LOVE GUITAR – THE REAL BEGINNER'S SERIES | Andy Read | Skillshare

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LOVE GUITAR – THE REAL BEGINNER'S SERIES

teacher avatar Andy Read

Watch this class and thousands more

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

87 Lessons (12h 6m)
    • 1. The Real Beginner's Series Intro

      3:09
    • 2. Basics 1: Guitar parts

      2:07
    • 3. Basics 2: Finger names/Open string names

      2:21
    • 4. Basics 3: The left hand home position

      2:27
    • 5. Basics 4: The chord box

      1:59
    • 6. Basics 5: Six must-know chords

      5:28
    • 7. Basics 6: TAB (guitar tablature/notation)

      2:22
    • 8. Basics 7: The rest stroke

      1:32
    • 9. Basics 8: Finger picking

      2:01
    • 10. Basics 9: Strumming

      2:08
    • 11. Basics 10: Tuning

      9:38
    • 12. TAB 1: "Easy peasy", "Lift Off", "10 Green Bottles"

      8:17
    • 13. TAB 2: "Happy Birthday" (pt1),

      8:49
    • 14. TAB 3: "Happy Birthday" (pt2), "Merry Christmas" (pt1), "Oh When the Saints" (pt1)

      11:01
    • 15. TAB 4: "10 Green Bottles" (pt2), "Jingle Bells", "Swing Low"

      24:14
    • 16. TAB 5: "Happy Birthday" (full), "Oh When the Saints" (full), "Merry Christmas" (pt2)

      23:50
    • 17. Tab 6: "10 Green Bottles" (full), Blues Scale, "The Grand Old Duke of York"

      27:13
    • 18. TAB 7: "Blues Solo" (pt1), "Blues Solo Bass" (pt1)

      24:14
    • 19. Tab 8: "Blues Solo", "Blues Solo Bass", "Auld Lang Syne"

      30:49
    • 20. TAB 9: "Merry Christmas", "Give Me Oil In My Lamp"

      14:19
    • 21. TAB 10: G major scale, "Yankee Doodle", "God Rest..."

      11:17
    • 22. TAB treat: "E Squeeze" blues riff

      11:04
    • 23. Chords 1: Easy E

      2:12
    • 24. Chords 2: Easy E and A

      2:18
    • 25. Chords 3: Easy E, A, and B7

      3:08
    • 26. Chords 4: The full chord of E

      4:01
    • 27. Chords 5: The chord of E and A

      4:04
    • 28. Chords 6: E, A and B7

      5:01
    • 29. Chords 7: E, A, B7 and D

      5:03
    • 30. Chords 8: The 16 chord block (E, A, B7, D, G and C

      10:35
    • 31. Chords 9: The 16 chord block without boxes

      3:49
    • 32. Chords 10: Strumming styles

      28:00
    • 33. FP 1: Finger picking Easy E

      4:07
    • 34. FP 2: FP Easy E and A

      2:25
    • 35. FP 3: FP Easy E, A, and B7

      2:39
    • 36. FP 4: FP the E chord

      4:37
    • 37. FP 5: FP E and A

      3:02
    • 38. FP 6: FP E, A and B7

      3:28
    • 39. FP 7: FP E, A, B7 and D

      4:55
    • 40. FP 8: FP the 16 chord block

      5:39
    • 41. FP 9: FP the 16 chord block without boxes

      5:12
    • 42. FP 10: The 16 chord black FP styles

      8:21
    • 43. Classical Notation 1: Open strings, the rest stroke, crotchets and minims

      10:30
    • 44. Classical Notation 2: The stave, and songs with the notes E, B and G

      9:26
    • 45. Classical Notation 3: The dotted minim, semibreve, and the notes F and 'higher' G

      11:06
    • 46. Classical Notation 4: Songs using B, C and D.

      23:25
    • 47. Classical Notation 5: The major scales of G and C

      10:06
    • 48. Extras 1: FF (finger to a fret) Scales

      10:24
    • 49. Extras 1: Major scale

      13:42
    • 50. Extras 1: Blues scale

      8:48
    • 51. Extras 2: Six must-know minor chords

      12:08
    • 52. Extras 3: Full-bar chord shapes

      7:39
    • 53. Extras 4: Half-bar chord shapes

      8:35
    • 54. Extras 5.1: "On a Mission" riff

      18:14
    • 55. Extras 5.2: "Running Home" riff

      9:10
    • 56. Extras 5.3: 12 bar blues (intro)

      10:59
    • 57. Extras 5.4: 12 bar blues (full)

      21:45
    • 58. Extras 5.5: "Setting Sun" (finger picking)

      28:43
    • 59. Extras 5.6: "Soft Steps" (finger picking)

      11:47
    • 60. Extras 5.7: "Runaway Train"

      14:26
    • 61. Extras 5.8: "Blues Rock"

      10:39
    • 62. Extras 5.9: "Blues Bass"

      9:46
    • 63. Extras 5.10: "Run For Cover"

      7:01
    • 64. Extras 6.1: "E Quartet" progression

      14:01
    • 65. Extras 6.2: G/D/Em7/C2 (cool chord progression)

      4:41
    • 66. Extras 6.3: "D Prog"

      4:05
    • 67. Extras 6.4: E/G/D/A (cool chord progression)

      2:06
    • 68. Extras 6.5: D/Em7/C2/G (cool chord progression)

      1:51
    • 69. Extras 6.6: D/A/C2/G (cool chord progression)

      2:17
    • 70. Extras 6.7: D/Bm/Em7/C2 (cool chord progression)

      2:03
    • 71. Extras 6.8: G/C2/Em7/D (cool chord progression)

      1:54
    • 72. Extras 6.9: E/G/A/C (cool chord progression)

      2:06
    • 73. Extras 6.10: A/C#m/Bm/E (cool chord progression)

      3:13
    • 74. Extras 7: "Minuet in G" (famous classical piece)

      9:39
    • 75. Extras 8.1: "Greensleeves" (chords)

      12:38
    • 76. Extras 8.2: "Greensleeves" (finger picking)

      7:28
    • 77. Extras 8.3 "Greensleeves" (TAB)

      22:48
    • 78. Extras 9.1: "Jingle Bells" (chords)

      3:14
    • 79. Extras 9.2: "Happy Birthday" (chords)

      3:08
    • 80. Extras 9.3: "The Grand Old Duke of York" (chords)

      2:53
    • 81. Extras 9.4: "Oh When The Saints" (chords)

      2:20
    • 82. Extras 9.5: "Swing Low" (chords)

      2:44
    • 83. Extras 9.6: "Amazing Grace" (chords)

      1:55
    • 84. Extras 9.7: "Auld Lang Syne" (chords)

      2:38
    • 85. Extras 9.8: "Ten Green Bottles" (chords)

      1:48
    • 86. Extras 9.9: "We Wish You a Merry Christmas"

      1:52
    • 87. Extras 9.10: "He's Got The Whole World"

      1:16
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About This Class

Perfect class for start-from-scratch beginners or returning guitarists.

This class gives a solid foundation for all those wanting to learn campfire/street style guitar.

The 6 sections include: The 10 Basics, How To Play TAB, How To Play Chords, How To Finger Pick, Understanding Classical Notation, and Extras (more challenging chord progressions, riffs, and songs.

Class requirements: A guitar that has all 6 strings!

A 112 page handbook is available for you to download and help with your learning!   

