Lasso Tool Magic: Floral Explorations in Photoshop | Stephanie Fizer Coleman | Skillshare

Lasso Tool Magic: Floral Explorations in Photoshop

Stephanie Fizer Coleman, Picture book illustrator/licensed artist

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10 Lessons (1h 49m)
    • 1. Intro

      1:42
    • 2. Lasso Tool Basics

      15:48
    • 3. Lasso Tool + Brush Tool

      14:39
    • 4. Practice Shapes

      19:04
    • 5. Demo - Single Flower

      13:10
    • 6. Demo - Flower Cluster

      16:44
    • 7. Demo - Flower Bouquet

      11:14
    • 8. PDF Tip Sheet

      0:45
    • 9. Your Project

      1:08
    • 10. Bonus: Procreate Demo

      14:29

About This Class

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When I began illustrating digitally, I was using a really slow process of building out my flat colors in Illustrator then importing everything to Photoshop where I would add texture and detail.  Not only was the process slow for me, but it wasn’t intuitive or fun and my work had a distinctive digital look that I wasn’t fond of. 

Discovering and mastering the lasso tool in Photoshop changed everything about the way I work and the way my work looked.  When I started combining the lasso tool with my favorite Photoshop brushes, I discovered the building blocks of a digital style that didn’t look so digital. 

Today I use this technique across all of my work from children’s books to greeting cards. 

In this class I’ll break down the basics of using the lasso tool in Photoshop before we move on to some lasso tool practice sheets. 

Then I’ll walk you through three floral demo drawings using the techniques I’ve gone over.  I’ve chosen flowers for our subject matter because the shapes are bold and playful which makes them perfect practice for the lasso tool. 

I’ll start with a single flower drawing, then work on a small flower cluster and finally demonstrate my technique for illustrating this large bunch of flowers. 

By the end of the class you’ll learn how to master the lasso tool in Photoshop and use it to create beautiful textural floral illustrations.  The skills you acquire in this class can then be applied to other styles and subject matter. 

So head on over to the first video and let’s make some lasso tool magic!

PS -- This class now includes a bonus video detailing how these techniques can also be used in Procreate!

