LANDSCAPE OIL PAINTING: 'DEEPQUIET STILLNESS' | Sarah Mckendry | Skillshare

LANDSCAPE OIL PAINTING: 'DEEPQUIET STILLNESS'

Sarah Mckendry, Canadian Realist Painter

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17 Lessons (2h 27m)
    • 1. 'DEEPQUIET STILLNESS' INTRODUCTION

      2:42
    • 2. MATERIAL LIST

      2:54
    • 3. LAYING OUT YOUR PALETTE

      1:31
    • 4. BRUSHWORK PRACTICE PART 1

      4:32
    • 5. BRUSHWORK PRACTICE PART 2

      2:31
    • 6. BRUSHWORK PRACTICE PART 3

      2:42
    • 7. BRUSHWORK PRACTICE PART 4

      5:50
    • 8. BRUSHWORK PRACTICE PART 5

      4:46
    • 9. UNDERSTANDING COMPOSITION

      4:55
    • 10. LAYING OUT YOUR BACKGROUND

      4:37
    • 11. CREATING DEPTH WITH MIST

      15:42
    • 12. CREATING DEPTH WITH MIST

      16:30
    • 13. LAYERING MISTY TREES PART 1

      16:36
    • 14. LAYERING MISTY TREES PART 2

      14:18
    • 15. CREATING THE FOREGROUND

      11:21
    • 16. FINAL DETAIL WORK PART 1

      17:40
    • 17. FINAL DETAIL WORK PART 2

      17:40
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About This Class

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This exciting tutorial is called 'Deepquiet Stillness', and we will be painting to life one of my favourite original landscapes from a recent collection that I released.  This soulscape is jam packed full of depth, mist and serenity, and I will guide you through every single step that I take to achieve the final outcome.  I highly recommend that you take a meander through my first tutorial ‘Getting Started With Oil Paints’  before beginning this class.  I explained what products and materials I will be using in all of these tutorials, and why they are my absolute favourite things to create art with.  I also go over some basic tips and tricks that are super handy for those who are just starting out!

I am a completely self taught professional artist, so I know first hand how daunting it can be do begin exploring a new medium on your own.  That’s exactly why I have decided to pour my heart and soul into each of these videos for you, so that the fear and apprehension that you may be feeling about diving into oil painting, can be replaced with excitement, joy and a sense of adventure instead.  I will guide you through entire realistic landscapes from start to finish, sparing no details or explanations as we move along.  I am making it my mission to share every ounce of wisdom and all of the skills that I have learned on my journey this far, so that your very own creative landscape can flourish and grow that much easier. That’s what it’s all about anyways, creating a nurturing community in a world that’s filled with far too much competition.

Any editing flaws within these videos are completely complimentary and have been overlooked with love by a mom that was burning the midnight oil… so please just smile if you happen upon any!

Material List for Deepquiet Stillness:

Paints:

Titanium White *

Indigo *

Prussian Blue 

Payne's Grey*

Charcoal Grey*

Olive Green*

Prussian Green*

Sap Green

Vandyke Brown *

Raw Umber

*These colours are really essential to the tutorial, while the ones that do not have a star beside them are less essential but great to have on hand.

Gamsol or your favourite Mineral Spirits

Liquin Light Gel Medium (or walnut oil if you do not want a quicker dry time)

Paintbrushes:

Proart Large Handle Brushes (find whatever you can, but try to have at least one of these):

3" x 1

2" x 2 or more

1" x 2

A selection of various sizes of white taklon (or your preference) brushes in both filbert and flat varieties.

Canvas:

20" x 24" Stretched Canvas

or

36"x 40" Stretched Canvas (or whatever dimensions you can find within this general range)

A few canvases of any size to practice on

A Painting Palette

1 or 2 Palette Knives

Shop Towels (a stronger type of paper towel that do not have any lint) or Clean Rags