Meet Your Teacher

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Andy Read

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Transcripts

1. The Real Beginner's Series Intro: When I first picked up a guitar, I had no idea what I was doing. What I did eventually improve enough to teach others. I couldn't find a simple book that taught the basics in an easy to understand way. So I wrote on myself, fast forward 25 years and loved guitar has been fully road-tested into the method it is today, a street style guide for everyone and anyone ever wanted to Strom or finger pick your favorite songs around a campfire on a beach, or just by yourself quietly at home. I hope this helps. Hi, my name is Andy Reed and I'm a full-time guitar coach working out of the beautiful city of Winchester, UK. I've just spent this last year of lockdown filming all 55 lessons of every chapter to turn love guitar, the real beginner's guide into love guitar, the real Beginners series. Let's check out once inside, there are six different chapters or modules. The 10 basics covers, guitar parts, finger names and string names. How to read a chord box. Six must know cords and tuning, how to play tab. There were 10 lessons starting super-easy and progressing in difficultly. Each lesson has two or three tabs old when I say Tab songs, I mean single note melody lines of well-known songs. How to play chords. Here we get to know six chords really well. And when I say really well, I mean able to play them and change between them on time. Every time. Cords are such an important part of playing the guitar. And once you've nailed Six really well, all the others will be so much easier. We also get to grips with strumming and different strumming styles. Finger picking can be really fiddly for taking time to learn. It will be so beneficial for you. It really is one of the most rewarding skills you can learn on the guitar. Understanding classical notation. This is a very basic overview of all things, crotchets and minims. It may be a little more challenging to read them tab, but it's a universal language that once understood, can be read and played by any musician on any instrument anywhere in the world. Back of the book extras. This section is full of more challenging songs, courts and refs. It includes six must know minor chords, full bar and half bar chord shapes, major and minor scales, and 10 cool chord progressions. See it as a springboard to the next part of your journey. Because of copyright, all the songs included may not be the coolest, trendiest classics, but they are all classics in the sense of being well-known and familiar. Because what we are learning principles and techniques of guitar playing. So once you're confident in these, you'll be free and in a much better place to go and search out your very own personal favorite songs to learn and play. It really is the series I would have appreciated when I first started out. It's a fully road-tested 12. Our introduction to an amazingly versatile instrument. 2. Basics 1: Guitar parts: Hi and welcome to Basics Lesson 1. In this session, we'll be learning eight main guitar parts. We need to know the correct words to use to describe the bits and pieces of the guitar. We could say things like turn the thing about Bobby around the watch and Nicollet. But using the right vocabulary is going to bring clarity and understanding for yourself and for others. Let's check it out. Okay, so let's look at eight basic guitar parts. The first one is the body. This is the main hollow part of the guitar that gives the notes the depth of sound when the strings are played. And these are the physician dots. These are like road signs for the fingers to help you remember where they are on the fretboard. And this is the nut. This is the bar of white plastic between the head and the fretboard that holds and supports the strings in place. And these are the tuning pegs. These tighten or loosen the strings. This changes the pitch and is how each string is tuned correctly to each other. And this is the fretboard. This is the top strip of wood on the neck of the guitar that the frets lie across. The strings run over the fretboard between the nut and the bridge. And these are the frets. These are the metal strips that lie across the fretboard and this is the sound hope. This helps to project the sound of the chords or notes when the strings are played. And lastly, this is the bridge. This supports the strings coming from the nut and fixes them to the top of the body, sometimes called a soundboard. Okay, so one more time. Body position dots, not tuning pegs, fretboard, frets, sound WHO, and bridge. These are the eight basic guitar parts. 3. Basics 2: Finger names/Open string names: Hi and welcome to Basics Lesson 2. In this session, we'll be learning the finger names and the open string names. Trust me, learning these names now at the beginning of your journey will save you so much hassle in the future. Let's check it out. We like to keep things really simple here. Loved guitar, so we're going to call our fingers these names, thumb, index, middle, ring, and little. Wait a minute, wait a minute. If both hands use those finger names, what happens if you're playing chords with a left-hand fingers and say finger picking where the right hand fingers, well, they're still called the same, but abbreviated with a lowercase and uppercase. So here the left-hand fingers are shown using lowercase letters for when you're playing tab. And also within the black circles seen here on this ii chord. Now say you want to use your right hand fingers for finger picking. Then as you can see here, they're shown in upper case letters. You can probably notice one Rule Breaker, and it's this little guy over here. We use an uppercase L for B, left-hand little fingers. We don't get confused with the eye for the index. So the open strings, the strings played on their own without any left hand fingers on the fretboard. So we have the thin string, which is the first string, first, second, third, fourth, fifth, sixth, which is the thick string. And the note names are these, B, G, D. A little phrase that I sometimes use to remember, well, shaking groundbreaking phrase, every big God takes a, B, G, T, a. 4. Basics 3: The left hand home position : Hi and welcome to Basics Lesson 3. In this session, we'll be learning the left-hand home position technique is the way that we play. And the left-hand home position shows us good technique when it comes to thumb and finger placement. Let's check it out. Let's now take a look at the left-hand home position. You may not have your fretboard hand in this particular shape all the way through your guitar playing. But it reminds us of best-practice technique, especially for scales, solos, and single note tab cells. Okay, let's start by putting the thumb nail right behind the back of the neck. We're going to start on behind fret 41234. So right behind fret four. You need to have that thumbnail right in the middle pointing upwards. Not like that. Not like that. Not like that. Like that. And then with the thumb state that we're going to put our index finger on the fifth string, fret three, like this. Fret three. Middle thing up, right behind, fret, full ring finger, right behind the fret five. And if we can stretch that little finger right over behind fret six, there'll be a struggle to begin with. But That's the shape we're aiming for. So you can see here lots of space in between. Lots of space. So that the fingertips are reaching right over and not touching any other string. And trying to get a nice straight angle m with the fingers. And this is the left-hand home position. 5. Basics 4: The chord box: Hi and welcome to Basics Lesson 4. In this session, we'll be learning how to read a code box. Courts play a huge part in guitar playing. And there'll be a time when you'll see the chord of E, for instance, and being able to play it off by heart. But when you're learning them for the first time, it helps to see the code written as a diagram that shows you clearly which finger to put on what string in which Fred. Let's see how it works. So this is how you read that code bugs. And I've got page nine open here in front of me. I'm going to put on my lap like this. You can put on a table as long as it's in front of you. So I'm looking at the cold box now and we have six lines going across horizontally. And the string, the line that's closest to me is the thickest string as you can see here. And the furthest away from me, the string is the thinnest string, the first string. And the lines that go vertical, other frets. And these are the frets here. So the anchor finger for the quarter e is the index finger. So I'm gonna put my index finger on the first, second, third string behind the first fret. And the next finger I'm going to use is the middle finger. And it's gonna go on the fifth string, second fret. And then a ring finger is going to tuck underneath on the fourth string. Second fret. The more you read codes and record boxes, the quicker your mind will be able to put it altogether and you'll be able to do it straight away. So this is the core of a and this is how you read a cold box. 6. Basics 5: Six must-know chords: Hi and welcome to Basics Lesson 5. In this session, we'll be looking at six must know chords with so many calls to learn as a guitarist, it can sometimes feel overwhelming. So focusing on knowing just six chords can take the pressure off. Besides the process you go through to learn these six chords really well will help you enormously when you try and learn other chords. Let's check it out. Welcome to Basics Lesson 5, we are going to look at the six must know cords as a beginning guitarist, although there are 2341 pebble chords, thankfully, you just need to learn six. And these are those. So let's look at the left-hand column first. Easy Ease the easy versions, easy, easy a, easy B7, D, G, and C. You'll notice that the d is the same, both versions. Okay, so let's look at easy E then the index finger. I'm going to put that in front one. And it's going to be the third string. For always easy versions, we're just going to play the last three strings, that three thin strings. That's easy enough. And now easy a, we're going to slide up one fret to the third string, fret two. And then the middle finger is going to tuck it underneath on the second string. And I'm going to play just those three strings again. That's easy. Easy. B7. We're just going to drop that middle finger, one string to the first string. This is fret too, are all in fret too. And then let's just play bass, easy B7. And then for D, add that ring finger in fret 3, second string. And we're going to cheat a little and play for strings for D. That's D. And then we're going to look at easy G, the index fingers, going to go on the first string, fret three. Let's ECG and easy see, we're going to go back to fret 1, second string. Again, just playing those last three strings. And those are the easy versions of the six must know cords. Let's now look at the right-hand column, EA B7, D, G, and C. We're going to look at E festival. So the index finger goes in fret 1, third string, the same as easy, but we're going to add the middle finger fret to fifth strain. And then the ring finger is going to tuck underneath on the fourth string fret too. And when to play all of the strings. Here we go. Let's play this four times so we allow, Let's look at a. The little finger, fret 2, second string. Ring finger goes above it. Third string. Middle finger goes above that fourth string. And it's got a cross. Cross means don't play the string, so we're just going to play the last five strings four times. And now B7, the little finger is gonna go down one to the first string, fret too, this is the ring finger. We're going to miss out the second string got to the third string is still fret TO middle finger, miss out that string and go up to the fifth string. And the index finger just falls naturally. Home that fourth string fret one. And this is lost five strings as a cross. So I'm just going to play this nice and slowly. B7. Let's look at g. The little fingers going to slide up to the first string, fret three. Ring finger goes above it. Second string, middle finger stretches right up to the sixth string. And the index finger again just falls naturally on the fifth string. For it to. Let's play that four times. And last of all, we're going to look at C, the index finger for at 1, second string, middle finger, fret to fourth string. Ring fingers stretching over to the next fret. Fret 3, fifth string. Again with a cross. We're just going to play the last five. Here we go. Those were the six must know cords. 7. Basics 6: TAB (guitar tablature/notation): Hi and welcome to Basics Lesson 6. In this session, we'll be learning how to read tab. Tab is short for guitar tablature. It's a form of notation that uses lines and numbers to show you where to place your fingers on the fretboard. Tab is the quickest and easiest way to play chains using single notes. And this lesson is a quick introduction. Let's check it out now. Welcome to Basics lesson six, a quick introduction to tab. I'm looking at page 11 here in the book. And as we can see under the left hand, we've got a tablet chair hair. Tab is short for guitar tablature. So we've got six lines and we have numbers on the sixth string, which is the sixth line here. So the lines represent the strings. The top line is always the thinnest string. So all the numbers that we're looking at there, 3456, they're all played on the sixth string, the thickest string. The numbers show you which fret to place your fingertips on. So let's do that. Let's play 3456. So the same as the left-hand home position. I'm going to put my thumb up behind 1234, the fourth fret, going to push my wrist forward. And now I'm going to plot my index finger on the sixth string behind fret three of us see the numbers here, 34, 56 going to be frets 3, 4, 5, and 6. So let's just play three. And then I'm going to put my middle finger on the next fret on for and then ring finger on five. And then little finger stretching it over to six. So this is how you play tab 3456. 8. Basics 7: The rest stroke: Hi, welcome to Basics Lesson 7. In this session, we'll be learning how to play the rest stroke. The rest stroke is a technique that is used to play single notes in mainly tab or classical notation. It's also the easiest way to produce the clearest sounding note. Let's check it out. So the rest stroke is a technique that is used to play single notes and tab or classical notation. It's also the easiest way to produce the clearest sounding note. It gets its name because after plucking the string, the finger rests on the adjacent string after it follows through, getting a slightly rounder, often punchier sound. As opposed to the simplicity, this technique can be used by the right-hand index finger on the first, second, third string. While the right-hand thumb uses it when playing notes on the sixth, fifth, fourth string. With a thumb, you simply press or plucked down on the string away from you, come to rest and the string below. 9. Basics 8: Finger picking: Hi and welcome to Basics Lesson 8. In this session, we'll be learning some finger picking using a simple, basic pattern. We're going to be learning how to pick out certain strings using fingers from our right-hand. Finger picking is fiddly to begin with, but it's one of the most rewarding skills you can learn on a guitar. Let's check it out. So finger picking as a technique that uses their fingertips to pluck individual strings. It's mainly used with chords played by the left hand and unique as it adds a variety of sounds by picking out the different notes of that chord. So with my left hand, I'm just going to be playing the chord of E. And then with my right hand, I'm just going to show you the basic fingerprinting pattern. So the thumb looks after generally throughout this book anyway, the left guitar book looks after the sixth, fifth, and the fourth string. Whereas the index, middle and ring always look after the third string, second string, and first string. So the index always looks after the third string. The middle finger always looks after the second string, and the ring finger always looks after the first string. So the basic pattern we're going to look at right now is thumb, index, middle ring, and then back on the middle. And the index is going to sound like this. Nice and slowly. Nice and slowly. We are going to play that again. We're going to play it twice through now. 10. Basics 9: Strumming : Hi and welcome to Basics Lesson 9. In this session, we'll be learning how to hold a PEC and how to strum using a simple, basic pattern. Being able to strong chord smoothly and cleanly starts with a good technique. And this is how you do it. Let's check it out. So strumming is the Swinging action of the arm with a peak or from brushing over the strings. It's used when playing chords only and provides random picks, sometimes called drums, come in a variety of thicknesses and colors. Having used many over the years, I really liked the Jim Dunlop Nylon, 0.6 or 46. This white Peck is a 0.46 and the gray is 0.6. I'm going to use the white 0.46 for this demonstration. Players user pick as opposed to a thumb to give a louder and more even strum across the strings. So let's hold the pick between your thumb and the index finger. The nice straight arm down here. And we're just going to look at the basic strong pattern, which is 12341234. The downstrokes and, ands are always the upstrokes and this is what it's going to sound like with the left-hand. I'm going to play the chord of E. And then strum this. Now, here we go. So let's try that again, but slower. A patent twice 123. 11. Basics 10: Tuning: Hi and welcome to Basics Lesson 10. In this session, we'll be learning how to tune the guitar digitally and manually. For the digital method, we'll be using a super easy free app to help us get the strings in perfect tune. And for those who have some spare time and want to do it old school, I'll be going through the manual method. The digital method is quick and easy and you don't really have to think much. But learning the manual way really does improve our listening skills. Let's check them both out. Now. This is called Guitar chill T U N a. And I'm basically going to down ch unit or put it way and see what we get. Okay. So according to my knee facing you so you can see I'm just going to play the festering first, showing too low. So I'm just going to tighten the right tuning peg here. Little touch up. It should tell me when it's in tune. And you go. Let's look at the second string now. But he sure I've got my left-hand ready to turn it if it needs to hear too high. So it's always good to come up to the note to create that tension in the string. So I'm gonna come down with it and then come up to the night. Kinda see the third string. It's too low, it's flat, so I'm going to play it and then I'm going to twist. Turn it up. Tight-knit. Good. And that's festering, delicate of the fourth string. Let's shops that's too high, so I'm going to just break it down and then come up. Perfect fifth strain. Too large, that's flat, so I'm just going to type it again here. Good. And the sixth string too high, so I'm gonna come down and come up to it. Perfect. Sounds pretty good. How easy was that? Okay, so conversely, we are going to look at the manual way of tuning. And you need an awful lot more patients for this. So the same way as before, I'm just going to put actually what I want to do and where to put the second, third, fourth, fifth, sixth string at a shoe. Because the way this works is that it puts everything in tune with the first string. So as long as the first string is kind of near constant pitch, the right note, the right to1, then you're okay. So when this method falls down, when you're trying to tune everything to the first string in the first ring is way out, so either way too high or way too low. So we know it's about right. You know, it's perfect actually. So we don't need to touch that first string. We're going to place left-hand index finger behind the fifth fret, second string. So that's here, a fifth fret, second string. And I'm going to pluck the open first string, followed by that second string. Now, let's just listen carefully to the second node, which is the second string. Now, you have to listen to that second note and say, is the second note higher or lower than the first note? Right, that is definitely lower. So what you need to do is to get that second string tuning peg. And just little bit. Let's try that again. That's better. That's pretty good actually. It is pretty good. One other way of just double-checking is to play them together. It's out of tune. It'll be quite wavy and the sound, you might hear a wobble or a pulsing. And it's in tune as a distinct clean sounding note ringing true and even less good. Okay, so let's now put the index finger on the fourth fret, third string, and then do the same thing again. I'm going to play the second string that we know is pretty much in chin. Right? Does that second note on the third string has definitely sharp. So I'm going to play that third string and just release it a bit just so it lowers it. So let's try that again. That's pretty good. So I'm happy with that. I just played on together. Yeah, I'm happy with that. Let's go back to the fifth string. So we've done 545. The way to remember it is 54, 55. That's what we are going to be doing. So let's go to the fourth string, put it on just behind the 43, and let's play the third string. So it goes down. So it's flattened. Nice to be tightened up a little bit. So I'm going to go to the four strings tuning peg here. I'm going to tie it up. Pretty happy with that. So now we know the fourth strings and chain. Let's go put our index finger on the fifth string. Threat. Leg goes down. So it needs to be tightened a little bit at fifth string. Let's try that now. Last of all, the fifth fret, press it down on the sixth string. That's definitely lower, that needs to be tightened as well. So I'm going to play the sixth string. Sounds pretty good As soon as sounds like with a quarter of a second. String is a little flat, so just a little nudge there. That's pretty good. That's pretty good. But it'll take a lot of practice. And just keep going. Be persistent. And the more times you do it, the more junior AS will base, you'll know. You'll be able to listen to, see which notes are a little bit flatter, little bit sharp, but keep going. Okay, so I'm going to just try something wonky that near to where it should be. A little training exercise. So I'm going to do it quick and down to see. After some laughter, a lot of practice. You'll be much quicker than what you may be now. So. 13. TAB 2: "Happy Birthday" (pt1), : Hi and welcome to tab Lesson 2. In this session, we'll be learning the easy versions of Happy Birthday, Jingle Bells and Old MacDonald, as well as the first string. The thin string will be venturing out to the second string and also using different left-hand fingers. I can totally understand if you want to rush through these first few lessons, but trust me, spending time becoming confident with his songs you're learning at the lesson level you're on will really ground your progress. You don't want to be jumping in lesson 7 and getting frustrated. Lose heart. Remember, we're learning to play simple things. Well, let's check these songs out now. Let's look at Happy Birthday part 1. We're going to introduce a different string now. So we're going to start off on the second string, cell, know to begin with fret two. And then, and then note on the first string. And then the ring finger plants itself on for second string. So you can see we're starting to use different fingers. Quite free to still use the index finger. But again, if we can start good habits right from the beginning, and it'll be really useful for the future. So let's play that again, nice and slowly. So for, again, for time. Okay, Let's play it through with a better rhythm now. And I'm going to count for I'm going to come in straight out from one to 4342342341234234234234. Let's look at Jingle Bells now. Stone the first string. But this time we are going to be using seven, which is way up here. Let's play it nice and slowly I'm actually starting from four. So we're here with the index finger for, for, for, for stretch. Little finger on to the seventh, fret 790, slide your hand down and index finger plants on B2 and then ring finger on for a little bit more movement here, but we're going to start again from the beginning. So your index finger ready on for 234. Expelling a little bit of rhythm is going to be quite slow. To begin with. Let's try that again. 