Korean for Absolute Beginners 2 | Keehwan Kim | Skillshare

Korean for Absolute Beginners 2

Keehwan Kim, Language teaching professional

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28 Lessons (3h 24m)
    • 1. Course Introduction

      1:37
    • 2. Sino-Korean Numbers

      9:49
    • 3. Native-Korean Numbers

      10:11
    • 4. Review Lesson - Number Systems

      8:53
    • 5. Large numbers 100 to 1,000

      6:46
    • 6. Large numbers 10,000

      6:54
    • 7. Counting in Korean

      7:50
    • 8. Review Lesson - Large numbers & Counting

      8:10
    • 9. Days of the week

      6:59
    • 10. Date

      5:57
    • 11. Review Lesson - Days of the week & Date

      6:25
    • 12. Counting months

      5:58
    • 13. Time

      7:07
    • 14. Review Lesson - Counting months & Time

      6:04
    • 15. Pronouns - I and you

      7:38
    • 16. Pronouns - he and she

      6:17
    • 17. Pronouns - we and they

      6:57
    • 18. Review Lesson - Pronouns

      9:56
    • 19. Present tense - Formal

      8:43
    • 20. Present tense - Polite 1

      7:39
    • 21. Review Lesson - Present tense 1

      5:08
    • 22. Present tense - Polite 2

      7:35
    • 23. Present tense - Polite & Casual

      7:27
    • 24. Object particles - 을 & 를

      6:25
    • 25. Review Lesson - Present tense 2

      8:35
    • 26. Negative Form

      10:11
    • 27. Question form

      6:20
    • 28. Review Lesson - Present tense 3

      6:36
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About This Class

This course covers some of the most essential aspects of Korean language for beginner learners.

The content of this course includes:

  • Korean numbers (both Sino-Korean and Native-Korean numbers)
  • Use of Korean numbers (counting, telling the time and date)
  • Use of pronouns in Korean
  • Verb conjugation in the present tense
  • Use of objects
  • Forming negative statements
  • Forming questions

You will learn all these important concepts through guided speaking practice, as well as handouts which you can download for further practice.