Transcripts

1. 'DEEPQUIET STILLNESS' INTRODUCTION: - way . Hey, everyone might even say McKendry. I'm a Canadian realist painter. This is my second tutorial video that I posted here on skill share, and I'm really excited to actually dive into the paint with you today. For those of you just joining in my very first video that I posted was a really in depth walk through my studio that it featured on my favorite products from brushes and paints and solvents mediums. You name it right down to the basics of how to clean your brushes, also the kind of campuses that prefer to use. So as we're working through this tutorial, if you're unsure of anything I'm talking about or any of the products I'm using just to go back to the very 1st 1 and take a look through that you find an answer to almost all your questions. But as always, drop me a line, if not, and I'll be happy to help you, so make sure you take the time to honor yourself through this process. If you're a seasoned painter and you have all the skills that you need to keep right on up with me and go through this video from start to finish a one go. That's fantastic. Chances are you're not. Chances are this is a really overwhelming process, and this might take a while to get through. So just honor yourself, sit down, watch a couple of videos and get to a point where you realize, Hot Man. I think I need to work on that a little bit before I move forward and stop focus on that, work on it, let it dry and then take the next step for it. Because if you rush through this process, you might feel really disheartened at the end. And you haven't achieved the look that say I have created. It has taken me 11 years. We will sit down and paint the way I do. I have done my time. Trust me. And I took the time to slow down and really trust myself. And my instinct does was moving through a piece. There's no rush. You can go back and revisit these steps over and over and over and over again until you hone in on your own brush techniques to move forward. In a piece with confidence and happiness in your heart and an excitement to learn more 2. MATERIAL LIST: So let's take a second to go over the colors that we're gonna be using in this tutorial. From left to right, we have indigo Paynes, grey, charcoal gray, van dyke, brown, raw number, all of green, Prussian green sap green and your titanium white. You do not need all these colors to follow along with this tutorial. If you have a blue a gray, a brown on a green, you'll get by just fine. Oh, and of course, your titanium white. That is a necessity. So if you can't find into go blue in your local art star, that's completely OK. Pick up a tuba blue in a tube of red in an affordable oil paint. You then makes two parts blue toe, one part red, so it's 2/3 blue. 1/3 red makes that up really well with your palette knife, and you have yourself some indigo blue to work with. So I suggested to different campus sizes. For this tutorial, there's a smaller one and a larger one. You can choose whatever one you feel most comfortable with. The smaller one, I say around 20 inches by 24 inches in the larger 1 36 inches by four inches. I don't need his exact dimensions. If you couldn't find them, just find something that's close. I recommend having GAM Saul on hand or your favorite mineral spirit, as well as liquid like Joe, which is a medium that speeds up the drying tire of oil painting. If you can't find that, by all means just used walnut oil or linseed or whatever you have on hand. In my first tutorial, I went into an in depth discussion on which paintbrushes I prefer and use constantly. For this tutorial, you're gonna need one or 22 inch pro ward large handle brushes or another brand that's similar and a selection of various sizes of white tackling or your preference brushes in both filbert and flat varieties. If you have a few extra campuses own hand, that would be fantastic. I created five little videos within this class but show you different brushwork techniques that you should really practice As you move forward with the story. You need a painting palette of any shape or size, whatever you're comfortable with, or you have laying around Ah, palette knife, some shop towels or rags or paper tiles, whatever you have and an open mind, a happy heart and the ability to let loose. Perhaps upon 3. LAYING OUT YOUR PALETTE: So let's talk about how we're gonna lay out your palate. You want to find a flow within your palate that works for you. I like to lay my colors all along the top. So lays me a lot of space to work with the colors as I mixed them before I put them on the campus. I have my medium, which is my liquid like jail down on the corner. And I have my titanium white here completely separate, so I could just pull from that up into whatever colors I'm bringing together. So let's take a second to go over the colors that we're gonna be using in this tutorial. From left to right, we have indigo Paynes, grey, charcoal gray, van dyke, brown, raw number, all of green, Prussian green sap green and your titanium white. You do not need all these colors to follow along with this tutorial. If you have a blue a gray, a brown on a green, you'll get by just fine. Oh, and of course, your titanium white. That is a necessity. So if you can't find indigo blue in your local art star, that's completely OK. Pick up a tuba Blue in a tube of red in an affordable oil paint. You then makes two parts blue toe, one part red, so it's 2/3 blue. 1/3 red makes that up really well with your palette knife, and you have yourself something to go blue to work with. Also trying in the habit of laying your palate out the same way every time you sit down to paint, no matter what it is you're working on that one, you just becomes muscle memory, and it's a lot less thinking of what your right hand is doing and separating it from the process of what your mind wants to translate onto campus. 4. BRUSHWORK PRACTICE PART 1: one of the greatest tips that I could give you in creating a realistic landscape is approaching. Is it? It is still alive and moving. Don't paint a cloud with just the idea of a brushstroke going up and down or left and right . Imagine that the wind is rushing across your campus, take your brush and every movement should mimic that what that wind is doing or how the rain is falling or how the mist is settling. What I do is I use my brush in a lot of different ways to achieve that feeling of energy and flow and movement. So we're gonna grab a two inch brush and just take your blank canvas here. For a long time, I was worried about damaging my campus. But these guys can take a lot of pressure before they even show hints of damage. The tendency when anyone starts painting is to think that you have to be really delicate and soft with your brush that it's just gonna gently brush against the surface, and that's gonna achieve all the stuff you want achieve Well, it doesn't really work if you want to create the kind of miss that I create. If you can see here my brushes just gently resting on the campus, see how the angle it's just normal. This is the amount of pressure that I put on that canvas. Whenever I'm really working in color around where I really wanted to blend realistically and create a feeling of movement or depth or heaviness with the fog, we'll be using all sorts of brush techniques from really soft and gentle to pretty rough and tough. I just want you to know the different pressures that you can use because those are essential in creating these realistic looks. So again, here's no pressure. If I say put a lot of pressure on your brush, I want you to really push it in and really push that paint along the campus. It's really gonna help you create the realistic looks that we're going for. All right, I'm gonna show you a little close up of some of the brush techniques that will be using today on your blank canvas. Won't you take your two inch brush? I want you to get a little bit of liquid like Joe, and I want you to put a line of your titanium white right about here on your blank canvas and then want you to pick any color that's on your palate. That's a lot darker. So let's do some greens just for fun. So, you know, grab some looking like Joe. Grab some of your greens that are on your palate like you to put a line right here. Gonna show you just how I blend this green into this white and this white up into this green. So with my brush, I'm going to press down pretty hard on my brush, and I'm just going to start pulling us green down towards the white just like that. I'm pushing down the brush and I'm doing a circular motion keeping the same pressure as I pulled a green down towards our white line. All right, so on the side of my brush, you'll see that I have a lot of that green paint because I was really pushing into it. Now what I'm gonna do is I'm gonna flip over my brush, causes white paint on there, and I'm gonna start just above my white paint line and start pushing down and blending forward. I have the same pressure on my brush. I'm pushing down in a circular motion, keeping that same pressure the entire time. And when I go to move up a little bit to keep pushing that white paint towards the green paint, I'm going to keep the same pressure on my brush. It's not really gentle. It's a good firm pressure. So here we go on, moving up, keeping the same pressure. And now more white is reading that green. I'm gonna move up one more time keeping that same pressure. We just blended two lines together and created a really beautiful flow in between them. All we did was keep a really nice pressure on her brush, and we kept pushing the pain for with her brush while maintaining the same pressure just like this. It's a really simple way to blend paint. You just have to get used to that feeling of pressure between your brush on the canvas, as well as making sure you're pushing the paint where you wanted to go 5. BRUSHWORK PRACTICE PART 2: What you need is a brush of any size that you like. This is just one of my old tackle on 3/4 inch brushes. I'm gonna pick up some green and a little bit of my grey. Just perfect. So I'm just gonna put a tree in the middle of this little sample we're working on. What I do is I have that same kind of pressure on my brush. I started a little bit of a circular motion cause I'm just blocking in the street. It isn't detail work. We're just building a background here. So I have the same amount of pressure on my brush, and I start slowly pushing that brush up while narrowing my stroke so it kind of creates a triangle. Okay, So simple is that now let's put this brush down for a second. Let's pick our blending brush back up. So you really need to practice blending. You also need to practice how much you blend. Based on where this tree will be in our landscape. Right now, we're gonna pretend this tree is way at the back. We had the back means is really light compared to the ones in the foreground. So what I'm going to do is have my brush here, my blending brush this the side. I was pushing more of the white paint this way with trying to keep that side down. And I'm just going to start working my brush along the edge of that tree, see how much it instantly softened it. I'm then going to turn my brush. Now this is with my other hand. But I'm also going to do it on this side. Same amount of pressure. Walk it up that tree. Look how beautiful that blended the edges. Instantly, that tree became really soft. The more white you bring over top of that, the further in the distance it becomes. So if I really wanted to push that way into the back, get a little bit of weight on my brush, you push a bit more white overtop and instantly that tree falls even further into the back . And then you just touch up your background by putting that same amount of pressure on the brush, working around in circles on either side. And now you blocked in a tree that's pretty far back in the background. 6. BRUSHWORK PRACTICE PART 3: So what I've done here is I've taken charcoal gray and pains create, mix it around the campus at a little bit of white, blended it in, and then I actually wiped it off with a rag. I don't want a lot of paint on the canvas. I just want to be able to show you the techniques for creating Missed. Without there being extra paint to mix in with this white right away will be a little bit coming up, but this is gonna allow you to see it a lot better. So what I've done is I've taken a little bit of titanium white on my two inch brush. And what we're gonna do is we're just gonna drag that paint across the campus. You don't need a ton of it, but I'm just gonna show you how to properly blend the mist. So laying your brush flat and putting a pretty ample amount of pressure down to see how those bristles are bending into the campus and the Caymus has some give to it. That's what you want. Do not change your pressure. It's really fun learning this pressure and seeing how you can pull and push that paint around the campus. This is a really important technique. To know how to do when we're creating are missed. I'm gonna ease up on the pressure I'm putting down and the more ease up Nicer. The blend is on the edges. So I just created a beautiful little wall of mist. All I did was draw my white paint across the canvas. I then placed my brush down and I put pressure. I worked my brush in a circular motion in any way you want left or right or right to left. It really doesn't matter. And then after I established that line, I started working slowly up and releasing the pressure on my brush with each layer that I did by the time you get to the blend line that you're trying to create. So if you want your Mr End here, you should have barely any pressure on that brush. I'll show you again and I'll pull it down this time. So there's my missed. I have my brush really pressed into that campus. I have the same amount of pressure. I'm gonna pull my line right across same amount of pressure and then what? I'm gonna do is I'm gonna gently keep working that line. Barely. Any pressure on this? I'm just gonna blended into the background so that it's seamless and beautiful. 