234234. Two, Three, Three, fall off. You've done that a few times, you'll find on actually getting quicker. So let's try it a little bit faster now. 123234234234. Okay, let's take it all with Donald. So we're going to be using the first, second string. This is how it's going to sell in a really nasty slab. So we got a 2, 3, 2, 3 fall. 234234. Let's try for time. So we're going to spin a bit, 1, 2, 3, 23423234. 14. TAB 3: "Happy Birthday" (pt2), "Merry Christmas" (pt1), "Oh When the Saints" (pt1): Hi and welcome to tab lesson 3. In this session, we'll be letting a slightly longer version of happy birthday as well as Merry Christmas. And oh, when the saints, with every lesson there are more challenges and that's how we grow as guitarists. After lesson 1, lesson 2 may have looked daunting, but with good practice, we can become confidence and move on to the next level. And this next level might look daunting at first, but we practice in the same way as less than 12 to become confident and less than three. Let's check it out. Okay, let's look at Happy Birthday. Po2, debit to bonds now, when a threat to begin with. So it's the second string to know what's on the first string. And then they come back to the second string, fall. And then the second bar is to use an index finger. Index finger again, to know a little bit confusing using different fingers, but repetition is the case. Let's go through it again. Let's look at the first bar. Concentrate on that for us and doing a bit of chunking here. So we're going to do this in little chunks within the first few times, then the second bond, I'm going to join them together. Here we go. So the first bar, 2, 3, fall. The first bar again to three ball. Last time. The second bond now, 234234234231234234234. Okay, We're going to push the speed up a little bit more. And let's play it over four times. 234234234. Okay, let's play Merry Christmas part one. This is a little bit more challenging because we're trying to apply different strings. The first, second, third string. Let's just concentrate on the flat bar and walk through it very slowly. Him, Agassiz, start SA node, which is the open string, string, second string. And we go. And then it's the note on the open string, on the first string. Again, your index finger. And then ring finger own fret, second string. And then it pops down to the third string. Pops back up a second string to float for strain, front to back up to second string fret to play that again. 34234. Well, let's just focus in on that little section where it's quite quick and the rhythm is quite challenging. So I know to know for too little run. So I want to repeat that as focusing on that little section. Is that no two, no fault. And then the other tricky bit is the 2, 2 to the second string fret. Third string fret to you and then backup, see my water again. And then just add that run together. Okay, Let's play through that first bar again. 234. Let's move on to the second power to two and then four. And then second string. Together, 234. The first bar, 2, 3, 4, 3, 4, 3. Last time. Last time. Let's put those together. And this is what we get nice and slowly, 12, 3334. Okay, Let's Play when the saints, the first three bars at the same, which is great, a lot of repetition there. And the fourth bar, 400, 14 is less play that lesson slightly, one t, t. Last time. It's difficult sometimes to get the rhythm right, but adding those two pauses in the middle, it's really important to keep the rhythm flying. So we'll try that again slab at this time. 15. TAB 4: "10 Green Bottles" (pt2), "Jingle Bells", "Swing Low": Hi and welcome to tab Lesson 4. In this session, we'll be learning a longer version of ten green bottles and the full version of Jingle Bells and swing low. Because tabs not indicate timing or rhythm. It really helps to know the songs so you can instinctively play the correct rhythm yourself. That's why the training songs I've picked a well-known, not super trendy, but well-known, and that's the important thing. It's much easier to use your index finger to play all these notes, but that's what the other fingers for. Being encouraged to spread the load and use the right finger for the right note. It will massively improve your technique and make you a far better guitarist. Let's check these songs out now. Let's look at ten green bottles Part 2. We've got four bars here. We're just going to focus on the first two bars. Let's plan after 41234, 323234. Let's move on now to the last two bars. We've got here. It's all still on the first string. 4, 4, 4, 7. So finger, index finger ready here on PrEP for. Little finger stretches over 2.7 and the middle finger just falls where it is on the 55457 and little finger, and then back to four on the index. Let's try those two bars. 234, 234234. Last time, 34. Okay, let's try it all the way through all four bars. Three, sled up to the fourth. 234. Two, Three. Last time. Three. That's now at this time. 233423. Fall 34. Okay, let's look at Jingle Bells, eight bars. But everything is still happening on the first string. So let's look at the first two bars. Index finger on fret for the slave or done it before. So just recap it to three. Remember that quick tool for that? Let's do that again. 234, stretch to seven to four. Let's look at the little finger on 555544224. And then stretch the seven again. Let's just concentrate on 34. So little finger on five of that string. Let's try that together. 234 and then stretch to seven. Quick five-step. Let's do it again. 23423, the whole of that first line now, 123123. Let's try one more time. 2345. Now. 56 is exactly the same bar. 5, 6 and 7 are actually exactly the same as the first line. Last bar, bar, right? That's the difference. Let's do the second line altogether. Three. So let's just focus on drill down on that last bar. Fingers I'm for. And then little finger stretches to the 72 sevens and then slides down to the five. And then the index finger just falls right on that too. Just to repeat that last bar again. To three to three to three. Hey, there last few notes. Let's try the whole thing all the way through nice and slow. 323323. Struggling too. 333. Let's try swing low now for bars. And the action is on the first second string. Let's just walk through that first bar ring finger on the 444. Lessons. Try that a few times. 2334. Couple of pauses in the middle. Doesn't matter whether you say whereas to pause or 23, luck and day, but just keeping that a space in between there. So let's try that again. 23423. Let's go to the second bar now. No, no, no, no. And then index on for a couple of fours and then stretching a little thing. Okay, let's try that. 1234. 233412 together. 1, 2, 3, 4, 3, 2, 323. Last time, 34. Then third bar. Slightly tricky because we are stretching even further. And a little finger on nine. Satisfied first three notes. And then it goes on and says Stay with us first three now. So the third bar, 974. Curtis, just want to just spend a bit of time with the index finger. You might want to just make sure you concentrate on not overshooting. That's why it's a little bit easier to get use to the fingers of the finger and then slide down to seven and then just the index finger where it falls on that fall. Just want to repeat that. Let's just do that fat bar on its sign. So we're going to go stretching little fingers and 9 and then coming down to the seven. And then all the way through to the end of that third box, I read a 23423 and a couple of pauses in there. And the middle. Let's try it again. 23, fall, stretch that level to seven, and then no one to three. Cos, 2, 3, 4. And the last bar is pretty straightforward. To three quick notes, to three to four. Let's just those last two bars together, plus 3 and 4. Stretching that line. There we go. 234 cos, cos 2, 3, 4, four ohms. Pause. Last time. 34. Okay, let's go from the beginning. Or boss, boss 1, 2, 3, 4, 1, 2, 3, 4. Pause. Cause, pour strapped to the Nile. Hazy last bar. Straddling 234 columns. Let's try that. Islam. 2, 3, 4, stretch to the nine columns. Hello, Last time, 234. 16. TAB 5: "Happy Birthday" (full), "Oh When the Saints" (full), "Merry Christmas" (pt2): Hi and welcome to tab lesson five. In this session, we'll be looking at the full versions of Happy Birthday and oh when the saints, alongside Part 2 of Merry Christmas, which takes us across the first three strings. Just want to encourage you to keep going with Smart fingers. That's using the suggested fingers written in small letters beside the tab numbers. Although fiddly at first, over time, this will really help you to maintain smooth playing and speed around the fretboard. Let's check it out. Okay, tablets and five. Happy Birthday full version is happening over the first second string. We could have few stretches, the seven. Let's try the first part that we've already done that, but let's try the first second part together, nice and slow, starting on the second string. 2, 3, 4, 23234. Had a surrogate is interesting, or third bar naught, naught. And then a little finger stretches the saddle and the index where it falls over 4. So 7 for Linnaeus slide that hand down so that they remain an index. Just fall on the form the second string. Let's just focus on that. Now. Here we go. So as your load on the second string and a little fingers ready and waiting, hovering over the seven on the first string, index where it lands. And then as you're doing that, you're moving the hand down so that the ring and the index is just ready and waiting lists is try that on that. 234234234. Time 2, 3, 4. And last part of that little finger on five. Pretty straightforward to try that 234234234. Just focus on power 3 and 4. So that stretch sustain that the third, fourth parts together, 1234234, calls 2341234. Okay, Let's run through right from the beginning. Let's take three fingers stretch. 723. Paul. Paulus. Course. Cause more time to three. When the Saints full version, a pass, but don't worry, it's all happening on that first string. And also, there's a lot of repetition. The first three bars is you can say index and middle finger on 507, straight allies. A couple of pauses in between. And then index finger on for node 4 two is a pretty straightforward in that last bar, we've already done this, but let's do the first four bars together. 1, 2, 3, 4. One again, 23 for all time, 234. Let's go on to the second line now. Br F5, ring finger on for pause and then index slides up. And then stretch the middle finger where it falls. And then index 4, 4, 5, and 7, which are used to index on a four. Okay, pretty straightforward. Challenge that. So let's do that. First or second line bars 5 and 6, and we carry 23412, 341234234 chords. And then 37 or eight index on the four little finger 57 for the hand slice down to assist try that. Does to your boss. 12342334234. Okay, Let's just put that second line together now. Bus 5, 6, 7, and 8. The ring finger on the 423423234. Last three, foam. Okay. Let's go right through from beginning all eight bars, 1234. The last time. Okay, Let's have forgotten Merry Christmas part 2. Four bars, three strings. Although the third string, we've already got that little two down there. So nothing much to worry about. Let's have a look at the first bar. So we've got the open string, second string, and then hopping down to the first string, North, index finger on to naught, and then down to the second string for it for two. And then we just got the hop down to the third string and then back up. But that's going on to the second bar. So we're just going to look at the first part is taken necessarily 123423334, the second bar on that second string. And then popping up to the first string on temp, fret two, and then ring finger on four nodes. And then second string, one finger on for an unknown state, that second 23234. 3434. Stay together. Power than two to 34. And up on the first string. Three tricky section there when it goes to 0, second string, data, the third string back to the table, then straightaway up to the first string to say, just focus in on a little fiddly, little bit section. Okay, first two bars, 234234. Now back to the four on the second string, the ring finger, up to the first string 4. And then a little run on that little finger 5, 4 to know to then down to the tail. So the hand is all there waiting and ready. Federally. There's just a covalent 342334234. And then you've got the last part, two on that second string, first string, and then ring finger and for second string. And then a little bit fiddly. Just slightly 2323234. Time 2, 3, 4, 3 and 4. Now, finger ready on the second string. 2, 3, 4, 4, 2, 3. Last time. Okay, Let's set them altogether. 1, 2, 3, and 4. Second String, String node 23423334. 17. Tab 6: "10 Green Bottles" (full), Blues Scale, "The Grand Old Duke of York": Hi and welcome to tab Lesson 6. In this session, we'll be learning the full version of ten green bottles and the Grand Old Duke of York, alongside the blue scale and G scales, take our tab work to the next level as we're using all six strings. This particular scale is really versatile because once you've learned the pattern, you can change the key by simply playing it from another standpoint on the sixth string. Let's check it out. Ten green bottles, full version, eight bars over the first second string. Let's do the first two bars. Note, note, ring finger on, PrEP for. And then to note too for no. And then they hand slides up the index finger on the four fingers stretching to the seven. And then middle finger on 54574. And then to propel us into the fifth bar. Okay, so let's do that nasa slowly from the beginning, 123 to slide up 234. Last time. Three. Let's move on to bar 5. Now. You've got little finger up a nine, and then slides down to seven, index where it lands. So let's start from the column. Okay, let's just concentrate on that little section, 99733384. And then the x bar. Note, no, two, for two note, comes down to the second string fret to repeat that, bar six. Let's just do that 56 together. And also tack on those two notes. On the end. Let's get our little finger ready on the 9. Out of my rhythm. Nice and slow to begin with. To fall to three. 323. Last time, 34. Just be aware of that. Quite important to get the hand position, right. So obviously you're playing the note on the first string, but that little thing is going to be hovering over the nine ready, sliding down. And then after that note, the whole hand slides down. Okay, let's look at the next bar. 7, 2. Comes back on the first string, no, no, no, for two to four. Pretty straightforward. Let's us do those two bars. 23423, 233. Okay, let's go all the way through from the nickname. Too. Slide. Index on for 23. Finger on, down a bit more down to 33. Stretch scale. That's the blue scale in G. And it's to help kids. Ready jumping into the deep end. 123 strings. Here we're using all of the string, but we're going to take it nice and smoothly. That's just concentrating the first bar. So we're starting the index finger on three of that sixth string. Okay, So we're gonna restaurant with a thumb. So we're going to press down and come to rest on the fifth string. Okay, index finger on 33 on the sixth string. And that's going to be a little bit of stretch here. That little thing got stretching to the six. Find your thumb is if your thumb is right behind, you can push your rest a little bit further forward. And then we're going to jump up to the fifth string, index finger, middle finger, again, down to the fourth string, three, and then ring finger on five, shredded again, 3335. That's a little bit. Hey, last three to three to three to 3. Second, bought out the third string. Index on three, ring finger and little finger on a 6. Second string, index on three. And then six little bit of a stretch again. Index all six on the fast. Let's try that again. The index finger on 3, 5, 6, 6. Let's do the last one slowly too. 30234233412 down, 3423433 of us at a3. A3 or finger tapping down to the second string, 6365. Try that again. Fed by 3. That's the second string, 63653, discuss and try to allow 234234. 23434. What I should be doing is the restaurant isn't the index finger. For these purposes. Just make it simple and meeting with them all the way through it. Okay, Let's look at the last bar. Baffle. Finger or 50, that fourth string. Array index, finger or five. On eBay. Six stretch. Index is char that are licensed. 234234234234. Okay. Let's see that we're getting slide 23423, pathway level 223423423434. Ok. This is mostly heavily on the first ring with a little for a second. But the thing about this, So a little bit tricky that first few notes because as you can see, our little finger, middle finger of five, and then four index finger. But it starts pretty quick. So it kind of goes, well, proper speed, it goes to T for quick to begin with. Let's just try. 234. 2343434, B2. Pretty straightforward, know, to, to, to, to, to disrupt those together. 12 to three, for little pause in the middle between bars 12 to three to three to three. Okay, bar 3, 2, 4, 4, 5, 5, 5, 2 and 4 its own on the second string. And then note, little tricky with the jumping and which strings that too. So let's just concentrate on that. Class. 5 by 2. Here. Let's just focus on that little bit of a quick Tommy, know that 55 to three to three to three. Let's just look at us 3 and 4 now together. So 2, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 5, 5, 5, 5 to slower. Now too. 34234 or a base, it is to get the beats and notes to play. Mistake too. Last time to start from the beginning all the way through 234234. Last time, 234. 18. TAB 7: "Blues Solo" (pt1), "Blues Solo Bass" (pt1): Hi and welcome to tab lesson 7. In this session, we'll be learning easy versions of blues solo, Blue Solar base and give me oil in my lamp. In the blues solo and base will be looking at bends and slides and give me oil some more challenging stretches over the middle four strings. Let's check them out. Okay, let's look at the blue solar power one tablets than seven. We're just going to walk through the first to begin with. So this is slightly more challenging. It's over three strings, and it's quite high up in the fretboard. So I'm afraid of heights. I'm going to crack on with the ring finger on 12. So it's, the octave. Should be a little composition here to show you. And most guitarists right on the edge. We have the neck meets the body. So the ring finger is on 12. And then we're going to display the index where it lands. Were going to be stretching over three friends. But if you stick two fingers to a friend, FF's, and you'll be fine. So ring. And the first string on 12 and an index where it lands on the 10 and go hop up to the second string. Again, it's 12, 11, 10. Let's just do that again. 34234234. Thus Time 3, 4. And then the ring finger hits that 12 on that third string with a little bend. The B in front is the band just here, that little bend. And then we are going to break a rule for the index planting itself from nine. So we're stretching over four frets. Little bit of a break in the rules of that finger to fret. So that's charged from the beginning, 23434234234. Last time, three volt. Second Bob. We're just going to slide that index finger on the third string down to France to seven. And then we're going to apply 79. Aware that middle finger lands is just here ready and waiting. So if you can see that sort of triangle shape, a triangle shape here from the seven on the third string. And then to the second string, the middle finger. And as a band back to the 9. So let your index finger be the anchor. Just keep it there. For the rest of the hand. Again to three to three. 234234. Let's put them both together by one but two. Nice and slow. 234. And pause and then slide down to the several triangle. 2, 3, 4, back to the 12. Stretch over 4. Pour slide down to 234. Slide. Last time 234. We're just spending time getting to know those notes. Obviously, when you get more and more competent, you pled 100, two hundred and three hundred times, you're going to put a bit more rhythm in. So you might find out a little bit faster and you could pick more expression onto your plate. So here's a little slide will be quite nice at the beginning. Had a bit of vibrato at the end with my ring finger. Just play that again. So full boss is happening. Three strings, the three strings on the sixth, fourth. So let's try that nice and slow you that first bar. Only use my thumb to restaurant that string. So plugging away from you, going to rest on the string below. So this play. And then index Fenghuang three and then ring finger or by wetlands. And then you play it again and slide up to seven like this. Let's try that. That's the first slide, or 234434. Then we're going to go up to the five, or let's fifth string. And then another string to the fourth string and that five, pull it back on the seven. S, 2, 3, 4, 3, 4, 3212 together. 