Transcripts

1. Course Introduction: hi there. And welcome to the second course in our Korean for absolute beginners. Siri's I'm new instructor Kim given. Now, if you took our first course, then you would have learned how to read and go and how to form basic sentences in Korean. And our second course is going to build on this and help you develop further knowledge off the basics in Korea with first going to look at the number system in Korean will learn to number systems yes to number systems, Sino Korean and Native Korean numbers. And we'll look in detail how these numbers are used in Korean language. After that, we're going to learn how pronouns are used in Korean, and then we'll spend quite a bit of time looking at Vogue conjugation rules in the present . And then we'll look at how objects used in Korean differences. Finally, we're going to wrap up the course by learning to form negative sentences and questions in Korea. While the aim of this course is to help you develop the fundamental knowledge in grammar, we want you to learn by doing rather than just listening. So every lesson involves guided speaking practice as well as independent speaking practice to help you learn the lesson content. There are also review lessons at regular interval, with further speaking practice for all the different concepts to stick in your mind. And don't forget to download the exercise sheet after each review. Lesson to practice writing Korean. We've packed a lot in this one course, So when you're ready, dive in and we'll get learning more Korea. See you soon. Bye bye. 2. Sino-Korean Numbers: hi there. And welcome to the lesson on numbers in Korean now one of the most important aspect. So Korean language is that because of the history off, using Chinese characters as a writing system before the creation of hunger. Even to this day there are many words in Korean which have Chinese origin, and this is something that you will need to learn more about as you continue to develop your vocabulary knowledge. And one of the biggest influences of Chinese is in the number system. Now Korean language has to number systems. The number system that is influenced by Chinese is called Sino Korean numbers, and the other, which is based on Korean language, is called Native Korean numbers. Now I know it seems a little strange. Why would you have to number systems? Why make it more confusing than it already is? But that's just how it is. And unfortunately, both number systems have very specific uses, so you can't just learned one and use that for everything. It doesn't work that way in this lesson. We're going to start things off by learning the Sino Korean numbers, and we'll learn to say the numbers 0 to 99. So let's begin. Now. Sino Korean numbers are really easy. Because if you can master the numbers 0 to 10 you've mastered almost the entire number system because most of the other numbers are basically a combination off these small numbers. So well, first to a listening repeat, Practice off the numbers 1 to 10 and we'll do this practice twice. So if you're ready, listen and repeat after me. Young it it e some so. Oh, you to pyre. Cool. Sit. Okay, that was great. Let's do that one more time. Repeat after me, young it it e some so. Oh, you to pyre Cool ship. Okay, that was great. Now let's do an independent practice off saying numbers 1 to 10. Try to say the numbers by yourself first, and then listen to me saying these numbers, Okay, So if you're ready, let's begin. Young young it it It is e e Sam. Sam. So so or or you you to to pyre pyre. Cool, cool Sip ship. Fantastic job. Well done. Now let's move on to numbers 11 to 99 Now Saying the numbers 11 2 99 is really simple. As I mentioned already saying the big numbers in Sino Korean number system is all about combining the smaller numbers. For example, to say, number 14 you basically have to say number 10 and four together. So 14 in Korea is ships, huh? Ships, huh? And you basically apply the same rule to all the other numbers. Now, to give you another example to, say, 28 in Korea, you first make 20 by saying two and 10 which is easy it and then you say eight in Korea, which is power. So 28 in Korea is e ship pattern. He should. Okay, so let's look at one more example to say 86 1st you make 80 by saying eight and 10 together , which is pay a ship. And then you say number six in Korean, which is you. So 86 in Korean is passion you not that difficult, right? Okay, so let's practice saying numbers 11 2 99 The 1st 2 lines will be a listening repeat practice, and in the next six will be independent reading practice. However, I will put numbers 1 to 10 on the screen so that you can use it as a reference So if you're ready, let's begin Some ship seven ship new. He's it. He's it. Or ship or ship? A pirate ship Partnership. Easy bowl. Easy bowl or ships higher or ships higher. Paris. Um you Paris? Um you That was brilliant. Well done. Okay, so in this final practice, we're going to do to independent speaking practices. The first is all numbers 0 to 10. And the second is a numbers 11 to 99. So this is a simple practice or saying the numbers. So if you're ready, this begin with the first practice. These are numbers 0 to 10. Let's begin. Young, young it it it it e e Sam Sam. So so. 00 you you to to pyre pyre. Cool, cool ship ship That was fantastic. World on. Now let's do the second Independence Speaking practice or numbers 11 to 99. Remember that these large numbers are formed by combining the small numbers. So if you're ready, let's not. It's have manship. It's having manship Cruise ship cruise ship, you sip you zip Kroosee bowl Kroosee bowl Sam ship Oh, Sam Manship Power e c B e c b Fantastic job today. Well done you did really well in today's lesson, we learned the Sino Korean numbers. First, we learned the numbers 0 to 10 and then we learned the numbers 11 2 99 and how they are formed By combining the smaller numbers together in the next lesson, we'll learn about the Native Korean numbers. So I'll see you soon again in that listen, but why? 3. Native-Korean Numbers: hi there. So in this lesson, we're going to learn about Native Korean numbers and we'll learn to say numbers 1 to 99. So let's begin now. In native Korean numbers, there is no word for zero. But if we need to say zero with native career numbers, we actually use the word for zero from Sino Korean numbers. So first, we're going to practice saying numbers 1 to 10 in native Korean numbers. This is a listener repute practice. So if you're ready, let's begin. Uh, Hannah to to said, Net Castle, your Assad. Here you go. Your daughter, I hope. Yeah, Okay, great job. But let's do that Practice one more time. This is a listening repeat practice as well. So if you're ready, let's do it again. Hannah to said Net Castle, your Assad. Here you go. Your daughter, I hope. Yeah, that was great. Now let's do an independent speaking practice off the numbers 1 to 10 in Native Korean numbers to try to recall what we just practise in a list and repeat practice. So if you're ready, let's begin, Hannah Hannah to To said. I said Net Net Castle ties up your thought your Assad if you go. Here you go. Yard oh Yard. Oh, I hope, I hope. Yeah, Yeah. Great job. Well done. Now, in native Korean numbers, there are specific words for double digit numbers that end in zero. These are numbers like 2030 40 and sort. Now, this aspect of having specific words for double digit numbers that end in zero is actually quite similar to English as English. Also has words like 2030 40 and so on. So let's practice these numbers by doing a listening repeat practice. So if you're ready, let's begin. Sumer, it's harden by hand, Shin yes and eat and yard and ah, and that was great. But let's try that one more time in a listening repeat practice. Are you ready? Here we go. Sumer. It's harden by hand, Shin yes and eat and yard and ah! And that was great. Now let's move on and learn to say the numbers. 11 to 99 Now to say numbers 11 2 99 In native Korean numbers, you basically have to just combine the double digit numbers that end in zero with the single digit numbers, for example, to say, number 13. You basically combine 10 and three together, which are yo and set. So 13 in native Korean numbers is Joosep to give you a few more examples to say 27. Is Sumer illegal? To say 43 is violence head to say 89 is Jordan Hall. So now that you have a good idea on how these numbers are formed less to a guided practice , the 1st 2 numbers will be a listening repeat practice. And the next six numbers will be an independent speaking practice. Okay, so if you're ready, let's begin. Sodden, sodden, pass out. Sumer Sumer, Hinn Hinn Yes and yes and similar illegal, similarly illegal Shin Hannah Shin Hannah Yes, and to Yes and to that was great wot done in this final practice will do to independent speaking practices. The 1st 1 is on the numbers 1 to 10 in the 2nd 1 is on the numbers 11 to 99. So let's start with the 1st 1 and we're going to do an independent speaking practice. All the numbers 1 to 10. So if you're ready, let's begin. Hannah Hannah to To said said Net net. Castle Castle, your thought your Assad. If you go There you go. Yodo Yard. I I hope, I hope. Yeah, yeah, that was great. Well done. Now let's do the second Independence speaking practice, and this time it's on the numbers 11 to 99. Remember that we formed these numbers by combining the double digit numbers with zero and the single digit numbers. So if you're ready, let's begin by hand by hand, eat and eat. And similarly, Assad. Similarly, Assad sodden it ago, sodden it ago by the NCAA, sought by the NCAA sought Eden. Your daughter eat in the old daughter. That was great. It was not easy, but you didn't really. Well, in this lesson, we learned the Native Korean numbers. First, we learned the numbers 1 to 10 second. We learned that double digit numbers that end in zero and third. We learned the numbers 11 2 99 which have formed by combining the double digit numbers with zero and the single digit numbers. In the next lesson, we're going to review the two number systems we have learned so far, so I'll see you in that lesson. But by 4. Review Lesson - Number Systems: Hello there. So, in this lesson, we're going to review the two number systems we have learned so far. Let's begin with a Sino Korean numbers. Okay, so let's start off by doing a listening. Repeat, practice off the numbers. 