is. I guess I will include it in my illustration. You can get inspiration from Pinterest or looking at homes, or take a look at your own home and look for your favorite spots. I have my favorite spot in my mind, but I'm going to go through Pinterest as well. I love this one so much. You don't need to look for a one-point perspective at this time. Just find inspiration for colors maybe, or arrangement of the room. You can get ideas for furniture or decoration that you would love to include in the illustration. I will put this aside and let's just go to the project 2 worksheet and turn off the layer of the worksheet. I'm going to do the exact same thing we've done in the furniture drawing, in the first project. I will create a new layer and go to the Canvas, Drawing Guide and select the 2D Grid. Now, select any color. Choose the 6B Pencil and define the horizon line. Now, this horizon line will not be the line between the ground and the walls. It will be your eye level. I guess I will get inspiration from this worksheet. I have put it to the upper third of the image, approximately a bit lower than that. I will try to put that also here. I will make it a bit bigger, so it will be here. It is almost a third of it, a bit lower to here? Maybe, almost to the center? Yeah. This will be great. You can place the vanishing point again to decide or anywhere you want but I would suggest to place it to the center. You will have an easier job. I will have the vanishing point here. I will start with designing the back wall. Create a new layer, choose black. I can see that this vanishing point isn't in the center, it will be in the center here. I will create the back wall. I had a 6B pencil, I have the black and I will define the back wall. The reason is that I'm in the room. I cannot see the front of the cuboid. I have my back wall and now let's do the sidewalls. What do you need to do is to go to the vanishing point and to the edge of this back wall and connect them and then you can erase this guideline. Now, ensure you are like a professional in doing this. This is the sidewall. We have the room. Can you see that? If you design this back wall a bit smaller, you can do that totally. Then you will have more space in the room. You can adjust it still. In the uniform selection just make it smaller and place it, for example, like this. Make sure that it is in the center. You can have a bigger room and I will just do that. Make sure that it follows and continues with these lines. A sketch doesn't need to be perfect. So we have the room. Again, add Edit Drawing Guide and the Perspective and you can place the vanishing point here. You can control the lines and see if they're running whether together. But I love to use this freehand thing because it is more organic than following technical credit. I will keep it to 2D grid here for myself. But if you would love to use the tool that is in the program, you are free to do so. I will continue with adding the window. I will have a nice big window here. I would love to over-complicate it because I'm really into designing now, but I need to keep it simple so that it is simple for you as well. I will create a window like this. I will add and therefore, adapt to the window as well. You will see what I am doing in a second. So like this. It doesn't fit. I will erase, make it smaller. I will also add this to the middle. Maybe I will add curtains. Yeah, that will look good. I will add some flowers here again. I'm designing this window now that is detailed so that I don't need to then erase from other furniture that I decide I will have in the image. I will think about the view as well. This is the reason why I've chosen the window to be at the back. You can decide what will there be. I felt there will be some mountains, little bit of sun going down and maybe a tree. I will see whether, there will be some clouds, very nice view, and I will place a lamp. Nice. Before I place anything to the floor, I want to define these lines of the floor. I will create a new layer for it. I will just simply go from the vanishing point and decide approximately the size of it. Make sure that the stances are approximately the same. I will simply erase this. I will place a door here. I will go back to this layer and just simply go from the edge of the room and draw a door. I will need to connect approximately with the vanishing point. You don't need to connect it fully. You will see at the grid where it crosses it and you can just simply place that line there. This will help you a lot in the work flow. I will continue adding details. I have a door, I will place something on the walls, I will have some images here. At this point, you don't really need to be absolutely precise with what you're doing. The main thing is that the room has this one-point perspective shape. You have a window at the back, you have something from the ceiling. I don't like this light bulb here. You have a door and you have a floor. Let's fill it with something. It will be an abstract painting and I will add a furniture here where the books will be? No, I'm not sure. I will approximately place the sofa here. I will create a layer and show it. It will be here. There will be a bit of furniture here for the books, and maybe there will be another one, and there will be a rag and, I don't know another bookshelf here, something like that. You can just do big shapes before you go in to details so that you can work on down a lot more more. I will speed this up because this is going to be time consuming and it is really about you focusing on creating this furniture. You know all the rules now. I believe in you, you can do this. I will start with creating my cell phone. I'm looking forward to see your sketches. This sketch will be available for you for painting. If you don't have anything in mind or you don't feel confident enough to create this sketch, you can use this one and you can adjust that, you erase from it, you can add different furniture, you can place things