7. BRUSHWORK PRACTICE PART 4: no. All right, so we've gone over a lot of the basic brushwork that we're gonna be using in this tutorial . One last thing I want to show you, just in case the campus is too far away and you don't quite see what's happening cause I'm gonna show you how I do the trees in the final stages of our painting. Now, we don't do these trees to the very end because they're the very forefront of our painting . So what I have is I have my Payne's gray have my browns a little bit of charcoal gray on my paintbrush. You could use any one of your paintbrush. Just make sure it has a nice little crisp, clean edge so that we can do some branch work. So I'm going to pretend that this is my ground line. This is the water's edge, per se. It's all misty and beautiful when a lot about creating misty paintings are beautiful dead trees. They're just standing still and stoic and hauntingly beautiful in a landscape. So what I'm gonna do is I'm gonna show you how I create really realistic tree. So, as you see, I just pulled my paint from the top of the campus where I want the tip of my tree down to the bottom where it meets the ground. Let's pretend the light sources right up here. Just like in our painting. The light here means that it's going to hit the tree on this left side. That means the right side will remain dark Indian shadow. So what I'm gonna do is I'm gonna make some of the browns and the grays I used with a little bit of white. I don't want pure white, essentially. Just want a lighter version of this color, and I'm then gonna walk this paintbrush down the left side of this tree to show where the light is hitting trunk. Now it takes a bit of patients in the study and your treatment grow, and that's okay. Just other but more white. Just pull it right down there. So now I want to get my browns back on my brush with my Grace, and I want to re establish what I over painted. So I put too much on that, and I just want to bring the shadows back on this side of the tree. Super simple, just creating a little less divide between the shadow and the like Explosions. It comes down a little farther, right. So now we're gonna put some branches. I'll show you how I do my branches. So I get that same dark color that I've been using. In this case, it's browns and grays. I take the engine my brush in any way that I would like anyway that you like. I pull it some that trunk of the tree out. What I love about these old dead trees is that the branches air just so random and easy and really make a statement in themselves. You do not need to do much less is more with these trees, I find whenever I'm painting them in the landscape My mind I'm just finding a place where I think a branch ago, I'm gently pulling that paint away from the tree and then lifting my brush on the canvas As I get further away, I'm lifting my brush off the campus as I get to a certain point. Sometimes it's just a little not there. I like to pretend this tree just broke, so I'm gonna have a nice little shirt edge up there Yeah, you just build this tree up. However you like. This is exactly what I'm gonna be doing in my tutorial. Just give me a little far away, so might be tricky for you to see. So I want to have a little bit more shadow down the bottom, so I'm just gonna really add a little bit of darker. There we go. That's pretty awesome. Bring that highlight down a little bit more. So that's how you do these trees. It's super simple. Know what's really cool is you can really blend these into the background as well, just like we did with those pine trees earlier. So I'm gonna show you. I'm gonna take my pain fresh. It has the white on it still. And I'm gonna just go right over top of this bad and just build up other side of it. See how instantly the mist has fallen over top of that? Now it's kind of tricky gives his wet paint, but it's fun to play with. You could actually do that to the whole tree and then just go down either side kind of blend the browns that seemed to spread off of the tree Whenever we went over with the paintbrush, he could just kind of softly blend those into the background. And then all of a sudden, your tree is not in your face anymore. Instead fading right into that background, we had a little bit more white here. I'm gonna pull this mist right through the street. So there's a hint of the bottom and a hint of the top. There's so many fun things you can do with these techniques that I'm teaching you So again , for that missed. I have my brush down. I have a pretty good pressure. I'm pushing the paint and pulling it back along the campus and really creating a seamless cloud of mist. 8. BRUSHWORK PRACTICE PART 5: So I start in the middle and I dragged my paintbrush up towards the top just like that. That gives me my tree trunk. It gives me a little bit of a base, and I work from there. So for more detailed trees, what I do is to take the edge of my brush. Start the trunk. Ecologist pulled some branches out, always from the trunk out. This is how I block in my trees, in the middle layers of my paintings. There's not a ton of detail, so there's enough so that you know it's a tree. You know, those branches there gonna add a little bit more dark in here and you give it its general shape. We soften these up with each layer of the painting we're about to do, but it's really fun just to practice playing with these trees, finding shapes of trees you like, how you like your branches to stick out, what have you. So now if we're actually working this into a painting and I want it to be further in their background right now, it looks like it's sitting right in the foreground. So if we want to push this further back into our peace, I'm gonna show you what we do. So this is a a bit of a dirty brush, but that's OK, so I'm going to take my brush on its edge. Not very hard, very gentle. Before we're doing backgrounds, we had a lot of pressure. Right now we're doing missed and we're trying to blend. So we're gonna do a really gentle application campus to see how I'm just working it in here . Scolding. Start gently working it towards those branches of this tree. Have those branch to starting to fade back in the painting. You see how cool that is. So what was once really stark and in your face is now fading into the background, becoming much more soft all by just putting my brush flat, gently, really gently running it over top of the edges of this tree. Isn't that pretty neat? This is what bills really great depth within your painting. I'll do it to the side to gently reaching the edge. Boy. Paint around ever so gently have this brush on the canvas. But I'm doing circular motions. You could go right over the whole tree once you get a little bit funded. I barely have any pressure on that brush. Now look how soft and beautiful that tree has become. That's a perfect tree to put in the background of your painting. Now, the further back this tree is, the lighter it becomes. So I'm gonna add a little bit of white and I'm gonna push this even further back, show you what I do. It's always start beside the tree just so I can mix that paint around property on my brush . And then again, let's push it back so gently bringing this white paint that I'm working with and gently going over top of the whole tree. I'm going back picking up a little bit more that I rubbed in gently over top of the whole truth. So I'm gonna do the other side as well pick up a bit more of that. Transfer a bit more of that weight over here and I have no pressure on my brush. I have the whole flat side down like this, not too much pressure. And I'm gently gonna start working that weight across the poultry from the outside in. See how I was doing a circular motion. Now that tree is actually in the background. With these super gentle brushstrokes, you're gonna be able to create all sorts of depth in your painting, and you're gonna create a really believable, realistic missed. 9. UNDERSTANDING COMPOSITION: Okay, Once you learn the technique to laying out the proper composition of a painting where it's really pleasing for the eye of the viewer, you're not gonna be so terrified when you sit in front of a blank campus because then you have a game plan. You have an idea of where to begin. It's not just this vast amount of nothingness in front of you. You'll be able to figure out where you want your horizon, a sit where you want to your focal point, how you're gonna create that depth of field in really easy steps. I can teach you how to properly layout the composition of a painting so that every time you sit down in front of blank canvas, you feel an exciting adventure coming on, as opposed to the fear of the unknown. It's really essential and just approach it with fun. Don't get all caught up in your head. Just realize you're on a learning curve. It's gonna take a while to figure this stuff out, but you gotta practice, and if you don't practice, you're not gonna grow. Let's take a second before put paid to canvas and go over how I lay out my composition. As you get more comfortable with this process, you won't need to lay it out with a ruler or a pencil. You'll be able to figure it out with your brush just by your eyes. But that takes time, so don't worry, it will come right now. Let's focus on those basic so that you get a good starting ground for this painting. So now I would like you to take your blank canvas, measure the top and bottom, divide it into thirds and then connect your lines. Then do the same for the left side and the right side. Connect those lines as well. This is what your grid should look like. So in almost all of my landscape paintings, you will find my horizon line sitting right about here on that bottom horizontal line that you've drawn on your campus. Laying it out in this area allows for a lot of play and movement. Within the rest of the painting, you still have a larger chunk of sky you can play with to draw the eye into the focal point , and you can really play with things from here so you can see the focal point for this piece falls on that right hand vertical line. It's really important that you don't put something right front and center. It really just stunts the eye from explore the rest of the piece you want offset it, and a great way to do that is to either follow this right vertical line or left vertical line. If you put your focal point on one of those lines thereabouts, you're really gonna allow the item. Wander through the rest of canvas. It's a really important aspect to remember, so let's talk about death the field for a second. This is the distance you create with your work that pulls the viewers eyes back into the scenery. You'll notice that I have some really tall trees on the left and right side of the cameras . These air pretty awesome because what they do is they set the tone. From there, you'll see, they drop very quickly down into that clearing behind our focal point. This is a really key element to this piece, because what it's doing is it's drawing the eye down into that clearing behind our focal point. And then from that focal point, you'll see that I have later trees all the way back into the distance to that clearing. This is called the depth of field. This is where you're standing, where you are looking at this painting and you're able to feel a Ziff. You could walk for a mile out into that missed. These are all points that you have to really consider. When you're laying out your peace, be the mountains or clouds or trees. If you find some way to draw the viewer's eye towards your focal point, you're really going to create a pleasing piece toe. Look at now these air the extreme basics of composition, But it's enough to give you a start. It's enough to help you figure out how to create balance and flow within your painting. So we have our horizon that we talked about. You have a focal point, and we see how we're creating depth of field with those trees coming down into the clearing and then fading off into the distance as you gain more confidence, whose process you're gonna able to skip this step all together. But just so everyone's comfortable. As we move forward, I'm gonna great on my painting And what I'm gonna do is I lay out my composition in the same way we just discussed to those photos I showed you. So I prefer to work and really thin layers of oil paint as I'm working through a landscape . Because of this, I make sure that the lines that I put on my campus can either be erased really easily with an eraser. Or they could be painted over and not be seen as I build my layers up. My lines are super dark and heavy here for the sake of the video. I've actually just used oil paint to do mine, and I need to blend them into my landscape as I go as we work this painting don't panic if you lose sight of your grid lines. They're easy to reestablish, and we could even do them with oil paint over top of the layer you're working on so that they don't hinder the painting anyway. They'll still give me the reference points you needs, but you could blend them back in a ziff. They weren't even there 10. LAYING OUT YOUR BACKGROUND: Okay, so let's begin blocking inner painting. Here is the water's edge. It lies directly across this bottom thirds line. We're gonna build everything off of this line. Our focal point are gonna be these trees coming out of the water, but they're gonna be painted at the very end because they're the closest to the front. What we want to focus on is the background and building up that depth of field. You're gonna be able to find the reference photos that I've loaded, then projects and resource is which is directly below this video. Click on that and you'll see the files on the right hand side under resources. So the reason that there's a great on one of the reference photos and so that it's easier for you to follow how to block out your Caymus properly, how to lay out the composition. You be able to see what areas are supposed to be in what section of the grid. So as you see me block up the background for this painting, I'm gonna be following these general lines. First you'll see the background trees. I followed this line with my paintbrush. I see where the trees sit in each of the squares and then I copy that line with my paintbrush just to give them an outline in this quickly line. Right here is where I will be putting the water's edge because there's a ton of missed in this painting. The water reflections a little tricky to figure out here. But what I've done is I've mimicked what is happening in the middle section, and I've just drawn it down below in the mirror image. So as you can see, it's the opposite of what we did up top. So this is the whole purpose for laying of the grant. It allows you to see what parts of the paintings sit in which section of the grid and allows you to create the right balance because you're following what's already been set up and his tried tested and true. This is a really easy way to figure out scale and to really start understanding the composition of the peace. So whenever you Ruffin, forget the detail work, this is just to build up the general idea of the campus. These air rough brush strokes and they're not even going to be there when you get to the front layer, so don't worry about them. They're just to train your eye to realize where you want to build up the shadows and light and how you want a job I towards the focal point. So this bottom line is gonna be my building point. It's also going to be the most saturated color. So what? I'm gonna do this? You dip my brush in a little bit of my medium My liquid light I mean, a pull my van dyke brown some pressure green or all green whatever you like, some into go and a little bit of pressure blue and what I'm gonna do. See, I have a fair chunk of paint on my brush. This it's kind of substantial, and this is great because it's gonna be for blending up in a minute, as you'll see so dragging along my horizon. I just love you know, that's what I'm gonna start building all my trees and I moved from So I'm still leave that , as is now gonna block in my background trees really lightly with a brush. Now you can just do a real light brushstroke with what's already on your brush or you could add some or little Joe and a lot more white just to soften it up with and from the center of your print, as you see is related. So here's pretty much my fault tree, and then it slowly goes up and she's all way too tall. Trees. So what? I am doing any more basic of shapes just to see how I go. All right, on this side and go to this one Treetops. Here I have my use trio. So now we're gonna lay up the reflection of the water. Super rough. Nothing that's gonna stick around very long. It just gives you an idea what you need to focus on with these base layers as we start blending them all together. So you're only doing with 1/3 the campus for the water. So you don't need to cram this entire treaty into that 1/3 you're only doing this square, so just lay it out. She's so this is a reflection of this super simple insane. Down here, I have been a white space here. I'll have a white space here, after all, you need to do super simple and basic 11. CREATING DEPTH WITH MIST: take a look at a reference photo. All of our dark colors air found right along the water line. From here, we soften the colors and their layers as we go up. So what we're gonna do is I like you to grab on your brush. I'm gonna put a little bit of liquid night gel. I'm gonna put a lot of van dyke brown. They grabbed my indigo grab suppression green or whatever you have that's similar. And I'm gonna grab some charcoal grey or pains. Great. Whatever you have. So I have a substantial amount on my brush. I'm going to start pushing it in just on the top line of that water's edge that we chose gonna start blocking it all in by really pushing my brush into that canvas and moving the color down fat water's edge. So have a lot of greens and browns in this little section hearing and add a little bit more event like brown along the base because there's a lot of undergrowth and brush. Okay, now I want to add a little bit more blue to my brush, so I'm gonna grab my indigo, and I'm gonna mix that all the