0 to 10. Let's begin. Young it, it e some so. Oh, you to pyre. Cool ship. That was great. Now that you're warmed up a little bit less to an independent speaking practice off the same numbers. So this is an independent speaking practice. Off the numbers. 0 to 10. Are you ready? Let's begin. Young. Young It it It is E e Sam! Sam. So so Oh, or you you to to pyre pyre. Cool, Cool. Sip ship. Okay, that was great. Now let's do one more independent speaking practice. But this time on the numbers 11 to 99. Remember that these numbers are formed by combining the numbers 1 to 10. So if you're ready, let's begin. Sam C B Samueli be two ships are two ships are ship cool ship. Cool. Paris Siebel. Perishable. Easy, muche. Easy Mu. All ships our warships are. That was brilliant. Now let's move on to reviewing the native Korean numbers. Okay, so we're going to review the Native Korean numbers, and we'll first start by doing numbers 1 to 10. Let's first to a listening Repeat, practice off these numbers. If you're ready. Let's begin. Hannah to said Net Castle, your Assad. Here you go. Your dire, I hope. Yeah, that was great. Now let's practice the same numbers again. But this time, this is an independent speaking practice. So you ready this? Try that again. Hannah Hannah to To Said said Net Net Castle ties up your thought. Your Assad. Here you go. Here you go. Yard oh Yard. Oh, I hope, I hope. Yeah. Yeah, that was great. Well done. Now, if you recall Native Korean numbers have specific words for double digit numbers that end in zero. So let's first to a listing. Repeat, practice off these numbers. You ready? Let's begin, Sumer. Sudden! My hon Shin. Yes. And Eden Yard and Ah, hand. That was great. Now let's practice these numbers again. But this time this will be an independent speaking practice. You ready? Let's begin. Simmer, Simmer. Sodden Sudden Barton Barton Shin Shin! Yes and yes And Eden. Eden. Yarden! Yarden! On our own that was fantastic. Baudone. Now the final practice off this review lesson is on the numbers. 11 2 99 for native Korean. Others remember that we formed these numbers by combining the double digit numbers that ended zero and the single digit numbers. So if you're ready, let's do an independent speaking practice off the numbers. 11 to 99. Let's begin, Harden yells out. Suddenly else hot, you're do yo do similar net. Similar net Eden has hot Eden has out. I had to. I didn't do it! Shing yada Shin Yaddo. That was brilliant. Fantastic effort today, well done. In this lesson, we review the two number systems in Korean and practiced all the different ways of saying numbers. 0 to 99 in the next lesson will start learning how to say bigger numbers in Korea. So I'll see you soon in that lesson. But why 5. Large numbers 100 to 1,000: hi there. So in this lesson, we're going to learn how to say numbers using pick meaning 100 ton meaning 1000. So let's begin now. The first thing you need to know about saying numbers above 100 is that we only use signer Korean numbers for numbers above 100. There are words for numbers above 100 in native Korean, but we never used these. So we only have to learn the words for above 100 for Sino Korean numbers. And when we say numbers 100 above, we again combined smaller numbers together to form larger numbers. Let me explain what I mean by this now in Korean, 100 is pick, pick, pick. Let's practice saying this first repeat after me pick, pick. That was great. Now if we try to say 150 in Korea, we basically follow the same pattern we used to form double digit numbers. So first we say 100 which is Peck and then we say 50 which is a warship. So 100 and 50 in Korea is pick warship. Let's look at two more examples to say 458. We first have to say 400 which is Harbeck. And then we say 50 which is worship and then eight, which is power. So 458 in Korea is Harbeck or ship. Another example that follows his pattern is 623. Which would be you. Peck the ship, Sam. Pretty simple isn't Okay, so let's do a few listening. Repeat, practice off the numbers in the 100 range. Repeat after me. E bec Sam Beck, Sabic sabic ship sabic e ship Sabic. Easy bull. Fantastic job won't on. Okay, so the next large number unit is Chung, which means 1000. So let's first to a list and repeat practice off saying Chung, repeat after me Chun Chun, that was great. Now similar to pick to say the numbers in the 1000 range we basically combined chung with other small numbers. So to say, 1250 we would say chung e beg worship and to say, 4328. We would say that tongue Sam, beg the ship power. So, as before, is just a case of putting the small numbers together to form larger numbers. Let's practice saying the numbers in the 1000 range. Repeat after me or ton you chung two ton chicken John E bec to turn pro Beck to jump Arabic ship. Fantastic. Joe won't on. Okay, so in this final practice will do to independent speaking practices. The 1st 1 on saying the numbers in the 100 range in the 2nd 1 on saying the numbers in the 1000 range. So we'll do the 1st 1 This is an independent speaking practice. So try saying the numbers by yourself first and then listen to me saying that so if you're ready, let's begin. E beg e beg Quebec! Quebec Oh, back nukes Ship over. Yuk ship Sam Back Worship Sam back Cruise ship PIRA Becks Huh? Manship Pira Becks, huh? Manship Chili, Baggy ships high cherry baggy ships high. That was great. Well done. Now let's through the second Independence speaking practice. And this time we're going to practice saying the numbers in the 1000 range. This is an independent speaking practice. So you go first and then listen to me saying the numbers Are you ready? This begin Satyan Satyan! Could Chun Good chun Could Chun's Harvick Could Chun's Harvick, Eaton para Beck, Eaton para Beck or Ton per Arabic or ton parodic or tons Harvard Cruise Ship or tons Harbeck worship. Amazing job Today won't on. So in today's lesson, we learned to say the numbers in the hundreds and 1000 range. In the next lesson, we'll learn to say the numbers above 10,000 so I'll see you in that lesson goodbye. 6. Large numbers 10,000: Hello there. So in this lesson, we're going to learn how to say the numbers 10,000 and above. So let's begin now. Korean word for 10,000 is man and man is a very important world because we can add words that mean 10 shit 100 pick, 1000 tongue to make 1,100,010 million. Now these numbers are obviously very big numbers. But if we're talking money tree terms in Korea, remember that Ping man on a 1,000,001 is only about $1000 your luncheon career could easily cost mine on 10,000 won, which is again only about $10. So the use of man in Korea is very common now to say the numbers 10,000 and above. It's again about putting together the small numbers to form larger numbers. For example, to say, 15,000 we say mine would turn to say, 245,000. We say he ships Hammond Woodson to say 742,300. We say two ships Hamon. It turns handbag. However, what makes learning mind tricky is that this world man doesn't exist in English, so it takes a bit of time getting used to saying man. So why don't we do a listening repeat practice off saying numbers using this word by repeat after me man e Man, Salmon Ciman, Sam Xinmin, Sam seem Newman. That was fantastic. Well done. Let's now look at the numbers in the 1,000,010 million range. And remember that saying these numbers is all about putting the small numbers together. Let's look at a couple of examples first to say 2,500,000 in Korean. It's bebek pushing man and to say, 35 million, 650,000 in Korea is some tongue Lubeck. You can ship my again. These are really big numbers. But saying such large numbers isn't unusual. One way of looking at it is that this first number could describe someone's monthly wage, and the second number could describe someone's annual salary. So using such big numbers isn't that unusual in Korea? Okay, so let's now do a listening repeat practice off saying the numbers in the 1,000,010 million range. Repeat after me. Ping hman e Bagman, e Bec, Awesome Man, Ton Man or Ton Man or Tunney. Beg always in man, That was great. Wot done. Now the next large number word is which refers to 100 million and we can combine OC with ship pick tongue to say she buck 1,000,000,000 Hey, cook 10 billion and China which would be 100 billion. However, unless you're buying a house, you're probably not going to use this word oc so we're not going to practice this. But I just wanted to let you know that this number word exists. Let's move on to the final practice. Okay, So