the way you like. Let's summarize that just a bit. I would love to spend a minute on what I have done or what we have done in creating this sketch. First of all, we decided on the eye level, on the horizon line and the vanishing point and created a huge cube starting with the back wall and then defining the side walls that run into this vanishing point. Then, we added a window, with this one-point perspective as well so that it has a bit of a dimension. That is again not necessary. If you have a stylized painting style, you can put the window here as it is. I added a door here an image here, a lamp from the ceiling and define the floor. When I had this finished, I added to this pace some easy furniture. We don't want to play with two-point perspective now. Keep it simple and I'm excited to see yours sketches. You can share them in the project. If you are not sure, if they are okay, you can contact me and show me, and I will help you and suggest you ways for improvement, for example. I'm excited to see what you create and then meet you in the next video where we are going to paint this beauty. 12. Project 2 - Painting the Room Part 1.: Now that we have our sketch, let's paint it. Again, you are free to do it in your way, but you can follow me step-by-step using my sketch that you will find in the worksheet. You can use again your own colors as well. But let's go to the Palettes and choose one. I think I will be using this Parisian so I will just go and set it as a default. Now I go back to the classic so that I can add colors that I need to these ones. I have my sketch, I will actually put all these layers together so that I have one working sketch. I will create a new layer below this sketch and go to the sketch layer and lower its capacity and set it to "Multiply". Now, I will choose some colors. You can do color thumbnailing, which means that you make the sketch smaller and do several of them, and just thumbnail out basic usage of colors and color dominance and try out how the wall would look the best. I suggest you do that. I'm just going to go with this one, go with the flow, and just work in it. As you can see, I have these orange colors here. Maybe I'll leave them to the furniture. I will need green, so I will choose one later. I thought that I will use these darker colors for the floor and I will keep this light pink for the walls. I will choose this dark brown and I will choose my shaper. I will start with the floor. What I'm going to do is to, again, I will speed this up so that it is not that boring to you. Basically, I'm going to do the same that we've done in the furniture painting. I'm going to block in colors then add texture, etc. Now I have this, I don't care about this part because it will be covered with the sofa or the armchair. I will alpha lock this layer and choose this light peach color, and I will add a rough texture to it. I will choose a detailed brush, and with the same brush, I will just add some wooden texture to the floor. I try to follow the direction of this floor. I will choose this dark color, add maybe a bit darker, and I will just define these lines that I have here. I have a really cool vintage floor here. Can you see that? I think it looks amazing. I will create a rug on the top of it. I think the rug will be this dark pink. Again, go to the Shaper and define its shape. If the floor is causing trouble to define it, just turn the layer off and create a new layer above. Turn on the floor. That's great. I will add the texture to it. At first, let's add the shadow. I will choose this dark brow, maybe go a bit darker, and choose the shader texture. Alpha lock the rug. I will add bit of a bigger and less opaque. I will just go through it, add this dark texture. After I've added this little dark texture over it, I will add a rough texture with this pink, let's see what it does. It is too harsh, so I will make it less opaque, so more transparent and just roughly go over it. Looks great. It has a bit of a texture. Maybe I can add some more tips, maybe with white. Let's leave it for later when we are going to add these designer details fit. Let's just move on to the walls. 13. Project 2 - Painting the Room Part 2.: Let's continue with the walls. What I will use is this light pink. I will again use this shaper. These walls will be a bit lighter and this back wall will be a bit darker. I will start with the sidewalls and create a new layer below all. I will create a new layer below it for the back wall and I will make it a bit darker. For the ceiling, I will use this light pink. I can actually just fill it like this. Looks great. What I want to do now is to add texture maybe to the walls as well. I will Alpha lock these walls and just choose this rough texture. I will make it smaller a bit and add just a bit of this texture. You can change the colors of the walls as well for two different ones. Just do what you feel is good. All right, now we have the walls. I will turn on the sketch to see how it looks and it looks pretty nice. I have something here but it will be covered. I don't really like the rug. I need to distort it a bit. So I go for distort and make it more horizonal. Yeah, looks better. Turn on the sketch and let's move on to the window. I will create a new layer. Again, I will just add the wooden texture. I will use the same as I used with the floor because this window will be wooden. I will choose this brown and a shaper and just start painting. I will Alpha lock the layer. Choose this color and rough texture and just go over it. I will choose this front to be a bit lighter and I will go to the detail brush and I can choose this weary dark and just add these lines back here. I have the window. I will also choose this light pink or this light color and a detail brush and add some wooden texture. Now let's add the curtains. I will create a new layer above it. I think this curtain holder, or how is it called, will be maybe what color? May be it will be wooden also. I will Alpha lock it and