Learn Blues Guitar John lee Hooker Style | Rick Payne | Skillshare

Learn Blues Guitar John lee Hooker Style

Rick Payne, Teacher And Performer

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21 Lessons (33m)
    • 1. Introduction

      1:02
    • 2. The Hooker Style

      0:19
    • 3. Ex. 1 - 5 Rhythm And Chords

      2:32
    • 4. Ex. 6 - 11 Rhythm And Chords

      1:55
    • 5. Riffs And Runs

      1:34
    • 6. Adding More Style

      2:07
    • 7. E7 Accompaniment

      3:12
    • 8. Ex. 1 - 5 Riffs In Open A

      1:47
    • 9. Ex. 6 - 13 Riffs In Open A

      2:11
    • 10. Chillen Grooves

      2:00
    • 11. London Beat

      0:43
    • 12. Hooker shuffle & variation

      1:43
    • 13. Smiler

      1:11
    • 14. Crawling Blues

      1:23
    • 15. Mississippi Flood

      1:30
    • 16. In The Mood Boogie

      1:24
    • 17. Hooker Blues

      0:59
    • 18. Maninka Blues

      1:19
    • 19. Chillen Groove

      1:16
    • 20. Chillen 2

      1:08
    • 21. Copastatic

      1:55

About This Class

Of all the guitarists that I've listened to and studied over the years, John Lee Hooker is the one steeped in the real DNA of the blues, and certainly the most African sounding.

You can't help but be drawn into the primitive and simplistic way that with just a few riffs and chords, he conjured up the sound of both the Mississippi Delta and west coast Africa. Somehow, he managed to instinctively avoid the normal rhythms of his peers in the early days of the Delta. The twelve bar patterns and blues formats that we associate with players like Robert Johnson, were definitely missing in the dark and tribal sounds of Hooker's playing. He favoured a more loose and hypnotic combination of runs and chords to accompany his talking style of blues and story telling.

To me, John Lee sounds the best sitting alone with an acoustic or Sheraton guitar accompanied by the solid foot tapping that was so typical of his sound. In this way you can begin to appreciate that he really was the most 'blues' sounding of all the blues guitarists. When I'm giving a blues guitar workshop I often say if you want to play authentic blues guitar there's only one riff you need, and that of course is one by the genius that was John Lee Hooker!

In this course I'll be sharing with you some of these riffs and exploring the ways you can begin to sound just like the 'Healer' himself. You can choose to use an acoustic or electric, either way setttle down, get your foot tapping and let's play some 'Hooker Blues'

Lessons Will Include:
Rhythms And ChordsĀ 
Riffs And Runs In Regular And Open A Tuning
Hooker Grooves
10 Especially Written Pieces In The Hooker Style