let's review what we learned today We're going to do to independent speaking practices. The 1st 1 is on the numbers in the 10,000 and 100,000 range and the 2nd 1 is on the 1,000,010 million range. We'll begin with the 1st 1 So if you're ready, let's through the first independent speaking practice. Here we go. Salmon, salmon Pyman, Pyman Easy man. Easy man Chih xinmin to Xinmin to see woman to see Borman Cheer ship Woman Proton! Cherish it, Woman Patton! Great job. Well done. Now let's move on to the second Independence speaking practice. And this time we're going to practice the numbers in the 1,000,010 million range. So if you're ready, let's begin. Sam Brangman Sam Brangman You Penman, You penman Ton man, Ton Man, Sat Sundman, Satyan Hman Saturn's Ham Being Man, Saturn's Ham Being Man, Saturn's Ham back Trish Inman, Saturn's Ambac, Trish Inman. Brilliant effort today. Well done. So in today's lesson, we learned to say the numbers above 10,000. Using the word man in the next lesson will actually start learning how to use numbers in Korea. So I'll see you soon again in that lesson, but why? 7. Counting in Korean: hi there. So in this lesson, we're going to learn how to count things in Korea. So let's begin now in English when we want to count. Uncountable now owns. We use certain counting words. For example, if we want account uncountable noun paper, we use the word sheet, and if we want account hair, we might use the word strand. And the way we count things in Korean basically follows the same rules off, using certain counting words to count things. However, unlike English, Korean language doesn't have the concept off countable and uncountable. Announce. So, whatever now and you want to count, you have to use a certain counting words so naturally in Korean, we have to learn many different counting words to count. Different now owns. Now let's start with the most common word, which is care. We use care to count most in animal objects. So if you're ever unsure what counting word to use with a certain object, then you should use care. Now we can use care to count things like this. Penn Hunger one pen 10 hunger. So first we stayed, the noun we're counting and then the number word, and finally we state the counting word when we count things, we always use native Korean numbers. However, as you may have noticed already here, the number one Hannah has changed its form to hand. And this changing form happens to numbers 1 to 4 and 20. So Hannah becomes hand two, Becomes two, said becomes, say that becomes nay and Sumer becomes sumo. However, things get a little bit tricky when we start counting above 100 because native Korean numbers go up to 99 only. So to count, above 100. We generally switched to Sino Korean numbers. But when people count above 100 it's very common for people to actually use Sino Korean numbers and Native Korean numbers together, particularly when the counting between 101 and 109. So people will say things like Pick, hang, gay or pick eagle okay, and to count above, 110. There is no fixed rule on whether you need to use Sino Korean numbers and Native prime numbers together or just Sino Korean numbers, but I think it's much safer just to use signer Korean numbers. When you're counting above 110 it's a little confusing, but I imagine that you probably won't need to count above 100 too often. But if you do try to follow the rules that I've explained in this video, for now, let's focus on counting things using smaller numbers and first will practice counting up to 10 using the word K. Repeat after me. Hunger two. Gay It's a gay. They gay pass up gay. You also gay. You two go gay. Your daughter gay, I hope. Gay, you already gay? That was great. Now let's look at some other counting words now. Using appropriate counting words is really important off course, because you're a second language learner. If you were to make a mistake, Koreans will generally be quite forgiving. However, if a Native Korean person were to make a mistake, it not only makes that person seem foolish, but it can also be quite offensive and causing. Offence mainly happens when you're counting people. For example, Koreans find it really rude when you count people using the word K. Also in Korea, there are two different counting words. When you count people, one is more polite, the other is more general, so if you use them inappropriately, it can cause offense to people. Here are some of the more common counting words Young Young Poon Poon, body body Pyung Young 10. 10 Kwon Kwon Tung Tung It's higher, Sarah Charlie Color. Now, obviously, that's a lot to remember. So we'll focus on these three and care for now and we'll learn the rest as and when the opportunity arises in our future conversation courses. Also as mentioned before we use Myung in a more general sense. But when we want to be more respectful and polite, we use Okay, So let's practice these three counting words Young Putin and Muddy Repeat after me. Hm young? Yeah, I'm young 21 yard open. Say Mahdi name Adi. Fantastic job. Well done. Now let's to the final practice. In this final practice, we're going to do one independent speaking practice on using the words care Young Hoon and Muddy you will see prompts on the screen and I like you to complete the phrase using appropriate native Korean number and also the appropriate counting word. So if you're ready, let's begin pass on Myung Pass on Myung to Myung to Myung You're open. You're open, Eric, Open it ago. Open yours. Okay, You're not gay hunger. Hunger. Your daughter Maddie. Your daughter Maddie. They're muddy. Name Adi. Fantastic job today did really well done. So in this lesson, we learned to count in animal objects people, animal fish and insects using the words care Byung moon and body in the next lesson will review the numbers above 100 the rules of counting covered in this lesson. So I'll see you soon in that lesson. But why? 8. Review Lesson - Large numbers & Counting: hi there. So in this lesson, we're going to review everything we learn in the last three lessons. First will review the numbers above 100 and then we'll review how to count things in Korean . So let's get started. First. We'll do a listening repeat practice off the numbers in the hundreds and 1000 range. And remember that to say these numbers, we use the words Peck, Meaning 100 Chung meaning 1000. So this is a listening repeat practice. So let's get started. Pick Sam back ton or ton Sam John or turns him back. Okay, so that was great. Now let's do an independent speaking practice off the numbers in the hundreds and 1000 range. So you're going to go first and then you can listen to me saying the numbers. Are you ready? Let's begin. E bet E bec sitting back, sitting back, You beg you back Eaton sitting back. Eaton sitting back. Samsung, you peg Samsung, you pick. What's Johnny Beck? What's Johnny Beck? That was great. Wot done. Now let's move on and review how to use the word man. Okay, so this time we're going to do it. Listen, repeat practice off using the word man. Remember that we can attach ship, pick ton to man and say 1,100,010 million. So we're going to say a lot of big numbers. So if you're ready, let's do this listening. Repeat practice. Here we go, man. Cool man Xinmin, Sam's Inman Salmon ship Kumin or being Man Sat Youngman Saturno Brangman That was great wot done. Now let's do an independent speaking practice off using the word man, If you're ready, let's begin. Silliman Chairman Crewman Kuhlman Yuks in Man Yuxin Man The ship Chairman The ship Chairman Chili Ship Kuhlman Chili Ship Kuhlman Yu Ping Man Yu Ping Man Some Thomann Some Thomann Samsung You brangman Samson, you penman! That was fantastic! Well done. Final review of the lesson is on counting words And our focus was on learning the words care young hoon end body which we used to count objects, people and animals. We also learned that to count things we use Native Korean numbers and we also learned that numbers 1 to 4 and 20 change their form when counting things. So Hala becomes hand tour becomes too said becomes said net becomes there and Sumer becomes sumo So let's now do a listener Repeat practice using two of the counting words care and muddy. Repeat after me Hunger. Say gay your Assad Marry your own body. Great job Now This time, let's do a listener Repeat practice off the counting words which we used to count People remember that we used young to count people in a more general sense. And we use Poon to be more respectful. This is a listening repeat practice. So if you're ready speaking to Myung your dad I'm young Pass up one de Boon Well done. That was great! Now the final practice is an independent practice on a live four counting words using the prompts on the screen I like you to use the correct native Korean number and also used the correct counting word. So this is an independent practice which means that you speak first and then you can listen to me next. Are you ready? Let's begin. Pass on young Pass on young hand Young ham! Young Eric, Open it Open You open you open two gay to gay You're so gay! You're so gay! Se Muddy Samadi, Your dark gay Your daughter, Ok, fantastic job. Well done. You did really well today. In this review lesson, we review the numbers above 100 using man, and we also reviewed how to count things using counting words and also Native Korean numbers. Now we're going to continue the theme of numbers and focus on learning how to say the time and date