Learn “Amazing Grace”, as a fingerstyle blues. | Mark Honeyman | Skillshare

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Learn “Amazing Grace”, as a fingerstyle blues.

teacher avatar Mark Honeyman, Musician

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
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Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

5 Lessons (38m)
    • 1. Intro

      2:20
    • 2. Lesson 1

      2:24
    • 3. 1st verse

      9:46
    • 4. Verse 2

      13:35
    • 5. Verse 3

      10:20
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About This Class

In this class you will learn to play the evergreen song “Amazing Grace” as a solo guitar piece. In the style of a 12 Bar Blues.

The first verse is a single line melody, the second is a chord Melody and the third is a chord Melody with embellishments and outro. You will learn 2 turnarounds, a minor pentatonic scale run and an outro in the Key of E. The piece builds from bare bones into an impressive blues solo guitar piece, with slides , hammer ons, pull offs and walk ins. 
This is a great way to get a real feel for blues in E and you end up with a piece that will impress!

Although this piece is well known as a hymn, written by John Newton in 1772, Newton only wrote the words. The melody is a Traditional piece with no known composer. It has been used in other songs, including the song “New Britain”. This was the song from which the melody was taken by William Walker in 1835 and combined with the words, to make the “Amazing Grace” we know today. Playing it as a 12 Bar Blues seems very fitting given the important role it has played in Black History.

Each lesson builds on the one before and the first lesson has detailed on screen, string and fret Positions. The second and third lessons have detailed positions for anything new. The lessons are step by step with very concise instructions and lots of examples of how each bar should sound. 
The downloadable Tab for each verse is included in the project section.

Lets get to work!

Meet Your Teacher

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Mark Honeyman

Musician

Teacher

Hi, I’m Mark,

I am Irish, but live in Southern Spain. I am a wedding guitarist and guitar teacher. I have two guitar businesses  “Marbella Wedding Guitar” and  “Honeyman Guitar”.
My main focus is on fingerstyle guitar and I play most genres, including classical pieces, Jazz standards, pop, rock and original compositions. My music is on Spotify, Amazon and Apple, and I have a YouTube channel.

I have been teaching at a university level for over thirty years, and lectured for many years in Trinity College, Dublin.

My classes are mainly about learning fingerstyle pieces note by note, but as a Wedding guitarist I have a lot of experience playing live and using performance equipment, so some lessons will reflect this.See full profile