way across here and pull it up from my line again. Do you see how hard I'm pushing with my brush? I'm pushing nice and hard, and I'm really just blending it across the campus. It's picking up every color that I have put on my brush and just dragging along that are what colors you choose to do this with. You just need your darkest values of those colors, so make sure you choose a blue and a brown and green and just mix them together and pull them along like this and then filled it up from the water's edge. If you get paint down below, it's no problem. We're gonna be building up our reflections next, so I need a bit more paint. I've run out, so I'm gonna grab a little bit more of my liquid. Like Jell just makes the paint spread a lot easier. Van Dyke Brown into Go Blue and a little bit oppression Green as well. Just mix it together on my palette real quick. Come back over to my water line, put a bit on the base here, that's where it's darkest, and then I'm gonna pull it up towards the top of the trees, and it's gonna keep that like that. I'm pushing really hard with my brush. I'm not hurting the Caymus nor my hurting my brush. I'm just really blending those colors together. And it's a really thin layer of paint. Take some time here. Just play with this layer. I really want you to get a feel for how hard you're gonna be pushing that brushing of the campus. I'm really pushing my brush into that campus to really pull this pain and push it around the campus. I don't want thick layers, and this really allows a paint to spread, and it gives it a really soft feel. This is a perfect way to build up your base layers. Just play here for a minute. Come back over to this side, bring a bit more in that paint up just a little higher. Just practice. Hold on that paint around the campus. You do not need a lot of pain. It is a super thin layer, and I'm pushing really hard with that brush to do this. Now I'm noticing. I have a lot of green on my brush here, and I kind of want to cool it down a bit with some blues. So what I'm gonna do is I'm gonna put a little bit of liquid like jail on my brush, a tiny amount and they grab my integral blue. And since I already have that residual green on this brush, I'm just gonna add a little bit of white. I'm just going to start building up towards that tall tree. Make sure you pull both sides your brush, get all that paint off rooms, start working those colors up. Got a bit more into go blue because of the techniques for using you do not need to add liquid my jail every single time you pull paint off your palace. So I haven't added any. That is nice and blue, which is what I want. I'm pulling that green up into the blue. You just keep going back and forth up and down with the same pressure on your brush and you're really gonna notice that all of a sudden it's a really nice blend. Bring it right up above that other thirds line where those treetops are. Just keep working it like that again. We are just really roughing this in it is not gonna look like this at all. When we're done, I add a little bit of my grey, so I prefer charcoal gray. If you have pains grain, that will work well, you can add it right around here. I just want to build this up with more, some doing large circles with that same pressure, mixing the full layer together. I'm going to come up wherever I see a tree in my reference photo. So there's one right here on this line. If you look at your reference photo, it's gonna come up a little bit, kind of block it in my fat and then come back down. There's a little one here, pop a little bit, then come back down. There's a couple of the background here. You do that all the way along, just following where I see a little bit of a hint of a treetop along my grid. So this one goes all the way up just past this line and then back down, pushing really hard on my brush. I'm just carrying the same colors I've had this whole time and using the remaining paint on my brush. It just keeps the layer nice and thin and really allows for soft. Look, we're not after detail work right now. Right now. We're just want to block in our trees. You're gonna see how cool it is to build the layers once we start adding some weight to that background and bringing that forward right now, blocking and trees. Now, this tree over here in the reference photo, this big one, you'll see there's a lot more blue in it. So Payne's gray is really nice to add a little charcoal, a little bit of indigo and mix in a bit of your green, but not too much. That's good and a little bit of your liquid light jail make it, and it's darker than all the other trees song. Just adding a little bit more paint up here. It's gonna change whenever I start working in the rest of my layers. It's just blocking in that tree again. I'm pushing really hard on my brush until there's no white space left in this whole area. It's all blocked in with a nice soft color of some sort. Whatever has come off your brushes gonna work just great. So what? I'm also going to do so. I'm also gonna block in an extra layer trees now really softly. So if you can tell me a reference photo, there's a couple trees that are just a little bit of distance, Citrus hints of trees and those air really important to creating the depth of field. So I see one here. There's a couple back in here really soft treetops and all the way up through here. You'll see some treetops poking through. So what I'm gonna do with that a little little into go a little gray, a little bit of my liquid like job. And I'm a little white to that, and I just start working that it's gonna look dark. Don't worry what you want this cooler color. See how it's a lot more green in here in this blue really contrast. But we're gonna be pushing that to the back. Don't worry. This is just to set those tree shapes so that we can work off those as we build up. The other layers have some trees here, few trees there. Now it's starting a little too dark, so I got a little bit of white, a little bit more liquid like Joe. Just add a few trees in here. There's going blue. I'm pushing really hard, really pulling these layers across the campus. If you start to feel as if you're fresh, is running out of paint, considered dipping it into your palate, you can also just go back and rub it in an area that might have a little bit more paint and just use that. So I have a decent sized tree coming up right around here, so I'm just gonna block it in like that. There you go. We have blocked in the basic shapes of our foreground and our background. I like to use the same brush. When I do all my blocking in until I get to the rial light stuff, I'll switch my brush or wash the one I'm working with. Whatever they like about this painting is how simple the reflection is. There's not a lot of intricate detail work. It's essentially just translating the same colors down into the water. So what we're gonna do is we're gonna go back to our palate. We're gonna grab the same colors that you did to pull this line across and build up towards the trees. We're going to get our colors and we're gonna pull them down towards the bottom with water line. So grab some nickel night gel. A little bit of your van dyke brown a lot of your green, a little bit of your blue. Mix it in until makes it until you find something very similar to the top. So if you look at your reference photo, you'll see that there's missed along the water line. This is where your eyes immediately drawn to, because your focal point is right here. So what I like to do is when I do my reflection work, I leave a bit of white space here just for my own eyes. I just like reminding myself that Oh, yeah, there's gonna be a really beautiful reflection there, and it allows me to really gauge my shadows and lights and mid tones based off of that. So don't bring your pain right up to the water's edge. Leave a gap. Allow your mind to remember. So don't bring your paint right up to the water's edge. It's nice to leave. A gap just makes it easier to work in the whites into just makes it easier to work in love . The light values to your forefront just makes it easier to work in your lighter values in the foreground whenever we get there. So what I do is I leave. I'd say about a good inch, and I just start building my reflection from there. Okay. See, it's the exact same color that I have on my waterline pulled up towards the trees. I'm putting that same color down here, and I'm gonna pull it down towards the bottom of the painting. Now, the water I like to make just a little bit darker, a little bit more murkier. So I had a little bit more gray to this. Whenever I'm building my water reflection just okay, it's a really, really feel to it. So I'm gonna add some charcoal gray to mine and a little bit more liquid to pull it down. May I can start pulling my water down towards the bottom again. Your colors don't have to be perfect at this stage. We're just blocking it in. We can add anything we want to this after we get a block, I just want to add some more. It's getting a little too green for me. I just want to add some more indigo blue in a little bit of pains. Green charcoal. Great to this more liquid. So even though I'm adding more gray and blue to the water, there's still a lot of the green from my brush from my trees. So it creates a really nice balance between the two. It's not too contrasted. There's still a flow between both top and the reflections, so I'm just gonna work this down right down towards the bottom. This is a really simple reflection and that we don't have to get these treetops inner reflection there cut off. So essentially, we just have to fill the space with these colors from here to here. I'm still using that same pressure than I did up here with water. I just like to go back and forth as well to create that softness. It's not essential step right now, so I'm still pushing really hard of my brush. I'm also just pulling it back and forth just to spread it. Do whatever you have to do to get this nice blocked in sections. So again, I'm using a little bit more in to go a little bit more gray down here. The green is still transferring in to make it really look like a singular painting. And this is just rough, so you don't have to d exact with fist. So now you know the other side. I'm gonna do the same thing. I'm gonna give myself the same amount of space even a little bit more of just leaving this blankets. What could be easier for us to polar are grays and are whites through here to really create a dramatic foreground. So let's just leave that empty and don't paint it just yet. You'll see what I mean and how much easier it is to pull our pain through their if we don't have a dark color to contend with underneath of it. Now, with your reflection, we can add and take away at any time. So don't stress if you over blood. If you block in beyond your lines. Totally Okay. You're going to see how much transformation you can do with just a little bit of white on your brush and that same brush technique. I'm pushing really hard on my brush. I just really want really soft Tyne base layer that blocks in those trees that are up above a little bit here, they haven't we blocked in our trees. Super basic, very rough and all with one paintbrush we're gonna start working is lighter colors up in the sky and down in the reflection. If you have two of these two inch brushes, go ahead and grab your clean one. If this is the only one you have, go ahead and wash it with your mineral spirits, but really tapped that dry. Really? Work it into your child and try and get as much of that mineral spirit office you can. The reason I say this is because excess mineral spirit on your brush and really thins out your paint, which can work for a blending. But it might thin it out too much if you have too much of your spirit on your brush. So if you're washing, your brushes, really take the time to find White. Have really Bob Ross that I know. He just slapped that brush around. What I do is I just take my towel. After I washed it and dried it off many, many times. I just I just hit like this on the towel and it pulls out any of the extra spirits that might be resting along the bottom of the bristles on guy. Just do that over over again, that I rub it into my towel again that I do that again a little bit of spirits. Okay, It's just gonna thin your paint. And it's not gonna achieve the same effect that I'm going to show you here with a dry brush . 12. CREATING DEPTH WITH MIST: take a look at a reference photo. All of our dark colors air found right along the water line. From here, we soften the colors in their layers as we go up. So what we're gonna do is I like you to grab on your brush. I'm gonna put a little bit of liquid might gel. I'm gonna put a lot of van dyke brown. They grabbed my indigo grab some Prussian green or whatever you have that's similar. And I'm going to grab some charcoal, grey or pains. Great whatever you have. So I have a substantial amount on my brush. I'm going to start pushing it in just on the top line of that water's edge that we chose to start blocking it all in by really pushing my brush into that canvas and moving the color down fat water's edge. Now I want to make sure I have a lot of different variation in colors that go along that water's edge. So have a lot of greens and browns in this little section hearing and add a little bit more event like brown along the base because there's a lot of undergrowth and brush. Okay, now I want to add a little bit more blue to my brush. So I'm gonna grab my indigo, and I'm gonna mix that all the way across here and pull it up from my line again. Do you see how hard I'm pushing with my brush? I'm pushing nice and hard, and I'm really just blending it across the campus. It's picking up every color that I have put on my brush and just dragging along that are what colors you choose to do this with. You just need your darkest values of those colors, so make sure you choose a blue and a brown and green and just mix them together and pull them along like this and then filled it up from the water's edge. If you get paint down below, it's no problem. We're gonna be building up our reflections next, so I need a bit more paint. I've run out, so I'm gonna grab a little bit more of my liquid like Jell just makes the paint spread a lot easier. Van Dyke Brown into Go blue and a little bit oppression green as well. Just mix it together on my palette real quick. Come back over to my water line, put a bit on the base here, that's where it's darkest. And then I'm gonna pull it up towards the top of the trees. It's going to keep that like that, for I'm pushing really hard with my brush. I'm not hurting the Caymus nor my hurting my brush. I'm just really blending those colors together, and it's a really thin layer of paint. Take some time here, just play with this layer. I really want you to get a feel for how hard you're gonna be pushing that brushing of the canvas. I'm really pushing my brush into that canvas to really pull this pain and push it around the campus. I don't want thick layers, and this really allows a paint to spread, and it gives it a really soft fuel. This is a perfect way to build up your base layers, so just play here for a minute. Come back over to this side, bring a bit more in that paint up just a little higher. Just practice. Hold on that page around the campus, you do not need a lot of pain is a super thin layer, and I'm pushing really hard with that brush to do this. Now I'm noticing I have a lot of green on my brush here, and I kind of want to cool it down a bit with some blues. So what I'm gonna do is I'm gonna put a little bit of liquid light gel on my brush, a tiny amount and they grab my indigo blue. And since I already have that residual green on this brush, I'm just gonna add a little bit of white. I'm just going to start building up towards that tall tree. Make sure you pull both sides your brush, get all that paint off. Um, should start working those colors up. Got a bit more into go blue because of the techniques for using you do not need to add Look with my jell every single time you pull paint off your palace. So