so all season again. But why? 9. Days of the week: Hi there. Great to see you again. Now, in this lesson, we're going to focus on how to say that days of the week. But we're also going to learn how to count the number of days. So let's begin now to say that they of the week we attached the syllable that represents that particular day to the word your oil and the syllables that represent that there. The week originate from Chinese characters, and each syllable has its own meaning. The Chinese characters and their meaning are on the screen, but you don't have to memorize thes. They're just on the screen for your reference. What you do have to memorize are the Korean syllables that represent the days of the week. Such as while. Why Sue? So we'll do a listening repeat practice off the days of the week. You ready? Let's begin. Water. You're here. Hi. Oh, yah! So your your mortgage earlier Cu Mulia toyou. CDO era A lot of the syllables that represent the days of the week end with a pattern And because the following syllable begins with an e in the patch, him sound carries over. So why you're ill becomes war your it. Let's practice that days of the week one more time and keep in mind about the constant sound that carries over to the following syllable. So if you're ready, let's begin Water. You're here. Hi Oh yah! Sue your your mortgage Earlier cu Mulia toyou CDO era That was great. Now let's move on and learn how to count the number of days now the important word when counting days is the word. This word originates from Chinese characters and it means day. So to say how many days we simply put a signer Korean number in front of the world to say how many days like this salmon, three days, Hamid. It's as simple as that. The only thing you need to be mined for is that in Korea, the word it doesn't need to change into a plural form. Let's listen to a few more examples shipped. It'd 17 days, ship chitter. You get six days, you get it. He ships higher 24 days. Egypt's higher. Okay, so I think now you probably have a pretty good idea on how to count days. But we do listen, repeat, practice off what we've learned so far Repeat off to me, Samir. You get pot editor. She better ship Sayeda. He's in new gear. That was great. Now let's move on to the final practice. Okay? So we're going to do to independence speaking practices the 1st 1 on the days of the week and the 2nd 1 on counting the number of days In the first practice, you will see an English prompt. And I like you to say the days of the week in Korean, obviously. Okay, so if you're ready, let's begin. Warrior Warrior, here. Hi. Oh, it high Over here. Sirio! Sirio Yah! More Goya more go here. Come, Yulia. Kunio it toi toi et oya e d o a. That was great. Well done. Now let's do the second independent practice on counting the number of days you'll see an English prompting the screen. And I like you to say the number of days in Korea. Okay, so if you ready, let's begin it. It it it you get, you get she better she be ships. Higher ship, sire. Easy, bitter Easy. Bitter Easy powder. Easy partier. Amazing job. Well done. Okay, so in today's lesson, we learned that days of the week in Korea, and we also learned to count the number of days using Sino Korean numbers in the next lesson. We're going to learn how to say that dates in Korean, so I'll see you soon again. But by 10. Date: Hi there. Welcome back. So in this lesson, we have one objective, and that is to learn how to say that dates in Korea. Let's get started. An important word we used to talk about the date is the word. While this word originates from the Chinese characters and it means month and to say what month it is, we say Sino Korean number plus one. So to say, January, it's it'll to say February. It's he want and to say March. It's similar. However, there are always exceptions, because to say June and October, we have to remove the patch him from the number word and then add one. So it's not you go, it's you want and it's not she boy, it's she wa Okay, so let's first practice saying the months in Korean Repeat after me eat are e wa sam water psy war y you are zero paddle Cruella She waas CBR c B y. That was great road on now, saying that dates in Korean is really simple. You first say the month which we just practiced and then say that date number by using Sino Korean numbers, plus the world in which we learned in the previous lesson. So the first of September is who are ill. 17th of May is a warship Cheddar, and the 25th off December Is she be were easy. Boy, it's really not that difficult. But as with anything, you just need a little practice. So let's do a listening repeat practice off saying the dates. Repeat after me gruel oil Cruel, easy Bill. Who are party or ship? Samir? She be WASI Bitter CB were easy. Boy, that was great. Now let's move on to the final practice In this final practice we're going to do to independent speaking practices. The 1st 1 is on the months of the year and the 2nd 1 is on the date. So we do the 1st 1 but we won't practice the months in order. So if you're ready, let's begin. Sam are Sam or Cruella Koo? Are he wa she waas paddle paddle she be Will she be were Siderar sido That was great. Now let's do the second Independence speaking practice And this time you're going to need that important word which means they get it. Are you ready? Let's begin. You are see better He wasa better you are easy beer. You are easy Beer. Perot. Quit patter. Queer Power Shmuger Power Shmuger! Cheetos! Higher Chihuahuas! Higher. She be Role is shipped. It'd she be. Role is shipped. It'd fantastic job today won't in this lesson. We learned the months of the year in Korean and we also learned to say that date in Korean . In the next lesson, we're going to learn how to count months in Korea. So I'll see you soon again. But why? 11. Review Lesson - Days of the week & Date: hi there. So in this lesson, we're going to review what we learned in the previous two lessons. Talking about the days of the week and the date. Let's begin so we'll begin with the days of the week. Now, if you recall, the days of the week is about attaching the syllable that refers to a particular day to You were. So let's do a listening repeat practice off saying Monday to Sunday. Let's begin Water. You're here. Hi Oh yah! So your your mortgage earlier cu Mulia toyou. CDO era. That was great. Now let's review how we count the number of days to count the number of days we use Sino Korean numbers with the word it which means day. So let's do a few listening. Repeat, practice off how we count the number of days. Eat it. Hi it You get it? She bear. See, boy here he's a partier. That was great. Now let's do an independent practice or what we practice so far. The 1st 3 lines will be on the days of the week and the last three will be on counting the number of days. So if you're ready this practice Morgan where. Borger. Here. Hi Oh, you high Oita toi toi partier potted. She better she better. Egypt's higher. The ship's higher, fantastic job won't on. Now let's move on and review how to save the date first. Let's review how we say the months in Korean to say a particular month in Korean, we say a signer Korean number that refers to a particular month with the word while, which means months. So if you're ready, let's do a listening repeat practice off. How to say the months in Korean, Sam or sour? You are cool. See what CeBIT order? That was great. Well done. Now let's review how to say that dates in Korean to say that dates We first state the month using one of the expressions that we just practiced and then to say the number date. We use the expression that we use to count the number of days. So it's a signer Korean number in the word it. This is a listening repeat practice on how to say the date. Let's begin psy war. Is she better? Sour? Easy, Better school were who are some new getter. Sam Ori ships higher CBD Oil Party that was great. Well done. The last practice off this review lesson is an independent practice on saying the month and saying that date the 1st 2 lines will be on saying the month and the rest of the practice will be on saying the date. So if you're ready, let's begin. Paddler Parro, she wa she wa powders Seabury pot Or is she better See why? Oy see why Oy you are Sim. You get ur sim you gator CB worry ships Higher CB were Egypt's higher great job today won't on in this lesson We reviewed how to say that days of the week, how to count the number of days, how to say the months in Korean and lastly, how to say that dates in Korean. In the next lesson, we're going to learn how to count the number of months in two different ways. So I'll see you soon in that Listen, but why 12. Counting months: Hi there. Welcome back. So in this lesson, we're going to learn two different ways to count months in Korea. So let's begin. The first way of counting months is to use the word while which means month. And we learned this word in the previous lesson and to count the number of months we put the counting word care in front of why. So we say K y And then we use a Sino Korean number to indicate the number of months in front of Kois. So to say, five months, we say or get where? Okay, why? To say 10 months. We say ship care wire should care what and to say Eight months. We say Paraguay water. How you get what, and that's all there is to it. So let's go straight into a practice off counting months using K Y. Repeat after me, it's hard gay one or