I am doing the same things over again. Shader texture, lighter color. I will make it smaller, and I will just add a bit of a texture to it and now create a new layer. Now I'm going to choose a nice turquoise. I will choose this darker one from the Nebula color palettes. I will choose this aqua color, if I can say that. I will just paint the curtains. I will Alpha lock it again and now I will play with the shading. I will go to the classic, choose a lighter version of the color, choose the shader texture and just make it less opaque and a bit smaller, and just add lights like this. I will go and choose a darker one to make it a bit bigger then just add shadows. I will make it opaque, even darker like this and I will choose this detail brush and choose this light one and just add some lines here. I will choose black and I will just add this here, oops, to a new layer. Maybe I will make this a bit darker. I will choose the curtain, choose adjustments, use Saturation, Brightness layer, and just make it a bit darker like this. It looks great and I will add these things here as well. I will make them black. I will go to this layer and just add. Now let's move on to the door and the image. Let's do the door. It will be wooden again. So the same thing I'm going to do. You can get more precise with this details if you wish. I don't want to bore you too much with painting at so I will just do this roughly. I will Alpha lock this again. Choose the lighter color shade it to rough texture. Just add with a light detail brush some wooden textures. I will add to the handle that will be black. All right, now let's move to the plants. I am keeping this simple as you can see. Lets do the plants, create a new layer. It will be a gray part, oops. I will use the shaper. I will add the soil. Alpha lock it. I will go to this lighter gray and add rough texture. I will add a bit of light with the detail brush up here, oops. Like that, just here like this. I will choose this brown and the shaper for drawing to a new layer. I will Alpha lock it and again, play with textures and shading. Now let's create the other one to the window. Now let's move on to the, I don't know, this little one. 14. Project 2 - Painting the Room Part 3. : In the first few minutes of this video, I'm just going to let you watch me finish up the furniture that's left. With the first two videos, you might have got the idea how I'm doing it. Again, I'm filing shapes with color, shade, and add texture and detail, so that's my way. Just feel free to follow this process by yourself and let this speed-up part run, as I'm going to show you how I set the mood we delight and the second part of it. I will erase this window and just play with the outside world. I will go to the back wall and the eraser and just erase. I'll add some words. I will create a new layer below this window and choose a dark-pink maybe. There is no dark enough, and I need to erase better from this. I will choose an even darker color. It will be evening. There will be a street light maybe. Let's try it. I will create a new layer above it. They'll be this circle. I will go to Gaussian Blur Layer and create these lights. Maybe I will choose almost black and just draw a cityscape to the background and I will also blur it a bit. Looks great. What I'm going to do is to add more lights, so I have lamps and what I'm going to do is to create a new layer above everything. Keep this orange and go to the Dropshadow Hard and make it bake and try to make a winding like this. I will make it less opac and I will select it and invert. I have the invert selection. I will create a new layer. Maybe I will try a dark-purple color. I will turn the selection off. What I don't like is that I really can see the textures, so I'm going to go Gaussian blur both. I'll go to Adjustments, Gaussian Blur Layer. I'll Gaussian blur it, and also the lights. How cool is that, right? I can strengthen this light if I want like this, but I don't like it that way. Another light I will add will be this one. I will create a new layer, and you can choose this orange, keep the Dropshadow light, and add even more lights. I will Gaussian blur that as well and maybe place it here. I will lower its opacity and maybe put it here. You can play with the light. I will add to it a bit more. Looks cool. I will make it this transparent again. If our light source is from the top, we can add shadows below. I can create a new layer below over the rag and choose black and we did Dropshadow Hard. I can add shadows. Looks nice. Congratulations, you are one step closer to mastering One-Point Perspective. I'm sure you have done an excellent job with illustrating your room. Don't forget to update your project with this illustration. Sometimes I'm miss project updates, so the best would be if you could write a comment too about updating your project. This way, I will not miss it for sure. I think I could have spent more time on details, but it is not the focus of this class. Give yourself time if you wish to perfect your illustration. If you wish to make several versions, do so. Enjoy the process, I really loved creating this room, even though it was a bit tiring. I had a bit too much of furniture here and elements. I can spend on it 24 hours or even more with creating illustrations, but I think you got it. Now you've got the idea of it and you've got some tips with lining of facts and stuff, but that's a topic of a different class. Now, we are here for the One-Point Perspective. We have already created a furniture, we have created a room, and now lets me meet you in the third project, where we are going out to the streets. See you there. 