23334. And thus 2, 3, 4 pathway that will finger on the eight. And then several. Hold x, I'll F5 Land Rover where it lands, but it's all a faster too. 3, 2, 3, 2, 3, 3, 4. Plus Br index where it is ready, waiting on that 57 index on the five of a squat store and then back. And is there ready and waiting? So not a lot of movement. 343. Last time, 234. Let's play bar 34 together. That'll finger, ready and waiting. All eight of the fourth string, 2, 3, 4 2334224. Okay, Let's try all that score bars together to less than two, to three. To 323423. For again, if you're playing a lot and you're just going to find you're naturally going to get quicker and put a bit more expression until playing. So it might sound a little bit like this. Give me all of my lamp part one. This is aquatic challenge compared to what we've done before. It's over for strings. Not only is it using the four strings, but we're hopping all over the place with the different strings and the threats. So let's walk through slowly that first bar. We start with the three open string, the notes. And then the index finger goes on one string. And then the little finger is stretching over to that for on the fourth string. And then the middle finger on the two. Back to the little finger, old fall. Back to the middle finger on. And then the little finger hops down to the fifth string and backhaul to the middle finger or two of the fourth string. So this is where FF's really come in handy because ideally your fingertip should be hovering over, hovering like a helicopter over those frets ready to play. So try and get your fingers ready and waiting. This try that. Split again. That's hardest, 123 for three to four to four. Last time, 34 second bar. Still the same three notes. Same index finger, other one, and then goes back to the one. And then lastly, that ring finger on the fourth string. Okay, Let's just try that to three. 0, 2, 2, 3, 3, 4. So let's play those first two parts together. Really slow, really slow. 23423 to three. Last time, 234. Okay, the third bar, exactly the same as the first. And then we stay on the middle finger. Let's look at the fourth bar. Fourth bar is the little finger on that. A little finger old for back to that one. We're getting to a lot in this so and then no middle fingers to first-time use middle finger for that too on that string 1. And then back to the stretch on that for middle finger onto little bit tricky, little bit federally. That's what the song, so what about, but it's a great song. Here we go. Let's just try that now to the middle finger. Ready and waiting on that fourth string. 2, 3, 4, 23. Free fall. Free fall. Okay, Let's beginning of the line. So I got to keep that middle finger on that to three. Okay. Last time. 234. Stay on that too. 19. Tab 8: "Blues Solo", "Blues Solo Bass", "Auld Lang Syne": Hi and welcome to tab lesson 8. In this session, we'll be learning the full versions of blue solo and blue seller base along with the New Year celebration favorite outline xi1. The great thing about these first two blues solos is that they can be used over the top of the 12 bar blues on page 90. And with improvisation, you can literally jam along with these risk for hours and never get bored. Let's check them out. Okay, in blue solo, full version for pass here, it's going to go over the first two paths that we've done a little while back. So right up to the top on the 12th. The Octave for the ring finger, 12, ten string. Second string, 12, 11, 10. Bend that 12 or a stretch. We break that rule. We've stretched the index finger 10 to the nine, and then we slide down 798, bend nine. So let's just play that through to sort of refresh ourselves. 234, rest. 234. Perhaps. One more time. 34, rest, slide. Okay, by three. We are going to repeat that line. And then down to seven. Come down to that fourth strain, 97. Get out of that five. And then where it lands that role finger on several. Five. The sixth strain, Seven, 65, make up that little band. And the node. Okay, let's just look at that. Bar 9 on the third string. Let's just try that nice and slow. 234, 234234. Last time, 34. And then the fourth finger on several wetlands, just their reading and writing. Let's try the last 2342323434. So I'll say a lot of similarities and that pattern of the third power, the fourth bar, Safeco hair. Pretty much the same as. Okay. Let's go right through from the beginning. Does this hold 234? Cause 234234. So there are a few pauses in the middle. I just give us time to get together. Starting from the beginning, 234 course 2343434, cores. 23434. Okay. Last time, 23423434. Okay. When you practice that, a few times you get confident, then we can start to doubt silicate less pauses. So the rhythm will sound. A little pedal IS just going to add in a little slide at the beginning because it's quite nice. Little bit of a course. Slight pause and again, 234. Please. Cellular base for four bars using all the strings. So we've done the first two. So what does do that necessarily? 2, 3, 4, all your little finger on eight. So 1234. Stretch. So we go back to the index finger. And that slides up to 757 or the middle finger, ring finger. A line pops up today, third string, 7989. So you've got that triangle again. There. Has just looked at that third bar. So we start with the index finger. For F5, that fourth string. We're going to be using the index finger for the seven as well. So we're going to be playing the 57978234234 triangles. 234423423 For 23423423 fall. And then the fourth body index finger looks after that eight now rather than the middle finger, the index finger takes that eight on that second string. And then again, like we had down there, it just takes it up on the to the index thing and then a metal ring 12 and then this where it lands just there, ready and waiting at index 0, 10 to 12. So that's just look at those two strings now, the first string on the second string, 8, 10, 11, 101234234, three plus time 34. Okay, and that's to loss boss together, bus 3 and 4, we're going to start with the index finger on the five. That's going to be on the fourth string. Here we go. And again, just like up there, we're going to bring about index finger up Two flats above 57. Let's try 2, 3, 4 triangle that red a metal. And we use the index finger and instead 234 little finger on that triangle. 234234234234. Last time. 234234. Okay, let's do all the way through down. Last slide. 1, 2, 3. For index 0523, hold 23 For Slide 2, 3, 4, let's say a 4344234 index back on slide. 2, 3, 4 index. Okay, Last 234234 index. Okay, so once you get used to that, we are confident that jelly up from the SEC strain to the First up to the 12th. And you can start to relax and just put some failing and there are no hard and fast rules with less part-time. Or it may sound a little bit like this. Okay, I'll let xi1 note on the first string. And then four ring finger, index finger. And then second bar. Bring index on the two node. And then the index on the four. Little finger stretch seven. And then a little finger slides up to the nine. Okay, let's just focus on those first two bars. 123, 234. Stretch to align 234. And then the third bar stays on 97. The four index finger wetlands to two. And then just to finish off that fourth power or to suppress fire for this last two-pass. Already in waiting upon 9234234234. Time 3, 4, the fifth bar. Now, law repetition, hair. Recognize some of the notes, but we're gonna go a little finger. 972, Monica 79101234234. And up again, 2334. And then the second line, 744, exactly the same as the fifth power. And it just goes for like a guy's last name with a 234. So the last two bars of the second line or assignments allow us to pass my first slide so we can go right through that second line. The last four bars, 5, 6, 7. And I started taking 349234. 334. Okay, let's go to two to 33344 Strain. 334. 20. TAB 9: "Merry Christmas", "Give Me Oil In My Lamp": Hi and welcome to tab less nine. In this session, we'll be learning the full versions of Merry Christmas and give me all in my lamp. Both SMS or eight bars long with the second stone give me oil. Probably in the top five most challenging tabs in the book, meeting some serious focus, resilience and patients. A great opportunity to improve your fine motor skills. Let's check them out. Okay, my Christmas for two strings with that little two on the third string. To worry about. Okay, let's do the first like 344234. Okay. Tidings. First two bars of that second line. 56, 2, 3, 4, four poles. 234234. For the next two bars, snot, bring theorem for a stretch to seven. And then basically interested that restaurant straight down to the open string second, struggling to get that little hop around at the end. And then for the last two. So I'm going to add in that lovely note there. The sixth, 23234234. Okay, let's go right through from the beginning. Second line. Three. For pause, ring finger off. Okay, we're gonna look at, give me all of my lab full version. This is quite a challenge whether take it nice and slow. We've gone through that first Bob, just refresh our memories. Second string, open string naught, and then the index finger, which is going to anchor the rest of the hand, stretching that little thing. Second bother lot on the second string. Back to the second string. For little finger onto the system. Slowly. First-line, first four bars. 34. Pause, pause, pause, pause. Okay, let's look at the second line. Note on that second string, or the index finger, the anchor finger that we've been using up to now. And the middle finger are to 0, the notes on that first bar. And then we just basically go up to the second two on the second string. And the index finger just above it to two and the middle finger stretches. This is going to be interesting. Back to the two. So let's just try that loss is slowly. 23423423. For 23. You can see I've used index and middle there, basically use intelligent fingering. So use whatever fingers that best suits you. We've all got different size hands and sometimes it's easy just to move around your fingers towards suits. You. Let's look at the second bar, that second line now. Posix, four of that second string. A bit of a movement with that little finger. Less at a run their 234234. 231234. Disturb those two bars together. Now, 23423 got a lot of repetition here with the fifth, sixth, seventh, eighth. Any differences that to 20 in that sixth bar? So let's just go through the second line. 234. Pause. Okay, Let's go through the whole of the song. Get nice and steady bar by bar. To pull those. 234. Paul. 21. TAB 10: G major scale, "Yankee Doodle", "God Rest...": Hi and welcome to tab lesson 10. In this session, we'll be learning the G-major scale, the full version of Yankee Doodle and one of my favorite carols, God rested Merry Gentlemen. Over the last few lessons, the tabs of obviously become more challenging for a reason. It means that lesson by lesson, you'll being increasingly stretched and challenged to have to work a little bit harder to master the songs. Let's choose that and check these songs out now. Okay, G major scale to objects and back. Good about this is patents. If we can get to know the patents during the scale, we're going to remember them going from a six to the first, and it's just reversing exactly the same. So let's look at the first five notes, and that covers the sixth and the fifth string. So let's do that last slowly. 35 to 35. 2, 3, 4, 2, 2, 3, 4. Last time. For the next two strings, the fourth string on the third string, basically exactly the same, goes for the index on the two. Rail on day four a little. And then exactly the same index to allow for us to stay those two strings, 2343434. Last time. For just a little technical reminder, just try and keep your thumb back hair. Loss of space in here, pushing a little forward, not too much but a little forwards to say got that space underneath there. Okay, let's try this for strings. Sixth, fifth, fourth, third. So the main, 234234234, Last 34. In the last two strength the second and the first 35. And then index federal to the middle. So let's just do those. 234232234. Okay. Let's do that first bar. Right to the sex of the first to Alaska slightly or 23. The middle. 234. 234 plus three. Okay, We're going to just rewind exactly the same from the first string. Let's go from the index of two. And the three. Make sense. Okay, Let's hope that nice and slowly will go right through to 323. Let's do all of that law. Starting with three scales are the bread and butter of good technique. So it's just fantastic to be able to focus on something. It would let feel monotonous and boring. But actually, this is great if your fingers, especially also to keep the rhythm as well, having a metronome subsidy bright. So let's do that for any loss or slow. 32, 34232323. As you get used to that place where you could play it, evil eyes closed. Gala smooth, rhythm. So loud sound a bit like this. Sas G, G sharp major scale, the same layer pattern. I guess wherever you are, That's the major scale or wherever you start off a statement. 22. TAB treat: "E Squeeze" blues riff: Hi and welcome to the tab trait. In this session we'll be learning the E squeeze riff. There are three difficulty levels, bronze, silver, and gold. And the main skills we're learning through these are bending 123 notes up together using our index finger. A great strengthening exercise for a really cool sounding href. Let's check it out. Okay, Tap trait. Let's do the squeeze ref Bronx, which is the simplest version. Let's look at the first power eight bend. So we've got little finger on the second string. And then nine, left third string, 7, 9. That's all it is. Just bear in mind as we go through. It's the triangle again. Of the middle. Bring an Index. 2, 3, 2, 3, 2, 2, 3, 4. Can add a little horizons in SQL Analysis. Fill. Let's look at the second bar. That's what it is. And then you bend on that last 8. So 234 slow. 342323234. The third bar, 8979. Fourths train a. Seven, slides down the five. Ring finger lands where it is ready and waiting on that seven of the fifth strain. So because 34234234234. Okay, Let's do the whole line. Squeeze with the bronze four bars too. For Paul to pause. 234. So we've already broken the back of all of these squeeze. If you can sort that one out and coming to the silver, we're just adding one extra note. And this is where we use this triangle shape. And the index finger get used to put it out across all three strings. That seventh fret for at seven. There'll be weird if you've done it before, it'll be a weird feeling. But at the moment we're just because it's the silver were just looking at the middle and the index together. So the middle fingers on eight, index fingers on seven. And we're just going to have nails as excited as I either sign because the ring finger ready and waiting on the nine. So basically all you're doing is adding the 87 together. Because the rest is exactly the same. You've done that, you know, it is to start adding the index finger there. So let's go through and keep that index 3, 4. So I use my index and middle just to pluck that. And I just use the index finger with our right hand. This is data from beginning to 34234234. Okay, so let's move on to the gold. And basically you're just adding that seven of the first string. So we're doing everything else the same. But I'm going to use my right hand, index, middle, and ring. That's actually a D-shaped, but the index finger is hope for all three strings. And the middle finger comes on to that second string fret. And everything else is exactly the same. Pose. 34234. Cores. Last time. 34. Pause. Appreciate the first time you try to attempt this. It will bill, weird and strange. But all I can say is just keep going, even if it sounds completely rubbish. Just keep going because over time you're strengthening your index finger is strengthening or middle finger pushing up? An I do appreciate that. To begin with, you may not even be able to get anything. Sounds like that, are much easier that term middle and index as two strings. Often keep going. After a few 100 times, it may sound a little bit less. 234. 23. Chords 1: Easy E: Hi and welcome to cause less than one. In this session we'll be learning the core of easy. Don't forget, this is the first step of the staircase. Starting real easy. All we're using is just one thumb, three strings, and one finger. That's easy. Let's check it out. Is my index finger is gonna go on the first, second, third string of that first fret one. With all these easy chords, we're just going to be concentrating on mastering strings, strings 3, 2, and 1. I'm just going to place my fingers just to support the hand. I'm just going to use the thumb which to gently down strum. 2342233. Placement. Sometimes too. Little routine where I will put my left hand behind their back, 3, 2, 1, bring it out and say hello, it takes me to get my fingers to the right place. Three, 21. Little technique to help us speed up getting our fingers to where they're supposed to pay. 24. Chords 2: Easy E and A: Hi and welcome to chords Lesson 2. In this session, we'll be learning the chords of easy ease and easy a. We still any playing three strings, but for ECA we're using two fingers. The courts may be easy versions, but we're also learning how to change between chords smoothly without pausing. Let's check it out. Easy and easy. So we're going to stop weather index finger. Let third string for it. One, where we're going to play E times I'm going to move up the slide up that index finger to fret to the third string. And then the middle finger toxin right underneath on for it to still. But second string. And this is what ECA sounds like. So let's do DNA together. Are you ready to three? To put it to slide up to three? Full. And ready. Easy to change too. The last time, too. 25. Chords 3: Easy E, A, and B7: Hi and welcome to chords lesson 3. In this session, we'll be learning how to downstream the chords of easy, easy, easy a, easy B7, and back home too easy. We still only playing three strings, but this time we have for courts to play and we're attempting to downstream them four times H in a slow and even rhythm. If we can change chords in time with these chords, then we'll be able to achieve that with more difficult ones. Let's check it out. Okay, we're going to introduce easy, be sudden. So let's just go over the index finger, third string for a one. Slide up the little finger tucked in underneath. What's going to be easy? A V7 says the middle finger dropping down one string to the first string, still offer two. Here we go. The other using three strings. Let's put altogether no less. Or to move up a little folder. Like to e three. He sees a seminal back to a to screen for Last time. Three. 26. Chords 4: The full chord of E: Hi and welcome to chords Lesson 4. In this session, we'll be learning the full quarterly. We're now playing all six strings, which means we're making sure the three fingers were using for a stretching over the fretboard without touching any other strings. Planting the fingertips exactly in the right place is a must know skill for every guitarist. Let's check it out. Okay, let's get the chord of E. It's going to be index finger on the easy shape, which you know, already done that. And so we're ready and waiting there. That middle finger is on the fifth string. Fret too. And ring finger, tucking it underneath and middle finger on the fourth string. So don't fret too. And that is d, The code of a. And this time, as you've probably guessed, we're going to use all six strings and we're going to just gently down strum with the thumb. So let's do that four times. 3423233 for the thumb, I've got down here, but sometimes then the book that sometimes the rules are relaxed a little bit. I sometimes find it easier to have it over here little bit, little bit higher up, just able to grab the neck a bit tighter just for support for the rest of the hand. Just to make sure there are still lots of space here so your fingers are coming right behind. No touching any other string. Let's do the behind the back technique. Just now put Smith getting the fingers to the right place at the right time 321. Now it's time 321. I'll put little anchor finger star system helped me with which finger to put down first. Of course, you can decide which finger you want to be the anchor finger, but I'll just put suggestions. So for me it's the index finger. So I know when I'm coming around to place my fingers index first, and then for me it's middle. And then wing talking under the order. Well, to see to begin with, it's going to be one finger at a time. But the more you do it, you'll be able to just place one, go, Three, 21. Just with practice, like anything else. 27. Chords 5: The chord of E and A: Hi and welcome to chords lesson five. In this session, we'll be learning the chords of e and a. So it's the first time we've attempted to play to full chords together. Learning to change between them smoothly and in time is one of the most important skills you can begin to learn. T plus r equals a. This means technique making sure that the thumb is in the right place behind the neck and the fingertips are pressing down right behind the fret. Plus R repetition equals a achievement. It's not rocket science. As long as you've got the right technique and repeated enough times, you'll achieve and make dramatic progress. Let's check it out. Okay, let's look at E and a. So b, we're just going to play it four times, 234 in the middle of the ring finger. Just going to put down one string together like this. And then budget up a little bit more. Or budget back, I should say, just to give the little finger enough room to put down right behind that second string, fret two. And then where the eye, you've got the cross on the sixth string so we don't play the sixth trend. Just downs troubling generally four times. And that's a, we're going to move from a little fat comes in underneath, and that's the last five strings. And let's play that together less than slowly. Or two. 323423. Last time to tree. Sometimes changing chords is the bane of a beginning guitarists live. And it is so frustrating when you desperately want to change Colton time, but your fingers don't play along with the idea. But what I found really easy is just to downstream it once and then just move the next chord. Let's put the timer on for a minute and just basically repeats again and again and again. And it might take you ages to get to the colon, but it's all about repetition. Repetition is the key to success. And just play it again and again and again, DIV, two minutes, if you have called the patients, do that four or five times a day. And I tell you out, within a few days, even a week, you will have lost that core change that you're walking along. 