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Transcripts

1. Intro : Hi, my name is Mark honeymoon. I'm a professional wedding guitarist and the guitar teacher, and I live in Southern Spain. Welcome to this news class, which is Amazing Grace is a 12-bar blues. We're gonna play this in a number of levels. So this is what we're going to learn. Okay, let's get to it. 2. Lesson 1: Hi and welcome to the class. The guitar and I'm playing is an arched top guitar article. Guitars are very traditionally used for blues as well as as jazz. A lot of the guitars that were made in the early 19 hundreds. We're arched up guitars, Han curved arch tough guitars, and they have a very dry wood. You sound perfect for playing blues. And this guitar is strong with flatworms strings, which again give it quite a, a, it's a very woody sound that doesn't carry very much, which is perfect for blues as well. We tend to be quite roof on the guitar when we're playing blues. And you don't want notes that carry on for a long time or they'll start to Sarah or as you get into the next quarter of the court after that. So it kills them relatively quickly. And it means that you can be pretty tough with the guitar. And I'm using this particular guitar for this song because it actually has the fret markers on because we're going open down the fretboard quite a bit. It makes it easier for you to see what it is that I'm doing. Normally I'd play a nylon string return, which is no fret markings on them at all. I hope you enjoyed this, this particular song, Amazing Grace. I don't know if you read in the bluer, the words to this song were written in 1772, but it wasn't actually put with the music until the 18 thirties on, although a particular man put the words and the music together, he didn't write the music. The music itself is an old traditional piece. And it was around for so long that nobody knows who actually wrote the melody, the original melody. It's a wonderful tune, a wonderful sounding shown. And it's been a non-thermal of sorts for the civil rights movements and four black communities for a very long, long time. So it's suitable that it would be played as a 12-bar Blues, which was invented by those black communities. And putting the two together seemed quite natural to me. I hope you enjoyed. Let's see, in the actual lesson. 3. 1st verse: Okay, so before we get started, let's just break this down a little bit. This is a 12-bar blues. That means that there are 12 bars in each of the verses, and it's in 44 time, so there are four beats to the bar for B, so the bar, 12 bars to reverse. And we're going to learn three versus, although you can play as many vs as you like, yeah, each verse follows the same chords. And we're working around those with fields and hammer ons and walk-ins and all of that. What does he need to know about the song in the key of E, the wonderful blues key of a. So all of the turnarounds on walk-ins that you learn in this, you can use in any 12-bar blues that are in a, I need blues song or most blues songs tend to follow a pattern which we call a 14x five. They used the forced courts, the fourth cord and the fifth chord in the key, and the key of e, those chords would be E, a, and b. And in this particular song, whether or not this particular song and most blues songs, you would change those to seventh chords. So would be an E seventh, eighth, seventh, and a B seventh. And you'll find that as we go through this song that those chords, the E7, the B7, and the A7, are forming the core of all of the things that we do. Even though it looks like we're running up and down the fretboard. In actual fact, we're revolving around those, those three chords and those three notes. So the first part of this is just a very, very simple melody line. All we're playing is what we call single line melody. And that's just one note for each of the beads. So let's have a look at where we're going with that. We're going to start here on the fourth fret, on the third string. So we're going to play before, we're going to play the sixth. And then we're gonna slides down all the way to the ninth. They will go to drop down one string. So we're playing the ninth fret, but we're now on the second string, 9759975975. So now what we've got is on the third string, for 69, on the second string, 9759572. And then off. Simple enough, they were going to an A7 chord. And we're going to do this A7 chord with six string open, fifth string onto the fourth string open and the third string on one. We're not really going to worry about the other strings because we're only going to be playing these four strings for bass strings. And what we get is never going to be moving to the first string. And we're going to go 0 to four. And then back again. Four to 0. Back to four. So what we've got is E17. Now we're going on the second string again, and we're going 9-12. We're gonna hit that 12 twice. And then back to this nine, 5-7, nine Ron that we had in the first part. So what we've got is and 752 and back to the seven. So what we've got so far is I'm never going to fall back to four. Back to two. And then we're going to go to the second string on 5024420. Four to five on the second string, and that's the end of the first verse, Except for the turnaround. And the turnaround is going to be on the first and the third string. And we're going to put our fingers down so that we're on the fourth fret of the forced under third string. And we're going to play it like this for three to then take your third finger off and you're just playing the third string and the fourth string open. When you feel comfortable doing that, you can actually alternate between the third and the fourth string. And the way I'm doing that is 313. And then moving up a fret, strings, 3130 per fret playing it on the third string, 330 per fret playing on a string. And this time we're going to play the first and the third string at the same time to finish it. And then to the E7. And that finishes that verse. And we're ready to move into the next fairs, which we'll cover in the next class. So let me go through this again. We're on the third string and we're going for 69 second string, 9797537024 on the first string, 420 to four. And then two on seven. We're on the second string and we're going 91212 again. And then 9797530 on the first string, 024420, back to four, back to two, five on the second string. And then the turnaround A7. Practice that, get it onto your fingers. Pop it up so that we can all have