15. One Point Perspective in Landscapes: All right, so we are finished with the second project. Welcome to the third one, which is going to be our last project. We have already gone through a long journey together, but don't worry, this project will be fine as well. I'll just open One-Point Perspective in Landscapes worksheet and let's talk a little bit about it. As I already mentioned at the beginning of the class, one-point perspective is typically used for images of roads, railway tracks, hallways, or buildings viewed so that the front is directly facing the viewer. The concept is the same as it was in the previous projects. We have a horizon line, a vanishing point, and all buildings have the front side facing us. The most typical is when the vanishing point is placed to the middle of the horizon line, but these drawings can look a bit static. If you place the vanishing point bit to the sides, your drawing will look more natural and we are aiming for it in this project too. Before we start building our street view, let's take a look at some artworks to get inspiration. The first artwork I would love to show you is from Fifi Wong art. Just take a look at this scene, how wonderful it is. Let me just analyze a little bit the composition of this artwork. As you can see, the horizon line is somewhere here. This is again an eye level. If you follow the lines that run together, you can see that the vanishing point is somewhere here. This is an option. Placing the vanishing point outside the canvas is a way to build an interesting view or an interesting composition. It doesn't necessarily has to be on the canvas. Or you can make a bigger canvas, place it there and just use one piece from the artwork as the final piece. I totally love the color palette too, it is a kind of cyberpunk color palette. This is a night scene. I totally love this green at the background and a cityscape here. As you can see, it is not complicated. This is one building on a street and it looks just amazing. The second one is from Maria Regueka, if I'm pronouncing it right. This is again, a different kind of an artwork and a different solution. I've chosen this artwork because it is really unusual. We got a little sneak peek into the streets. The horizon line is somewhere down here and all these lines run together. Can you see that? Most of the artwork is taken by the front view of these buildings and I totally love this inky style. This is one solution to it and it is really interesting. I totally love it. Let's go to my favorite one. This is Salulu art. She is a big inspiration for me. This is the artwork I would love to show you. Just look at the scene, how perfectly the one-point perspective is applied. Keeping all the shapes starting from almost the horizon line. Let's just analyze it. If you follow these lines, you can see that the horizon line or the eye level is somewhere here and the vanishing point is somewhere here. Can you see that the buildings do not start from here, but almost from the horizon line, which manipulates or position in the scene. It creates the effect as if we would have been on the ground at the level of a cat. Maybe we are a cat who is looking to this scene. This widens the whole street view and all the building start from here as you can see, here is the bottom and they run into the vanishing point. It is just mind-blowing that with placement, what different kinds of effects can we achieve? This class is good, in my opinion, because it will help you to look at things differently and to analyze scenes and how certain looks, effects and feelings are achieved with placements, and how creatively one-point perspective can be applied in different scenarios. The street views are just mind-blowing and artists can do so amazing things. What I suggest to you now is to go out to the streets of the place you live in. I would love if you wouldn't rely on online references now, but go out for a walk, make some photos and look for a one-point perspectives, try to capture them. Experiment with making a photo closer to the ground and from places that are a bit higher and analyze these perspectives in real life. Obviously, if you don't have possibility to go out maybe because of a lock down, you can obviously use online references. You have Pinterest, you have Google. I suggest you look for keywords like street view or streets of a certain city. Maybe you will find photos of your city online and you can use them as a reference and just look at them, how the photos are taken. Where is the horizon line? How wide the street is? Where are the buildings starting et cetera. I suggest you build a mood board. Gather references, take the photos you'll find online, take the photos you make. You can also take photos of details or buildings that you like and put them together. Try to explore the possibilities that lie within the simple concepts. In the next video, we are going to do some practice drawings with simple lines to try out the different effects we can achieve with simple compositions. Then we are going to create the sketch for the street view. See you in the next video. 16. One Point Perspective in Landscapes - Practice: Before we start catching our [inaudible] , I would love you to try out some scenarios and practice how to draw them and explore the possibilities that lie within this concept and to understand some rules. The first thing I will do is to turn on the drawing grid, the 2D drawing grid so that it helps us with the drawing. I'm going to choose a color palette. I will just need one color. You can choose any color. I will choose this pink and a 6B pencil for sketching. Now if you have taken the first class from these mini class series, the entering space, an introduction to perspective and procreate, you already know that with the placement of the horizon line, you can influence the position of the viewer of your image. What that means is I will create a new layer and I will just draw on that. What that means is that if you place the horizon line to the upper third of the image, you will have a bigger part or you will see a bigger part from the ground. It can mean that we have, for example, some mountains here and we have a vanishing point here, and we have a road. As I already told you, we are usually using one-point perspective for roads. I'll just use that as an example. You