gay y you get what? Google wa sipg A while that was great wot done. Now let's look at the second way off counting months in Korea. Now, the second way of counting months is to use the native Korean word Tired means month and because this is a native Korean word. We also use Native Korean numbers. So to say, five months, we say, pass out there to say two months. We say to diet and to say, 10 months. We say Yoda, sometimes to say three months and four months instead of saying said I ended their which are both correct. Karim's often say Suck their and Dr and these words sock and knock refer to numbers three and four. But they're only used to count months and then never, ever used in any other context. Okay, so now you have a pretty good idea on how to use the word power. Let's do a speaking practice. Repeat after me. Hand I through thy ned. I yours. Are there your handout? That was great. Well done. Now, both expressions care, war and power are commonly used in everyday speech in Korea, however, care what is a little more for more than time. So, in official documents such as property contracts with a state that duration of your stay, you more likely to seek a were used then. Okay, let's move on to the final practice. In this final practice, we're going to do to independent speaking practices. The 1st 1 is on using the word care one. And the 2nd 1 is on using the word we'll begin with the 1st 1 on using Kor. Remember that with care. What? We use Sino Korean numbers. So if you're ready, let's begin. Sorry. Gay. What? Sorry. Gay What? Ugo Ugo Chili get while Chile Gay wire Sick girl. Whoa! Shit guy wire Eager wir e g a y or gay y or gay? Whoa, that was great. Wot done. Now let's do the second Independence speaking practice And this time we're going to practice using. And of course, there is a native Korean word. So we use native Korean numbers. So if you're ready, let's begin Honda Honda pass out there has out there If you go up there, you go die your Onda your and I to die to die said I said, I awesome job today. Whoa! Done In this lesson, we learned to count months using the phrases care our entire. And we also learned that we use Sino Korean numbers with Karen and Native Korean numbers. With Pat in the next lesson, we're going to learn how to tell time in Korea. So I'll see you soon in that lesson. But why 13. Time: Hi there. Welcome back. So in this lesson, we're going to learn how to tell the time in Korean, and we're also going to learn how to count hours, minutes and seconds. So let's begin now to talk about time. There are two very important words. One is she, which means our and the other is Poon, which means minutes and telling the time is very similar to saying that date because to tell the time we say blank, she blank Boone and each plank we say a number word that refers to the hour and the minute . Here's an example Your issues Hamed Shippan 10 30 Your issues. Hamed Shippan. Now I don't know if you noticed there already, but there is one unusual aspect to telling the time in Korean, and this is the use off both number systems to say the hour we use Native Korean numbers. But to say the minute we use Sino Korean numbers, here are a few other examples. True, she open 205 to see. Open your answer. 11. 10 Your RNC Shippan Passel sheep, Hon 5 30 has a sheet pan, so as you can see, we use Native Korean numbers to say the hour and Sino Korean numbers to say the minute and in the final example we have this word pan Pan means half in Korean and we use this word to indicate 30 minutes past the hour. So has she Pan means 5 30 Okay, so let's do a speaking practice off telling the time in Korean Repeat after me. Hanzee, Hanzee, Shippan They see easy open there she hadn't. You're isi Sibon, you are the CEO Shippan. That was great. Wot done. Now let's look at how we count time in Korea to count time In Korea there are three very important words she can spoon and troll Now this words Shagan is made up off she which means our and can which means duration. So she got refers to the whole duration off the hour And then we also learned this word pun which means minute And the final word is chalk, which means second Now listen to the following examples that used these words two she gone two hours. Two she can sash Shippan 40 minutes It's hardship one watch. Oh, five seconds or Chou So as you can see to count the hours in Korean. We use Native Korean numbers and to count the minutes and seconds we use Sino Korean numbers. So let's do a speaking practice off. Counting the hours, minutes and seconds using Shagan Moon and Choked. Repeat after me says she gotten passel Sheikhoun e Sipan Sigh, Xibalba one. Salmon ship, Chou para Chu O. That was great. Well done. Now let's do the final practice. Okay, so in this final practice and we're going to do to independent speaking practices, the 1st 1 is on telling the time, and the 2nd 1 is on counting the time. We'll begin with the 1st 1 on telling the time. Remember that we use Native Korean numbers to say the hour and Sino Korean numbers to say the minute. So if you're ready, let's begin. Pasos, she's hash Shippan Castle. She's hash Shippan. You're Assisi ball one. You're a C C. Bogan. It'll go up, See? Pan it a group C pan to see Sipan two. She Shippan Ya, Darcy or Shippan, Your Doris Iwill Shippan. Fantastic job. Well done. Now let's do the second independent practice. And this time we're going to practice counting the time. Remember that we used Native Korean numbers to count the hours and Sino Korean numbers to count the minutes and seconds. So if you're ready, let's begin. Hans Juergen, Hanns Egon Passel, Shagan Castle. She gone easy open. Is it open? Warships have been or ships happen. Ship tour. Sip Chou Salmon ship chul Sam Conceptual. Great job Today won't on in today's lesson. We learn to tell the time in Korean, and we also learned to count the hours, minutes and seconds in the next lesson. We're going to review how to count the months and also review everything covered in this lesson. So I'll see you soon again in that review lesson, but why? 14. Review Lesson - Counting months & Time: Hi there. Welcome back. So in this lesson, we're going to review how to count months in Korean, how to tell the time and how to count hours, minutes and seconds. That's a lot to get through. So let's get started. We learned to count months using care well, and we learned that we use Sino Korean numbers with Keller and we use Native Korean numbers with Let's do a listening repeat warmer practice off using cable and repeat after me, either. Gay water. It's hard. Get what? Parag? A war pass out the yo down! Yo, dude, I That was great. Well done. Now let's do an independent speaking practice off using K our entire. And in this practice, the key is to use appropriate number words with Karen. And so, if you're ready, let's begin. You get water, every gay water Krueger y cook air y paygate while Paige a wire Did I Did I yours not thy years out there? Yo, dude, I Yo, dude, I That was great. Wot done. Now let's move on and review how to tell the time and how to count the hours, minutes and seconds to tell the time we use the words she which means Our and Poon, which means minute. And the key aspects of telling the time is that we use Native Korean numbers with she and Sino Korean numbers with Putin. So let's do a listening repeat practice off tending the time in Korea. Pazos She pass a sheep, hon. It hopes a Sipan you are CCB open. Great job load on now. We also learned to count hours, minutes and seconds in Korean, using the words Shagan, prune and Chore. And we also learned that we used Native Korean numbers to count hours, and we use Sino Korean numbers to count minutes and seconds. So let's through a listener. Repeat, practice off counting the hours, minutes and seconds. Repeat after me day she can it develops. Egan Sip bun. Easy Bourbon, salmon Schiphol Starship chul That was great. Wot done. Now, this is the final practice off this review lesson and this is an independent practice on telling the time counting the hours, minutes and seconds. Think about what number system you have to use when 10 in the time and also when you're counting time using Shagan poon ancho. So if you're ready, let's begin pass us Share Shippan Pass us share Shippan Daisy Open daisy Open two She gun two She gun it Hopes again it hopes again. Easy, Oban. Easy, Oban. Eupen, you put in Sam Ship Chul Sam Ship Chou Pactual Pactual Great effort today. Well done. In this lesson, we reviewed counting months in Korean, telling the time in Korean and counting the hours, minutes and seconds. Now I think that's been a pretty in depth coverage off numbers in Korean. So we're going to move away and turn our attention to the elements that make up the Korean sentences. So I'll see you soon again, but by 15. Pronouns - I and you: hi, everyone. So in this lesson, we're going to look at the use of pronouncing Korean. Now. We've already seen the use of pronouns in some of our previous lessons will be formed sentences using the pronoun I. But I think it'll be good to focus on learning exactly what pronouns I in Korean and how they used. So that's what we're going to do. Let's first begin with a pronoun I first. Unlike English, Korean doesn't have different pronouns for subjects and objects in a sentence. So in that regard it's a little easier. However, there are two different forms of the pronoun I formal form and an informal form. The formal