28. Chords 6: E, A and B7: Hi and welcome to chords Lesson 6. In this session, we'll be learning the chords of E, a, and B seven. Of course we're not just learning three chords were also letting our fingers get used to the feel of the fretboard. And France, we want to gracefully move between one quarter and another. And we do this by repetition. If sharp rocks are tumbled together for enough time, they get smooth. And that's exactly what we're doing here by playing these chords over and over. They'll start off rough and jagged around the edges, but given time, it'll sound smoother and smoother. Let's check it out. Okay, let's look at EIA, B7 and a, four chords. But we're obviously returned the whole key of E. So let's do that nicely slowly. 2, 3, 4. Get ready to change to a B7. Probably the earliest core that you'll come across as a beginner. But if you can master fiddly B7 and you can launch the most courts. So this is the route I take. Jordan did take before I could do it in one go little finger up a string, little finger down the string and index for this where it lands, ready and waiting on that fourth string, fret one. That's what it sounds like. It's got a cross on that sixth string. The sort of courts that really does sound bad if you apply. Just why I sometimes use the thumb to bring it around just to mute the sixth string. You might not be able to get your thumb around. Depends how big your hands are and also how big neck is. This is quite a wide neck too, but so last day muted so that that can be played without a discord. And then back to a again. Let's play that. Thus 30 all the way through 1, 2, 3. Call it ready to change, but that pay back to a. You'll find that that be seven. Just ANCA with that middle finger. Keep it on there. Changing back to you might want to just take some time just to focus on a B7. Again, put the timer on all minute or two minutes. But just go over, over, over again. Over, over, over, over your fingers will get the message. Muscle memory and OLAP gets to that through 1, 2, 3, 0. Already. If I say by way of things, I got to go back to a 234 at each change. Across time. 234. 29. Chords 7: E, A, B7 and D: Hi and welcome to cause less than seven. In this session, we'll be learning the chords of E, a, B7 and the new quota D, less than six was one column of four chords. And we're now doubling up to two columns. We're just moving up the boss, so we have to work a little bit harder to jump a little bit higher. Let's check it out. Okay, E, a B 70 introducing D AB, AA is the next column. And so there's just look at D. We're going to be strumming the last four strings. Middle finger, first string for it to index finger. The third string, fret to ring finger, goes in the middle of the next fret up, fret 3, second string as the triangle, triangle day. Play the last four strings. Okay, let's just go through it. E a B, E a D, E a. Put a finger symbol already, a 234. Let's change to a. Ready for B7, back to a. Debrief for d, or we go to B, 234, V sub E. Get ready for today. Back to the other quotes that we've done the change. A two day. Again just to practice that again. And again. That again. I get us to that status. Time 2, 3 fall. Hey, boss, time 234. Scott to buy up today, change. A Gosling. 30. Chords 8: The 16 chord block (E, A, B7, D, G and C: Hi and welcome to chords lesson 8. In this session, we'll be working on a 16 core plot with four columns over two pages with a new courts are G and C. There are only six different chords. These are the must know cords are Basics. Lesson 5. This is where we start to get stuck into mastering the core changes. If you can work on down strumming these chords smoothly and in time, then you are ready for full-blown strumming. The 16 core block is a really unique training tool to help you become a solid and confident guitarist. Let's check it out. Okay, 16, call block, EAP 7, 8, ADEA. The two new chords we're going to look at are G and C. Let's look at g. To begin with. The anchor finger is the little finger. So we're going to place it on the first string, fret three, ring finger. Tuck it in right above it. On second string, second fret three, tool G. So we're gonna middle finger right up to the top. That's going to be the sixth string. And the index finger folds just wetlands. Ready and waiting on that fifth string fret too. That is Ci. Okay, let's just play G on it. So 234, 234234. C-h, stretch. See the index finger is on the second string, fret one. The middle finger stretches over to the fourth string. Fret, too. Cold finger, fifth string. Fret tray to sit, stretch. Say. Again, corning going to be downstream in the last five strings. Let's talk. Touch the sixth string and it's just what it sounds taught. 23423423. Okay, Let's go through all those 16 codes. But as you know, there are only six columns. And this is what's so great about this extreme cold block. It's about training your fingers to move between the cords. And if we are confident with six chords, then the next step is learning how to confidently change, smoothly change between them. We can learn to do with the six quotes. We can learn to do it within a six chords. So let's go for it from the beginning to three. Bowl. Let's move to the seven. To a. Moving hold to a triangle, D to a. But to try and build a again. Ready for tall Jay. But a term of d again, dolce, stretch, say no. This just All CI and say, because they are quite challenging, changeover to say. Okay, let's just cover that together. Will change to three full days, but it's such a batch. A change, change, change, change. But to say, you have a little technique I do with two particular colors that you want to, like Smith. And you'll change is to set the clock for a minute, like count how many times you play. So B1, 23, and so on. So I think between 40 to 60 changes in a minute. This where you're heading full and you might only manage date 10 or 12 the first time you do it. But it's all about repetition in this, you know. And the more times you do it, you'll find that after two or three days you'll up to 20. Then after a week or two, we'll get to that 40 to 60 amount. Okay, let's do this slide. Of course, the beginning, 234. You're ready for this up to a T chart notes a to E. A. Michel de. Ready for troll. J, Ready, got a, G, C. And hopefully I j structure. We'll talk about Ready One, 23. Okay, so but to a degree, I joined, build a, well I build a tall walls column J stretch, say finally j. 31. Chords 9: The 16 chord block without boxes: Hi and welcome to cause a lesson 9. In this session, we'll be learning to play the 16 core block in less than eight. But this time without the chord boxes, it's really important to know the chords off by heart to look at a code letter and see the shape come into your mind and let your fingers go straight to that chord. The repetition builds muscle memory to the point that you just know what those codes are. And that's where we're heading and our quest to be confident guitarists. Let's check it out. Okay, let's do this. Slide. What's the beginning to get ready for this up to a T chart though it's a. But to me that they buy Building Control J Ready? We'll plot I j, structure up to three days, up to a. I. Do I build a day titled a. Goto. J. Stretch, say finally j. 32. Chords 10: Strumming styles: Hi and welcome to chords lesson 10. In this session, we'll be learning for different strumming patterns using the 16 called lock. Up till now we've been down strumming, but now it's time to introduce the upstream them. Let's check it out. Okay, Let's dismiss through pounds. I've got my pink I'm going to put 46 is quite a thin pick. And I'm going to hold it between my thumb and index finger. So ideally the pics pointing towards you. The player and the arm is nice and straight two and get away. Twisting of the wrist. Keep it nice and straight. And it's going to be like a clock pendulum with the inside of your elbow on the edge of the guitar. Guitar, nice and upright. You get a nice swing guide on that. Right across. Just lightly brushing. You start twisting arrest, you're going to be hitting some strings more than others. That's why it's keeping it nice and straight. In fact, it's really good to do some practice trolls. We're just gonna do the basic strumming pattern, 1234. And so you always start with the downstream when you're strumming, where we start with the downstream 1234. So you can see Lean's are upstrokes and the 1234 is the down-stroke. Plus just do the practice struggling. Just likely, hold the strings with your left hand fingers. But if you hold it too much. So let's see again the mica, horrible noise but just gently, new tool the strings. Let's do a practice. Strome 23423234234234. Okay. So let's have a go through the 16 code block, or 16 cause the sixth chords that we obey working on. Let's go through it slowly. 123. So let's just do that. First row, 234, The 78123423, full. 10 seconds. Here we go. Let's get our fingers ready for a sum of a meeting the sixth character, or if you tell it to three. What does it say? It three. Oh, I got it. Last. 234. Let's go on to the third. Run. The GI. Bill you Eddie triangle D two. So there is a j cosine Theta 1, 2, 3. Let's go to the last row, g, c, d, e, j Omega. That if they jump on that. Okay, Let's go through the whole thing. The AB, so the ADA, D, GAD, G, C, D, and G. Here we go, 1234. I struggle to add data. The general state-space say that J 234. I think we're ready for a date. So the second story button, 1234 and basically is exactly the same. The arm is swinging in exactly the same way as the Select button. Buddy. Pig does not come into contact with the strings on that first upstroke, CSD, the practice strumming. We got 12341234123342323, Ball 2 and 3. When you first attempt this, you might be tempted to bring your hand on the upstroke way out so that you don't hit in the strings, which is fine to begin with, but you'll find that as you do it more and more. Let your fingers and your platform will know how much to Callaway from the strings. And it'll just be second nature. But the most important thing is that you need to do that go stroke. So that's one That's the cross stroke that coming up. But you're not touching the string is it's pretty important, relevant and go 1, 2, and it needs to go 1, 2 as if you're doing the end, come up all that way that you would normally do for the end. But keep it nice in rhythm with the, say, the actual movement is the same all the way through these different, So many patents, the arm is doing exactly the same thing, but it's just how much your plectrum ECC comes into contact with the string s2. That practice from again, 2342302342234232 plus time free fall to me. Okay. Let's do all the way through. All of the 16 courts. Will have six colds. And let's do it unless it's like 123 for the seven oxygen. What is the change? That is, take J 234. Okay, so let's say this is probably the most accessible strumming pattern, 123 and pull. And if you play through souls with the first joint patent, it can be quite limitless because it's just too add to them. But let the seconds for a patent 1234, you can get a nice smooth deal with that and thus become two-party. So he played a few 100 times and it's going to sound a little bit about this fall. Okay, let's look at the third strumming pattern, 1234. And again, it's exactly the same that movement, but the first and the second downstroke the adds an applied or don't come into contact with the strings. So let's do that. Practice drum again. 123, 0, 3, 0, 1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3, 4, 3, 2. Okay. Let's try going through the whole of the 16 co-pilot with the third stroke. Like ready, here we go. Cells ready for E? 123418. They say, Oh time t, three, fall. Though it's a So TO say stretch, same thing. So challenging strong patent, it's the last one. Sterling patent fall 12. And okay, exactly the same 12 and then it's three upstroke spot. The most important thing about this is that ghost strokes and you've got to come down as if you were playing into the other store in patents to data. And it's really important that we complete that goes straight right down to the bottom. This if we were playing an EV of a pattern. So that's just try that. And, and, and, and 233234. Let's do four times. But that practiced row 1234. What good idea to say it out loud helps me keep rhythm. 1234. And, and, and, and, and, and, and it's good for the 16 cobalt now using the full story button 12 and k 23, full. So take time. Start to see. Last time, 23488. Okay, After a few 100 times, get in the flow and just letting your fingers learn from muscle memory, being able to play a blind. That's a way of learning. Yeah, we're proving with this one. But ramping up the speed, it's going to sound a little bit like this. 33. FP 1: Finger picking Easy E: Hi and welcome to think of picking Lesson 1. In this session we'll be learning to finger pick the caudate. Easy. Don't forget, we're returning to the first step of that staircase. So we're starting really easy. All we're using is just the index, middle and ring on the right finger picking hand, and the index finger on the left hand to play the chord that easy. Let's check it out. Let's look at the finger picking pattern for the first three lessons. The thumb right-hand panel is going to be resting on the sixth string. The index finger is always going to be looking after the third string. The middle finger is always looking after the second string. And the ring finger always after the first string. And the pattern goes like this. Index. Index. What we're gonna do is set up for this tendon has discarded or 234. And again, we'll take a bit of a while to get a nice smooth action. The more you do it. Become o even little sound. So let's just look straight at the first lesson. We're going to put up left-hand index finger, the third string, 1. Here we go. We're just going to play through the pattern 1234. So the more time you might find it and get a nice clean sound, just make sure that the index finger, you, you've got your thumb right behind pushing a risk for a little bit. So finger can come the first, second, third string and just be placed on the third string so that you've got no touching the skin here on the index finger with any of the other strings. Let's try three. 34. FP 2: FP Easy E and A: Hi and welcome to finger picking Lesson 2. In this session, we'll be learning to finger pick the chords of easy and easy a. We're still only playing three strings and focusing mainly on getting our right hand fingers to pick out certain strings is fiddly and it'll take a little bit more time than chords, but well worth the investment. Let's check it out. Let's look in less than two. So we've got easy, which is here. And then remember ethan a, the slides up one fret too. And you just pop that middle finger socket in underneath. And that becomes a. So basically it's going to sound like this to four of those. And then two of those, sorry, and then slide up to the a minus. Okay, So let's just move from easy, easy a, look into play the pattern twice. A0, 23. You're ready to hire 23423. 35. FP 3: FP Easy E, A, and B7: Hi and welcome to finger picking lesson 3. In this session, we'll be learning to finger pick the chords of easy, easy a, easy B7 and back home, too easy a. Best not to rush this. We're trying to build in good technique from the start. If you can learn to play the simple things, well, the hardest skills come Asia. Let's check it out. Let's move on to lesson 3. Easy, easy, a PCB seven and back to easy. Just to remind you with varying from ECA, strop that middle finger down one string to the first layer. The shadow. Okay, it looks different again. 234, ETA. Top that middle finger down. Three. That middle finger down. It has a B cell activation. Last time. 34. 36. FP 4: FP the E chord: Hi and welcome to finger picking Lesson 4. In this session, we'll be learning to think of pick the full quarter B. We're now introducing the right-hand thumb. So a slight change your finger picking pattern, but it's the pattern that will take right through to less than 10, so plenty of time to master it. Let's check it out. Let's move on to a full quarter V. And this time we're going to pluck the sixth string with right hand, thumb. And then we're just going to play the index, index, index in compared to the easy called versions. So this is what it's going to sound like. It's just a dummy run without using our left-hand three. For. The same rule applies. The index finger always looks after the third string. This is throughout the whole book. Actually, middle finger always looks after the second string and always looks after the first string. Stay that delay. But again, 2344 times, One More Time. 2, 3, 4, four times. Let's introduce the quarterly with our left hand index. Third, fret, fret three. That string, middle is the fifth string, fret to the ring finger. Tuck it underneath, right to still. That's the fourth string. So here we go. We're gonna do that patent twice. It's really important way to think of picking that. We're placing our fingertips just to the right place. And you've got that nice, nice bit of space in the skin of the fingers and not touching any other strings. Here we go. 234. Carry out I've got four terms as well. 234. Last time. 234. 37. FP 5: FP E and A: Hi and welcome to think of picking lesson five. In this session, we'll be learning to finger pick the chords of e and a. So we're now attempting to finger pick two full course together. Just take your time. It's better to start off super slow and give myself more space to be able to change to the next chord in time. Remember, this is not a race and there are no officials charting how fast you're progressing. Go at your own pace. Be kind to yourself and give yourself as much time as you need to feel confident before moving on, let's check it out. Let's move on to lesson 5. The courts have E and a. So you remember he, and then we move to a middle ring and little, they're all in fret too, on the fourth, third, second string. So let's get going with that and how you're ready? 1234. Do that, try Stella, move to a 4.5234234. Yeah, sure. I set before the root note of a is obviously a there, so we need to be plucking that shortly. Gather that by now. Forget it. We spoke to. 38. FP 6: FP E, A and B7: Hi, welcome to finger picking Lesson 6. In this session, we'll be learning to finger pick the chords of E, a, B7 and back home to E. Hopefully your left hand is getting confident with moving the right fingers to the correct chord shapes. Because the focus now is really on what their finger picking right hand is doing. If your fingers have never done this kind of thing before, and it'll take time to adapt. Yes, it might sound untidy and messy to begin with, but keep persevering. In a week or two of good daily practice, you'll be seeing some dramatic results. Let's check it out. Let's move on to lesson six. We're going to move on to the favorite cauterize the shareholder. Again, the thumb picks up that strength to get ready for the server. Back to translate elevate or 23. A ready for B7. Back to a time to fall. Sarah, rectangle. 39. FP 7: FP E, A, B7 and D: Hi and welcome to finger picking lesson 7. In this session, we'll be learning to finger pick the chords of E, a, B7, along with the new code of D. Less than six was one column of four courts. And we're now doubling up to two columns slowly finger picking eight cords all the time, keeping a nice steady rhythm. Every lesson gets just a little bit more challenging. So you have to work just a little harder to master the level you're on. That's how we get better as guitarists. That's how we improve. Let's check it out. Lesson 7, B7, and we're going to add that day. So the D picks up that fostering. So this is the Defender together for the last four strings. So here we get for later lessons, layer 1234. Back to a. There've been to a get ready for today. Back to E 234. A. I'd like to be up to a a, a last time a week, 234, up to a day. Lastly, vector a. 40. FP 8: FP the 16 chord block: Hi and welcome to finger picking. Lesson 8. In this session will be finger picking the 16 code block with four columns over two pages with a new chords of G and C. This makes just six different codes. But the 16 code block is about four sets of key families, cause that often go well together. That's why we're repeating certain chords, which is not a bad thing. As with chords less than eight, the finger picking 16 code block is a really useful training tool to help you become a solid and confident guitarist. Let's check it out. Okay, less than eight, we've got the big one layer. B, E a D E a, D G, a T G, C, D J. The new chords of g. Straightforward. And then say Hmm takes the fifth string. Okay, so let's go with that. Three is seven to eight. Welcome back to day. Function. Then the last row and we get the chain. See really that the back-end to ascribe more time. I'm ready 1234. Okay. Brown. Need them last graph and we get the chain. Okay? 41. FP 9: FP the 16 chord block without boxes: Hi and welcome to finger picking lesson 9. In this session, we'll be learning to think or pick the 16 code block in less than eight. But this time without the chord boxes, it's really important to know the courts off by heart. And if you've worked your way through the courts chapter, you'll already be quite good with your changes. The more confident you are with these, the more you can focus on your right-hand finger picking. Don't forget the repetition really is the key TO progress. It builds muscle memory to the point that your fingers will just know what they're supposed to be doing. That's how we improve that. Sally become confident guitarists. Let's check it out. 234. I'm back to E D, E D policy. Then last row, we get to J, C. Really, they're back home to say, let's try war time status time. I already were 234 rho, d and the last row, and we get J. 42. FP 10: The 16 chord black FP styles: Hi and welcome to finger picking, less than 10. In this session, we'll be learning different finger picking patterns using the 16 core blog. Up till now we've just been using one pattern, but now it's time to introduce three more. Let's check it out. Okay, let's try some critical thinking buttons. The first one we've done, Let's look at the second one. Thumb, index and the middle and the reign of plaque together. And then come back on the index. So it's the seller is listed that 4 times 2, 3, 4, 16 core corporate, using the second finger picking pattern had to go to 34. The last row, the third finger picking pattern. And it goes like this. The exporter running and they just repeated without any pause in the middle. Four times 23. Oh, okay. Let's try from the top plate, ready, all 16 colors too. We fall. Iceberg. Finally, let's look at the fourth finger picking fan goes like this. So just adding that middle of the index again. And it's a bit longer so we don't need to repeat it twice. So let's do that four times. 