can just draw this if you wish to try it out. It is a thin road and we have the horizon line up here. This means, and you can see it yourself, that it creates the effect as if it would be about this theme. Like you can see the road. As if you would be on a bridge or on another hill or in a helicopter or something so that you are above a bit so that you can see this road may be you are on a hill, and you can see this hole in front of you. This is one scenario. I will turn this off and create a new one. The second is when you have the horizon line in the center. You have almost an equal space for the ground and for the sky. My mountains got bigger. I have the vanishing point here. Now the road widens. Now, I'm not seeing that much from this scenario, so I'm a bit lower. I'm now on the road, maybe on a horse or something. I hope you understand what I'm trying to say to you. Now I will create a third scenario when the horizon line is at the lower side of the image and now I see a lot from this sky. I can see the giant mountains. I have the vanishing point and maybe the road is this wide. Now I'm part of the scene. I'm on the road going on closer to the mountains. The second rule I want you to know or to remember is that things that are closer look bigger than things that are further away. If I want to draw a tree here, it will be this big. If I want to draw a tree that is closer to the vanishing point, it will be this small. This will create also the effect of space. It will always get smaller and smaller. These are free scenarios. Whoops. This is when I'm above the scene. This is when I'm closer to the scene, and this is when I'm in the scene. In illustration, you usually don't just want to create a landscape. To look above it, you can, that's called mainly environmental art, but if you want to create a space where is something happening, usually you would choose the second and the third case. In our illustration in this last project, we will choose to put the horizon line to the center or a bit lower. If you remember the artworks we have seen, we always had these positions of the horizon line. I would love to try out this three scenarios that we have just seen in these artworks too I will create a new layer. Let's just try placing the vanishing point outside the Canvas. I will place the horizon line, for example here and put the vanishing point here. Now I will draw a road. There will be a road here. I will, oops. Like this, and I will draw a building as well. Let's say I have a vertical. Remember your lines need to run to the vanishing points so you can again use your eye to do so. Oops, I will not make it that long, but like this. I will erase the horizon line through this building, and this front is facing me. I have a building. I will place a window as well, oops like this. I will just put it to a clipping mask. I will place it above the main shape and hit clip the mask. Now, I have a wonderfully composed scene where the vanishing point is not all on the Canvas. I hope you understand the concept of it. Let just turn it off and create a new layer and let's try out the second one. When we had a horizon line somewhere here. The vanishing points and most of the artwork is taken with the front of the building. I will just draw a big building here like this with a front view. I will draw big windows here and another one is going to be, maybe here. This is going to be bigger, for example, with balcony. Typical. I will connect this. This is going to be a road. There can be a road like this here as well. It's a crossroad, for example, and I will connect these buildings as well here like this. Maybe this will be not that long. But what I want to point out as well is that I will erase the vanishing point here and the horizon line as well. You don't need to see them. I will erase these ones too. I will draw a giant building to the back as well. This is typical in the cities. You don't see the road ending in a vanishing point. It is not natural to see that vanishing point in a city. It is usually blocked, so you can usually not see the vanishing point. Look for these things on the photos. Let's just see the third case. When I am going to turn this off and when we are on the ground on the road. It really interests me. I will put the horizon line down here, for example. I will have the vanishing point here, and I will not have a road. This is going to be the road itself. I will just draw lines from here. These are going to be the buildings, and I will again block this. There will be another building here with a window, and I will have the vanishing point here. I will need to draw windows like this. Every line is vertical. Like this. You can use the guidelines. I'm using now my eye and I'm doing this really roughly, and another big window. Again, what is bigger is closer to us, or what is closer is bigger if that makes sense, and maybe like this. Something like this, and I will just make these things that are on the road. Can you see this? As if I was a little mice or a little cat sitting on the road and looking at these buildings. These are all different kinds of scenarios and there are endless possibilities. I want you to realize that one point perspective in a street view doesn't necessarily have to be a vanishing point and a horizon line and two buildings and some trees, but you can be creative, and artists are so creative, and there are so many different solutions, and I want now you to be creative. This is why I want you to go out and explore the streets and your environment, and to experiment with the camera placement. Take a photo from the ground, from above to see how perspective works, and it is so easy with one-point perspective because what you need to do is to find something that is facing you and to see where the lines running, and you have one point. Here are all the different scenarios. These are street views, all different kinds of compositions, and I would love you to experiment and spend time on it. Really spend time on it to try these out and practice. What I would love the most is if you would take these little simple compositions and put them into your project so that we can see what processes you went through, and maybe we can have a eureka moment with you and you can teach us something, a composition that I haven't thought of or something like that so that you can guys inspire each other and that would be amazing. I'm so excited to see this practice drawings, and if you are ready with your mood board and with your practice sheets or drawings, I suggest you do at least three. Try out at least three and choose a composition that works for you, and you have a mood board, and then see you in the next video where we're going to start Project 3. 