Transcripts

1. Introduction: Hi and thanks for dropping by and my name's Rick Pain and welcome to my course. Who could lose? One of the things I teach when I'm doing please workshops is that you really only need one riff. And that's by the famous John Lee Hooker, one of the most authentic blues players, I believe. I mean, in this course, we've been looking at a lot of the stars. We're looking at the riffs and runs we're looking for playing within the Hyuga style, and I've written 11 study tunes, especially Teoh. Create some of this poker style for you. Easy to play. Download the power tab on the pdf resources that will see on your pages as you work with course. It's all there. The great John Lee Hooker, one of my favorite blues place, full time. So let's sell down and get the foot tapping and place, um, Hooker Blues 2. The Hooker Style: Okay, this is the how how how Section on we'll be looking at some warm ups. Adding more flavor to some of these riffs will be doing some rhythm and some corpulent as well, so I never get to download the pdf tab of music on Let's get stuck into this section. 3. Ex. 1 - 5 Rhythm And Chords: the rhythm styles John Lee Hooker Very important for this authentic style of blues playing and also the use of some typical hooker style cords were important. So let's look at a few exercises on that score before we look at some of the patterns that make Johnny who famous and machines African style. A few of the rhythms, the key rhythms first of triplets, especially with the accent on the first of each of the threes. Then the heavy down be patterns. Just think boom, boom, staggered accents, Maybe signature variation, I think dimples. Maybe the kind of boogie chillin, the the off beats heavy off patterns like So you can start playing some really hooker type of sounds with the hooker called That's on the page there, using this G seven court shape and you get a good effect by pinching in on the court. Onda just a slight, offbeat patent gives a nice driving with him. E can play that fossil slow. Uh, Onda. This, sir, partially seven shape is another instant hook atop called Using the seven Shape. We can create a typical hook apartment with a big lead in it on the base time 4. Ex. 6 - 11 Rhythm And Chords: on the A seven called here on the typical p seven shape here. Okay, using this a tuning with this little needle hook a court to start to you got It's like variation to that preview shape. These two notes, slights and again, rough drama Uneven. With just the open ice treating strange way I know we're going to use the typical dealt seven shape just to make sure you don't Your fourth string doesn't sound just just pinch away, I think more scratching. 5. Riffs And Runs: So first, let's play some warm ups on these, like some scales really supposed to be with them and their great tools to play with any started. Please, really, Andi. Here we have the email pensions on its Calif consensual tool for them, for the hooker leave paying and general riffs. And, of course, using the bottom lot's of those scale produces the typical with. And here it is again in Tupelo with, as you probably were already them. You can move to skate around playing all kinds of groups and patent about just remind you this one, because you don't know this one that makes a great thing. 6. Adding More Style: on. Now let's try so adding some flavor to those Ripston runs. First we look at the hammer ons. You can be quite hard with these, I think, to get style way, Uh, and here the ham rolls and triplets again, this time introducing the rift based around the way. Now we got slides way. And here's some slides on DSM Hamels together, and here's a rift using some bends. This time there will be a little bit easier on electric using. That sounds good on the acoustic. Of course, you could do some bending with some constant bass notes. For most of the both states, I've been using them, putting with damping based on just a stop it sounding to open but anyway. 7. E7 Accompaniment: okay, in this section, we're back in little regular tuning on. We're doing some exercises based around the seven hold really the Percussion e. A B seven, which I think was one of John Lee Hooker's favorite two progressions. Just simple, simple shapes, really, but some effective blues playing. So look at the following six videos and you'll see what I mean. A great did in the hooker. Rifts in regular trading were based around Good. I'll be seven. We've changed like Tupelo or I'll never get out of these blues Alive On is one Now he would often various risks, with a bit of picking strum to just change the rhythm way. Just mixing a few pentatonic runs there fairly often on this acoustic style, John Lee Hooker would introduce her kind of frenetic, far strumming start over. The seven called on the B 77 It's gonna treat write this one down, but really just far strum, using my fingers like almost in Spanish. Uh, I would be seven and a seven cooled. We get this kind of effect on a little chill. Now, this is something with practice. Check your part. Just a fast hammer on and pull off on any string escaped with this. Oh, 8. Ex. 1 - 5 Riffs In Open A: So this is a big section. It's some of the riffs and runs in open a tuning. Never get. We have to tune our guitar to open a, which is E a C shop E, or you can use G tuning on a cape. Oh, um, this is a great exercises. Here's a great videos is 13 in total. So, um Gage, guitar tuned and let's get on with the hooker in open a tuning on our local use lots of pinch timescales and works just as well and open a training. So just followed the town. A nice bright sound. Too good on the same kind of guy we just made. Missing out a few notes. Sounds very good with starting this government high notes good, especially with the extra trip in time even high starting up on the eight books here, sometimes including the Blues note here 9. Ex. 6 - 13 Riffs In Open A: on the blue scale again, but a little bit higher. Starting new books this time A lot of these pentatonic notes were from trilled, having on pulled off a frenzy. Ugo on lots of ham rolls on with these double no courts. I also sliding technique Teoh with other effects. Don't forget the bends which dio in this example here with starting off with a hammer put some of these surfaces together through this typical thescore check that we looked at earlier way. 10. Chillen Grooves: in this section will be exploring some summer Tony hookers, great chillin grooves or boogie lines that he became quite well known for. If you think of Boogie Children and she trains like that, you'll you'll see what I mean and hear what I mean. Um, so this one that once again is in a tuning, So have a good old group and boogie on down. Yeah, here's those open strings again. Listen to correct this classic chillin in the best way to do this is going to be picking up . Picking just on some good, solid downbeat here almost means it. Here's a classic hooker star group. Now it's variation way off topic because, of course you do. The bottom end of the top makes a great mix stop. 11. London Beat: and now it's well, first study, June This one's called London beats a typical, generally hooker style Cooper question. Sounds great on electric or acoustic. Just make sure you keep records flowing on nice and beaten rhythmic so London Way. 12. Hooker shuffle & variation: Okay. The next study, June, is called the Hooker Shuffle. And it uses a great G seven court on. And you can see this from your music. Uh, watch the video, try and keep it again rhythmic and nice. And Bt, And then look at the variation, which follows just a slight variation using a bit of amenity line as well within the court . So hooker, shuffle on variation and , uh 13. Smiler: Okay, this next, uh, focus study, June uses constant base finger store method. It's a good exercise for that and also kind of typical hooker style amenity as well in the top line. So make sure you download the PdF music on for a video on Let's Go for Smiler. 14. Crawling Blues: the next time between crawling blues, one of my favorite hooker styles. Using these, these riffs very typically Tommy Hooker, Great once again, a great fingers still exercise and a good introduction to the style generally, so get stuck into this one, calling blues nice and slow and easy. 15. Mississippi Flood: in Mississippi will be looking at some of the E seven and accompaniment riffs that we started Area that's using the seven the A and the B seven with some of the trip that runs. It's a great feel on. You can play it slow or quick, and however you feel about it is a great hooker riff, acoustic or electric, and he saw you like, really? 16. In The Mood Boogie: on once again in regular tuning, this one uses another typical hooker style. I'm schooled in the mood boogie, and it's got that great Poco referred of gaining, so let's get in the mood there. 17. Hooker Blues: okay for these last few study genes. We're back in a tuning on the 1st 1 Here's the hooker blues on. I think this one catches the nuances of the hooker starting opening tuning really nicely. You can adapt this one to suit your own were playing great with, So let's try some hooker blues. 18. Maninka Blues: I've done many caboose because I wanted to base it around the men Incan style of African music, the blues music West Marley, which I think John Lee Hooker really captures, especially in these A tuning really brings out the nuances of style. So quite important piece, really medical blues on you capture all the hooker flavor. 19. Chillen Groove: Okay, chilling grew. This is based loosely around to the bookie Children riff that John Lee Hooker became famous for Boogie Chillen Nice riff If you play it faster Slates really good, uh, captures all the hook. Start once again, I think and once again makes full use of the open a tuning So let's boogie on down with Children grew 20. Chillen 2: So if you want some more boogie, this one's view this one's called chillin to on DA. It's just a bit more pounding in the rhythm sense. Andi, could we play faster? Slow medium samples? Good. So download pdf. Make sure to check out the music tab and follow the videos on all these examples in overnight, Let's go chill into way. 21. Copastatic: So here's our final study tune, Andi. If you like the hobo blue style of John New Yorkers playing, then this is the refer You. I think if you only ever had one blues riff, this would be the one to learn. Simple. To play great great blues sound played in open a tuning or you can use open G tuning. It just comes up, the whole feel forming, and it's my one of my favorite risk. So this one's copasetic and hope you enjoy it. Get that foot seven.