form is chart and we use chart with the particle. And then however, when we use the particle car, chaw changes to check. So in sentences they looked like this child. Then something human. Nida Cheka something You, me neither. The informal form of I is not and similar to the formal form that is used with a particle. And then But when we use the particle car now changes to today. So in sentences they looked like this nine in something you mia, they got something you, mia. Now, the important thing to keep in mind is that the pronounce that n char change form when they use with a particle car. So with that in mind, let's go into a practice of using these pronouns with different particles. This is a listening repeat practice off the sentences we have seen so far. Childrens hunting naming Nida. Check something naming Nida Dannon something. Neemia, They got something, Neemia, that was great. Let's move on and look at the pronoun you. The use of you in Korean is very different from how it is used in English. In general, the use of you implies that you and I are off equal level. So unless you're talking to your friend who is the same age as you, using you becomes rather inappropriate. However, when we're talking to friends who are of the same age, all those who are younger than us, we can use law. That is the most commonly used form of you. But you mustn't use this with people who are in a more senior position than you. As you can come across quite in polite. Here are some example sentences using the don't in something you mia Non In something you mia they Garzon singing Mia. They got something in media. As you can see here, the pronoun door changes today when it's used with a particle car. However, the pronoun there which means I and the pronoun there, which means you sound the same. And although based on the context, you can work out whether they're means you or I to avoid confusion, people often just say Bulger rather than beggar like this. No guys hunting you, Mia. No guys something you mia However, it should be stressed that the use of Naga is in speech only in written text issue. Right, ***. So let's do a speaking practice off these sentences using London and yoga. Repeat after me Don't and sons and anemia, Dogus hunting, Neemia Don't and Sons and Neemia Dogus hunting Neemia. That was great. Now, as I mentioned already know is only every used with people who are of the same age, usually with friends. So when Koreans address people who are older or who they aren't familiar with, Koreans generally don't use a pronoun you. In many textbooks, you will see words like Panjin and Cuda. But Panjin is only ever used between married couple and also in written texts, so it's rarely used in everyday speak. Also could there is a term of endearment, so you might see this word used in musical lyrics when someone is trying to express their love to another person, so it's really used in everyday speech. If you talk to people in a more senior position or people who you aren't familiar with, you will most likely address them by their title, such as their job title or family title, or just not use you entirely if it's unnecessary. So the important things to remember about using the pronoun you is that we used know when we're talking to people of the same age or those who are younger than us. And if we're talking to people who are in a more senior position, we either address them by their title or not use any pronounce if it's unnecessary. Okay, so that's enough of me lecturing. Let's move on to the final practice. In this final practice, we're going to do one independent speaking practice using the prompts on the screen and depending on whether the sentences used the particles in, then or eager. I'd like you to use the appropriate form of the Pronounce I or you and complete the sentences. Also, when you use you with the particles E car. Please use law in this practice as this is more common in everyday speech. Okay, so if you're ready this begin the practice, John. In something you mean Nida Thonon son saying naming Nida Dogus hands anemia though Guys hunting you Mia tega something Neiman Nida Check. Got something. You mean Nida nine and sons Anemia. Nine in something EMEA They guys hunting EMEA. They got something EMEA don and something EMEA. Norman's hunting you mia. Great effort. Well done. In today's lesson, we looked at two forms of pronoun I and the different ways in which the prone on you is used in Korea. In the next lesson, we'll look at how the pronouns he and she I used in Korea. So I'll see you soon in that lesson. But why 16. Pronouns - he and she: hi there. So in this lesson, we're going to look at the pronouns he and she in Korean. Let's being when you look at Korean textbooks, he and she are often translated as COO and Kenya, but these words are rarely used in everyday speech. The word could means that. And when we refer to people in the third person, we often use coup and announed that refers to that person. This now is commonly some form of title, such as a job title or family title. So we might say something like coups hunting him, that teacher who's hunting him. We can also say Ananda, that man and creator, that woman. And although these terms are formal, they're not very respectful terms, so you shouldn't use them if you need to be polite. Another common term is a tingle, that friend and coaching go is a very common way or referring to somewhat in a very friendly way. But this is a rather casual way or referring to someone in third person. So again you shouldn't use this term if you need to be polite. Okay, so let's practice using all the different ways off, referring to someone in third person in sentences. Repeat after me Who Something human peach out in McCoy Oh, his hunting human pH at Edinburgh. Lawyer Coonan Zanten P chatterbox Oyo Conan's and then p chatter about oil. Julio Down in P Charity ball. Goyo Kuhio, John in P. Chowdhury Ball. Goyo could single None, Pete added above I o could Singin in peace added above Oyo, that was great. Now let's look at the formal way off, referring to someone in third person Kuban Kuban. We saw this word Poon in an earlier lesson on counting people. We can use point when we're referring to people that we need to be respectful to, such as teachers. And we can also use put when we're not sure what title to use when referring to certain people and when we're not sure it's better to be respectful than to use casual language and potentially causing offence. Lastly, we can use Poon to refer to both men and women. Let's practice using Poon in sentences. Repeat after me coupon in P chattering Montoya coupon in peace at Royal Coupon in p Charitable Boyo Coupon in peace Animal, boyo. That was great. Well done. Now let's look at the casual way or referring to someone in third person. Okay, Okay. Que is a shortened form off who? I And although the word I means a kid, we used care to refer to our friends or those who are younger than us. But we should never use care when referring to people in a more senior position. Also, care can be used to refer to both men and women. And although K is spelled with a Y glide year in far, speech is pronounced as care. Okay, there's practice some sentences that use K repeat after me Canon Pediatric logo Canon P. Saramago Canon Pizza Tebogo can then p. Chatumongol Great job won't on Let's do the final practice In this final practice, we're going to do one independent practice off using the pronouns we used to refer to he or she using the prompts on the screen I'd like you to complete The sentence is using appropriate now. So if you're ready, let's begin. Could Chingoka ph other above i o Could Chingoka p chatterbox Oyo cu hack singing P chatterbox yoyo ku Boxing in P chatterbox boyo Cooper Union P chatterbox Oyo coupon in P chatterbox boyo Kenan Ingoglia, Canon Ingoglia Kenan pH Other mogul. Kenan P. Chatter Boco Great job today, Water In this lesson, we looked at how we can express he and she in Korean. In the next lesson, we'll look at how we can express we and they in Korea. So I'll see you soon again in that lesson, but why? 17. Pronouns - we and they: Hello there. So in this lesson, we're going to look at the pronouns we and they in Korean. Let's start the standard form of the pronoun we is Woody. Woody is the same for both the subject and the object of the sentence. However, Woody has a formal form and an informal form. Let's look at some sample sentences using both forms would in in kombu hail wooden in kombu , hail tiene in Congo tie and then combo. So these sentences mean the same. But Choi is formal and Woody is infallible. One other important point to note is that in everyday speech, Woody contracts with a particle and then so Woody and then becomes wouldn't. But he does not contract with a particle within. And of course, these to pronounce can be used with a particle car as well. So let's do a speaking practice using Choi and Woody Repeat after me, Woody, then kombu. Hail would in n kombu hail Chilean in kombu hail So in in kombu Hail! Would you, guy Pete adding more oil? What do you got? Pediatric ball? Goyo Toy Guy Pediatric logo. So you got pizza dribble Goyo. That was great. Well done now the last point. Enough about the pronoun we is that the formal form HIV, when used in sentences that here sound in the second syllable almost disappears. So that's something to keep. You might, as you do the speaking practice later, Let's now move