a look at how you're getting on and if you've got any questions, ask them. And I'll see you in the next class where we're actually going to core the second verse and make the whole thing a little jazzy, little more bluesy, puts some more frills and thrills into it. I'll see you then take care. 4. Verse 2: Okay, so we're back with the second verse. Hopefully if you've gotten that first verse on your fingers, that single line melody with the little rooms and the E7. For all of these classes, you're better off downloading these, this handout, which is in the project section. And it has the full tab for all three verses on it. You probably wouldn't have needed it for the forced download that anyway, you're definitely going to need it for the second verse. On the second verse should be looking like that. That make it easier for you to go, to go back and see exactly what it is that I'm doing. If you miss something or you're having some difficulty with the part. So where are we? Well, we've gotten through the first verse and we're going to play it again. And now we're into the second verse. And for that second verse, you'll find that the nodes are pretty much the same, but we're doubling or tripling or to actually start to make chords. I'm adding in a little more legato, which is the, the slides and hammer on isn't all of that stuff. So we're back to the fourth fret and we're on the third string as we were in the first verse. But this time we're actually going to play the third string and the fourth string open. And we're going to play those together. And we're going to play those the whole way through this force part, which is 469. And you can play that one of two ways. You can either play each individual node or each individual chord. Or you can hammer wrong to six. And then slide. Now it may be that for this fairs, you would want to do play each one individually. And then in the third verse, which has a few more flourishes in it to actually play it this way. Just because it sounds a little more blue 0 then jazzy. Okay. Now this is where the big change combs because instead of actually playing just these 957, what we're actually going to do is play a chord. And I'm not even going to name this chord for you, despite the fact that if you, if you look at it, you'll actually see that it's it needs a variation on the knee, but we're going to spell it instead. The way we spell this chord is the open E string. And we have covered the fourth string on the ninth fret, third string on the ninth fret, and the second string on the ninth fret. And our index finger is on the second string on the seventh fret. And it's there for a reason, and you'll see what that is in a minute. So the way that we actually play this is we're going to pluck all of these four strings together. That's 6432, which sounds very dry. But what we're going to start off with the little finger off. So now we're actually playing the second string on seven. And we're gonna hammer on the little finger onto that ninth fret. So what we've got is, and then we're gonna come off. And we're going to play individually the third string. And then we're going to play just the three strings, 234 with the little finger down. On what you should get is now we're changing chord. And we're changing this chord so that you've got your third finger on the fourth string, on the ninth fret. Your second finger is on the eighth fret, and it's on the third string. And your first finger is on the seventh fret, and it's on the second string. And we're going to put those altogether. And then we're going to move the whole shape up two frets so that you're now playing the third finger on the seventh. The second finger is on the sixth, and the first fingers on the fifth on exactly the same strings. So what you've got so far is, and then the next chord is appear. And it's Lincoln a seven. But we're putting an extra finger down. And the way we're gonna play this is open fifth, two on the fourth string, three on the third string, and two on the second string. And then we're going to go to that E7 we played in the forest. So what we've got is and then we're going to switch to a B7. And the B7 is too on the fifth, one, on the fourth, to the third. The second string is opened. And the fourth string is onto really only playing two notes, which would be the fifth string and the fourth string. So what we've got is, and now we're going to play. The 0 to four thing, but we're going to play it with these two fingers. We're gonna play the third and the fourth string together on the same fret. 0 to 40. So what, we've got a 024420477. Now we're going to play 9-12 on the second string. I played the 12 twice. And we're gonna take the two fingers to center fingers again. And we're going to put them on the second and the fourth string on the ninth fret. And we're going to play our nine 75 back to nine in using these two fingers. 9759. And then we're going to go back into this chord that we played before, which is third finger on the fourth string, the ninth fret. Second is on the eighth fret on the third string. And then the first finger is on the seventh fret on the second string. And we're going to play this. I gotta move up again, where the whole thing starts now on the seventh fret, back to that chord, which was the variation of the A7. And this time we're going to play that plucking the fourth string, which your index finger, and then using your second third fingers to pluck the second third strings. Back to the, the A7. And then we're going to walk into the B7 by going 012 into B7. And then here we've got so far. And now we're gonna take the two fingers. It's easiest if you leave the fourth third finger on to do this part. 02440420. Two and slowly into four. And then play the fifth fret, second string. There were going to the scale. And we're going to play that, playing the third fret on the second string. Then off, there were going to the third string. And we're going to go open two, open to and slide into three, into two again and into the fourth string onto. And then we'd play the seventh chord. And now that's the end of the actual verse, and we're into the turnaround. And the turnaround for this verse is completely different. So for this one, we're going to play this. And in order to play that, we're going to go to the fourth fret on the sixth string and the third string. And you can play it either this way. Play them together. I'm, we're going forth fret, third fret, second fret, A7, or you