23. Let's go through it. Extreme cold. Finger picking pattern for 2, 3, 4. And change. The last part of this, probably my favorite. And but if you time to get used to it, then it gets smoother, quicker. Maybe a little bit like this. Okay. 43. Classical Notation 1: Open strings, the rest stroke, crotchets and minims: Hi and welcome to classical notation Lesson 1. In this session, we'll be learning all about the open strings. The rest stroke, crotchets, minimums, and a few songs that show all of these in context. Although tab is easy to learn and gets you playing songs quickly, that type of notation is only understood by guitarists. Classical notation, on the other hand, maybe more challenging to learn at the start. But once understood, it can be read by any musician on any instrument anywhere in the world. It's the ultimate universal language. So if you want to be a well-rounded, well-balanced guitarists, this will really help you. Let's check it out. Okay, let's look at the restaurant. I'm going to simply place my thumb on the sixth string over the sound home. And then I will straighten my index finger. And I'm going to place it on the first string and just gently pull back. Come to rest on a string above the second string. Okay, so we're going to practice that with the crotchet, ie. Last for long beat. Most of the time signatures in this Booker, 3, 4 or 4, 4. And so if you see a crotchet, it's going to be one beat. Here we go. Let's play for A's. Four crotchets, 123423423434. Now let's pluck the second string, be eight times 2342342343. Mixture of a, B, and G, which is the third string. So again to play E, G, B, E 2342343 for three, for two beats. And we'll get to play the first string a four times. And I want to count in between. So it gets know what the duration of that load fill slide or two. For 234223423. Let's look at a couple of exercises using the first string. And the first one is fill the beat. And as you can see, we've got a couple of crotchets that a minimum couple of crotchets and the minimum four crotchets and minims. Let's play that nice and slowly. 1234. You might find that I count the various durations, 1, 2 or 1, 2, 3, 4. If I count 1, 2, 3, 4, it's going to be the opposite. The bar, which is, if it's for, for all the nodes are going to count up to four. So I might, whether I count 1212 for the minimums or 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, two minims. I think it'll be hopefully pretty obvious, but let's do you feel being again 234, hostile to the soccer field of a two is just a mixture again. So let's go from the beginning to three to three to three. For this now look at up and down. And we've got a couple of minims. Playing E, couple of minimum is playing B. And then I got a couple of crotchets of g. Come across is a bay and then back to a couple of minims, E. Okay, let's do it nicely slowly. 123, oh, 23234. Let's look at the in and out. Slight challenge here with a minimum between two crotchets. Let's play that now. To three to 323. 44. Classical Notation 2: The stave, and songs with the notes E, B and G: Hi and welcome to classical notation Lesson 2. In this session, we'll be learning all about the stave. Musical notes like crotchets and minims are all written on a five-line staff. And also we'll be learning to play simple songs using the notes E, B, and G. Because in classical notation, each node has a defined length with a defined tempo. That's the timing of a song. It makes it much easier to play along with other people in duets and trios, does a little bit more to understand and tab, but hang in there, it'll all be worth it. Let's check it out. Okay. We're looking at the crotchet and minimum in contexts of the stave. Now, so let's look at a, the e2. Here we go, 1234234234. And the BGN, I'm sort of thing, but on the second string, the B string, Here we go, 12342342234. Let's look at the E against B. We've got a little exercise here using both of those strings. So we get 234234234. Let's look at the G. So similar to the other exercises we've done only a strain of the base string. Let's do the last. 23423423433 and a boat missing all three strings, a, b, and g. 234. 234234 to it about monopoly, use the restaurant for the soul when a pluck the first, second strings together to slide this with our thumb and index finger. To the fall is going to pluck. Second string. Index finger plucks the first Omega. Well, 234123. Paul. Great thing about these three salts in this page. 38 about tuned about we can played as duet. So trio is find somebody else who will play the other souls. And you'll find that it goes closer together. Okay, let's look at going to sleep. Again. We're going to be using the first, second string, omega 234234234. Waking up to 234. Last 234. 45. Classical Notation 3: The dotted minim, semibreve, and the notes F and 'higher' G: Hi and welcome to classical notation lesson 3. In this session, we'll be learning all about the dotted minim, semibreve and songs using the new notes of f and g. If you ever get confused with where you are on the fretboard, just go back to the fret box diagram to remind yourself. The more you familiarize yourself with the layout, the quicker your brain will help you reorientate the notes, strings, frets, and fingers. Don't worry. Take it at the pace you're comfortable with. And it'll all start to make sense. Let's check it out. Okay, doesn't mean m is three baits. And we're going to play the E string fostering four times. And we're going to be playing for dotted Muslims. There we go. One, 23, oh, 333334343. At the semibreve, four beats for the first string, 4 times 4 celebrative. So we go 1234234. Okay, next few songs. We're going to use everything we've learned so far. So the first, second, third string, E, B, and G, crotchets, minimums, minimums, semibreves. And we're going to introduce the notes F and higher G. So F is going to be the first string fret, one using the index finger f and higher J. As opposed to say, Oh Jay, Jay, just to differentiate. So let's play lazy j. Going to stay upon that. Fret three with the index finger. Can we get lazy G 234234? Hello, Lacey, G, string 34234. Okay, high or low. And we can use mixture of G, f, and a, mostly our crotchets with the men and at the end, index finger ready? 234234. Okay, skimming stones, part one. I'm going to use my index finger for the F and the ring finger for the G. 2342 to three to three. To start with the GI 323234. Skimming stones part three. Minimum there. So let's just go through this lesson slowly. Starting on the third string, all the way through on this string. So we just got the minimum to worry about 234 covalent space. And we're going to pluck two strings, the third string, the first string. The thumb, is going to pluck the G, and the index finger is going to pluck the E, f, and G notes on the first string and we go 123. Just the first line will do, get that under our belts. The first three to the second line now, E, F, G, F. Very, very similar to that. Together. Two to three, often to three to three. 46. Classical Notation 4: Songs using B, C and D.: Hi and welcome to classical notation Lesson 4. In this session, we'll be learning some new songs using all the notes we have learned so far, along with the new notes of B, C, and D. As you can see, the souls are getting longer and more challenging. But always remember the staircase. We're all wanting to become confident guitarists, but we know we have to start at the bottom step. It was scary at first, but we gradually become confident on that first step. We felt confident enough to move on to the next step, Lesson 2, which is again scary, but over time and good practice, we became confident at that enough to move on to lesson 3 and so on. Exactly the same applies to songs and we call this chunking. We start at the first bar, the first chunk, and we work at mastering that. We then move on to B2 and master that. We then work on bar 12 together and master that. This is how we progress and is exactly how we become confident guitarists. Let's check it out. Okay, ball around B, we're going to introduce B, C and D or B plan B, which is the c. So this is fret 1, second string, C and D, and use my ring finger for D on a fret three seconds tree. So let's run through that ball around bay. Here we go. Gonna start with the open string. Second string, which is Pe 2, 3 For 234234. Okay, Small steps. The first string, a, 100 and F, and then change every 3423. For last time, 234. Small steps part to the a and the f. So introducing for this little section here, the celebration and the dotted minimum, or the same salt. So here we go, 1234234. Thanks away. Part 1. We're going to be using the notes G, B, D, and D. Let's just go over those. So G, It's the third string, open string. B. List the second string, string. And then say fret one on that second string. At index finger and ring finger. You're going to stretch over and play fret three, which is noted day. So we've got G. And let's just play that first bar. We're actually, we're going to just tuck in that D, the first note of the second bar. So I've got all the notes in there to begin with is try that 23423423423. Last time. Okay, let's move on and to stir, mop up that second bar. When it is the first bar and the second part together. 234. Again, 234. More time, 234. And the final two bars, you've got. And then the D, couple of days. And then without a semi brave at the end finishing off 234. Let's try those two parts together. 234234234234. Okay, Let's try or four bars. Glycine slowly. 234234234. Chapter 2, 3, 4, split out 23423 and again, Two, Three, Four Last Time. 2, 3, 4, saints away. Part to the notes are B, D, E string, fret 3, first string. That's pretty much it. So let's just go through it nice and slowly. Be jumped down to the first string, e. And then ring finger looks after the fret three, that G. And then yes, reversing it. Celebrated at the end. 34. Okay. Let's do the first two partially. 2, 3, 4, 234234. Last time. 234. And the last two bars, B, B, G, G. And this is a brief of the endless did that 23423. And again, last time, 34234. Okay, let's go for it from the beginning, nice and slowly, or 23 for the j 2, 3. And again, G. To create a little slower now for 23. Thanks white part three. We got a dotted minimum. Three beats, followed by just a straightforward a crosscheck with the semibreve at the end. And we're only playing B, the second string, open string. Here we go. Let's try the first bar, 2, 3, 4 to 3. And that's how we play that. So let's play it all the way through. Nice and slow. 234232323234. And again, 234232323234. It's the police Part 1. Similar notes that as we've done before, we're going to play G, G, B, second string, open, C, D, fret three, G, fret three on the first string. And then we come down to E. And then this is play those first two bars, nice and slow. 234. Little bit tricky with the ring finger on the fret three and it goes to, some people would cover both strings with the ring finger. Might be easier to move like that, but heavy find it. With practice. It will get smoother and smoother. So let's just do the first two bars of that, 234234234234. And the last two bars, or GG eight is a nice run up to D. Let's do that together. 1234. 234234234, et cetera, come together now or four bars. 234234 and again 234 and again, slow as time 3234. And again last time 234. Let's get out of the second line now. It's going to be a, B, C, D. Just what we've done before. G is the same as line 1, but you keep on D, C, B, and then you finish off on a couple of times, t and t plus two, the first two bars, it is exactly the same as L1, L2 it anyway, 2, 3, 4. And then we're going to just finish up the last two bars to extend it all the way through, I suspect 2, 3, 4, 234 to the police Part 2, mostly minimums, couple of semi Braves and four crotchets, but it is a bit simpler than the poem. A, strike together. Top line 23423. Pull two. Data a. And then d, 2, 3, 4. Let's try that again. 123423422234. And the second line, similar, but the four crotchets on the seventh bar, finishing off on the b, 3, 4. Let's try that. Line. 2342341234, crotchet G. 234. Let's try it again. 234 For 234234. Let's do the whole thing. Part two. Let me go to 3412341234232223422222234. Let's try it again. This last time. 234234223. Back to CHI, two to four crotchets. 234. 47. Classical Notation 5: The major scales of G and C: Hi and welcome to classical notation, lesson five. In this last session, we'll be learning the major scales of CNG with a couple of duets to finish with. There's also the guitar note finder on page 81 that shows clearly all the notes we've been learning so far. And a really useful stave, tab and flexbox layout. Let's check out the scales. C major scale up to G. So the C with the index finger for at 1 second string. Ring finger stretches over to fret tree, which is the d. And then open string, first string. And then index finger on fret one, which is F. And then ring finger up to fret three, which is j. So we've got nice and slow. 234, 23, and again, and again, 34234. Let's try the C major scale right through now on that line, 234. And again, 234. Now this time 234, G-major scale up to D. We're going to start with the G string, the first string. And then we're gonna put our middle finger on fret to that string, which is a, B open string, second string. And then see the index finger and the ring fingers going to the CAFTA on that fret, second string. So we're going to play G, a, B, C, D. This good at 234. Up to that day, That's Try that again. 234234 and again 23. And let's come back down now. Let's do the whole line. 234234. Again, 34. Much slower this time, 234234. See in five-part one, very similar to the scale. But we're going to just make it into a little ditty. Here we go. So the first two bars, pretty much similar. C, D, E, F, G, and back. And then C to G, M and M. And then ending on the semibreve four beats. And that's repeated that line. So let's just do that nasa slowly. We're too 342223 and repay 2. 2, 2 part 2. See you in five. You've got a semibreve, see, and then the G string third. And then it goes up to j. Pretty straightforward. Let's try the whole line, 23423423423 and repeat 234234234, G15, very similar to C and five, but obviously you're going to start with G. And then a, B, second string open C, D. And then we're going to work our way back, C, B, a, G, and then it goes, hops up to D for the minimum, and then back to G for the semibreve four beats didn't necessarily 2, 3, 4, 2, 2, 3, and repeat two KG and five. Just take it nice and slowly. We've got a, a semi brave for the summary for the d. And then it's just a nice little simple backup to do that together. 234234234 for the game, 234. And repeat. 48. Extras 1: FF (finger to a fret) Scales: Hi and welcome to extras less than one. In this session we'll be learning scales, specifically the FF's, the major, and the blue scale. I cannot overemphasize the importance of scales. If all you ever did was practiced these for 20 minutes, every day for a month, you would see your confidence on the guitar moved to a whole nother level. It's a complete no-brainer. You make sure your thumb is in the right place behind the neck. Make sure your fingertips that planting in the right place behind the fret. And you just get going. The great thing is you don't even have to think. It's the repeating of his action that creates muscle memory and overtime will revolutionize your playing. Let's check it out. Let's look at some FF's finger to a fret. This is the best exercise for toughening up your fingers and increasing your speed around the fretboard. It's the greatest beginner exercise if you wanted one exercise to help you be a great guitarist, this will be at. So let's look at the best practice. So the left-hand thumb, there's going to be tucking behind fret four. Keep that thumbnail nice and flat against the back of the neck, pointing upwards. And then index fingers can tuck behind fret of three. This is sixth string, middle finger. Tuck it behind for four. Ring finger, tuck it behind fret 5 and little finger forensics. So here you have the magic triangle. Make sure try to make sure it doesn't happen every time that the thumb is equidistant between the index and middle finger. So looking at it from the top, you can see this triangle. Just try and remind yourself just to keep the thumb from going up here, down around the corner. Let's keep it nice and tidy. So let's do this nice and slowly. I'm going to use the right-hand thumb restaurant. So I'm going to pluck it down, come to rest on the string below it. I want to do that for three strings, the sixth, fifth, fourth. And then when it comes to the second first, I'm going to do the same thing, rest stroke, but I'm going to pluck it, come to rest on the string above. Let's try that necessarily. 34. I'm going to move down to the fifth string. Same fret, 3, 4, 5, 6, fourth string. Now, your thumb will want to creep up, but try and keep it there. Second string. And the faster. As you go from the sex to the fastest, make sure you've got lots of space as much as you can underneath here for the hand to breathe. And we're going to do that one more time. From the sixth to the first string. 234. Fingers, mommy, difficult to begin with. Trust me, the more you do this. I forget muscles stretching regularly. And the muscles that you're going to be using, these muscles stretch out sideways. It's a bit of a weird action, but that's the sort of muscles you want to try and stretch gently. Ok. Let's come down now. On the way up, we have kept our fingers down. You can say what I didn't do. Push all day now is today the rest stroke on the index finger. And we're going to come back down with individual fingers. So little finger, ring, middle, index. And then we're going to stretch the little finger side. We are going to be doing each finger at a time. String to stop that. So once we've got the technique right, It's really a case of repeating. Repetition is the key. And you might want to just spend five or ten minutes a day. Four or five times a week. It will be a challenge and a shock to the wrist to begin with, but as long as you don't have to do it. And as SI repeating that, find that naturally, you'll get quicker and quicker. You may want to use a pick, in which case we'd have exactly the same thing, but we're going to down pick my Usually I just gently palm UTEP, so I've got a little bit of the palm, the skin just touching the strings. So rather than I've got more of a softer sound, sounds, you don't to be overloading. You're learning all at once because it's going to take enough time to focus on your fingers, stretching them, pressing down the fingertips right behind each fret. Rather than learning to use a pick correctly, you'll find, just like I did in some of those notes going up, hitting both strings. As you practice. You'll find scat. And then when you've completed fret three, just move up everything including the thumb, just one fret, and then do exactly the same fret. And then fret five slides. Keeping those fingers nice and straight. Rather than Ben. Just trust that rest ever so slightly. Straight fingers. Fret for. Now again. Back to fret three. If you want even more of a challenge, you can learn how to double-click. And that, as the name suggests, it's just down picking for the first note, up picking for the second item and so on. This just means that you can get faster and faster. 49. Extras 1: Major scale: Let's look at the major scale. There are many different ways of playing scales on a guitar, but we're just going to concentrate on the scales that go from the sixth string to the first and back, two octaves. We're going to look now at the G major scale. So we're going to start with the middle finger on fret three, That's Jane. And it's all about patterns and we can get the patents in our head. And this is going to be so much easier for us to remember. And in the end, we'll be able to play it does through muscle memory. Will let the fingers do what they do. We don't even have to worry. The fingers through repetition will know where to go and which fret to press down on. So we're going to start with the middle finger on Fred three, that's the sixth string. And then the little finger index on the fifth string. So that's one octave. And then we're gonna go through. And that's the two octaves. Guys drill down now and take it nice and slowly. So we're going to play, that's the middle finger. Little finger stretches over. And the great thing about this, We didn't have to move our hand. It's just going to be very simple FF. So finger to a frets or the index fingers going to look off to the 2s, the middle finger, the 3s, the ring finger, the 4s, and the little finger, the 5s. So let's just take it slowly. Middle finger and little finger on the F35, extreme down, index finger, middle finger, Fred, three, little finger Fred 5, index finger, fret to ring finger, fret four and then the little finger to finish off how to okay, we will come back straightaway, but we're just going to go over that. Let's do that. Well, if what's got to trice, I read a 3423423. Full last time. 234. So let's just reverse what we've done exactly the same but going backwards. The ring index, next string down, middle finger, index, and then a state license slowly down and back up. Good. Two, Three, Four and back. Three, fall and back straightaway. This last time, 234. All the patents that came to mind when I was learning was starting with the middle and the middle. And then these two strings, the fifth and the fourth, the middle finger comes in and then switches with the ring finger. So you've got, so the middle fingers used on that fifth string. And then let's shrink down the ring fingers used. So they sort of swap. Okay, let's look at the final octave, the second octave. And basically these two strings, the String and the third string just mirror each other. So you've got the fifth, two strings here, the third and the fourth are exactly the same. So that's a little anchor in the middle. You can remember. And then the second string is just using the middle and the lessor like this. And at the top of the mountain, if you like, it's the end x and the middle, just those two on their own. And then coming back. And then these two strings. And then we finish off with, okay, let's look at the second octave. Nice and slow going to start off with that J, spin of a stretch but towel in Moscow a sphere now. So g, middle and lateral. And then at the top, just the index in the middle. And then we're going to come down to that nice and slowly. 