Transcripts

1. Intro: When I began illustrating digitally, I was using a really slow process of building out my flat colors and illustrator, then importing everything to Photoshop where I would add texture and detail. Not only was the process slow for me, but it wasn't intuitive or fun, and my work had a distinctive digital look that I wasn't fond of. Discovering and mastering the Lasso Tool in Photoshop, changed everything about the way I worked and the way my work looks. When I started combining the Lasso Tool with my favorite Photoshop brushes, I discovered the building blocks of a digital style that didn't look so digital. Today, I use this technique across all of my work from children's books to greeting cards. In this class, I'll break down the basics of the Lasso Tool and Photoshop, before we move on to some Lasso Tool practice sheets. Then I'll walk you through three floral demo drawings using the techniques I've gone over. I've chosen flowers for our subject matter because the shapes are bold and playful, which makes them perfect practice for the Lasso Tool. I'll start with a single flower drawing, then work on a single flower cluster and finally demonstrate my technique for illustrating this large bunch of flowers. By the end of class, you'll learn how to master the Lasso Tool in Photoshop, and use it to create beautiful textural floral illustration. The skills you acquire in this class can then be applied to other styles and subject matter. Head on over to the next video and let's make some Lasso Tool magic. 2. Lasso Tool Basics: We're going to start with a basic look at the Lasso tool in this video and the next video. Then we'll move on to practicing our skills with some shape exercises, before working on some flower drawings to really build up our skills, and really start making connections about the magic of the Lasso tool. We're also going to be looking at the Marquee tools because they can be used together and interchangeably with the Lasso tool, and it's a lot of the same concepts. We're going to be looking at both of those. The first thing that we need to do is take a peek at where the Lasso tool is located in Photoshop in case you're not familiar with it. I am using Photoshop CC 2018 right now. If you're using an older or newer version, things might look a tiny bit different, but the tools should be in the same places, and they should work in the same ways. Let's just start by selecting our Lasso tool, and we'll make some basic selection. Our Lasso tool is going to be the third option down over on the toolbar, and if you hold down this little arrow right here, if you either click and hold or tap and hold, you're going to get a sub-menu. We're going to take a look at two Lasso tool options. We're going to take a look at the Lasso tool, and then the Polygon Lasso tool, which will allow us to get some straight lines. We're going to use both of those. Make sure when you select the Lasso tool that you have the first option selected up here in the toolbar, which is just going to give us the solid shape, and then we'll talk about adding and removing selections a little bit later on. The first thing that we want to do is just take a look at just a really basic example of how to lasso a selection. When you lasso a selection, you're doing exactly what it sounds like. You're just selecting it, you're circling it like you would lasso something, and then you can fill it in with a color or you can pair it with a textured brush for a lot of cool effects. What I have here on my screen is just a few examples of some random shapes. Since we are going to be drawing flowers a little bit later in the class, I've got some leaf and petal shapes, and then I've just got some random amoebas and random blobs that we can take a look at selecting. I'm just going to use my Lasso tool to select to this little leaf right here, and I'm just going to press down, select the shape, go all the way around, and then I'm going to end at my starting point. Now, this one is actually pretty easy because we have got nice endpoints that come to a point. If you don't have that, things can be a little bit tricky. Let's fill this in really quickly, and then let's take a look at some other shapes. I'm just going to pick a color. I'm going to go to Edit, and Fill or the shortcut for that is Shift F5. Now, you can see I've got a color filled with my lasso selection. Actually guys, I'm going to do that on a new layer. There we go. That's better. Let's take a look at another one of these shapes that doesn't have a pointed end, and let's talk about how to ensure that you get neat endpoints because let me show you what happens if you lasso. Let's just lasso around here, and let's just say that we don't end very neatly. You can see my start point and my end point are off. If I fill this, what I get is this little tail right here where my start point and my endpoint weren't close. Photoshop automatically just creates a line between those two, and that's going to end up with a little tail. You can actually fix that in a couple of different ways. You can just go, and select an Eraser tool, and just erase that if you want to. I can just erase that out of there, and I do that all the time. There's no shame in it. That's one option or we can try to have neater endpoints. If we try to have neater endpoints, my trick is that I will try to make my end point go just a little bit beyond my start point. It ends with a nicer edge, and I'll show you what I'm talking about here because if you go too far, you're going to get a funky looking edge. I'm just going to start here. Circle around, and then I'm just going to take it a tiny little bit past my start point, it's just a tinsiest little bit, and now when I fill in my shape, I have a nice, fairly even shape at this point. If you go too far beyond your starting point, if I went up here, sometimes it gives you like a jagged, weird results like that. That's something to keep in mind. Another thing to keep in mind when you are drawing with the Lasso tool is that you want to be drawing from the shoulder. You want to be moving your entire arm when you're making these lasso selections. If you're just making the movement from your wrist, it's going to end up giving you jagged edges, which is something that you don't want. You can fix them with the Eraser tool, but it's so much easier, if you don't have to do that. When I'm making these selections, and you guys can't see me right now, but I'm moving my entire arm right now. I'm moving from the shoulder, and that's helping me get nicer selections when I'm working with the Lasso tool. Now, let's take a look at how we can add to selections that we've made with the Lasso tool, and how we can remove from those selections as well. Let's take a look at this little flower shape right here. That's got three little petals. I can lasso this entire thing together like this, and fill it in. But maybe I don't want to do that. Maybe I don't want to select the entire area at once. Especially if I'm working on a more complex shape, like if you guys follow me on Instagram or, you know my work at all. I draw a lot of animals. A lot of birds, and when I'm lassoing their shapes, some of them are very complex, and if I'm trying to get a perfect lasso in one try, it can be really frustrating. Sometimes I want to do it in sections, which is what I'm going to show you here. In this case, let's say I'm going to do this petal, this petal and this petal, and then hopefully have a nice neat end at the bottom. We'll see how that works out. What I'm going to do is I'm going to start my selection here, and I'm just going to try to end it in a sensible spot, because when I'm selecting multiple things, I don't want to have jagged edges, although if I do, I can just erase it, it's fine. What I'm going to do now is I'm going to hold the Shift key down on my keyboard, and when I hold the Shift key down, you see a little plus icon pops up next to my Lasso tool on my screen here. Now, I can add to what I've already selected so I can do this other petal, and then I've still got the Shift key held down, and now, I can do the third petal, and then I can filled out entire selection, and I'm done. That's a really awesome way to take care of things if you've got a set of really complex subject that you need to do, and you don't want to try to just lasso it all at once. Now, you can also remove sections of your selections. Let's pick this amoeba right here. We'll just pretend we messed up this edge. I've got my selection made, and I need to remove this little left edge over here because it's wonky. I'm going to be using the Alt option on my keyboard. Now, I'm in Windows. If you're using a Mac, it's actually going to be option instead. I'm going to select Alt. You see I've got a minus that pops up and now it's removed this section of the selection that has gone over. You can use both of those things. You can use the Add option and the Remove option whenever your last sewing a complex shape and that way it makes it a little bit easier and you've definitely are going to feel less pressure than if you're trying to last through the entire thing at once, it definitely feels a lot better. The next thing that I want to show you is let's take a look at the feather option up in our toolbar up here, you see you've got your feather option here. Now, this is just going to soften the edge. This isn't something that I use a lot in my work because I use a lot of different brushes, which we'll talk about in the next video to get some nice soft effects. But if you've got a different style or if you want to just experiment a little bit, the feathering option might be a good idea. Let's just stay 20 pixels is going to be our measurement. We're going to select this area and now when we fill it, it's going to have a softer edge. We can see here it's got a much softer edge than any of the other selections here and I picked a decently high pixel number, so you can really see the feathering effect, but it doesn't necessarily have to be that high. You can switch the feathering effect to something a little bit softer if you want to. This is what happens if our feather ratio is five and you can just see it's got some nice soft edges. That's just another fun thing that you can do with the Lasso tool. Now, the last thing I want to show you about the Lasso tool before I move on and talk about the Marquee Tool a little bit is the polygon option. I'm just going to tap and hold select polygon and now what