17. Project 3 - Streetview - The Sketch: Welcome to the last project. We have already gone through a long journey together. At first, open the project worksheet. I will turn off the worksheet itself. I would love to show you the images that I have taken. I went out to the streets and took some photos of the lovely city I live in, namely Komarno. It is on the border of Slovakia and Hungary. I was looking for one-point perspective. There are several things I want to show you. The first one is that I have found a building that I will include in my illustration. This is this shop where there is this bike up here that I would love to create in a neon color. I would love to show you the difference between this image and this image. Now, one-point perspective here works because I cannot see the front of this building. I cannot see the front and a one-point perspective simply works. The vanishing point is somewhere here and these lines around in together. But at this image I have created, you can see that here is the one-point perspective, but I can see the front, but it is not 100 percent facing me. This is actually where two-point perspective comes into the story. There is another vanishing point on the horizon line to which these lines run into. But that's the topic of two-point perspective and we are going to discuss it in a different class. Now I would love to really focus just on one-point perspective. What I'm going to do is I'm going to draw this part of the building facing me 100 percent and then build the one-point perspective into it. As you can see, I'm not talking about a huge percentage of angles. As you can see, you cannot even see it in the roof. You can see it at these lines of the windows. Here, it is really about millimeters, so I'm not going to worry about it. It will look fine. This is the second thing I wanted to tell you that there will be two things from the scenarios we have gone through in the previous video. Then I'm going to apply into my illustration. One is that my vanishing point will be outside the canvas, and yes, this is the second one that one part of the building is going to face me. Then another thing I wanted to show you is this. Can you see? This was on my eye level and in this photo, I put the camera to the ground. Look at the road, how wide is it. On my eye level, it is this wide. When I go here, it's almost as wide as the horizon line. Can you see that? This is why it is good to go out and experiment with this and then analyze the pictures so that you will have a deeper understanding of it all. Then I took some photos of details I liked. I really liked these lamps, so I will include one or two in my illustration as well, and this [inaudible]. Looks amazing. This bench and this is the wonderful square of the city. What I want from you now is that after you gathered the reference photos, even if it is from the internet, think about the elements you would love to implement into your illustration, how would you love to compose it, and maybe create a simple sketch of the composition like we did here in the practice part. So that it is. What I am going to do in the worksheet is that I'm going to create a new layer and insert a photo of that building so that I can turn it on and off to see my reference photo. Now I will turn this off. What I'm going to do is to create a new layer and define the horizon line and the vanishing point. I'm going to go to Canvas, Drawing Guide, and Edit Drawing Guide. Actually, I'm going to keep it now in the 2D grid. I will return to it in a second. I will choose a color and the 6B pencil and just define the horizon line. My horizon line will be not at the center but a bit lower than the center. I want this horizon line to be defined like this so that I can have it as a reference because when I'm going to just go from one drawing guide to the other, it can be confusing. Now what I'm going to do is to turn on this reference photo and just draw the front of the buildings. I'm going to choose black. I will create a new layer for the sketch and just simply start drawing. I will speed this up so that it is not that boring. I have an approximate front of the building. It is not a 100 percent copy because I didn't want to copy it. What I wanted was just to roughly have it similar. This window is wider. Actually, maybe I'm going to make it thinner. I will use free-form and I have it more similar now. I will just add some details. I will think of a street number like this. I will add flowers like this and I will work on details later. Also, I will make his bike look better. But what do we need to do now? I will turn this off and go to the Edit Drawing Guide, and go to Perspective. Now we are going to place the vanishing point outside the canvas. I will click it. Can you see that? I accidentally placed two, so I will click and delete and now I have one vanishing point. Can you see that? I can move it all around, even outside into canvas. I will change the color to this so that you can see it, that Procreate's tool or drawing guides also creates this blind space outside the canvas. What I want to do is to make the horizon line run together with the horizon line I have defined. As you can see, I'm playing around with two vanishing points. Oh, here is the