I haven't added any. That is nice and blue, which is what I want. I'm pulling that green up into the blue. You just keep going back and forth up and down with the same pressure on your brush and you're really gonna notice that all of a sudden it's a really nice blend. Bring it right up above that other thirds line where those treetops are. Just keep working it like that again. We are just really roughing this in. It is not gonna look like this at all. When we're done, I add a little bit of my grey. So I prefer charcoal gray. If you have pains great, that'll work. Well, you can add it right around here. I just want to build this up with more, some doing large circles with that same pressure, mixing the school later together. I'm going to come up wherever I see a tree in my reference photo. So there's one right here on this line. If you look at your reference photo, it's gonna come up a little bit, kind of block it in my fat and then come back down. There's a little one here, pop a little bit, then come back down. There's a couple of the background here. You do that all the way alone, just following where I see a little bit of a hint of a treetop along my grid. So this one goes all the way up just past this line and then back down, pushing really hard on my brush. I'm just carrying the same colors I've had this whole time and using the remaining paint on my brush. It just keeps the layer nice and thin and really allows for soft. Look, we're not after detail work right now. Right now, we're just wanna block in our trees. You're gonna see how cool it is to build the layers once we start adding some white to that background and bringing that forward right now blocking in trees. Now this tree over here in the reference photo, this big one, you'll see there's a lot more blue in it. So Payne's gray is really nice to add a little charcoal, a little bit of indigo and mix in a bit of your green, but not too much. That's good and a little bit of your liquid Late jail and it's darker than all the other trees song. Just adding a little bit more paint up here. It's gonna change whenever I start working in the rest of my layers. It's just blocking in that tree again. I'm pushing really hard on my brush until there's no white space left in this whole area. It's all blocked in with a nice soft color of some sort. Whatever has come off your brushes gonna work just great. So what I'm also going to do so I'm also gonna block in an extra layer trees now really softly. So if you can tell me a reference photo, there's a couple trees that are just a little bit of distance, Citrus hints of trees and those air really important to creating the depth of field. So I see one here. There's a couple back in here really soft treetops and all the way up through here. You'll see some treetops poking through. So what I'm gonna do with that a little little into go a little gray, a little bit off my liquid like Joe My my little white to that. And I just start working that it's gonna look dark. Don't worry what you want this cooler color. See how it's a lot more green in here in this blue really contrast. But we're gonna be pushing that to the back. Don't worry. This is just to set those tree shapes so that we can work off those as we build up the other layers have some trees here, few trees there now It's starting a little too dark, so I got a little bit of white, a little bit more liquid, like Joe. Just add a few trees in here. There's gonna blue. I'm pushing really hard, really pulling these layers across the campus. If you start to feel as if you're fresh is running out of paint considered dipping it into your palate, you can also just go back and rub it in an area that might have a little bit more paint and just use that. So I have a decent sized tree coming up right around here. So I'm just gonna block it in like that. There you go. We have blocked in the basic shapes of our foreground and our background before we begin blocking in the sky. We're gonna also trip before I begin working on the sky. That's behind these trees that you just walked in. I'm not going to just build up the water reflection. We already have the same. I like to use the same brush when I do all my blocking in until I get to the rial light stuff. But not I'll switch my brush or wash the one I'm working with what I really like about this painting is how simple the reflection is. There's not a lot of intricate detail work. It's essentially just translating the same colors down into the water. So what we're gonna do is we're gonna go back to our palate. We're gonna grab the same colors that you did to pull this line across and build up towards the trees. We're going to get our colors, and we're gonna pull them down towards the bottom with water line. So grab some nickel night gel. A little bit of your van dyke brown a lot of your green, a little bit of your blue. Mix it in until makes it until you find something very similar to the top. So if you look at your reference photo, you'll see that there's missed along the water line. This is where your eyes immediately drawn to, because your focal point is right here. So what I like to do is when I do my reflection work, I leave a bit of white space here just for my own eyes. I just like reminding myself that Oh, yeah, there's gonna be a really beautiful reflection there and It allows me to really gauge my shadows and lights and mid tones based off of that. So don't bring your pain right up to the water's edge. Leave a gap. Allow your mind to remember. So don't bring your paint right up to the water's edge. It's nice to leave a gap. Just makes it easier to work in the whites into just makes it easier to work in love. The light values to your forefront just makes it easier to work in your lighter values in the foreground whenever we get there. So what I do is I leave. I'd say about a good inch, and I just start building my reflection from there. Okay, See, it's the exact same color that I have on my waterline pulled up towards the trees. I'm putting that same color down here and I'm gonna pull it down towards the bottom of the painting. Now the water I like to make just a little bit darker, a little bit more murkier. So I had a little bit more gray to this. Whenever I'm building my water reflection just okay, it's a really, really feel to it, so I'm gonna have some charcoal gray to mine and a little bit more liquid to pull it down. Okay, I can start pulling my water down towards the bottom again. Your colors don't have to be perfect at this stage. We're just blocking it in. We get ad anything we want to this after we get a block, I just want to add some more. It's getting a little too green for me. I just want to add some more indigo blue in a little bit of pains. Green charcoal gray to this, since more liquid, even though I'm adding more gray and blue to the water, there's still a lot of the green from my brush from my trees, so it creates a really nice balance between the two. It's not too contrasted. There's still a flow between both top and the reflection for so I'm just gonna work this down right down towards the bottom. This is a really simple reflection in that we don't have to get these treetops inner reflection there cut off. So essentially, we just have to fill the space with these colors from here to here. I'm still using that same pressure than I did up here with water. I just like to go back and forth as well to create that softness. It's not essential step right now, so I'm still pushing really hard of my brush. I'm also just pulling it back and forth just to spread it. Do whatever you have to do to get this nice blocked in section. Do whatever you have to do to block in this section. I need some more paint. So again, I'm using a little bit more in to go a little bit more gray down here. The green is still transferring in to make it really look like a singular painting. And this is just rough, so you don't have to de exactly that. It's Now go on the other side. I'm gonna do the same thing. I'm gonna give myself the same amount of space even a little bit more of just leaving this blankets. What could be easier for us to polar are grays and are whites through here to really create a dramatic foreground. So let's just leave that empty and don't paint it just yet. You'll see what I mean and how much easier it is to pull her pain through their if we don't have a dirt color to contend with underneath of it. Now, with your reflection, we can add and take away at any time. So don't stress if you over blood. If you block in beyond your lines. Totally. Okay. You're going to see how much transformation you can do with just a little bit of white on your brush and that same brush technique. I'm pushing really hard on my brush. I just really want a really soft tin base layer that blocks in those trees that are up above a little bit. Here they haven't we blocked in our trees. Super basic, very rough and all with one paintbrush, we're gonna start workings lighter colors up in the sky and down in the reflection. If you have two of these two inch brushes, go ahead and grab your clean one. If this is the only one you have, go ahead and wash it with your mineral spirits, but really tapped that dry. Really? Work it into your towel and try and get as much of that mineral spirit office you can. The reason I say this is because excess mineral spirit on your brush and really thins out your paint, which can work for a blending, but I might thin it out too much if you have too much of your spirit on your brush. So if you're washing your brushes, really take the time to find White. Have really Bob Ross that I know he just slapped that brush around. What I do is I just take my towel. After I washed it and dried it off many, many times, I just I just hit like this on the towel and it pulls out any of the extra spirits that might be resting along the bottom of the bristles on Guy. Just do that over over again, that I rub it into my towel again that I do that again a little bit of spirits. Okay, it's just gonna thin your paint, and it's not gonna achieve the same effect that I'm going to show you here with a dry brush 13. LAYERING MISTY TREES PART 1: So now I'm gonna get blocking in Skyway and the reflection using a clean two inch brush, I'm gonna be using that same pressure, Really. Pushing the brush into the canvas to pull the paint around this white is really important because you're gonna be drawing it out into your other layers. If you're white, gets blues and greens and browns in it, that's totally okay. We're gonna be using those. Anyway, this is just to get your weight on your campus so we can start pulling our layers up or pushing them to the background. So I'm dipping in a lot of liquid my gel and I'm getting a ton of white paint on my brush. As you can see, there is a good chunk. This is for my whole sky area when I'm done this and gonna block in my bottom reflection as well. So you will use all this pace start in the middle and push that brush into your campus and really gotta get rid of my lines here. And really, you can't see the white but is happening. Don't worry. Just push it around the full section A little bit more liquid Night, Joe, a lot more white. Just drag it along the top because I got to cover the full thing. Now you can still see my lines through my wife. But don't worry. They will be gone by the time I get my layers on. This'd just blocking in the white background. More like a like Joe. More weight, Really pushing it into the canvas to blend it. Well, I do not want it fixed Way will be bringing this down into the trees. But let's just avoid that. For now, we will be bringing this white down into the trees and starting to build up our layers. But for now, let's just focus on covering the remainder of the campus that is white with white. This is a super thin layer. Do not eat a ton of pain. You just need to make sure that white is covering all your blank canvas underneath. Okay, Now, I don't have enough paint on my brush to put a decent amount down here, so I'm just gonna pick up a little bit more with my liquid like Joe, and I'm just gonna put a circle of it right in the middle. Not gonna bring it to my edges yet. Wind of it. So what I'm noticing about my painting is I'm going here is there's a lot of green and I really want a contrast between greens and blues. So what I'm gonna do is I'm actually gonna take this brush those using white, I'm gonna have a little bit of my Payne's gray, my charcoal gray and a tiny bit of indigo blue to it. And I'm just going to start adding that in between all these trees here, it's kind of around. It will be really rough. It's gonna look What are you doing, Sarah? It'll make sense in a minute. We're creating depth, believe it or not, slowly and steadily. So just at this blue, all the way around your trees and we're gonna start just mixing, pushing really hard, pulling into the edge of these trees here we're creating the background for painting. So if you look at your reference photo, you'll see that there isn't exactly a whole bunch of white. There's little pockets of it here in the sky, but all the way up here, your trees. There's kind of translate up to the top really softly. But there's hints of trees there. So what we're gonna do is we're gonna take that blew that we're adding around the edge. We're gonna draw into this tree. So what I mean is just kind of push it in and then pull that green back out and moving upwards. You can see there's a little bit of a translation between the colors. If you can see I'm pulling all the colors. Do not worry about these shapes were gonna be building them up over and over again to get this misty feel. Right now, we're just creating a little bit of hint of trees in the background that are nice and cool and blue and far away. So I'm pulling my brush down into what I've already blocked out and pulling it back up. You'll see hints of your greens coming up into your blue and your wife. This is a really important step, so just keep flying around with this for a minute. So the blue and the gray that added to my brush to outline the whole forest is now really blended. As you can see, I've pulled it into the trees and out, and now my colors is starting to get softer as they inch towards the light source. I'm gonna keep mixing in my blues. I want a darker here, so I'm not gonna pull a lot of the white and right yet, but I'm just gonna mix together What I already put down and blend it really well, right up to the top. I can't take this tree, full it right up, fix it around a bit. Still putting a lot of pressure on my brush. Just blending these all together. Now, I'm completely aware it seems like we're going backwards as we mix these together. I mean, we just blocked in our trees, and now we're blending white down into them to really soften them up. We're gonna be building up these trees again and again because each time we do, we're gonna change the shape a little bit. So you're creating trees in the background, moving all the way up to the foreground to really need technique, takes a bit of patients and understanding that we are not erasing the work that we just did . We're building it up in a different way. So the sky is not just white in this reference photo if you take a good look, there's a lot of blues up in the right corner. There's a lot of greens up in the left corner, and they all kind of come together to meet in the middle of the light source. So that's what we're gonna be working on. I really want to start pulling these colors here up and into the center, kind of like they're encircling the light source up here. So right now, I just have what's all my brush from all this extra blending I've been doing? I can pull some more up here. I'm just gonna walk it right across the top, pushing hard. It's really important that you brush strokes, follow a certain trajectory like you're carrying the mist through the landscape. You're not just putting in a block and then calling it missed. It won't look real. What you have to do is start at one point and work your brush up and out, or work your brush down and in, and you're really going to