the polygon option does, is it actually is going to give me nice straight lines. If you have something where you need to have nice perfect edges that your last sewing this is a good option. For this, I'm tapping my points, I'm tapping where I'm starting. I'm tapping this corner, tap this corner, tap, tap, tap, and then I'm going to tap to close and now I've got a closed shape and then I can fill, which is pretty awesome. Then the other thing that you can do is you can actually pair this tool with your regular Lasso tool. If you have a complex shape like this, I can do my edges. We'll leave out the ends there, swap over to my irregular Lasso tool. I'm going to hold the Shift key down because I'm adding to the selection that I already have and then I'm just going to go in and do this outer edge, loop it around close to the point and now I've used both of those tools to create the shape and I've still got it set on feather. Hang on a second, let's go back and unfeather that so it matches, there we go. I've got all of my shapes selected now and the next thing that I want to take a look at is I want to take a look at how we can use the Marquee Tool on its own and how we can use it in conjunction with the Lasso tool to block out some colors. I'm just going to delete what we have done already and then we're just going to select our Lasso tool. This is the same trick as, I'm sorry, we're going to select our Marquee Tool and then this is the same trick as our Lasso tool. We hold down the little arrow and then we can choose rectangle, ellipse, single row or single column and then we'll tend to only use these to the rectangle and the ellipse. We'll select one of these and it's just going to work the same way I can select an area that I want to block in say, I want to do this color or this shape, fill it with a color. Let's go back and make sure that's on a new layer and now I can go in with my Lasso tool and remove using delete on my keyboard and getting rid of my shape and now I've made a different shape. So another way that we can use our Marquee Tool in conjunction with our shapes, is we can transform whatever we filled, so we can use the Ellipse tool. We'll say that's probably about close enough to this shape that we've drawn here, let's fill it, let's make sure we're on the correct layer, let's fill it. Then I'm going to transform that, so I'm going to hit Control T to transform or Command T if you're on a Mac and you can see now it sort of meets the shape that we originally had but not quite. I'm just going to go up here to our warp option and then I'm going to use these little n points right here to start pulling my shape around and making it fit to my original sketch. Now, we should have something that fits closely to the original sketch. You can just make a circle or a rectangle with your Marquee Tool and then you can use the transform and warp options to make it fit whatever you need. If you're new to using the Lasso tool or you're new to coloring and Photoshop, you might find that your edges aren't really great at first, so you're not really happy with how things look, so using the Marquee Tool is a pretty good way to sort of ease yourself into that and if you just have a tricky shape that you're having a hard time drawing, it might be a good idea to use the Marquee Tool or to combine the Lasso and the Marquee tool. You can sort of get a good chance at getting things the way you want them to look. So with the Marquee Tool, you're going to have the same power that you have with the Lasso tool and that you can add and remove things in the same way. If you want to add things, you hold the Shift key down and if you want to remove things, you're going to hit the ALT key. I could use my Marquee Tool and make a really big shape here, fill this in or not. Let's not fill it in yet, let's try to correct our edges first. Let's select our Lasso tool and let's start adding and removing. First, I'm going to remove the extra bits. I'm going to hold down ALT and I'm just going to subtract these extra pieces on the edges here and you can see I'm just doing this in sections, I'm not trying to do this all at once because I want to make sure that I have nice edges. Then I'm going to hold the Shift key down and I'm going to add this little bit in here. I think I messed up that edge, but we'll fix that with a erasing, fill it in and now we've got our shape. I'm zoomed out a little bit close on the east so you can see even my shapes have guard maybe not perfect edges. I'm a little bit nervous now because I'm teaching you guys and recording these videos. But with a lot of practice, you're going find that you have cleaner edges and you'll also find that as you work on your illustrations and you add texture and detail and depth that nobody is really going to notice if your edges aren't a 100 percent perfect and you don't want them to be really super-duper shaky, but it's totally fine if they're not a 100 percent perfect. So practice a lot, work on making your Lasso selections, especially work on making those using your entire arm instead of just your wrist so they're not going to be too shaky and just practice, practice, practice until you get better. Now next up, let's head over to the next video and I'm going to talk to you about pairing the Lasso tool with the Brush Tools, which is one of my favorite most versatile tricks in Photoshop. 3. Lasso Tool + Brush Tool: One of my favorite things about pairing the lasso tool and the brush tool is that I can get so many different fun effects. I can get nice crisp edges with the Lasso tool, but if I'm using a textured brush, I can get these really beautiful textural effects and it really makes my art looked less digital and more like it's really painted or drawn or whatever. We're going to take a look at putting together the Lasso tool and some Brush tools. We're just going to see what effects that we can get and I'm really hoping that this will inspire you to experiment when we get to the next video on practice shapes. Really play around and see what different effects you can come up with when you're using this technique. I'm just going to delete what we've already done. I've got my layer selected here, I'm going to make a new layer on top of it and I'm just going to do what we were doing before. So I'm just going to use my Lasso tool to select this shape. Now, let's have some fun with some brushes I'm going to be using, let's start out with one of my favorite brushes, which is the Gouache go-go brush from Kyle Webster. If you're using the CT version of Adobe Photoshop, you'll have access to Kyle's brushes. You'll find some down here in the Photoshop defaults folder and if you want more of his brushes, you can go to Get more brushes, that's going to take you to Adobe's website and it'll show you all of the various sets that are available. If you are using an older version of Photoshop and you don't have Kyle's brushes, there are tons of other brush options out there. I'll include a PDF under the your project section with the downloads that'll give you some links to some different places that you can purchase some fun Photoshop brushes. I use Gouache go-go all the time. It's one of my favorite Photoshop brushes, it's super versatile and it's got this really awesome texture. Let's take a look at how, I'll just fill in the shape with a little bit of soft textural edge. I'm not filling the shape in all the way, I'm just being rough with it because I want to have this little bit of lightness that's peeking through. I'm just going to de-select that and let's take a look at how that looks. You see the difference instead of just having it filled in with a flat color, I've got just a nice textural gradient almost created here. You can really be as rough or as light as you want to be with this. Let's delete that and let's just make the brush bigger. You can just fill it in this way and get some more really fun texture. That's what it would look like, then let's take a look at a couple of other brush options just for fun. I'm going to take a look at, let's use a pencil brush to fill in the shape. I'm just going to select it, let's just fill this in with some pencil scribbles. We're just going to make it look just rough and casual. That's a fun option, I'm just going to move this over so we can continue to work in this because next let's take a look at using one of Kyle Webster's spatter brushes. This is going to be under the special effects folder in your Photoshop defaults, I'm just going to pick one of his spatter brushes, let's make it a little bit bigger, and then we'll fill that in. That's pretty cool. Let's do another one. Let's pick a watercolor brush, this brush set is from MG brush, which I'll link to. Let's find a brush that's got a little bit more of like a watercolor look to it. That's pretty, let's see, I'm not super satisfied with those. I'm actually going to switch over to one of Kyle Webster's watercolor brushes. I really want to get that nice watercolor effect here, and you can see what that looks like. That's four different options. Then let's also take a look at how you might be able to combine those brushes. As long as you've got a selection that's lassoed, you can combine any number of brushes and textures and colors and just have a lot of fun with this technique. I can switch over to my Gouache go-go brush from here and add, maybe I'm going to do part of it in Gouache go-go. Then maybe I want to use a little bit of this spatter brush again on the end of it. It's so cheesy to say, but the possibilities are endless. There are so many different ways that you can play around with this technique and make it work for your style and for the art that you want to create, it's really just a matter of doing a lot of experiments and giving yourself just time to play and have some fun with it. Another thing that you can do, like I said, is you can also layer colors while you've got your selections. I'm actually just moving the selection around. I've selected the Marquee Tool, and I'm just moving my lassoed selection around here so I can keep using it over and over again. Which is a handy trick if you're working on something that you have to draw repeated things and they need to look a little bit different. For this one, we will just start with our orange color. I've got Gouache go-go selected. Maybe we want to do a gradient with this. Let's just pick some darker colors. We'll just do three colors. That's an awesome effect already, and then if I want