third one. You can just click and delete if they pop up randomly. When you accidentally tap the screen, so you can just do that. I have my vanishing point here. I will place it with the horizon line. What I'm going to do is to click Assisted Drawing. What this means is that every line that I am going to draw now will automatically run into this vanishing point. Because if I don't tag on the Assisted Drawing, I go back to the Canvas, and I don't see the vanishing point. I can just approximately draw the lines. But if I have the Assisted Drawing, I just go from a dot and just draw a line and it automatically goes there. It is incredible. Can you see this? Oh my God. This is such a wonderful tool. Here I don't see the top of the roof. I just randomly draw it there as if it was the top of the roof. Now I will go back and edit drawing. I will go back to 2D Grid. What is good about this tool is that it remembers your vanishing point. If you go back to the Perspective tool, your vanishing point will remain where you have placed it. I will go back to 2D Grid, Done, and I will define the depth of this building. I think it will be this deep, and I will try to mimic this line so that I can have the Assisted Drawing. I will go back to the Edit Drawing. I turn off the Assisted Drawing now. What I need to do is to get these angles that we have here. This is not perfect, but anyhow, I will adjust these things like this. I will erase all the other lines here. Wonderful, right? This tool is really great from Procreate. I implemented only to this project because I wanted you to understand how this works, not just to rely on the tool but to understand and use your eye to get it. Now what I'm going to do is to work a bit more on the details. I would love to place a straight here. Again, I am going to Edit Drawing Guide, Perspective, Assisted Drawing, Done. I will just draw the lines of the street like this. Actually, this line is all. So this will be the street itself. This will be the street. I can also draw a door. I want to turn on the 2D Grid now again, Edit Drawing Guide, 2D Grid, Done. I will draw this door here, and there will be another window from here and here. Maybe a thinner and bigger room. I'm not sure yet, so I just note where these things will be. Again, I will speed this up and just draw in detail. All right. Now, what I want to do is to add the lamp I have created up or I have took photo of. I also want a bike sign like BIKE SHOP here. I don't know, I will place one here, one lamp here, and maybe one lamp here or here. I'm not sure, but I'm going to trace it or use as a reference. So I will create a new layer and add and insert a photo. I will just create a new layer above it and just trace it. I will turn off my sketch now. Okay, I have a lamp here. It is not perfect, and I have made it simpler. I can see that it needs just some adjustments, so I will try to do so like this. I will turn my sketch back on and put my lamp here, for example. I will duplicate it. I will duplicate it and maybe make it a bit bigger, and here, maybe here. No, that will be too much. This lamp will be here. I will just draw a tree at the back like this. Maybe there will be a line here and some more trees as if there was a park behind it. Here is the street, and I guess that's all. I think my sketch is kind of finished. I will add some details in the painting part. Now I really need the main perspectives to be okay. What I actually don't like is that this window, I think, is too big, so I will make it smaller. You can adjust things when you need them. I'll make it smaller so that it fits at all a bit more. Yeah. All right, so this is my sketch. I love it pretty much. More focus is now to get you understand how the Procreate tool works, how you can place the vanishing point outside the image. You actually don't need to do this in your own artwork, but it is good to understand it at least, just to get the idea how you can put one-point perspective into street view. See you in the next video where we are going to start painting it. I'm looking forward to see what you'll create. 18. Project 3 - Painting the Streetview: Hang in there, we are almost finished. In this video, we are going to paint the street. But before we do that, we need to talk about colors. As we are talking about the scene that is outside, it is important to decide what time of the day is it. Is it in the morning, evening, noon? Where is east and where is west? Where is the sun? How will the sun be blocked by the buildings? You are free to create several versions of the artwork in different times of the day. It is good to create colors that may link. Again, you can make this smaller and try out colors and color versions. I have created for you the color palettes that you can use. These are more color schemes and not necessarily colors for the times of the days. What I am going to use is the cyberpunk color palette. I want this scene to be a night scene or maybe early morning scene. I'm not sure yet. I will see in the painting process. But you can be more mindful of choosing colors in your illustration. You'll, again, feel free to use this color palette add and remove colors. What I wanted to say also is that in the entering space, an introduction to perspective and procreate. We have learned that the colors in the background are paler, brighter, and cooler than the colors that are in the front or closer to where colors are darker, more saturated, and warmer. We are in the greater distance. We didn't apply this in the other projects because there were not that kind of distances in these projects. But now we are outside. I will need to make sure that this part that is in the background is paler, brighter, and cooler, and the front of the building will be darker. I'm going to follow the usual painting process I do, and I'm blocking in the main colors, adding texture, and shading, and a progress like that. I have my color palette selected. I have my brushes, the painterly brush set. I'm going to