can alternate the same as we did in the first verse. So How's all is that when you put it all together, it should sound like this. So spend some time with that. Use the top sheet that you have. Play around with it a little bit. Get it onto your fingers. Posted. Force first and the second verse together so we can actually hear how you transition from one into the other. It'd be a great help to other students. And if you want me to have a look at it and comment and make any corrections or whatever. A juice Note that in I look at the model anyway, but I won't make a comment unless you want me to make a comment. Okay, I'll catch you in the next one where we're gonna wrap this journal and finish off on that spicy last verse. I'll see you then. 5. Verse 3: Well, welcome to the last part of this class. And I'm hoping that at this stage you've gotten the force to versus onto your fingers. And you're ready for the last verse. And then the last verse doesn't actually change that much of anything. The notes are pretty much the same. There tends to be a bit more legato when it a bit more sliding and a bit more hammering on and that's it. But it starts out pretty much the same. And I'll refer you to your handout, which is in the project section of the class. And you can download this and all three verses are in there. So this will help you. It's a good guide as to what's going on. Well, remember that's all it is. It's a guy gets a 12-bar blues. And when 12-bar blues, wherever you think sounds nice. Thus what you play, so learn this and then play around with it and make it your own. That's what it's all about. So we're going to start to off on that fourth fret again. And we're going to play the two note chord. So we're going to play toward string and the fourth string. But this time we're actually going to hammer on and slide. So we're hammering onto the sixth threat. And then sliding to the, the next part is pretty much the same as the second verse. And this is where it gets a little bit different, although we're playing the same chord, instead of just playing it as a straight flock. Or we're actually going to do is play the fourth string with your index finger. And then play the next two strings, which are the second, third string, which are second, third fingers. And do the same when you move to the seventh fret. And when we go to that variation of the A7, we're going to do the same thing again. We did this in the last few years. And now gong to that E7 to the B7. The next part is pretty much the same as it was in the second, except for that little part. When we play this fourth fret of the second time, we're going to alternate that as well. So we're going to play the third string, then the fourth string. And we're going to slide both fingers up and then play the open hammering on the two, sliding back to four. So what you should get is. 024420247, which we played twice. And you can alternate on one of these if you want length or enforced. Now when we go to the ninth, we're actually going to be playing the second string and the fourth string together. And we're going to slide into the 12. And again, you can alternate therapy, the one on the second 12. Back to this nine, 75. And we can do another slide there. We can fit another slide in from the 79 data. Now we're back into here. And we're doing the same again. Pluck, pluck. Same under a seven into the E7 than the walk up to the B7, 0244, back to two, back to four. And that five, you can actually play with two fingers. Or hear. That sounds quite nice when I'm playing there is, I'm playing. The, my first finger is on the second string, on the fifth fret, and my second finger is on the fourth string. On the sixth fret. We're gonna play the scale again, and we'll go to play it the same way, which is 30 on the second two, off again. And then hammer on the two and slated three, back to two. And then we're going to play two on the fourth string. Back to the A7. And then we're going to play the altro. And the altro is gonna take us the whole way down to the 12th fret. And for me, I like to play this with my little finger on the fourth string on the 12th fret. And the reason for that is that we are going to be leaving that little finger there and moving up a number of threats. So it leaves you the space. And we're going to play this alternating. It's on the fourth string and the fourth string, starting off both on the 12th fret. So that's on the fourth string. Wealth. And 12, fourth string, 12 again. And then we're going to play the fourth string on the 11th. Played the 12th string, that 12th fret of the fourth string again. Then we're going to play the 11th, threatened the fourth string. Then take that to ten. And then take it again. It's just a last one. When you're getting to the ninth fret with the index finger, you play the anoint, the fourth string and the fourth string together. So that's where it finishes. And in slide, this little finger, anywhere, it doesn't really matter. As long as you get back to the the E7, don't keep it to lunch. We're gonna play the ESA, and then we're going to take the second finger and slide it the whole way down to the seventh fret. And we're going to play the top part of what would be a B7 chord. I put the little finger here on the eighth fret, on the second string. I'm finish on that note. So what you should get is we're playing those strings individually as an arpeggio. So we're playing 5432. So let me play that last verse again for you. And that's it. So put all of those three together. If you manage to do that or when he managed to do it, I should say a post mooc. Let's have a look. And if you'd like me to have a comment, just put that underneath and a wheel. And if you can move with any variations yourself, anything else you'd like to add in? Do that? Remember that the turnarounds, these for all three verses. For the first one, for the second one, and are all in the key of E. So any song that you have in the key of v, you can pop those turnarounds in there. It's really valuable to know we've got three different ways now of coming to the end of the verse and getting into the next one on any 12-bar blues in the key of a. Okay, I'll have lots more classes and on various, on various subjects. Please do comment in the comment section. Leave me some feedback so that other students will know whether or not the class enjoyable or none and follow me so you know, when my new classes are coming in. Ok. I look forward to hearing from you. Take care.