to, I can go back in with like a pencil brush or the spatter brush or any other kind of brush and I can add more colors and I can add more texture and just really layer things over and over and over again. Another cool thing that I can do is I can make a new selection on top of an existing selection, and then I can add more depth from there. Let's take a look at this watercolor style leaf right here. I'm just going to make a new selection inside of it. Now, I can use my Gouache brush and I can add more details. I can do the same thing inside any of my shapes with any other new shapes that I want to do. This is all super fine and dandy as long as you are working on a white background or you're working on a really simple illustration. But let's start thinking about what we would do if we have sections of an illustration that are going to overlap one another and we still want to have these really lovely textural effects. What we can do, and for this one I'm just selecting "Gouache a go go" again, I told you it's my favorite and go to it all the time. I'm going to turn off my layer. Let's just pretend that we've got two leaf shapes or two flower petal shapes that need to overlap. Let's make a selection. Here's our first shape and then we're just going to color that in. Let's go back to our lighter color, so maybe you can see this a little bit better. We're just going to color this in and then let's say, we need to make another shape over top of it, so this is maybe like a daisy or something like that where it overlaps. Okay, so that works fine. That's definitely a method that we can use, but what happens if we also have other elements behind this? Let's just pick a green color and let's pretend that we just had maybe some stems or whatever in the background. You can see now, because I've got this really textural shape, you can see whatever is in the background behind that. I've got a few different things that I can do here. I've got a few different ways that I can look at this. Number one, maybe I like this and I want to leave it like this and that's awesome, but it's something that you should be thinking of in advance when you start working on an illustration using these techniques where you know you're going to have a lot of really textural shapes where you're going to be able to see white space, so you should just have in mind that if anything is filling in that white space, you're going to be able to see it. First thing I can do, and I can just erase this, so If I decide I don't want this here, just use my Erase tool. Super easy, right? But the thing is, now if I decide I want to move these shapes somewhere else, now I've erased it and I'm going to have to go back in again and I'm going to have to erase again and I'm going to have to draw this in, it's going to be a whole thing. Let's think about how we can handle this in a way that's going to be a little bit easier for us. The first thing that we can do is you can just include a background whenever you are selecting your shapes. Let's say, I'm going to select our orange again. I'm going to make another petal here and then, let's just fill it in. I get to this point and I'm like, "Okay, I like that. I don't like this here, so I'm going to make a new layer." I'm going to fill. I can select "White" or I can select any other background color that I want to. I'm basically just giving a background to my textured sections here. You can see here that you can't see the green anymore. Now, I can also switch the color of this background to anything that I want to, so I can get a lot of different effects. And then, if I decide that I don't want it at any point, I can remove it and it's totally fine and I've still got my shape created, I've still got my background, and I can just remove this little petal background color if I want to. I'm just giving myself a lot of options. I often find that it makes more sense for me when I'm working this way to go ahead and just add this little background to my shapes whenever I'm working and then, as I proceed, if I decide that I want to have some cool textural effects and say, I want to be able to see these backgrounds or I want to have things overlapping and just really creating a lot of interesting visuals, then I can do that, but I've got my background here if I need it. Now, if I didn't do that and I still need to add a background at some point, I can just go in with my Lasso tool again. Select the area and this is where it's a little tricky because especially if you have textured edges, you may not get it exactly right and this is why I like to be prepared and just have my little backgrounds in there in advanced. I've added my background and then if I need to soften those edges, I can go in and erase and soften any of the edges that I need to, so they don't look quite so harsh. There we go, and that looks pretty nice. Let's take a real quick look at a way that we can play around with blending modes. If we've got our selections on different layers, so we can create a lot of interesting depth and effects and this is something that I like to do a lot in my work. I've got a flower shape here. Let's draw another one. I'm just going to have some overlap between the two of them, so we can really demonstrate what happens. It's going to fill this guy in. Okay, there we go. That's perfectly serviceable the way it is if that's the design decision that I've made in my illustration, that's awesome, but another thing that I can try is I can mess around with my blending modes. I can switch this to Multiply and you'll see now, that I can see the bottom petal, I can see it through the top petal. I've got this really nice little overlap here and I can just go through and try all kinds of different effects. I often just play around with this stuff and see what everything does and see what sort of effects and fun visuals that I can come up with. This is another way that you can really play around with this Lasso tool and texture brush technique. You can see how a lot of colors are going to overlay and how different effects are going to affect your illustration and just what sort of things you're going to get overall. This is definitely just another area where you can play. Again, that's why I just feel like this combination of the Lasso tool and the Brush tool, where you can combine clean edges and texture and then you can add in blending modes as well, so you can really get a lot of beautiful effects. As we progress through the demos in the class, we're going to start pretty simple, we're going to be working on some practice shape sheets first, then we're going to move on to drawing just individual flowers, which is going to help us grasp a lot of the techniques we've learned here. Then we'll progress to a flower cluster and then eventually an entire vase full of flowers where we can really play around with blending modes and different textures and overlays and all sorts of fun stuff like that. Head on over to the next video and we're going to start working on some practice shapes, so you can really practice working with the Lasso tool and really start to get a feel with it and start thinking about how you're going to be able to use it in your own work. 4. Practice Shapes: In this video, we're going to work through a couple of practice sheets. Under the your project section on the Skill Share website, you'll find two lasso practice sheets to download. Now if you're watching this class in the skill share app, you may not see the downloads, so be sure to log in to the class from the Skill Share website so you'll have full access to everything you need to download. In this video, we will be using those practice sheets to perfect our lasso tool techniques. Before we get started, let's keep a few things in mind from the previous video. First of all, you want to make sure that when you are lassoing your selections you're using your shoulder to draw, you're moving your entire arm, and that's going to help ensure smoother shapes. You also want to pay attention to those end points. If they're not neat, you can always erase them, but of course you make life a little bit easier on yourself if you're mindful of your endpoints in the first place and you don't have those weird little spikes and overlaps sticking out everywhere. Another thing to keep in mind is breaking complex shapes down into simpler groupings and then lasso tool is in small sections instead of trying to lasso the entire thing all at once and making life a little harder for yourself. You also want to think about how you can combine the lasso tool and the marquis tools. So if you need clean curves or clean edges, that might be an easy way. If you need to have nice circles and nice rectangles, it might be good to look at combining the marquee tool with the lasso tools. I've included some shapes in the practice sheets that'll give you a little bit of practice using the marquee tools in the last two tools together. Then the last thing that you want to think about is just experiment with different brushes combined with the lasso tool for fun effects. Just have a lot of fun with this play around. There is no right answer in art, so do what is going to work best for your style and just do what you like the most. Now I'll take you through a few shapes on the practice sheets and then I'll just time-lapse the rest of it. You'll see that there are two sheets of shapes here. We've got one that's just got a lot of random shapes on it, I did sneak a bird shape in there and this one looks a little bit like a dog. The rest of them there are pretty random shapes. You've got some circles, triangles, and then just random curves and lines so you can really get a lot of practice with different Lasso Tools and with the Marquee Tools as well. Then you're going to find a second sheet of shapes. Because for this class, when we were working through our demos, we're going to be working with florals. I've done a sheet of floral elements for you, and this is just some elements that are either shaped maybe like a flower like this is like Bluebell down here, and this could be like a petaled flower and then you've got some leaf shapes, some general silhouette shapes. This is a geranium leave, just some indications of flowers, nothing really specific, but I thought it would be really fun to practice. If you've got your lasso sheet, you can do a couple of things. I like to always make sure that I'm working on a new layer, so I'm going to make a new layer. Now, I can either draw on top