234 and back. 234234234. And last time, 234. Sorry about the wind and the rain. I've got a studio at the bottom of the garden. And it's really, really nice except for wind and rain. I have a tree that is right next to the roof and it's pretty much touching. So when the winds blow, that if you can hear the creaking, but yeah, it creeks and it's quite eerie, but I think it's pretty well, bill. So hopefully I'll be okay. Anyway, here we go. This is end of November and the rain has arrived. Let's do the G major scale right from the bottom half of back. Nice and slow. 3, 4, right behind. Two strings are the same. Just the middle and then lateral, followed by the index and metalized 2. And then we're going to just pause 234. Two strings, the same. 234234. Last time we did an ISIL sled is time 2, 3, fall. Middle, two strings, the same metal electrode to the top. 234. To do this, maybe for 510 minutes a day, four or five times a week, you're fired. In a couple of weeks, your mind will begin to get the pattern and the muscles. Will you just be able to let the fingers go and they'll soon be able to do it without much thought from you. So it's going to sound a little bit like this when you get bit more experience and confidence. The great thing about learning this pattern is that we can play exactly the same pattern, but a different starting point, and it becomes a completely different scale. So that's J sharp or flat for a threat five, B flat, flat six. And then it comes to, say, on fret eight, C as n, say. 50. Extras 1: Blues scale: Let's look at the blue scale as before. Once we learn the pattern that we can play it right across the fret board. I really like this blue scale, one of my favorites. So let's hear what it sounds like. Okay, let's take it nice and slowly. So index, we start on the index fret 3, sixth string. And then we're going to stretch right over to fret six. Little finger. Again. The index looks after the 3s, the middle, the 4s, the ring, the fives and the literal, the sexes. Here we go, stretching to fret six with the little finger and the ring and index being used here, which is slightly easier. And the major scale. And then the index, middle and ring. And then we've got two strings of index ring, index rank. And then the little finger tucks in there. And then the second string is just the stretching again, index level and the index, the top on his own. Then we're going to come back and little index, little ring, index, and then ring middle index stretch again. It's quite nice there, a little band there. By bluesy sound. Okay, Let's go through this nice and slow. We're just going to take those three strings, the sixth, the fifth, the fourth. Little bit at a time. Let's do that now. 1234, 23423. Fall. Last time. 234. I'll just plucking with my thumb and index finger. You can use the restaurant if you want. Slightly mellower sound is in the restaurant. Okay, let's now play the last three strings that, the second, first. It's going to sound like this. And then it'll allow the top. Here. We can play that through together to three, fall. To fall, to free fall. Thus Time 3, fall. Okay. Let's go right through from the sixth string to the fast to three full loaded index and rings. For the beginning again, 234234. Last time. Let's come back now. From the first string, fret three. Let's get right through showing nicest 2, 3, fall. To three from the top. Last time. Three, full. Okay. Let's go right through from the six and then back again. And we're going to take it a little bit slower. 1234, index, array, index and design at the top, 34234234. So once you've practiced playing that caught a few times, it's going to sound a little bit like this. 51. Extras 2: Six must-know minor chords: Hi and welcome to extras Lesson 2. In this session, we'll be learning six must know minor chords. Minor chords are set to sound sad in comparison to happy major chords. And it's easy to see why they're not quite as popular, but each chord has its own color. And when we listen to a great song, the picture it paints is often full of contrast and tone with the different colors helping to bring depth and vibrancy. A minor chord can add something unique to a sound so well worth knowing a few, Let's check them out. Okay, Let's look at six must know minor chords, a minor, D minor, E minor, C sharp minor, D minor, and G minor. And these are the courts I use quite a bit so, and we're going to look at some favorite transitions to and from those minor CO2. So let's look at a minor. A minor is, is this. If you go from E major, exactly the same shape down one string, becomes a minor. Obviously the root note is a fifth string, fifth string. So we just play the last five strings. So the index is on that second string. Print one. Middle finger is on the fourth string for it to ring finger, tucking it in right underneath. And that's third string. Fret, too. Nice. Favorite transition is a minor to C, because that ring finger just takes off and put it on right on that fifth string. Fret three is quite a nice little transition. Okay, so that's a minor. Let's look at a B minor. Exactly the same shape. In fact, if we just change around our fingers, middle, ring and little. And say my leg just slide up two frets and then the index finger goes right across for a half bar. Chord is B minor. As you can see, that root notice now be a was a. Let's now be exactly the same shape. B minor. And attach it works exactly the same, C minor, C-sharp minor, but we're getting ahead of ourselves. So that's B minor. So some of the transitions that we use for BMI level I use d, e, j. That's used quite a bit, that D to B minor. That's a really great quarter. No. Let's look at E minor. That's the bog standard E minor chord. So it's E-major. Without the index finger to the index finger off, becomes E minor. And the a minor be MyLab. Change works exactly the same if we use the ring and little finger, e Mila, and then patch up one fret, index finger right across full barcode now, so using all six strings, F minor becomes F sharp minor. And that's cheap either. Okay? So that's a minor. Some of the favorite transitions going to g. So that's e. Mylab. Let's look at C-sharp minor. Very similar to the B minor, but we're just moving from the beam Iowa, which is fret to hear the index finger, half bar chord. Move up two frets. C-sharp Minor. That C-sharp Minor, the index finger is on the fourth fret. Fret for everyday has exactly the same. You could start with a minor and then move your way up to C sharp minor. Sometimes I found it really easy if I got into pickle, I would just start at a. And then down the string is all about the journey. Map, that roadmap, a, down a string to a minor and then I'd know I was on the right train. For the B flat minor, B minor, C, and C sharp minor. So my favorite transitions, a, let's call it a nice, and then back to B minor. And then just drop. That fell onto the sixth string. I remember as a beginner I listed love this progression. A minor, B minor over E, a C sharp minor, B minor. And then you're just dropping on that open string, ie, the sixth string. So that's C sharp minor. Let's look at D minor now. So there's a little bit tricky. Some people use their ring finger on that second string fret three, I tend to find it easier to use my little finger. So the index, that's D minor. So the index finger is on the first string, fret one, middle finger, third string for it to. And the little finger on the second string fret tree is D. So we are just playing the last four strings with that root note that the fourth string open street. Some of the nice transitions for D minor, D, and then just dropping down that C are ways to play this a lot. As many other instances that were, use D minor but a little bit fiddly. D minus a minus cot, a nice. So that's D minor. Let's go to G minor. The last of the six must know minor chords would pretty much covered it. But we'll go through the journey again. E by that with the ring and little fingers. And then add the index finger full barcode on the fret one. It's going to be F, F sharp, and that's going to bring us to G minor, G minor chord. But in the middle finger. On that third string, fret four would make it a G major In a core page, so it's G minor. So we have a minor, B minor, E minor, C sharp minor, D minor, G minor. It's often useful to have the context of the course, rather than a random bunch of minor chords on a page. I'll show you some simple copper Russia that I might use With these chords. So a Mila, I like putting c, d up to C, G, D. And then with B Mila, I'll use a Carla with D. But a quick change. E minor to G. Free minor might use to G. D to a surface C-sharp minor, and probably start with a C sharp minor, B minor. Ie. A C-sharp either be Laila, the de Milo. I'll probably use other minor chord. So D minor, a minor, E minor to j. So for G minor, um, I have a simple little four chord progression that goes G minor, D minor, a minor to G major, a minor, a minor to G major. And I settle, transitioning between G major and G minor. 52. Extras 3: Full-bar chord shapes: Hi and welcome to extras lesson 3. In this session, we'll be learning some full bar chord shapes. Barcodes give you great versatility and allowing you to take the same chord shape and move it up and down the fret board to make new courts. With a barcode, your left-hand index finger presses down on multiple strings, acting as a moveable nut or kapo. While the middle ring and little finger create the different chord shapes. Some people have scared of barcodes, but if you take it slowly, a small step at a time, you'll be amazed at what you can do. Let's check them out now. So in this section we're going to look at the full BOM major chord shape. For bomb minor chord shape takeoff the middle finger for Br minus seventh chord shape. Take off our little finger. Seventh chord shape but backed and middle finger. It's all about the shapes. If you can get the shapes into your head, it's going to really help you with working out what chord it is, whereabouts on the fretboard. So let's look at the full bar major chord shape. Basically, if we start with E, We slide up one fret and we put our index finger. The full barcode is where the index finger goes right across the fretboard. So almost like creating a moveable nut. So we're playing the Shape 1, Fred out the index fingers, we're going right across fret one. That becomes F. F major. Note, nice and clean. Then you might find it's going to be, you're going to find really painful muscles around here when you first start doing our course, but don't worry, push through. So that becomes F. If you find that you're getting Busey and roughly notes, just tilt your index finger little bit more so the bone is closer to the fret board. And really it's a case of getting stronger. Having that thumb right behind here, creating that clamp is so important. The more you do this to strongly will become fret one. F. We're just going to slide right up. The thumb slides up to that becomes F sharp. Slide at one more, becomes G flat for G sharp, one more, up to fret five becomes a, which has like same chord but just a different shape using different notes. So That's the major chord shape just going into your head. It's like the E. But we're just moving up the course. We're following with a full bar chord. We're following the root notes on the sixth string. So that's going to be E, F, F sharp, G, G sharp, and a. So one more time that shape then starting with a sliding up. Index fingers right across fret one, F, exactly the same. Have sharp fret too. Jay fret tray, G-sharp fret for coming up to a That's fret phi toolbar called 4-bar major chord shape. Full bar minor chord shape. It's actually the same as the major chord shape. But we take off that middle finger. That's the difference in sound. A full bar minor chord shape. So let's go down to E minor. Slide up a fret to F minor. F sharp minor, G minor. G sharp minor. A minor. That's going to be the same as the full bar. The full BOM minor chord shape. So with a full bar minus seventh chord shape, we're taking off another finger. We've taken off the middle finger to make it mine. I were going to take off the little finger to make it a minor seventh. Can you see the difference? Can you hear the difference? It's my favorite topic or the seventh. Nice sound. And so, let's take it from the beginning. E minor seven, F minor seventh, F sharp minor seven. G minor seven, G sharp minor seventh, a minus seven. Now we go to the full bar seventh chord shape, no minor is just the seventh. Let's look at it at the G shape here, the fret 3, the index than fret three. That's the seventh chord shape. So it's the major without the little finger. A little fair can take a break for a little while. So that's the seventh chord shape. Let's look at it from the beginning of the journey. Is seven, That's E7 and F7. Nice clean know that. Seven, F-sharp seven. G7, C sharp 77. That's the same as a 7 here we're using the middle and the ring. So let's just recap those for full bar chord shapes. We've got the major, we've got the minor takeoff, the middle finger. We've got the minus 7, take off the little finger. And we've got the full bar seventh chord shape with the middle finger back on. 53. Extras 4: Half-bar chord shapes: Hi, welcome to extras lesson four. In the last session, we looked at full barcodes. In this session, we'll be learning some half bar chord shapes. In some ways, the half bar chord is easier to learn than full bar chords is we're only pressing down five strings as opposed to six. Whichever way we are learning to strengthen the muscles around the thumb in order to create that clamp affect. The stronger the clamp, the cleaner the notes. Let's check it out. So in this section we're going to look at the half bomb major chord shape. A half bar minor chord shape. Half bar minus seventh chord shape. The half-past seventh chord shape. Let's look at the half bar chord shapes. And the difference with these is we're moving down a string. This fifth string will now become the root node. So we're looking at that as far as the, the root notes that the courts, so that's obviously a. B flat. B on fret to C, C, C-sharp. Remember, C sharp minor seven, C sharp and then D. So there's a few notes we're looking at as far as the root node, so concerned. So we're not even touching the sixth string with our need to worry about that. In fact, when we use the index finger across, which is tucking it under here, just to mu that nicely so it's not being played. So let's look at the a half bar major chord shape. So let's look at a normally. And then we're going to slide up like we've done before. The index finger is going to go right across that fret. One becomes B flat. Major chord shape, That's a B flat, is quite difficult to play. Some people play it like that because it's not normally played like that. Scott, difficult. Challenge to play that. Let's move up. Fret two becomes B. That's why people play B7 so much similar, so much easier, and playing B with a half bar chord shape Bay. And then we'll move up to say. That also is a lot easier to play the normal say, as opposed to the C sharp major chord sharp, C sharp. And then we're going to go up to D. And again, much easier to play. And I guess you can say I'm play this in a while. I sometimes if I'm strumming, are playing this, just use a ring finger across those three notes. So that's the half bar major chord shape. And let's look at the half bar minor chord shape. He said a play again. So let's go back to a minor. The middle ring, and little started the journey and then we move up. One fret, index finger comes right across. That's B flat minor. We're going to slide up one fret, fret to the index fingers fret too, that makes it a B minor, B minor, C minor. Remember the C, C minor, C-sharp minor and D. So the D minor, compared to the, the shape of the D minor, your choice which you find easier to play. So that's the minor chord shape. So let's look at the half bar minus seventh chord shape. One of my favorites type, of course, the minus 7th. So we've got the, a minor seventh, let's use the middle and the ring here, a minor seventh. Remember that's a minor changing to a minor seven chord. So going back to the middle of the Rings, his slide up one fret. And that makes it B flat minor seventh. Slide up fret to be minor seventh. That makes that C minus 7 slide up to fret four. That's going to be a C-sharp minus 7. One more to the d, d minus 7, as opposed to D minus 7, which just has four strings. And then this is one of my favorite said, the minor seventh half bar minus 7th. I tend to play mostly the B and the C sharp, so I like eye color to some hammer ons here. Okay, Let's look at the half-past seventh chord shape. So let's go with a seven. Remember, we're not using the sixth string, we're all on the fifth string as the root notes. So that's a slide up, one fret, index finger right across fret one. That's B flat seven. Slide up one more fret to index finger on the fret to be seven as opposed to. And then move one more to see C7. C7, That's the other way of playing. C7 was a little bit of a stretch. Let's go to C sharp seven. And then D7. As opposed to thick I play, prefer to play that one as opposed to. So that's the Hofburg seventh chord shape. So just to recap, the Hofburg a major chord shape. Half bow, minor chord shape, half bar minus seventh chord shape. Half-past seventh chord shape. 55. Extras 5.2: "Running Home" riff: Okay, running how we've got again over the six and the fifth in a similar sort of a theme as on a mission. It basically 12 bar blues, but we're going to start with the sixth string, naught, naught 1212101099. So we're going to stretch right up. You might want to use your middle fingers the longest of your fingers, or chance of getting to that 12th fret. But we're going to just play gnaws and OT 12121099. Find it easier. The ring finger. So the ring and then the index finger to a fret ring, index and then just slide down, index their fingers refresh should be like that. But actually it's going to be a little difficult to get to, especially if you haven't got a cutaway here. So I'm just going to use my ring finger. You can still use your index if you want. But I'm going to use the ringer that do this, do that first line, nice and slow. 234. Soko to spear that adapts to it again, it does do it four times. So 1234. And again, the last time. And we're going to move down to the fifth string. Do exactly the same twice, 234. And again. And then we're going to move back to the 6th and do it just twice. 1234. Let's leave it there. We're going to just do those three lines. The sixth rate, four times a fifth string twice, and then back to the sixth string twice. Let's do that together. 234, the fifth, the sixth. More time. So that one more time. The whole thing, just those three lines. And we're just going to pick up the pace a tiny bit. 234. We're down to the fifth. Wave, back to the sixth. The next line is going to be on the, staying on the sixth string, and it's going to be fret 7. We're going to just basically play it eight times. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. Move down to the fifth threat five, again, 5678, stay that line. Now. Sixth string, we're going to play the 78 times and then the 5, 8 times c, ready? 2, 3, 4, and 7, 8. Okay, So more time too. To me, for two and back. Last line, six string is not naught. 12121010. Nine, Nine, and a little bit different. We're going to end up on nor 4, 4, 4, 5, 5, 6, 7. You can do that with the index middle ring and little, or you can use your index 4, 5, 67, or the middle finger on that seven if you want. And then finishing off with a naught. Okay, Let's do the last two lines then the sixth string playing the seven and the 58 times, and a little bit of finish off with that. Still on the sixth string. Play the last line. I already 231234361236. I did it one more time. 234364567. Finishing off on that note. Let's play all the way through. Running home. Here we go to fall down to fifth string, say the same. Back to the sixth. Down to the 72345678531. Last line, 4567, slow down and finish with a not sure that we'll try and last time, 234. The fifth straight. Back to the sixth. Fret, 7345678545678467. 64. Extras 6.1: "E Quartet" progression: Hi and welcome to extras Lesson 6. In this session, we'll be learning ten cool chord progressions in a similar way to riffs. When you find a bunch of chords that sound great together, there's something that makes you want to play them over and over again. And that's what we're trying to do because it's the power of repetition. While we're enjoying playing the progression, we're also improving our fingers strength, our fine motor skills on our agility around the fretboard. Let's check them out now. Equal sets of sounds like there's four chords. Then they come back down again. So be quartet was one of the first chord progressions either learned. And think about it is the fingers just keep on the same strings that move at all. They're just rolling up on the train tracks. Keeping nice and smooth. What's different is the spacing. So let's start right at the beginning. This is just the E chord. You probably weren't allowed out by nouns. So the middle finger is on the fifth string for it to ring finger. The fourth string fret to the index finger. On the third string fret one. And so we're just kinda play, that's the first chord. The second chord, basically the middle and the rain to slide up two frets. And the index to slides up one fret. Okay? So we lived from the first chord, the middle of the range, a slide up two frets, same strings, and the index just slides at one fret. So the indexes in fret, two metal ring or in fret for. Lovely thing about this chord progression is that you do have open strings. First string, second string, and a sixth string, and we'll open strings, are not touching anything with any fingers. Now the third Chord just slides up. The whole chord. Slides up. All the fingers slide up two frets. And then the final chord, the middle and ring finger, just slide up one fret and the index slides up to, so you've got that sort of v-shape. So the fourth chord is the ischaemia. But it's obviously five frets up and start again getting you got a bit of a stretch here, middle and ring stretching two frets, index just one. And then everything slides up two frets. And then we go back to the E shape, middle and ring to slide up one, and the index slides up too. So let's do that again. And we're going to go nice and slowly just between the first second called Position 2, 3, 4. And we're just going to strum it four times. And we're going to move. Let's go back to ideally. But working towards changing, like all the rest of the other core positions that we want to change. Time between one chord and the other, two. You may have to go over this a 100 times. That's why we're heading the CAPM. Nice low read them and you know what, even if you have to slow it right down, 34. See a slowing it down to give you time to move. Let's carry on. It doesn't matter that this array at a slow pace is going to be telling yourself as. I guess the change in time. Okay, Let's move now between the second position and the third. So basically we're keeping I had exactly the same position, but we're just sliding up two frets. It's try that to three. Fall to get ready to move back last time. Okay, let's move from the third position to the fourth. You really, and this time we're just going to revert back to the shape, but obviously five frets up. So we're going from index on the fourth fret, fourth, third string, metal ring, the sixth fret, fourth, fifth string. And then we're going to slide up the middle and ring to slide up one fret index slides up to, let's try that together. 