start with the shape art. I am going to place these here. I'm going to merge the sketch so that it is in one layer. Also these ones. I have my sketch. I will make it lighter and to multiply, and place a layer below, and start painting. I am just going to guide you through the sped-up process, as I have spent several hours on creating this illustration. I am sure by now, you totally understand the process I'm following. But I would love to share with you rather how I progress with illustration. I start with the front, basically. I'm doing the same as I mentioned. I block in color, add shading, texture, and detail. Where I have a type of a material, for example, wood, I add the texture there by hand. I also spent time on creating shadows to make the illustration believable. Then when the front is ready, I progress with the side of the building. I make it lighter a bit and add some deeper shadows, as it is also facing the land. It is worth it to think about the lighting situations in your image. I progress by creating the door and the steps, and then the second window. I also add some cute details like flowers, and I create neon signs with a light pen brush that you can find in the luminous brush set. I really love it as you can create this effect with any color. Then I work on the street and keep it on the minimum. I just play around with textures, and focus more on the colors of the sky. I chose to have an early morning moment so the sky is lighter at the bottom, and has some pinkish-bluish colors. Lastly, I add the lamp, the tree, and some bushes to the background. I add light to the lamp with the exact same process I did in the room so I create a shape with orange, and then I go [inaudible] blur it. With a drop shadow smooth, I add some light to the surroundings, including the side of the building and the ground. Then I just refined some lines, I decided to make it a bit cartoonish. I add some details to create this abandoned building effect to it and just experiment how can I make the building more interesting. Then I play a bit more with the shadows, and it is finished. All right. I call this finished. I totally love how it turned out. It is not perfect. I could spend more time on refining details, and adding more shadows, and things like that that would make it even more believable. But for now, I think it is good and it is a nice way to demonstrate one-point perspective in a street view. About the colors, I have used a color palette that I have here and I tried to create a time of the day from it. What I suggest to you, if you don't know what time of the day to put to the background and what colors to use, just go and research sky in Google or in Pinterest and find color palettes to it. If you don't know from your memory, how would, for example, early morning minute look like? I see this every day so I'm pretty sure it is accurate that the sun is coming up and it starts to be a light blue with a little bit of pinkish. But the sky is still dark at some point. I took this in a cartoonish way. If you can see, I have created one more layer and refined this cache itself to make it a bit more sketchy, a bit more cartoonish, and little details of the abandoned building. It was totally fun to create and I hope you'll enjoy this project as well. Actually, I want to congratulate you. You've finished your third project, and you can really be proud of yourself. I am sure you mastered one-point perspective by now. I am really proud of you that you have sticked with me by the end of this class. I'm sure that you have free amazing projects that you can show. The furniture the room, and the street. Amazing. Can you use see that from this three projects, this is where I used a reference photo. This two were created from my mind mostly. I can say that this project is the best from these three. Even though our point was to practice how to create the main perspectives and the lines that run into each other. I think that working from a reference photo from your life will make you create an illustration that is you. You will implement things to them that are you and that interest you. This is what will strengthen your illustration voice or artistic voice, if I can call it like that. I think this was incredible journey together and I'm sure that you learnt a lot. I hope that you enjoyed it, and that it was beneficial. I'll really see you in the next video where we're going to sum it all up. 19. Final Thoughts: Congratulations, you made it. I'm so proud of you for sticking with me so long and that you have completed all three projects. You can really be proud of yourself. In this class, we have covered so much. From the basics to application of the one-point perspective into three different scenarios. Incredible. If there's one thing I hope that you take away from this class is that art theories might be overwhelming, but you need to enjoy the process and use these theories only as a guide. Let your creativity flow and rule your artworks. It was a long, long journey, and I'm sure that you are satisfied now and you're confident, and I'm so happy about it. If you haven't already, go to the project gallery and put everything there and that you would love to share with us. I will be pretty happy if you could leave me a few words how you felt during the class, what you liked, what were your favorite eureka moments, which artwork was the closest to your heart, etc. Also for the cover of the project, choose the aspect that you're like the most. I'm so excited to see what you create. I'm really always so blown away by your creativity, they're all amazing. If you enjoy the class, please leave me a review, and follow me on Skillshare, and on social media, and everywhere, not on the street, to stay up to date about my latest classes and announcements. Until I release the next one, see you in my other classes. There are so many things to learn, and I hope to see you there. It was a pleasure to work with you. I wish you all the best, and happy to. See you.