of this, which is what I'm going to do or if I don't want to draw on top of this, I can drag this layer down below, could change this layer to multiply, change the opacity down to 25 percent and then I'll just make a new layer for my background that has white on it, I can actually change my opacity down to about 10 or 15 because these are such dark lines. There we go. I can do that and then when I'm lassoing, I'll be underneath the shapes instead of over them. Really either one of those options works. I'm going to be lassoing over top of my shapes, but I am going to leave my opacity turned down just a little bit, so it's not going to interfere too much with my colors. I'm going to start out with this sheet and then we're going to hop over and do a couple of floral elements, and I'm just going to go ahead and set this sheet up as well with the white backgrounds and we'll turn down the opacity, then I'm going to make a new layer on top of my practice sheet layer. I'm just going back to my general shapes sheet, say that five times fast rate. I'm just going to zoom in here, and I'm going to start with this circle. So obviously, since this is a perfect circle, I'm just going to use my marquee tool and I'm going to hold down the Shift key on my keyboard until I get, it's actually not a perfect circle. There we go. There's my shape and go back to my top layer, and then I'm just going to select a brush for this. I'm going to use a bunch of different brushes. So you can see a bunch of different effects and we're just going to do this in black and white for a couple of shapes. Got a really nice texture here, and then let's pick one of the blobbier shapes. I'm going to use my lasso tool for this one. Now I'm left-handed, so whenever I can I like to start my shape in a place where I'm going to be able to see my endpoint when I come back around. So I want to make sure my hand isn't going to cover up what I'm drawing, there I am. I've got my sheep selected, let's just pick a different brush, let's see what else we've got on this sheet, let's do one of these shapes that has a lot of straight lines in it. For this one, I'm going to switch my lasso tool to the polygon option because I want some nice straight lines on the edge here. I'm just basically going to make a rough shape out of this and then I'm going to switch over to my regular lasso tool again, so I can add this little curved bit. I'm going to hold the Shift key down on my keyboard and just add these little inverted curves. Let's circle around to the end, now I'll just use my brush to start filling in, and then let's pick one more shape from this page and then we'll swap over to the other page. Then I'm going to do a time-lapse with everything. I'm going to pick another one of these blobby shapes and just lasso it. Again, I'm starting so that my end point will be easy for me to see and you can see I'm not doing an exact job of lassoing, so let's try that again. That's another thing to keep in mind when you're practicing with the lasso tool is that it's not always perfect and sometimes that's okay if you're not lassoing exactly. Sometimes you have to lasso a shape a few times before you get to the point where you think it looks awesome and that's okay too. There's no harm in starting over, trying again and continuing to practice. This is just a watercolor brush that I've used for years that I'm using here, and looks like we've got a little bit of a rough edge on that one. I'm going to go down to my Kyle's eraser natural edge brush, you can see right here I've got a little bit of a rough edge where my starting point is, I'm just going to erase that. See guys, I've been using the lasso tool for like 10 years now in my illustration work and I still have wonky edges and weird little points on the end here. It's totally okay. Let's swap over to our floral elements page, and I'm going to walk you through a couple of those and then I'm going to time-lapse the rest of these two sheets so you can watch them in a speeded up version, instead of sitting here with me for an entire hour while I lasso and build shapes. For this one, I think let's mess around with the Marquee Tool, let's do the circle marquee, trying get this to fit into this space as well as I can. Then I'm going to switch over to my lasso tool and I'm going to hold down the Alt key this time because I want to subtract from the selection, and then I'm going to add after that. So I'm just going to subtract these little bits that are hanging over here. Get rid of that. And now I'm going to hold the "Shift" key down. I'm going to add these little sort of bumped shapes. Now, this is a case where I'm going to do this in pieces instead of trying to do it altogether. It just makes it a little bit easier, than trying to do the entire thing at once. So I'm just holding down the "Shift" key as I add each little bit to the selection. I've got this little bit on the point right here that I need to remove. So I'm just going to swap back to Alts. Let's remove that guy and then, just use this watercolor brush again to fill in, and let's take a look and see what it looks like. So I've got another little wonky edge over here where I corrected this. We're going to move this little piece and that's fine. We can just fix that real quick. Again, I'm zoomed in pretty far on this, so it looks a little jagged on the edges, but it's not actually died jagged on the edges when you look at it, an actual size. A switch to a different brush, now, I'm going to use Kyle Webster's new pastel brush, which has really pretty texture on it. I'm just going to pick this leaf shape up here, just using the regular Lasso Tool on this. Moving my entire arm when I create the shape. Then I'm just going to make this brush really big, kind of really nice pastels sort of texture to it. Then let's do one more on the sheets. Then I'm going to swap over to the time-lapse. So you can see this beaded up version of this. I hope that you are also working on your shape practice sheets with me as we go through this. This is one of those things that is really good practice. It's definitely going to improve your skill but you have to do it. I know sometimes when it comes to sort of boring things like this where you're circling things and just drawing in one flat color that, it might feel like it's a waste of time. Might feel like something you don't want to mess with. But in the end it's these little exercises like this that help you build your technique and your skill as an artist, and was something like Photoshop, just like any sort of other thing you're doing. If you're painting or you're throwing clay or whatever you're doing. You know if you're not practicing it, you're not going to get better at it. So I love things like these little practice sheets just if you're sitting in front of the TV or whatever and you want to take a little break. This is just a fun exercise to do to get better at something. The Lasso Tool is definitely a tool that requires you to practice. It requires you to go through a period where you may not be that great at it. It might be really frustrating to not be able to create things that you imagine that you want to create. But the only way to get through that is just more practice. So even though these shapes sheets might seem sort of like a not very fun exercise to some of you, it really urge you to go through at least one of these sheets, preferably both of them before we start jumping and to the demos and actually working on florals. So I'm going to go ahead and speed things up a little bit here. I'm going to time-lapse the rest of these two sheets because I want to get my practice in too. I'm going to go ahead and fill in the rest of these shapes with some fun texture brushes. I will see you in the next video when we start working on flowers. 5. Demo - Single Flower: In the next three videos, we're going to be walking through some flower illustration demos using the Lasso Tool techniques that we've been learning in the previous videos. This first sheet, we're just going to be working on the single flowers and you will actually find this under the your project section over on the right-hand side under the resources list, you'll be able to print out the sheet of these three flowers so you could draw along with me, or sort of do your own thing. Now, for the two videos after this, I'm not going to be sharing my sketch as a download because I really want you to branch out and do your own sketches and think about how you can apply these techniques to your own style the way you draw. All right. I've got my flowers setup here. I'm just going to set this to multiply. Then I turn my opacity down and I'm going to make a new layer which I am going to be drawing on underneath my pencil marks. I've just made a quick color palette over here to the left just because I feel like when I have a little color palette setup it helps me not be so bogged down by choosing colors as I work. When I choose colors as I work, it takes me a little bit longer to settle on things and when I have a color palette already set up, it helps me focus a little bit more, even though when I'm working on an actual illustration for a client or for myself, I may not wind up with the color palette I started with. I'm just going to add drop this green color here. I'm going to start with the flower on the left, and I'm just going to start with the stem first. I'm just selecting my Lasso Tool and I'm just going to start on this little piece here. Now, you might notice when I lasso, I don't always necessarily follow the sketch exactly, I follow it closely, but I just feel like it's okay for it not to match up a 100 percent. This is my art and I can be a little bit lax with myself if I want to. I'm going to be using one of Kyle Webster's watercolor brushes on this part and it really just blocking in some color here, getting some really nice layering. Then I'm just hitting Control D on my keyboard, it's command D if you're on a Mac and that D selects my selection and then I'm ready to move on to the next selection. I'm going to go ahead and switch over to one of Kyle Webster's other brushes, which has medium pastel. I'm going to use it to draw in the stem really quick because I'm getting ready to draw these leaves and I want to have something to anchor them to and it makes more sense to me to draw the stem first. I'm going to go ahead and draw that in. Now, I'm going to switch back to my watercolor brush and I'm just going to lasso these leaf shapes. I'm