create that feel that that mist is settling into your landscape a great way. A great way to achieve that is to really mix your colors in with broad circling brushstrokes, pulling it forward and pulling it across. You're just playing around right now. You're getting a feel for how you want your piece to be. You're also creating atmosphere. You're creating layers of brushstrokes upon layers of brushstrokes. That one little brush stroke you made here is gonna completely complicate the one. You wait here, it's gonna create that depth of field that we're looking for. So where the mist in the sky is constantly moving and you want to create that kind of flow within your painting, the water is calm and unmoving. You can create that stillness by moving your brush back and forth like this. Now we do that after we blocked it in with our rough brush strokes. You really want to blend the colors first like we have been doing, you really want to start creating that stillness, that calm and that flat surface, and I'll show you how to do that technique after we block in this final section here we have our light source here. I'm gonna be pulling these colors that we've already blocked in into that light source, and then I'm gonna show you how you create still looking water. So we're gonna have to build up more paint down here to get the shadows right. I want them to be a little bit more gray and blue and brown and a little bit more some mysterious and murky. So what we're gonna do is either. So if you're only working with one bay brush instead of washing your white because it's not going to affect anything, just really wipe off the excess white into a towel or a paper towel. What have you just really give that excess paint off and you'll be set if you still have your first paintbrush less use that one. So with this, I'm going to grab a lot of my great. So what? This fall, I'm gonna grab some great a little bit of my band like brown, a tiny bit of indigo. And I'm just gonna put it right here in the water. Just draw a line right down, decent about paying too much carefully in long this. I think I need a little bit more to go in there and pull like this from the edge. Nice and hard. Your brush back and forth and keep just pull it in a dumpster water in a straight line straight of us. Now what I do to achieve a nice blend when I'm working with reflections is really fast and quick brushstrokes. But then the same pressure as before, Still really pushing my brush into the canvas. But high vaccine for this makes a canvas. Just let me transitions so that they're really a lot more stuff and then you pull it across And then I can also do it on this side. Also, more paint over here. I'm gonna do more to go a little bit. Van Dyke Brown. Pull it down here. Living in the same thing. Pull across. Really Just quit first room. Same pressure, nice and hard words inconsistent before walking in and then switch to this. It is a whole layer work, but you're setting the bass player for really successful. So we blocked out the entire painting except for the foreground Here. We'll leave that to the very end because we still have a lot of work to do on the background before we even attempt to start the more detailed work of our trees. If you look at the reference photo, you'll said you'll see that the trees on either side go up higher than what they are right now. So what we're gonna do is we're gonna take our nice, cool colors were takes some blue, a little bit of Prussian green and some Payne's gray. And we're gonna start building up these trees right here just to create a really nice, solid structure. So you gonna grab some nickel, mijo, You're into go a little bit of charcoal grey or Payne's gray, A little bit of the olive green or Prussian green, whatever you have just right here. So I'm just gonna push my brush just like I did before. Nice and hard, Uziel hard. I'm pushing. I'm really pushing that up. And I'm just gonna draw this tree all the way up to here and then back down right down to the water, which I just really want that depth. Great. Next is this tree right here? It comes up a little bit here. I want to just have a nice presidents here. He's gonna push my Russian, build that up there. Now these shadows I want to be a little bit cooler. I don't want as much of greens and browns in them. So what I'm gonna do is I'm gonna add a little bit more Payne's gray and into go to them, and I'm really gonna work them all the way around the edge like we already did. But I'm just gonna build them up so they're stronger. So I have my blue on my brush. You could see just going around the edges. I need a little bit more My indigo blue. I'm gonna keep going all the way around here, right up to here where I have one piece trees, walkway balance the way it is right now. But we're going to really work on that with our lighter brush that we've been using for blending so I can take this brush. And just like we've already done, I'm going to break down these edges and blend them together. Just creating that movement with the farm that we talked about. I'm already creating a really cool fueled by doing this, I'm working down at the bottom of pulling my color all the way up down here. I'm just going to blend it a bit more. I don't have to go all the way up to the top of the painting. Just pull it up into the sky a little bit. You see that starting to create a little bit more depth. It's giving hints of something in the background, although it's not really detailed now. What we're going to start doing as we're blending these together is creating shapes of trees with your brush. But what you do is you take your brush. You started in an area with the color you want, and you just kind of shake your brush a little bit and pull it up to the top of the cameras just enough to create the shape of a tree. No detail work. It's just the General triangle shape, really long triangle. Let's see all the way up, and it's enough to create the idea of the tree back there. We don't want it really detailed. We want our focal point to be up here whenever we do these trees coming out of the water. What we're doing is creating depth of field. So again I want to build a couple little trees here, just the hints of them in the background. Another one here, you to make this one a little softer. I wanted to fade into the background of it. So I'm just gonna push a little white onto it. And you can have as many trees as your heart desires. It doesn't have to be identical to my painting. I'm just gonna pull these up a little higher into the sky just to create a little bit more drama. I'm just taking the edges and I'm rubbing my brush into the edges so that it's creating Ah , haze around the shapes that I already created. So I still have my base tree that I laid out. But I'm just getting rid of those rough edges and blending them together. And what that's doing is creating atmosphere that's creating movement, and it's creating the the look of mist in the distance. Now I'm gonna pull that across. Remember how recreating movement with all of our brushstrokes when it comes to the sky, you can even do brush strokes like this. Whatever it takes to try and find a little bit of movement 14. LAYERING MISTY TREES PART 2: you also kind of need to think like the fog. Whenever I'm alone in the mountains, I could sit for hours watching it just float down through the treetops and transform as it makes its way down into a valley. Now, I don't want to sound like a completely off my rocker. But what you want to do is pretend your brush is the fog itself. You want to create the same illusion that it does in the natural world. So up here, I want my fog to be settling into the depths of this painting and come right down to where our focal point ISS. By doing that, my brush has to move like the fog. So I'll show you what I mean. Here I have my trees there in the background and pushing with my brush, and I'm just gonna pull my brush down towards the foreground as if it's Falk settling in. Do you see how it just creates that solved movement? You can tell it's fog, and it looks natural because it's kind of falling down into the scenery around it. I don't want to do too much right now. I'm building up my layers, but in doing this. I also allow for some rials shadows to start popping up and creates a really neat, interesting depth of field. So I'm gonna do it on this side, too, to show you again want to create the illusion that the fog is coming in from the valleys and settling into our clearing here. So again, I'm gonna come up here. I'm gonna get a a little bit of paint on my brush that I'm gonna pull, push hard, I'm gonna pull down, and I'm just gonna push it like this across the campus, kind of until it settles into the painting. I'm gonna creates more movement now that I've channeled my inner fog. I don't want it to be so white because it's a little too contrast into the vibe going for here. But as you can see, there's a really need play on foreground and background starting to pop to the campus just by doing these simple layers where we're blending the edges as we block it all out. I know. I told you, this is a repetitive process, but the end result will make it so worth it. We're gonna go ahead and build up these trees again and then soften those edges with one of our blending brushes. I'm gonna get my in the go blue, my gray and a little bit of my liquid like Joe. And I'm going to start building up the shape of trees yet again, just on the outskirts. I'm not gonna go really far down into them this time cause I'm just doing the shadows and building up background trees, not for foreground trees. I just want there to be a hint of these trees, so I'm taking my brush. There's a little bit of the paint that I started with still on it. So there's adequate amount. And again I'm pulling my brush up into the sky, then working it down really gently. I'm pulling my brush up into the sky, then bringing it down gently. Now, this is a bigger tree, so I'm just gonna build it up a little bit more. Same with this one. It's got a bit of substance to it, so I'm just gonna build it up a bit more just like that. So I'm gonna add my indigo and a little bit of my grey, and I'm just gonna kind of go over those trees one more time. The ones that I just felt. I just want them to be a little cooler so that when we do our next blend, they have a little bit more of an impact on the whole feel of the paintings. We grab a little bit of white on our blending brush and start lending in those edges again and creating trees with those shapes you pulled up into the sky just around the edges, starting to create a really neat look for the trees in the forest. So I'm really happy with how this painting is really starting to come together. I feel like there's a nice balance between both sides with my misty forest. I feel like the shadows and depth of field are really coming together nicely, and I feel like this light sources nice and eerie and mysterious. I'll be able to reflect this quite easily down here with my brushes. After we get everything else done, I thought I take a second here just to remind you that you do not need to do this whole painting in one sitting. If you're just starting out, it is a lot to take in. And you know what? Painting is actually really emotionally draining. If you're really focused in on it for a long time, so honor yourself. If you're feeling you're getting a little tired, step back. Put your painting to a side, let it dry so that you're creating on a nice dry surface tomorrow and then come back and join in. So look, if you take a good look at the reference photo on the right hand side is a really be tree that is rather dark and quite pronounced, So let's go ahead and build out up. I'm really happy with how our shadows air working back here, we'll find to the master get are more detail work done here in the foreground, but I think it's looking really need over on this side and a reference photo. You'll say that these trees are really not as defined as the one on the right, but we already have a really nice build up off the shape. We just have to work on the little bit of the shadowing and light just to make it look a little more realistic and give it its proper place in the depth of field. As for the foreground, we're gonna start making this look a little bit more realistic and detailed as well after we get all these trees blocked in. That's what we're going to start working on the water because it's really hard to translate a reflection until you know exactly where your light and shadow is. So once we block these in finally and get some detail work in, I'll show you how we translate that into our water reflection. And then, lastly, we get to do the detail work. So for this look to get a little darker and a lot more grays and blues up here as well. It's probably a little bit of oppression green. If you have, don't put Olive Green. If you don't just use your blues and greys, it'll still work. Now this is where we're going to start on adventuring off from are blending brush strokes and just start building up a true shape. What I'm doing is I have pain till the end of my paintbrush. I'm not gonna be I like anymore liquid by Johnson this because I really want this pain to not move too much. I want to have to push it if I want to move. That's really gonna help with the shapes and with our real subtle blending technique. So use whenever we go to kind of just make this layer look a little bit less realistic. So I'm just having a campus building up a tree shape with my brush when I have low on paint and a little bit more going a little bit more of like brown to this. And I have my integral blue and my charcoal gray. That's why I get it. One thing you do is kind of draw lying down to about here for your tree and just kind of pull your branches from that. Just so you have an idea of the shape of your tree. Yeah, Yeah, this is not super detailed. It's just rough. What I'm doing is I'm just using my brush to create branches I am pulling from What would be the tree trunk. Oh, to the edges of isn't much. Prince, will you have the shape of the tree started to form? You pull it the more I like the look of this tree. So I'm gonna kind of extended up with these brushes, you could hold it on its edge. So you're just touching the tip of it down like this because you really need little effect is that there's just a little leaves on the end of a bunch. We can go in with one of our tackle brushes and use a branch work after before. This is just giving. The general idea does not have to be super detail. You could blend in a bit like this if you're feeling that it's not the shape, that's just the general idea of the truth. Since we're working on that tree, I'm gonna grab one of my tackle rushes. This year is the number six. And so Filbert you could grab any size at Work Street. What I'm gonna do is I'm gonna dip it in my blues and greys a little bit of my brown and I'm not gonna have a what I remember most of peaks off of the brush. So just rub it on, you tell. So it's just a little bit of paint on your brush. You don't need much. So what did you do this? I'm just gonna create the look of suppression. So you draw a line under my tree just like this. Maybe another line here this is gonna get planted. Instant doesn't have to be perfect. Just have some fun. And then I was a top brush around the edge to create the look of leaves on a branch doesn't have to be perfect. We're just getting started here. Grab some more That paint. So I have migrated. Move around my blue essentially just a little bit too much of my brush Pull up to the edge Angry A branch of whatever sort. Now the stage practice Figuring out trees is a lot of work, but it's really fun once you figure it out. Not super details. But I have to tell its tree you're gonna work across this landscape and just do the same for the next layer. So not across the landscape. And just block in a few more trees, A little bit more recognition. So I have on my brush. So while my brush, I have some into go a little bit of Payne's gray, a little bit of charcoal gray and a little bit of