234. And back. Last time. I find it easier to use different fingers. Index, ring, and little pat. Difficulty with using different fingers halfway through is that you're having to change. Whereas if you use these fingers, just going to have to stretch. But if you do find that stretching a bit too much and just move them around yourself to what's what's more comfortable. The reason that I love her so much because they sounded, it sounded really nice. And the great thing about riffs is that if you find, cause that sound nice, it gives you motivation, inspiration to play over and over the great thing about risks as you can, that's what the design sound. Good. You play them over and over because you love the sound of them. But in doing that, you are strengthening your fingers and just by repetition, getting better and better. And that's the point. So let's go through it right from the beginning. From the first mission to the fourth. Here we go, 234 again to three. Don't worry if in the course of playing days that you're getting your fingers not round enough. And it's again, an awful lot of us just to be expected, but Just try and keep that thumb right down here and you're actually trying to create that breathing space here. Bring your fingers right over as much as you can so they're not touching any of a straight. Let's do that one more time. 234. Great thing about this called sequences. You can go back again. So we can just reverse it. Let's do that. Let's go out in the back. And 2341 last time. So when you fit it a few, 100 times and you get incontinent with the core changes, you can use some strumming patterns. I should quite nice. Let's do it really slowly. It's going to sound a little bit like this. I'm going to use the 123234. 65. Extras 6.2: G/D/Em7/C2 (cool chord progression): Okay, Let's look at some cool chord progressions. I've got a whole list here, so we're just going to crash her. Let's look at the two. Number two, that is G, D E minus 7 C2. Again, you could play this all the way through a million times. Just a really great chord sequence. So it's going to be G, d, e minus 7, C2. And we're hoping that one day is going to sound like this. I'm going to use this Run button 1234. Okay, so let's look at the G. I'll mention this arrangement of G to G because it's a middle finger, sixth string, fret tree, index finger, fifth string, fret too. And the ring and the little a tucking underneath there right at the bottom on the fret freight, But first, second string. So before we get to the strumming, you may want to just jump four times, which might be easier. But again, with everything else is trying to change in time. That's why David and the d by now, you probably know that day. So spend time going over the minus 7 is basically G without the middle finger. So go from the De to the minus 7. Then C2 is like a mini G. Instead of the middle and the index on the sixth, fifth, we're just going to touch down to the fourth. I like this. And then you can use your thumb here is to mute that sixth string. Or maybe just use the middle finger here, just a touch. But we don't really want that sixth string from playing. So let's do it. Downstroke four times, less than sliding 1, 2, 3, 4. Get ready for Day. The mother cell. C2, 2, 3, 4. And ready for him. And the sudden C2. Last time, 23, fall. And change C2 to finish. Let me just play that G. So again, if you are really confident with that, and you could put a bit of rhythm into it with the strumming. It's going to sound like this. Two. 66. Extras 6.3: "D Prog": Okay, 3 D Prague, short for D progression. Really like this one. Basically. Again, similar to the e in the sense you're keeping the shape. Or the strings with a D. The first chord shape is D. And then you're sliding everything up to fret 5, so the index and the middle or fret 5. And then the third chord, the index and middle on for seven. And then you come back to. So if I strummed it, it may sound a bit others. The other nice eraser you can do is just down strumming and maybe sounds quite nice. Down strumming a times h. So let's look at that d middle index ring on the first string, fret 2, second string, fret three, and index on the third string fret too. So I'm going to downstream it nice and slowly four times. And then we're gonna move to the second position. Third position, and the back home. You were at St. that together, nice and slow. 23. Fall back to the first position. I'm going to put the paint down. Just use the thumb class and get caught. 234. Back. Stare at last time. 23, fall. So little difference you can make is that on the third strum, you can just add the little finger all the way through sounds, clot lysis, do that together. 234. Little bonus feature for free. 67. Extras 6.4: E/G/D/A (cool chord progression): Number 4, let's look at E, G, D, and a is going to sound a bit like this. A to J. And I'm going to call me you set using the pick 234. Okay, let's do that. First essay, 2, 3, 4, four times downstroke. Getting ready for day. 234 to fall. 68. Extras 6.5: D/Em7/C2/G (cool chord progression): Okay, let's do five, D, E minor, C to G, and you're ready to three. It's time to tree. Okay, right. Frame 17, 23. And change. That. 69. Extras 6.6: D/A/C2/G (cool chord progression): Number 6, D, a, C to G. I really like this one, and we're going to play a little bit differently. Why would a play to you? How it could sound? Liberal finger picking here? So 234, tuition idea of sort of nice sounds that the different courts make together. That's what I think is so nice about it. So let's just update our lesson slowly. So same as before. Just for downs, Trump's nice and smooth. 234, C2. Finish, but j equal to three plus charge. Now this time 234. So you can too. 70. Extras 6.7: D/Bm/Em7/C2 (cool chord progression): Okay, there were seven, d, B minor, E minor seven C2 bit of a challenge here with a BMI of barcode. But this is the sort of sound that's going to make supply nicer. Associate with that B minor. Okay, that's necessary then that D and that B minus specially 2, 3, 4, 7, 2, 3, 4. Ready for that B minor? 234. 71. Extras 6.8: G/C2/Em7/D (cool chord progression): Number eight, G, C to E minor, seven days for our favorite. Just sort of salvaging. Get from this 234. Let's do that. G, c2, e minus 7, and D necessarily 234. And that's a 234234. 72. Extras 6.9: E/G/A/C (cool chord progression): E, G, a, C, note the sort of Cauchy think we'll get together, but it's really, really nice. Civic 234234, guaranteed to J. C 234. Let's see, to cover 234. 73. Extras 6.10: A/C#m/Bm/E (cool chord progression): Okay, Number 10, last one, a C sharp minor, B minor, and a lovely chord sequence that I played. A lot of what I've said starting out when I sorted out the half basket. A little bit of tricky. Course, you can split a half bar, but this is how it sounds. Especially as we've got to challenging how far chords 234234. Last time. 234. Chunking already helped with this light with all the other difficult parts that you find. Basically just taking it a little bit at a time. So specially that a to the C minor. So you want to spend a few minutes study, not just repeating that. So I said, to begin with, it's going to take you quite a bit of time to land on the right place at the right time. But you'll get a repetition. The key to success. And then the C sharp, B minor. And then the B minor. 74. Extras 7: "Minuet in G" (famous classical piece): Hi and welcome to extras lesson 7. In this session, we'll be learning how to play the classical masterpiece minuet NG. Or rather, you'll be watching me try and learn it and maybe pick up a few tips along the way. I really wanted to show you the chunking process I went through in order to perfect the song. And believe me, it was by no means perfect even after six hours practice. But you'll get the idea, Let's check it out. So this is me taking a break from learning the minuet and g. To be honest, playing classical tab is not one of my strengths. So I knew I'd have to really focus for a good few solid hours to get to grips with it. We were staying in a mobile home, Gallaudet or door on the south coast. It was the perfect opportunity to turn off the phone and get to work on this tricky tab. Good, improper. This is what minuet and g sounds like. At this point, I'd worked for six hours of solid practice over two days. So as you can see from those different painful expressions, I still have some way to go towards a Polish performance that is smooth flowing and looking as though I'm actually enjoying it. So this is it right at the beginning of the process. Day 1, bars 12. I use chunking, which is trying to master one small chunk at a time before moving on. So as you can hear, I'm a little messy with this section. And in the end, I had to play these two bars 20 times before it sounded smoother. Now I tackle the whole of the first line, that's bars one through four. Not too bad. But as you can see from my face, this is the gritty and painful work of repetition. Despite the bummed notes, you just have to get up and keep walking, keep working those fingers, hoping that muscle memory will kick in and it will. Let's go to bars 5 and 6. So I ended up going over these two bars 30 times. I wanted to get my fingers to the place where they just knew what they had to do without even thinking about it. Another 10 reps of these two bars. And it was time to move on to probably the trickiest section of the song, bar seven. Yeah, needless to say, I had to go with this bar another 20 times before it started to flow. Hi, I'm faces. Another 20 reps of Bar 9 through 12 with one more line to go before starting the full run-throughs. For some reason, this little four decided to stick his heels in instead of the suggested ring finger for that note. I found it much easier using my little finger with the last note being taken care of by the middle. So this was the first full run-through. I'm using these blue dots, circles for the pinch points. These are the rough patches. I can really focus on my drilling down and smoothing out. So this is after 10 reps of the full run-through. So I've added another three smaller pinch points. But as you can definitely hear some rounding of the corners and smoothing out the edges. Let's hear what it sounded like after another 20 reps. So definitely some progress. Still, some stubborn patches. But this is where I just have to keep going, keep repeating. Let's listen to what it sounded like after another 10 reps. Yeah, that was a good feeling. Getting to the end of that. Still need some polishing if I was actually going to perform it. But most of the hard work was done. To end with, I thought I would just try playing it much faster than normal. And I actually ended up enjoying it far more than gone into much better flow. You can see it in my face. I'm a lot more relaxed with my playing. It was a hard graft, six hours that really worth it. 75. Extras 8.1: "Greensleeves" (chords): Hi and welcome to extras lesson 8. In this session, we'll be learning how to play the famous traditional folk song Greensleeves. And you get three for the price of one. You can downstream or finger pick the courts and also learn the melody line tab. And if you know anyone else that can play guitar who can join in, this is a great song to use as a duet or a trio. Let's check it out. Greensleeves. This is how it should sound too. For the so when I'm counting as normal for, but we're going to count six in-between each chord. Social sound like this. I'm gonna count in 234234563456463456. That's what we're gonna do it. Let's just look at that first line and take it nice and slowly. Way really to three times six. That again in 234234. Last time it's lower. 34 to the second line, now a minor G. And then we play a mile of a three beats and Eve three beats and then finish off with a minor axis. Look at that second line. Tip, three. Click Add 33463. We've got at the third line, C, G, a minor, E minor, three-character 234. Again, 34234. Last time, three. And the last line, C, G, a minor, a3, a3, and then finish off with a minor to tree, 466333332343. Last time. Three. Three. Okay. Let's do the first two lines. Faster, slow. 34. Line 234. Sex, tree, fall. In three. C, G, a minor, E minor. Here we get two last two lines again, 234234. Let's say these together. Lines 1234, nice and slow. 234. Sex sex sex, sex. Sex. 234. Sex, sex, sex. Okay. Last time. 234. Straight to say. 76. Extras 8.2: "Greensleeves" (finger picking): Let's do some finger picking now. So that's the same chords, but we're going to play each core, the pattern index, index. That's what we're going to play. And let's just follow along. The thumb. Obviously looks after the root note. So for a minor, you're going to be plucking the string for G. C. A minor, E minor is the sixth. A minor. G is the sixth string. A minor. A minor C is the fifth string. And everything else is pretty much straightforward. So just to recap, the right-hand, index, middle, and ring finger will always look after the third, second, first string, so they stay the same. But it's the thumb that changes depending on which court you're playing. So for a minor and see the thumb plucks the fifth string. And for G, E minor and E, the thumb plucks the sixth. Okay, Let's do the first two lines show that the finger picking 234. As you can see for the a minor and the E, we're just going to finger pick thumb, index, middle. So the a minor is going to be straight to the E. Let's do the first two lines again. Nice and slow. 234. Sounds a bit out of tune. Let's just have a look. My trusty guitar tuner. Great atlas T U and a guitar, piano. Actually that CEJ registered at. Sweet. Okay. Let's do that and we get it from the top. 23423, full. Let's move on to the last two lines. C G, a minor, E minor, C G minor, E minor, three Bth. Remember ending with a marina. Here we go. 23, ball. Last time, 23. I see the whole thing now. For the top lip to get a little bit slower to three. Straight to say. Okay. 77. Extras 8.3 "Greensleeves" (TAB): Okay, here we go. Gray sleeves tab. And this is how it should say 234. The lovely background of the gardened machines serve out that sunny day. Everyone comes out to do the garden stuff within noisy, noisy machines, but they go. So let's look at the first two bars. So we'll start with the middle finger on threat to third string. Here we go. 34. Let's just look at that first bar. Just to say that it'll be much easier for you if you use the right fingers. The index finger is going to look after all the ones in the first fret, middle finger, ring finger, all the threes, and the little finger all the force will be tempting to use just the index finger that, trust me, it'll be much easier because your hand and fingers hovering, ready to plant on the right note. So it'll be much easier in the long run, even though at the beginning, it's a little bit fiddly. So let's look at that first bar. Take a lesson slowly. 343434. For us time 234. For the second bar, the inner ring finger, all the three, and then notes second string, open string, and then third string and string. That'll thing. Comes all that too. And then back to the north, the second straight. Let's try that too. 3434. Separate those two together now, boss, 12343434. Then 341 on the second string. The middle finger to swear it's landing there. And then just that one. Well, that first string. And then the easy bit at the end on the last bar, the fourth string, second string, string, string nodes. And then little thing around two to 343434. 34 listed all of that line. Now, boss, 12342343434. So next line, 56 are exactly the same as bars 12, so less skewed along to seven. And a little bit fiddly. This, That's Bass 7, one on the second string, index finger, and middle finger on the third string. And back to one, delta one, and then the four that stretch back to one again. So you've got that one for y, which is a bit of a struggle. So you might want to just spend time doing that, discard it, just practicing that stretch. So let's just do a bar 7. Here we go. Three for that too, until just I put that in the end because they're quite easy in the middle thing is just ready and waiting there. So let's just do those two bars over here. Free fall. The fall. 3, 4. Last time. 34. Okay, let's do all of that. Second line. Boss, 5678. Here we go. 2343434. Last time. 34. So all about repetition of an over again, very boring, but this is how we learn, solves. This is how we get it sounding smooth and clean. So let's do the first two lines. License latter 23. Oh, I slide. It will flower now to 33. Last time. Three. Let's move on to that third line. Nine. Here we go. Ring finger. The first string, fret 33434. Last time, 34. Let me go on to that next bar, the next two bars. Pretty straightforward it that exactly the same as bars 34. So let's just do the whole of that. Third line. Here we go. Three full 33. Okay, Very, very center of this last line. Just a few little changes in the last two bars. So let's just do that. Offline. Law school parts of the piece 3. Stretch three. Last time, 34. Okay, so the last two lines here we got three. Should add up to scratch. Three. Last time. 34. Okay, Let's go through the whole thing unless the slow, slow as it can make it. Here we go. Three, I3, most time, 34. So hopefully you're getting more confident and you played it 1000 times. Or you want to get weird little guitarist who can play the chords and it might sound a little bit of light in free fall. Okay? 78. Extras 9.1: "Jingle Bells" (chords): Hi and welcome to extras less than nine. In this session, we'll be learning how to play ten easy songs from Jingle Bells and swing low to Amazing Grace and happy birthday. Here's some classic well-known songs to strum using just the three chords of D, G, and a. Let's check them out. Ten easy cells. Let's start with Jingle Bells. And all of the songs are going to say just using the cause of D, G, and a. So before we start, if you are not mega confident with those three chords and just take some time just to make sure you know them where the back of your hand, as if you could play them when you're half asleep. Whichever combination. Just get anomalies cause really, really well because it will be a massive help for this section. Because as I say, all of the songs are using these courts. So what better time, better time to learn those really, really well. Sel establish intervals if we go 234, the pseudocode. So say, Hey, 0, 0, 1, 2, 3. Go for it. Now that has 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4. To just say, hey, Jay, 10 is 2 is 2. So see last time three, full chain will go. Okay? Please do. So. 79. Extras 9.2: "Happy Birthday" (chords): Happy birthday, Here we go. The deep that's in brackets is just the code that you play. Sorry if you're leading a group of people who are getting together for a celebration, then they give them an idea. What key? It said that obviously this salt is in the key of D. Here we go, 2342. Time to pause. Okay, So if you don't have any friends called data, then just put in the right names. So the pause is really important. So we'll just do that again. Here we go, 2, 3, 4. To have the people box had 234 people in a box. Again, 23 for a two to the last IRB and slow 2342. Pause. 80. Extras 9.3: "The Grand Old Duke of York" (chords): Fidelity to the 4k, 2, 3, 4, 0, the crime down the chair. Tell if your stem cell and when they were they were and then when they, when they were on the way to the j, k, for the term t. Here we have ten x ten to 20 marks than 10 K. And when they were, when they were, now, that happened. 34 J curve into 10 K max them and encourage them. When they were alive, they were when they were a block, lee way. Last time, 234. The Dow curve, a 10, serve them till they came over at the stem. And when they were, they were, When they went down the wrong path, they will die. Now. 81. Extras 9.4: "Oh When The Saints" (chords): Oh, when the saints, same again, we're just going to use that data. Show us the key. Give us a little hint of the note to start with. This one is going to go When the Saints 2, 3, 4, 0, when they go marching. Oh, when the saints go to o, go to 3, 0, 0, 0, the saints go 1, 2, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4. Oh, when the saints go marching. Oh, when the saints go to oh, when the saints go, 2, 3, 4, 0 equals 0. When this same scope. I want to go. 82. Extras 9.5: "Swing Low" (chords): So hello. Hey, we got to three, full swing and sway. Chair. For the chair. For a while I like to see for a carry me 2323, full swing. Swing for a Camry. So sweet. For that. Why did I see for 10? For a cluster, 2, 3, 4, swing, sway? For a catarrhine. Though. Sweet. To save. For a carry. Forward. 83. Extras 9.6: "Amazing Grace" (chords): Amazing Grace for my favorite tea, for singing brain. That say swallows. She has to. Well, has that. 84. Extras 9.7: "Auld Lang Syne" (chords): Okay. So 310, 10. Yeah. By then someone can say take three. Screen. So share. Speak. For 1234 should follow. Okay. 85. Extras 9.8: "Ten Green Bottles" (chords): Green bottles, favorite real alleles, 23, green, green. And the former green, green, green, green and purple. They'll be a green and so on, so on. So 1, 2, 3, 4, ten green, green, green or protocol. Check that Leif thou be dy green. Dye grain. Should definitely for the particle. 86. Extras 9.9: "We Wish You a Merry Christmas": Every Christmas. There we go. 2, 3, 4. We wish you a Merry Christmas sweep. Shear stress. We show a Merry Christmas Day. Good feelings we bring to you and Joe, can we varied, this must be the Latter-day the bracket codes. If you can get to them quickly then great, but just ignore them. Let's go through it now without those 234, we rush. Marry. Sweet wish you the Merry Christmas. Wish you a Merry class. That's the swelling to you when we wish to marry. Be n plus time to treat for the wish you a Merry Christmas, we issue. And R3, This PSC, wish you a Merry Christmas. The building swaying brain to you. And we went shoe Mary Smith, and that. 87. Extras 9.10: "He's Got The Whole World": Oh, well, in this adds to this god is C. Scott is CSCA. Protocol is based 2, 3, 4. He's got to see if God is the last time. 23. Well, he's got is, is God? Is god? Is it God?