going to use the same green for this that I used for this flower base. I'm going to hold the Shift key down on my keyboard while I'm doing this so I can select multiple shapes at once. I usually do this if I am drawing different bits that are going to be the same color rather than lassoing them individually because that means that I can go in and add this fun depth all at the same time instead of doing it different types. I'm already running into a little bit of a thing here. This is just the point where you start to get used to thinking about how the lasso tool works, thinking about how things are going to work if you're using a watercolor brush like this and you've got some opacity like your mode is set to multiply. So you're going to be able to see through and things may not look as nice as you would want them to. I'm going to go ahead and deselect that so you can see what I'm talking about. You can see right here where the leaves are overlapping the stem, there is a little bit like a geometric shape happening here, which is cool, which I might like, but in this case I don't. I'm just going to undo this really quickly. I'm just using the undo shortcuts on my sentique to go all the way back. I can also use the history option and go all the way back. I'm going to make a new layer now, and I'm just going to drag it under this. This is the layer that has my stem and my little flower cup on it, and then this is going to be a new layer where I'm going to draw the leaves. So let's try that again. I'm just blocking in some rough color with this watercolor brush and I really like the variation, almost the gradient look that I'm getting, so pretty pretty. All right. That looks a little bit better now because I've got the base of the leaves behind the stem so that's actually giving me a little bit more definition, I think I like that. I could also pull it in front if I wanted to go for more graphics, like cut paper, sort of look, but we'll just pull it back there. Okay. Now, I need to do the actual flower itself. Let's just pick this yellow, using my lasso tool again and again, I'm not following this exactly. It's pretty close but it's not 100 percent accurate and that's okay. I think that we naturally just make corrections and tweaks to our artwork as we go. Right now you see here on this edge I've got a really wobbly line. I'm just going to hold my Shift key down. I'm just going to add an extra little bit in there to make up for that. That'll be a less wobbly line. I'm going to go ahead and just stay on the layer that I'm already on. This is the layer that has the leaves on it, so it's going to be behind these green pieces which are right here. Since I'm using a light yellow probably I'm not going to want that to be in front of my green. I'm just going to blob in some color. It's awesome. Then I'm going to turn off my sketch layer so I can see what I'm working with. Again, you can see here, I can see this little bit of yellow behind the green and this is where we would have, maybe I would've added on a white background when I was last sewing in this green part if I wanted to or any other color background but I'm just going to go in and erase this real quick. Either way it works. So you can either fill a background color in while you've got your selection made or you can just erase. It depends on your style, how you work and how you want things to look in the end. Let's just zoom out a little bit so we can get a look at that. I think that looks really pretty. Now, I need to add in some of the details. I'm going to turn the opacity back up on my sketch for a second, because I can see I've got some stripy details I need to add into the flower and also to the little base of the flower here, and then I'll just add on some stripy details on the leaves as well and we'll be done with this one. For my details, I'm going to switch back to the brush tool and I'm just going to pick up the medium pastel brush that I was using before, it's another one of Kyle Webster's. Now, if you are using Photoshop CC, you should actually have a list of your recent brushes right here under your brushes menu. So you can see the last what sudden brushes that you've used, so it's super easy to go back and pick up wherever you had before. For my details, I am going to add a new layer. I like to just keep everything on its own layer so if I want to change colors later it's super easy to do. If I need to move anything around, it's super easy to do. It just makes my life a little bit easier overall. Let's go. Let's start with our flower. I think maybe we'll just try this light color and see how it looks. Zoom in a little bit. I'm just going to draw on these stripes. I don't think that's going to work super well. Let's pick up on other darker colors and see if that gives us a little more contrast. That's pretty. I'm just going to draw in some rough stripes here. Okay. Then I'm going to do for leaves. I think I'm going to go with a lighter color, and I'm just roughing in some more shapes here to the base of the flower, and then I'm just going to add a little line detail through the leaves. Let's zoom back out. Okay, and there we go. We've got a nice textural flower that we've made by just using the lasso tool, a watercolor brush, and Kyle Webster's medium pastel brush, that's all. Look at all of the beautiful texture and color variation that we've gotten just from using two brushes and the lasso tool. I think that's so amazing. I'm going to continue on with the next two flowers in the sequence and I'm actually going to speed things up just a little bit. We're going to do a time-lapse here but you should still be able to follow along. Don't forget to download these practice sheets from your project section and give this a try on your own. Try out some different brushes and see what you like best and what works for your style. All right. Let's speed things up a little bit and finish these last two flowers. That's it for our three single flower illustrations. I hope that you'll take time to download the sheet from the your project section and play around with it a little bit and try things in your own style. Or if you feel like you can draw your own individual flowers in your own style and try this. For all three of these flowers, I just used a watercolor brush and medium pastel brush for the details and I really love all of the nice texture and I love the juxtaposition of the clean edges with the textured interiors that don't necessarily always fill out the lassoed shapes. When you look over here at this leaf, I've got a little space here, that's why, and then with these leaves, I've got a little bit of space where the color doesn't go all the way to the edge and I just think that that's a really awesome effect and I use it in my work all the time. I also love going in with a detail brush after I've laid down all of my texture and my color variation and just adding these pretty little mind details and little dots and stuff like that. I think it makes it so fun. Once you've practiced with your single flower illustrations, let's head on over to the next video and we're going to be talking about doing a more complex flower illustration using the same method. 6. Demo - Flower Cluster: In this video, we're going to be looking at a slightly more complex flower illustration, that we going to be coloring using our lasso tool and a textured brush. For this one, you will not find this under the Your Project section. I would love it if you would draw a little cluster of flowers in your own style for this, just something really simple. You can see that I've just drawn some really small flowers here and just a little bit of greenery. But you'll notice that there is some overlap in this one, and maybe some places where I can play with some blending modes, and some transparencies and get some fun effects. Keep that in mind when you're sketching. You're welcome to be inspired by the flower shapes that I've used, but like I said, I think at this point we have practiced through, and hopefully you're getting the hang of these techniques. It's a really good time to start experimenting with using these techniques on your own style as well. I have got my sketch on its own layer. I'm going to switch it to Multiply and turn the Opacity down to about 25 percent, just like I normally do. I went ahead and brought over my color palette from our single flowers that we did over here. Just because I think it's a fun, fresh color palette, and I think that I might actually put a dark background on this piece when I'm done with it. I think these colors are really going to stand out against a dark background. That's going to be a really good time for us to look at having some background on our lassoed selections and deal with those problems where, we either need to fill in with a solid color behind our lassoed selections, or we need to go back in and erase some things, or color in with black, or whatever. There are a few different ways that we can deal with this, so we'll definitely be taking a look at that. This time because I've got a few different elements, I'm just going to set up a group for my flowers. Then I think I'm just going to have a separate group for the foliage. That way I can keep things separate. If I want to use any blending modes or anything like that, it's going to be easier for me to do if I've got everything grouped. I'm also just thinking right now about how I'm going to be using my layers in Photoshop, what needs to be on its own layer, what can be on a layer with something else? I'm looking specifically at these little heart-shaped flowers right here. Let me just get a brush real quick so I can just show you which ones I'm talking about. This little heart-shaped flower right here, these flowers. I think I'm going to use a blending mode on this center part here because otherwise it's just going to be a boring little heart shape. But if I use the blending mode, I'm going to be able to have a really cool blended effect right here. But I'm going to have to be careful with that because I've got a lot of things that are layered behind us, so I just need to be mindful of that. Just like with our other piece, I'm just going to start working on some of the greenery first. For this one, I'm going to be using Kyle Webster's new pastel brush, which has got a really pretty pastel texture. I think that's super fun. I am going to speed things up. We're going to time-lapse this for a couple of minutes. I'm just going to start blocking