my band Great brown. And I'm just gonna go about the same way building awesome trees to start. So you used the edge of your brush tip of your brush kind of on an angle like this to build up some of these friend shapes. Give your tree a bit of life. So I go for a drink a little bit more into go little bit more. Check for great pressure for your to this lawyer with a little bit more definition. So going up here, I don't want this tree to be over. So opening the branches up. So now we're coming over to this side of the painting and our reference mobile. You'll see her and I speak to big trees right here. One is a little bit closer than the other. In order to achieve that, this one needs to be a little bit lighter. So I'm first going to start by adding the residual paint that's on my brush. I haven't dipped it in anything since we started this sex line of trees. You don't need a lot, but again, I'm gonna start at the center, color to my trunk of tree straight down. I'm just gonna pull branches like that. Either tap the campus like this to get paint on your brush and create a bridge you can pull from the trunk outwards until you reach where you want your branch down. Give your tree some shape. So as you can see, I'm also pulling that paint over from the trunk of the tree and then where I want a little bit more definition of branches, I'm just going to take the edge of my brush and working from the middle out. I'm not gonna have any more paint on my brush. My work on this secondary in the photo you can see it's kind of sent back from this first tree, so we don't need a lot of pain to do this. Remember things air darker in the front and as they move to the background, they get later. No, I have to play around and remember you can you put too much paint on to make a little dark ? That is totally okay. We can soften that up and drop it into the back around quite easily. With these techniques, I'll show you how it just often at mine to make sure it is farther back in the painting. Then this one in a second here right now, Let's just block in this next layer. Trees give a little bit more definition. Hold that painting down. So you see how I started my tree here? I really want a little bit more definition here. So I started my tree and I'm just kind of rubbing my brush. The general area getting a little bit of that paint off just so that I know that's where my tree's gonna be. One Another little guy down here. There you 15. CREATING THE FOREGROUND: so we just put in the next layer of trees in the foreground. Now, where you going to do is pick up on your smaller brushes? This here is the number six Filbert, and what you're gonna do is you can take that paint you just put into the layer and pull some of it up to the other edges with fine detail. What you're going to be doing is creating branches and foliage. That's fine. Tip growing pains ups in the center. I haven't had any pain to the state. Brush is all the on campus, just creating trees like this tree. So it's a little again. It takes a lot of practice to get poetry. I just want his brain just just a little bit more formal tree, a little bit romanced something. Branches. So this part of the painting I really don't want you use invisible spirit. Your brushes Just rub your brush on a towel or rag paper. Tell until you get most of that excess heat that will more than do for this stage paint. If you would add mental spirit to this painting at this point in any form, it's really gonna take away that later missed feeling kind of money up your layers on you. So either grab a clean brush that you have another two inch or just really take a red and start getting all that extra paint office. She takes a little bit, but it's worth it because it's really going to give you the effect that you need. But this is kind of want you to have not too much paint in your brush. What I do this, I'm gonna be grabbing my indigo blue a little bit of my charcoal grey. I run around on my wreg until I get a lot of excess off. Don't need a lot of this and then I take some white not gonna rub that in. Here are really what? I just have a nice even amount of paint on my brush. Total mess is the rag, not my brushes, a nice even layer off a nice, cool blue great business. You are being very gentle. You don't push into the campus very hard. It's a real soft movement. You want to hold on to all that detail work you just put in but still just wanted. Political center is a little bit. This takes a lot of progress, but start really soft and you'll see what I mean. So I didn't want did you soften up these edges? I'm just very, really gentle pushing in that canvas. It's enough to want oh, and a little bit more white to that actions a little too dark serial. So I built up the shape of my truth. Just give it up in the dimension so kind of walking my brush newly gently They're here, and it's really giving the tree a little bit of shape. And then I'm gonna take that same blue, that same color, that's all Me. I'm just gonna cover those edges once again on these pieces. Remember what we did before. We were just kind of going up and down either edge with this color. I mean, a little bit more white. Perfect. Hey, so it's a little lighter to Bush lighter, and I'm just gonna work those. I just really, really jumped. As you can see, a lot of the detail work remains, but I'm just building another layer missed around these and that sense of a heavy fall. I really want this tree to be behind this tree in my painting. So what I'm gonna do is I haven't added no other paint to my brush. I'm going to keep working the edges as we always do. I'm just gonna come in enough that it softens up that tree ever so slightly, just especially up in the top, and I'm gonna have it. So it looks like that Mrs Falling kind of tucking itself in behind this victory. I first saw Trudy just to create that feelings consistency. And then I'm just gonna soften up this tree a little that really, like, missed work over top. I really want this tree to be pushed into the background of it. So I had a bit wore white to my Russian with more blue. Why put on my ranks? There's no extra paint on that brush. Really? Just gonna make this miss look really cool in president. Pushing it in this tree is going to get a little bit of this love too. It's really pushed back with it, but I'm gonna take some wine. Wait, What else on my brush. So the cars I want I think these were a little too tall like this point. So he's gonna have some white up here. I'm just gonna reek the shape of the top of these trees. Think they're going a little too high for my eyes. Like holier. That's what's fun about you can always just adjust as you're going along. You don't have to worry about it being trying to Quick. Here we go. That's better. Again. I'm gonna move some of this color into my miss. That's only up here in this valley. Just pull it along through to my little light. More tax here. Well, that Miss Downs getting pretty heavy. It's pretty awesome. So you create this mist that I just did. What I do is I hold my brush up and down like this, and with medium pressure, I'm gonna do a circular motion and just move my brush to where I want that Miss flying to fall. Just like that, it's not a lot of pressures. Now, any paint, I'll show you again. So my brushes up here, I start a circular motion with medium amount of pressure, and I just moved through everyone. What? To create a line of missed in this paint. You know, you've got over here and just start building a little bit of death. So in your reference photo, you can see that there's a nice little bit of full huge here in the foreground, but there's mist behind it, so we need to build that miss before we really put our detail work up here in the foreground. So what you do is you just same technique. Push a little bit on the campus, pull down towards out water line until you see the amount of Miss that you really like. This takes a lot of practice. It's really easy toe over push and have too much, Mr Mayor. But that's how you learn. And that's how you move your techniques to the next painting. So this is the same too much pressure. I was just doing. I want to take this brush and I'm gonna love it up with pretty much the bottom of my light source. So here's the lightest part of my background. Now that Linus, part of my background, would translate to somewhere down here in this reflection of the water. So why do is just a really bag dancing of that light on the water? So I'm pushing pretty hard on the campus. I'm just translating subtle that likeness across the water. The reflection is not going to be perfect. You just want the sense of that. Missed. That's up above. Down here on your now here, you can see I kind of love the mist, fall down in through the pockets. So what I want to do is I want to make sure that that missed swore to translate its a little bit into my refresher. Everywhere that I put missed, I'm gonna really gently add some reflection of the water. So I have a little bit that doesn't dance here, where we're going to build up some voyage of the four brown. So I want to translate that into my canvas. Remember how we broke her cameras down into third? So this was the 1st 3rd 2nd 3rd in the bottom third. Remember? Our reflection that is only 1/3 of our campus, so it's only gonna be this much of a reflection that we're going to see in the water. You don't need to worry about your treetops because you don't have room to put them in here . So you're gonna be focusing on recreating this image reflected on the water. So I have. My light source is up here. You had a little bit of wife just around here. I just work that in a little bit. Just Teoh light in this area. I'm also going to cool with that technique. I showed you earlier. Pull that white across the color, but 40 for the year painting went on. What or drive does not matter. So this right here is one of my favorite techniques with water. It's giving you a line of sight. I build up my layer of fog. That's kind of like a straight line across the campus, and I just put a little bit pull on top. It just gives you a little bit of depth, allows you to see where the light is hitting and worried. Just make sure you pull your colors all the way yourself. Just keep playing with them until you feel that there's a decent balance. I know what Mr. I'm just slowly building up. This reflection takes a bit of work 16. FINAL DETAIL WORK PART 1: Now we're finally ready to start working on our final detail work. There's still work to go yet, but let's get started. So if you look at your reference photo before we start on our focal point, which is our trees and our water's edge, you'll see that there's a lot of darker trees that are built up and voyage and small little bushes all along this area of your they don't go to home, but they really create that depth of field because they make the colors pop. So what we're gonna do is I'm gonna walk you to you from right to left, work across, put in my darker trees. I'm still gonna be having this writing to her softening with one of my brushes. But I walk you through how I do this. She got one of my trick or inch tackling brushes. Use any box you like. There really is no requirement for this part. I just like the block in my treats quickly, and I kind of like to still remain a bit rough. This allows me to get some working, but also allowed just to have a little play with my pain. So for this. We've been using a lot of blues and not too much greens up here in the back. That's what I want to do is use a little bit more browns and grays and greens here in the form. It's really going to make everything contrast really nicely and draw your eye right into where we want people to be loved. So I put some truffle grace and pains, Craig, a little bit of my favorite creams and a little bit landing ground right here. My brush, whatever the dues, and start down the water's edge. And just like with a big brush, I'm gonna pull my brush up decree. So what? Have a tree, then the edge of my brush. I'm gonna pull that paint out just kind of like that. And so I create a shape of a tree. Now I kind of want a lot more green and brown up here in the foreground, some out of the warrant to my palette and start at the bottom and pull it up to my treat, just like I'm just doing. I will go through itself with this up with the brush again, but really generally, because I'm not as much detail work. I want a little tree right here. I'm pushing hard to get that paint off my brush. I really want to be nice and dark hearing and a little bit more freedom. Brown and gray on my brush create Look, I want coloring, so I'm gonna pick ups. Impression Green. Some of my sap green, a little bit of my olive green, some of my brown, my little cocktail greens. And I put it right down here along my water's edge so that I can pull it up to create looks I want I have my brush outside so Gregory to build the bottom of your trees. It's what you do is you kind of rough in where you want your bottom and then you slowly switch. Tell your brush. It's kind of more upright. It's a great way just to blend your trees into their surroundings. My favorite things to do to these landscapes is to add dead trees in the back, but really gently just have a stick. Coming up creates a lot of fun things for the eyes to look at, and nature is not perfect. All the trees they're not alive of nature's be in your painting. So just one of the more duct here. I love that missed here, Just really settle in. I really like how it's playing on the trees behind it and creating depth. So I'm just gonna add a couple little trees here. I don't want to green on the side because everything is really muted blue and green. So I do is I'm gonna have my chuckle Cray A little bit of blue a little bit. Agree. That's so It's a really dark tree. Come along. Just a pop up right here is your missed. We're gonna be softening it up after with my brush, so it looks really dark. Don't panic. We can soften it up. I don't want the whole tree visible. I just kind of wanted poking through the mist. You look really cool. I have other tree over here. Like to be a little darker. So pushing my version, she's creating a little bit more. Move over here. So it's finally things were a little too heavy on the side and not heavy enough on this side, so I decided just to add another tree to help balance it out of it. I'm gonna be taking my big two inch brush again, and I'm gonna be softening this layer of just a little bit. So it's really gonna help balance things out because I'll be able to have a little bit more Mr Fogg and through that side there. But I just want to give a little bit more depth on this Sinus. Well, okay, so I'm happy with this. A little bit worked with this guy we worked out. So I've been using this freshman blending, and I'm gonna use it again. As I soften up this final layer before we do our foreground, our water's edge and our final trees, I'm going to be gently, really gently working this through some of the layers to create some death. See how I just saw gently push that brush on and I work it down, and all of a sudden I have a break in that tree line where mist is kind of settling into the crevices. It doesn't take much to create these effects, and it takes a lot of practice to really have a gentle hand while you're doing it. So go easy on yourself. It's not quite the effect that? She warned. This is just the first time you're trying it out. You're gonna be doing it a lot as well. For now, I want to create a little bit more lightness down in this area. I really want a focal light to come down and just settle here because we're gonna be building up our tall, dead trees coming out of the water right in this area. So I'm gonna have my brushing him pulling down right down into that shuttle ever so gently . I'm just pushing my brush, that pain carrying the light and colors with it. He creates a really nice dynamic there could do this all along your edge out it wherever you want. This is the fun part of mist just to soften up all your trees just a little bit. But also just to create that plate of movement as that mist falls down