in some of the foliage and some of the leaf shapes. I've got most of the foliage blocked in now. I actually left these little shoots that are coming off the sides here because I don't think that I want them to be green, but I'm not a 100% sure what color I want them to be yet. I'm just leaving them for right now until I make up my mind. Now I'm going to start in on the flowers with the lasso tool. I'm going to start with these little four petaled flowers real quick and then we're going to talk about the heart-shaped flowers, and how I'm going to go about using the blending mode for that. Now we're going to be taking a look at the heart-shaped flowers. We're going to be playing around with blending modes on these because I really want a little bit of transparency from one side to the other. Let's take a look at this one at the top. I'm just going to select this orange color. I think I'm going to tweak it just a little bit. I'm going to select my first section with my lasso tool, and then I'm going to just go ahead and use my brush to fill it in. Now I'm going to make a new layer here and I'm just going to go ahead and add in my white background fill, just in case I decide I need it. I may not; we'll see how it goes. I can already see now that I've messed up. I've got things on the wrong layer here, so I'm going to need to make another group, flowers and I'm just going to drag these orange flowers down here. You can see now that I've move that orange behind the green here. I don't need this white layer right now, but I'm just going to have it just in case. I'm going to make a new layer behind the one I just did, and I'm going to do the same thing. I'm just going to select my petal, use my new pastel brush to color it on, I'm going to add my white background just in case I need it later. Now I'm going to go back to my original layer. I'm going to switch it to Multiply. When I do that, you can see I get this really awesome effect of this little bit of a darker section in the middle here and I really like that. When we put a darker background on this later, I might need the white background bit, but for now I don't need it. It's a just in case sort of thing. I'm going to go through it real quick and I'm going to finish filling in the remaining heart-shaped flowers. Then we're going to tackle the last of this foliage over here. We have all of our flowers finished up and all we have left now is this little bit of foliage and then I'm just some little dot accents that I've added to fill in some of the piece. I think I'm going to try to make this foliage yellow and also maybe add in a little bit of the orange, I think would be really fun. We'll do that when we have our selections made. I'm just going to go in first with my detail brush and draw on my stems then I'm going to use the lasso tool to select my leaves and you'll see, I'm going to be layering color. I'm going to start with the yellow, and then I'm going to layer a little bit of orange on top of it, and we will see what that looks like. Great. I'm all finished with this now. I went ahead in addition to finishing the foliage where I layered three different colors, it ended up being. I also added in just some little dots that I'm using as filler and then I added this cute little bow at the bottom. So I'm going to turn off my sketch layer, and I'm also going to turn off my color palette that I have over here so you can see what's going on. This looks really pretty. You can see that there is a lot of texture. We can see a lot of white space behind it. What I want to show you in this example is what happens if you have a darker background or just any background that isn't white that might be showing through this pretty texture that you've created. I'm going to go ahead and just fill this in with black and you can see right away a couple of things happen. First of all, I feel like the textural pieces, the little pieces on the petals here really jump out a lot more maybe than when they were on the white but the other thing that you might notice is that we've lost half of our heart right here and the reason that we've lost half of our heart-shaped petals is because I'm using a blending mode. I have these set to multiply. So if I switch this back to normal, it's still here and that's an option. That's one way that I can solve this problem. I can just switch it back to normal and my flower comes up, but I miss that cool little effects in the middle. I'm going to switch it back over to multiply. It is going to disappear now. But when I was working, I made sure that I added a flat backgrounds fill behind my pretty textured layers so I can just go down here and it's layer 13 because I haven't named my layers because I'm terrible about that. So I can just turn this layer on. You can see now it's added a white backgrounds and we can see the multiply, the overlay that we created. I can leave this color or I can do a color overlay on it and we can switch it to any other color in the background and get all sorts of fun effects. We can just switch it to the orange color, we can switch it to a paler orange color, we can switch it to a dark gray color. Anything that seems like it works for me. This is just one of those cases where you're just going to play around, see what works, see what looks good, see what feels good to you, and then whatever works is awesome. I think I'm going to stick with this yellow background because I think it plays really well with the foliage that we've got going on back here. Now, I don't love how hard the edge is on this background. Let me zoom in a little bit. I just think that this edge gets a little hard right here. So I just got a rough edged eraser tool and I'm just going to go in here and just very lightly erase the edges so they're not quite as perfect as they were. See, I think that looks a little bit better already. Just roughing up those edges, same thing here. I have to be really careful here because when I'm erasing part of my flower is going to disappear because of my multiply layers, so I have to make sure that it does not affect my stems or anything else that's going to show through. So I'm just keeping that in mind as I erase. I'm erasing this bit here that shows through the flower. I've got all that taken care of. Everything else, I think I'm fine with the background showing through. If I wasn't fine with the background showing through though, I made sure that as I was creating my petals, I added a flat background. See here is what the background looks like without any color on it. Actually, that's fun. Doesn't it? With the white peeking through there, that's super fun. See, so you never know what fun discoveries you're going to make when you're working in a style. Honestly with the black background, a really like the white. So let me get back to my purple flowers here. I'm just going to add a color overlay and I'm going to switch that white. I think that looks really pretty now that I've got a dark background on it and I can see all of the texture through the background. Now, if I wanted to have a textured background and I've got white selected now, I can just go through here and choose a different color that I've already got in my palettes and that's fun too. Now you see you've got a really pretty orangey textured backgrounds and that adds an extra layer of interests to it so I like that. So let's leave it. Then I'm just going to do the same thing here. I just want to double-check and make sure that I just don't work too hard. If they do look harsh in a couple places I'm just going to go through and just erase around the edges and this is just a personal preference. This is just something that I prefer. I feel like it creates a little bit of a halo sometimes when you've got this flat fill in the backgrounds, when you've got these pretty textured selections. To me, I think it just looks a little bit more relaxed if I go through here and just loosen up these edges a little bit. You totally don't have to do it. It's whatever is pleasing to your eye. Whatever works for the style of art that you're creating. It's totally up to you. I think it's fun in this case to see how adding a darker background changed the way that I looked at my color palette and changed the way that this piece ended up looking. That's it for our flower cluster. We've seen how to handle our layers if we're using dark backgrounds, how that might look if we're using dark backgrounds and how we can deal with any problems or things that we don't like. I hope that you are drawing along with your own flower cluster and playing around with blending modes and overlays and all sorts of fun techniques until you get some really cool results. Head on over to the final demo video, which is next. We're going to be doing a more complex floral illustration that is going to put everything together that you've practiced throughout the entire class. 7. Demo - Flower Bouquet : We've arrived at the last demo of this class and we're going to be drawing this bunch of flowers sitting in a pitcher. There's a lot of overlap and room for play with this one. I'm going to be using a dark background again, so we're really going to get to see the lovely texture as they go along. As always, I'm keeping in mind how I'll be grouping the pieces of my illustration in layers and groups, which pieces I'll be illustrating with the Lasso tool and which pieces I'll be just drawing in. I'm also thinking about places where I'll need a background fill behind the pretty textural Lasso pieces because I'm using a dark background on this one. That's something that we'll definitely have to be thinking about. Even though I changed my mind often when I'm working, I always find that a little forethought helps me focus and figuring out in advance how I might want to handle each portion of an illustration helps me move past the fear of starting. All right. Let's get started. You notice that I've changed the color palette a little bit on this one because I needed a few more colors because I've got some more flowers here and I wanted to have just a couple more colors added to my palette. I knew that I wanted to do a dark blue background on this one. Because of that, I had to tweak some of my other colors as well so they would work better on that dark blue background. I'm just going to go ahead and start by filling in the dark blue background. I'm just going to fill it in as a flat color and then I'm going to do like a little tablecloths sort of thing here with a lighter color. For this piece, I'm going to be using a Kyle Webster gouache brush and then later I'm going to be using his web pencil brush Tad in all of the final details. From this point on, I'm actually going to speed things up and you'll be watching this in time lapse, but you'll still be able to follow along as I work. You should still be able to see each step because you will be familiar with them by now and hopefully it'll be easy for you to pick out what I'm doing in the various portions of this illustration. I'll see you again in a few minutes. That's it. We're all done with this illustration. All I've used for this illustration is the Lasso tool, I used the Marquee tool on this little bottom tabletop section down here and then I used a gouache brush and a wet pencil brush. Both of those are from cower Bob service brush set. That's it. We've got this awesome amount of texture and variation that I really love and that's sort of a hallmark in my work. This is what it looked like with just the Lasso tool and the gouache brush. That's actually pretty cute, but I wanted to go in and just add some more details and add some more interests. So that's where I used the white pencil brush to go in at the end and I just added some contrasting details with a really dark, dark blue and then with whites instead. All right. That's it for the demos in this class. Go ahead and head on over to the next video, and I'm just going to go over the downloads that you can find for this class. In the video after that, we're going to be talking about your project and hopefully you'll be ready to get started and excited to create your own Lasso Tool magic. 8. PDF Tip Sheet: Just a quick reminder that if you look under the "Your Project" section of this class, you're going to find a few resources. One of the things that you'll find there is a PDF tip sheet that basically just include some tips and tricks and notes from the class. You will also find your shape practice sheet, your floral shape practice sheet, and three single flowers that you can import into Photoshop and color using the techniques that we've learned. Be sure you download all of those things before you move on to the next video which is your class project. 9. Your Project: All right, let's talk about your project for this class. Before you start on your class project, be sure to go through the lasso practice sheet to really get a grip on the technique. I always feel like a little practice leads to a whole lot less frustration in the end. Now for your project, choose one of the three layouts we walked through in this class. You can choose from the single flower, the flower cluster or the flower bouquet. If you've chosen a single flower, you're welcome to use the flowers I've included in the class PDF, but I'd love to see you try something in your own style as well, so definitely give that a try. Your project is to complete a floral illustration using the lasso and or the marquee tools, and just submit that under the Your Project section of this class. I would love to see the work you've created and I check the your project section frequently. I also do my best to leave comments on your work within 24 hours, so please definitely share your work with myself and the rest of the students. I really can't wait to see what you create. 10. Bonus: Procreate Demo: In this video, I'm going to be taking the lessons that we've learned in the class and I'm going to be demonstrating how they can translate from Photoshop to Procreate. I've been getting a ton of questions about whether or not these techniques will work in Procreate just like they do in Photoshop. So I wanted to do a demo for you guys so you can see how the lessons work across both. You'll find that when you watch my classes, the things that I'm showing you in Photoshop normally also work in Procreate, and the things that I'm showing you in Procreate will also normally work in Photoshop. I work in both apps, so the techniques that I use tend to work across both of them instead of just being for one or the other. One thing to keep in mind is that Procreate is not Photoshop. Even though you can do a lot of the same things, the brushes are not the same. The brushes don't function in the same way. You're not necessarily going to get exactly the same look that you would get in Photoshop, and then the same thing vice versa. But you're able to get something really close. I'm going to take you through my process in this video and talk about how the lessons that we've learned are going to translate over to Procreate. You can see this is our flower cluster demo that we've already done. I've imported it into Procreate and I've also brought my color palette over here so I can reference that if I want to. I'm going to start just by switching my sketch to multiply and changing the opacity down to 25 percent and then making a new layer that I'm going to be drawing on. I'm just going to show you a few things first and then I'm going to time-lapse the rest of the video, so it's not going to be a huge amount of time. The first thing that we need to look at is how the lasso tool is going to work in Procreate. It's very similar to the way that it works in Photoshop, but you are going to notice some differences here and there. Those are going to be important to note. Let me zoom in real quick here. I'm just going to select the lasso tool. It's probably going to be defaulted to freehand, so make sure that you've got that option selected if you don't already. You're going to have another couple of options here. This is going to be where you can make your rectangular and elliptical selections. You can actually just add to your selections. You don't have to tap on anything. You can just keep on making circles or rectangles and then dragging your color into it. That's pretty easy. The one thing that works a little bit differently in Procreate is going to be how we can make shapes and transform them. Before we get to that, let's take a look at just lassoing in some shapes because this does work in a very similar way, and then we'll look at how the transforming shapes option works a little bit better. I'm just lassoing my selection. I'm just circling it with my Apple pencil. Then to add to my selection, I just hit "Add." Then if I wanted to remove anything for my selection, I would just hit "Remove." This isn't quite as simple as Photoshop, but I definitely feel like it's a pretty easy method. Once I have got my shape selected for the bottoms of my flowers, I'm going to pick a color. I'm just going to settle on a green, and then under the Native Procreate Bushes, under Inking, I'm choosing a flat marker because it has a really great texture. I'm going to use that to block in my little flower base here and then I'm just going to tap the lasso again to deselect everything. You can see here I've got some really nice texture, just like I did in Photoshop. I'm just going to go in and erase some of my less clean edges, again, just like I would do in Photoshop. Now, I'm going to switch to the dry ink brush and that's also under the Native Inking Brushes in Procreate. I'm going to use this brush just to draw my stems in on these flowers. You can see this brush has a little bit of a rough edge to it, a little bit of texture, just like the web pencil brush that I prefer to use when I'm doing this sort of work in Photoshop. It does have and very similar look. Now that we've got our stems drawn, I want to go back and talk about how things work a little bit differently when we are creating elliptical shapes and rectangle shapes. I'm going to create an ellipse. I've gone into my lasso and tapped on the ellipse option. I'm just going to go ahead and make my ellipse shape and drag and drop my color in. Now to transform it, I'm going to tap on the transform tool. Now, it's automatically going to default to free form, which just means I can grab any of my anchor points and make it bigger or smaller or make it stretched out or squashed, or whatever. The next option over that I have is to have a uniform transformation which is going to maintain my aspect ratio, which is super important. We definitely want to use this sometimes, but not right now because we're trying to make shapes. The distort option just, obviously, lets you distort in perspective. If you're making any of these adjustments, you can just hit "Reset" over on the right to go back to the beginning if you mess anything up. Then the thing that we want to be looking at is the warp tool. The warp tool is going to be just like the free transform warp tool in Photoshop, and that you can use your anchor points on the edges and you can also use the extra anchor points in the center and along the outside edge. You can turn your ellipse into a more specific shape that you're looking for. Honestly, I don't find that this works as well as it does in Photoshop, but you can do it. I think it's awesome that you can do this in Procreate just like you can in Photoshop. Next up, I'm going to just get rid of the little demo that we've done here and I'm going to start in on our time-lapse. I'm just going to time lapse through my process of painting this piece. [MUSIC] This is what the completed piece looks like. You'll see that it has a lot of similarities to the piece that I created on Photoshop. Obviously, the color palette is a little bit different. I intended to use the same palette, but I thought it would be more fun to show you something a little bit different. I just went with the flow as I went along, added some extra details at the end. Let me turn those off, so it'll be easier for you to compare what was done in Photoshop because that one did not have a lot of details. I think it's pretty amazing that you can achieve a similar look between Procreate and Photoshop using brushes that are similar but not the same, and using techniques that are similar, but maybe not exactly the same. I think that's awesome. If you do want to learn more about Procreate, I do have a couple of classes here on Skill Share that will take you through the very basics of Procreate. Then, we'll also take you through layering, color and texture, in Procreate. Those are some more in-depth classes. That's little demo video was just an overview and just an example that you can take the Photoshop techniques that you learn and translate them over into Procreate as well. All right, so I hope that you enjoyed this bonus video, and I also hope that you've really enjoyed this class and are looking forward to my next one.