into the foreground . Now continue on the rule of thirds will be laid out. Compositions piece. The human eye loves to see things in all numbers. So what? We're creating our trees that are coming out of this water up into artist. You wanted union groups of all numbers so three or five or seven. Make sure there's a number between look a reference. First of trees have come right off our third line here. There's three. There's a smaller one right around to you. That's four. I have to work together here. That's five and six. And I have one just in the distance here. That second, that's gonna be really accusing to me. I know that rewarding work so hard to draw. He was. I threw the depth of field right into this pocket. We're gonna be putting this off number so forever. Detail work on these final trees using the flat style brush. This is the number 10 you can use inside you. Look, you don't want to be too big because you really want to have a nice, clean Chris coming down that tree. You don't want her should be too big because you know what you're treating you. He's actually pretty fine detail truths. I'll show you what So what? My cover. I have banned like brown and I have raw number. I'm gonna using both of those with a hint of my charcoal gray. He makes a little circle that over on the side of my canvas. I'm gonna add a little bit of my meeting to it so that my brush flows really well. You don't have to really, really work this initial line that you do. You want your pain to really flow down the campus nice and easily. It creates a really seeing must look to your truth. So I can see here that this is my 1/3 line that I had drawn initially. My other one is right here, so I don't need to block it out. I've been doing this long enough that I can figure it out now if you need to lay out your line or lay a ruler across just to know exactly where you're 1/3 line is that comes across here. Please do I know exactly what I want to do. I'm gonna just start pulling my brush down through the pain to hear That's the highest tree that I want. I don't want any higher than that. I really like Look Okay, now I pulled my treats. You here on a great trick to creating a realistic reflection is just to keep that going right back down through the water, just like that. We're gonna blend this always at the end and puts a Mr Over talk to make it look dynamite. So don't worry. Now I have in my reference folder, you'll see I have two trees here working together to create a really nice bounce. I have 1/3 just over here past my 1/3 line, but not very far. So what I'm gonna do is I'm gonna work on that second tree of lime. That's kind of hugging this guy right here. So this one I want to come up straight was gonna pull it down. I don't want to be as high. Just gonna pull it down right from here. And then I'm gonna bring it straight down to kiss that one doesn't have to be perfect. I'm gonna be bringing a lot of Mr Cross here, So it's just a general idea for the I. That's really pleasing. So where 1/3 line is just go a little bit lower than that. Put a little more my browns of my grey on my brush mix them up a little bit of my life. I want to make it so that it runs a since moved I'm gonna pull that one problems from right about here. Down into the water on gun down on. Reflected. Till about there. A little further. Okay, well, things to look a little bit more dynamic over here, So I'm gonna go ahead and a few more. Probably four more so that I haven't I'm gonna take my brown, my van dyke brown, my raw umber and some of my charcoal gray. Got little look on my job too much. I'm gonna add a nice little guy filling up with water right about here. And then he's gonna be reflecting just a little bit rate down there. When you're doing these trees, you don't want them all to line up together. You kind of want them all to be of staggering height. So I have a nice, smaller one here leading up to this big one. But wells that I create over here, I want them to be in the middle of these two hearts. It's just gonna be a really nice flow for the eye across these focal points. So right about here, I'm gonna start tip off one of those trees better sitting together. Pull it right down. Produced into the water right beside it. Gonna be united right down into the water as well. You know what more that's in the middle of all the It's a different height than all of my right about here. So you started to learn the basics of have accrued really realistic painting. You've already learned that the lead source up here needs to minute exactly what's reflected in water. But you also need to know is that like is hitting everything in a special way, especially these trees that are really pronounced. So what we're gonna do is we're going out of our highlights to the street before we have bridges. So what that means is having little white to the browns grays we've been using. And we're gonna bring them down the left side of your tree because that's what we like is actually hitting right. It's all generally coming from the left. You don't want real start contrast that you want enough to start building up the light. So what I'm doing is I just started at the top, and with the lights out of my brush, I just ran right down the same line that I created with my kind of essentially splitting that tree right in half with light brown and dark brown. Okay, so you do not again on all my trees. I don't have a ton of paint. I don't have a ton of weight. It's just mixed in with my broom. I'm starting at the top, and I'm following left side of Motrin all the way down to the water. You could go back and add more. In fact, these ones here, I do want a little bit more white play. So right here, especially. I kind of want out a bit more weight. I'm gonna go right down. This one here. Yes. Well, I need a little bit more white on my brush. Play it all the way down. Do the same for all of them, And then I'm gonna go back and really create the depths that I want to. So he's dead. Trees were kind of hiding back here. They're gonna have a little bit more magic to. So what I'm gonna do is I'm just gonna find in a place where I think the light might hit. I think it's right about there. Bowl trees. Pull it down just to get the hint already there feeling a lot more realistic. So I've taken my Browns and my Grace makes them together at a little bit of little like Joe . And then I pulled my trees right down through to the water. Then I took a little bit of white mixed with liquid like Joe. And on the left side of every single tree that I already painted, I draw my another line was white. This creates the realistic look off light hitting these trees. It's really incredible what a little bit of white can do in terms off creating presence with these trees. You don't need a time it, but you can add it here and there and play with it. Watch how your piece transforms. We're here more. Okay. And now you're gonna take your brush a little bit more. Your browns and grays are not too much mixed in with a bit of your white, and you're gonna start just pulling some branches on these dead trees that are coming out of the water. You don't need a lot to have a really beautiful effect. I'm just stillness of this piece. Just play with the shadows. Stand back from your painting. See how it's starting to look. See if you really figured out the lighter, you really need to work up creating the shadows where I need by adding a little bit. Well, this is a lot of fun. You are creating your very old trees here. He's my painting as a reference, or you could just go to town and create your own scene. Don't be scared. You cannot mess it up. It's a work of art. It's yours. 17. FINAL DETAIL WORK PART 2: So for those of you who are just starting out, I haven't suggest that you stop here that you're painting dry before you do the final. This work along the water's edge. It's really easy to pull colors and accidentally to your wife and really money out looking for so working on the waters that you're gonna pick up one of our trusty old two inch brushes to use these lot. You do not need a clean brush in this. What you need is to get rid of all the access plate. That's just introduce a rag on people. Child, get rid of all the extra piece and then we're going to go over and get some of your chechnyan white. You do not have any liquid gel in just your titanium white, not time that just get the edge of your brush. What you gonna do is I'm pushing really hard against the canvas, but I'm just gonna follow my water's edge. I've wanted to look misty up top so your brushes not have to be perfect. Go back and forth a few times like this. He's just gonna do the same over here. What would be right across your Honor, for such all that weight space. Start, pick up your other brush. And if you don't have any leftover paint on this brush, I use a little bit of your van dyke brown rock and your Payne's gray with integral ecology kind of me here. What you're gonna do is we're just gonna start building these islands of these trees. Toxic land. They're sticking. So I'm pulling this greater dust London into my like color that I just pulled across. So we pulled our first line of white paint directly across the edge of water. Now I'm using my darker color and then pulling a darker color just about half an inch underneath. You're gonna be pulling this up and into the mist that move around the streets. So just leave a sliver of that wait up, and then we have where our island is, where trees are going out is right about things. There's not a ton of white showing here, so we're gonna build this up. So I'm using a lot of my grades and living in my indigo some Van Dyke brown and some of my green decree the color that I need to create the shadows. So I'm just gonna pull from this edge, see how my brushes floodings Akins. It's gonna fall out. I really want to create a really nice contrast between the missed here and shadows water. Just pull your brush across the cameras to spread that a little bit. Makes it so I put a little bit of your graze on your brush a little bit of your indigo and brown wipe off the excess. What we're gonna do is we're going to start building the island that these trees breast off . So just like we did up top, you're gonna push your brush into this canvas and kind of pulled along very long. They're not a very big we'll talk to land that these guys were sitting and then over here, I'm gonna do the same thing. Just pull a little bit of paint off my brush that you'll also see that down here gets a little darker. So what I want to do, let's get a little bit one that paint on my fresh. I just want to run a bit of a different people from this side across and let my brush just kind of thing into that light color over here. I really want you just to really gently push your color up into this weight and just soften it up a bit. What I'm doing here is I'm just blending these trees into the water. I'm using re doctor brush, so it's really not a lot of pushing and doing, but it's enough to just Flynn that lined it into this reflection. In a few seconds, we're gonna be pulling these trees down to rest on the island. We're just gonna continue their trunks right down so they rest here in the water. I really want to take draw attention to this little piece of land that these trees air sitting on in the water. So what I'm gonna do, I have this white on my brush. I'm gonna start probably about 1/4 inch of that dark line that we just did in view the whole way across. But I'm gonna push pretty hard to canvass as we usually do. Start jiggling that brush and I don't know the poll My white paint right through and across . Just like that. You do it again. Help your brush over. You still have some paint on that side right across. Keep the same line as you pull across, because not only are you defining that island, but you're showing that maybe there's a pocket of miss resting on the water right here. It's a really need effect. I'm also gonna continue that down a little further. I just want this miss to be resting on the water. So see that I'm just pulling that. Generally across have my brushing on the campus. I'm not pushing too hard. It's just enough to transfer that white onto this reflection. I also want to create a little pocket of mist over here just for the I follow draw a little bit war from the side just to break up that dark, shallow and maybe join it into this pocket that we created rate. You know, What I'm gonna do is I'm just gonna take my brush and gently pull it all the way across. Just kind of pull the pieces together. So you created really feeling okay, So next we're gonna work on pulling these trees right down to rest on this little island that we're starting to build for them. So just right off the hop, I'm pulling the paint dinner, continuing the line and plopping them right there on the water where I want it. Now. Actually, I think this first tree I'm going to keep on the being part. So I'm gonna go back in and beautiful oil paintings form. Just erase it by rubbing over it really gently with a light brush. They're not sitting back on the island. I like the idea just having to sitting out here and maybe our little guy coming down resting here to everything else being in the main part of the land. So we're gonna take our Brown's again, our mandate ground law number as well as one of your grace. Further check old if you have it. It's not. Just use your pains. Great. I'm gonna transfer that shadow. Denounced this little island just like that. Well, I proper light after right now. We're just gonna build up these pieces also gonna pull this piece right down to the water's edge up here. Same with this treat. That one's OK in the distance. Yeah, a little bit of white to my brush. And what I'm gonna do is I'm gonna fall my highlight down these pieces. So I really want them. Mr. Stand, Everything's always contrasts over here. It's like that a little bit more white. Your brush. It's following this truck break down until the nestles itself right into the grass is right there. This tree I'm OK with just having highlights in the top half. I kind of like how disappears into world's around it. Yeah, So now we're gonna keep working on the highlights here to make sure that they slow right down to the water. So again, the light is hitting the left side of these trees. So I'm just gonna add a little highlight. The left this tree here I wanted to be resting right on the water's edge. So I'm just adding that. So grab anyone of your smaller brushes and we're just gonna do a little bit of detail work here for hear what browns and greens and grays mix together, and you're just gonna pull your brush just kind of pushing against the canvas to create the look off a little land really gently after you put that line in your water or your island is pull really gently up with your brush super gently and really softly and you're gonna create what looks like prices, super easy technique that really affect in the reference for you'll see a little tuft of grass coming out of here. So go ahead and just add a little shadow there if you want, or you can create another. Whatever you like. I had to pick up a bit of my team of white. A little bit of my pains. Great. Just a time of it. I'm just gonna play with some missed along the edge, just pulling from one side with my brush, just pulling the paint across. Just softening some of these Luns in contests. I really just making the effect of the mist resting on the water here to find a way to break up the reflection. I just drove the I and all these different little wants you. I can play at the final detail with one my paintings for days. I'm gonna leave it here really happy with how far with droplets together. But now, if you won't add anything else that to be on your own terms, I really want you to get creative. Or if you feel that you've done enough, then step back. Let your painting dry, revisit tomorrow. Make sure you gone. Everything accomplishment, you hoping to. We have covered along this video and it might be a lot. Take it so revisited a few times. And what do you think? Slowly take your time and enjoy the process.