on and look at the pronoun they in Korea. Okay, Firstly, in many textbooks, they is translated as could but similar to the pronoun he or she being translated to coup in Kenya could. It is rarely used in everyday speech, but we use this word in a slightly different way to say they the word to is a plural marker , and we can attach to too many different now owns to make those now is plural. For example, the word hacks ing means student. And if we say taxing the it becomes students and the word cabin means bag. And if we say cavender, it becomes bags. So in Korean rather than saying, couldn't we say coup? Axing the those students could cavender those banks and quitting good. Those friends Here are some example sentences that use these expressions who hacks ended in Congo. Hail those students study could hack saying that in kombu here could single Darren pH Arable bio. Those friends eat pizza Could single that in peace Added Involve oil Now I do want to highlight that because there isn't one word that means they in Korean. There are other ways of referring to a group of people in third person. However, what I've just told you now is the most common way off. Referring to a group of people in third person. So we'll do a speaking practice off using cu noun to Let's practice the sentences we have seen in this lesson. Repeat after me cu taxing that in kombu Hail who axing the then kuhm boo hail could single that in Peter Bo Goyo could single that then Peter everybody boyo. Creole jagged in kombu Hail creo jotted in Congo Hail Could I'm judge it in p charitable, boyo, Could I change other than pizza? Everybody Oyo Great job. Well done. Let's do the final practice In this final practice, we're going to do one independent speaking practice of using the pronouns we and they we learn from this lesson using the prompts on the screen. I'd like you to complete the sentence is using appropriate now owns pronounce or any plural markers that you need to use. So if you're ready, let's begin trying in kombu Hail China in kombu Heo Woody guy kuhm boo! Hail Woody guy kuhm boo Hail toying in peach added above oil Toying in pediatric above Oyo could hack saying that in combo hail could hack saying that in kombu hail Could ching good it in p chatterbox Oyo kitchen Gordon ph Saramago que yo Chadderdon kombu hell creo chatted in Congo Hail. Fantastic job today. Well done. In this lesson, we looked at how we can express we and they in Korea. Now the next lesson is a review lesson. And we're going to go over all the different ways of saying, I you he she and we've a so Susan again in that review, listen, but why 18. Review Lesson - Pronouns: Hi there. So this is a review lesson on all the different pronouns that we learn over the past three lessons. There's a lot to get through. So let's get started. First we learned both the formal and the informal form of the pronoun I char. And now and then we learned that informal form of the pronoun you, which is No. We're going to do a listening repeat practice off these pronouns, but remember that these pronouns change their form depending on what particle they use with . So, as you do the practice, please pay attention to the pronouns and see how their former changes. So if you're ready, let's begin. Turn in something You mean Nida Tonin Something humanly there, Chair guy Something humanly there a guy, Something you mean Nida Nannan Something EMEA. Lannan something You mia. They got something in media, their guys something EMEA, Dornin something in here, Don. And something in me a Loga something you mia doll guys hunting EMEA That was great. Now let's do an independent speaking practice. You will see sentences with blanks and I like you to complete the sentence is using appropriate forms or the pronouns I and you. So if you're ready, let's begin. There goes hunting EMEA their guys hunting EMEA John in something. You mean Nida Jonathan's hunting? You mean Nida dog something? Neemia? No guy something. Neemia, Take something. You mean Nida? Check something New Media nine and hunting Neemia Donnan's Hunting Neemia don't and something Neemia Donnan's Hunting Neemia. Great job. Whoa! Done. Now let's move on and review the pronouns He and she We learned the several ways of saying he and she in Korean. The most common way wants to say cu plus now. But we can also be more formal and respectful by saying Kuban. But we can also be more informal and casual by saying care. Let's first do a listening repeat practice on all these different ways of saying he and she repeat after me could single none. Pizzeria McCoy Oh, quit Singleton Ph At or above Oyo Kupchak singing kombu Hail Who Axing and kombu Heo coupon in sons and a meal coupon in Sons and give me a Kuban in peace Karen McCoy Oh, Cuban in Peach Caramel Kenan, Tinga, Kenan, Tinga, Kenan Peter Ramada Kenan Pediatric moga Great. Now let's do an independent speaking practice and similar to before. I like you to use the prompts on the screen and complete the sentence is using one of the expressions we just practiced. So if you're ready, let's speaking. Could Chingoka p chatterbox Oyo could Chingoka p chatter McCoy Oh Kuban in PGA Adorable Goyo Cooper Union PH everybody Oyo Kupchak Sing in P chatterbox, boyo Cu hack singing P chatterbox Oil Canon Ingoglia Canon Ingoglia Kuban Sons Enemy Ale Cuban sons Enemy ao Canon P chatter Mogul. Canon P. Chowdry Mogul. That was great. Wot done. Now let's review how to say we and they in Korea. Okay, so in the previous lesson we learned that there is a formal and an informal form of the pronoun we which are Choi and Woody. And we also learned that to say they we say cu plus now and the plural marker to So let's first to a listening repeat practice off some of the sentences that use we and they in Korean toying in Cumbria tiene en kombu. Hail would in in kombu hail. Wouldn't then combo tell you guy peace animal boyo Toy guy Pediatric oil could hack saying that in kombu hail who taxing that in kombu hail could single that in Pisa. Imola Kid singled, then pizzeria Barbara could I'm judge it in peace. Arable Goyo could I'm judge it in pizza in Mongolia. That was great. Now let's do an independent speaking practice and same is before using the prompts on the screen. I'd like you to convict the sentences using appropriate now's and the plural marker, too, if necessary. So if you're ready, let's begin China in Cambodia, China and kombu Heo Kitchen Budarin P Jarome Ago Kitchen Budarin Ph Saramago What do you got? Congo. Hail. What do you got? Kombu. Hail Could hack Sing that in kombu Heo could taxing Darren Kombu Hail Woody Nen P chatter McCoy Oh, Woody Nen p chatter McCoy Oh, could undulated in peach Saramago could I'm jutted and peach Adam ago. Fantastic job today. That's the last practice Well done. In this lesson, we reviewed all the different ways of expressing I you, he she and we they we're now going to move away from pronounce and focus a little bit more on learning about Korean verbs. So I'll see you soon again, but by 19. Present tense - Formal: hi there, and welcome back. Now all Korean verbs can change into formal, polite and casual forms, and they follow very strict rules of conjugation. In today's lesson. We're going to learn more about formal verb endings in the present tense. Now, as the name was suggest, Formal Verbund. Things are used in very formal settings, such as in job interviews, all by people who need to speak formal language, such as news readers. Let's find out how we can change verbs into formal forms in the present tense. Okay, so to help us along, let's use these verbs mock that which means to eat and kombu. Hedda, which means to study. These are infinitive forms. The base forms off these verbs, the infinitive forms of Korean verbs all and in time, and the parts other than car are called verb stents. So in this work, the verb stem years Bach, and in this verbs, the verb stem is kombu. How we conjugating verbs depends on two factors. One is the Valle used in the final syllable off the verbs them, and the other is whether the final syllable of the verb stem has a patch in or not and the two main ways of forming formal Verbund things is all about the pattern. First, when a verb stem has a patch in, we simply add some nida to the verbs, then to make it into polite form. For example, this verb Baca the verb stem is Bach, and it has Cheok as Patch him. So we add similar to mock to make Moctar into the formal form. So the former form of block that is boxing Nida Boxing Nida Also remember that this Sydney that has a people as a patch in but we read it as if it has me unless patch in So it's not box Nida is Moxon neither. Moxon Nida Let's look a few other examples The verb you that means to read and this verb has cut button. So here we add some need that to the verbs then So the formal form of it that is instant media. Another verb is Datta, which means to put or lay and applying the same rules. The formal form is those cinemedia those cinemedia. Finally we have the verb doctor which means to mix and again applying the same rule. The formal form off SAPTA is socks and media socks. Um, Nida. Okay, so now that you have a pretty good understanding off the first way of changing verbs into formal forms, let's do a speaking practice. Repeat after me. Look, that looks in nida it. That isn't nida. No time. No Cimini that socked their socks in Nida. That was great. Well done. Now let's learn the second way of changing verbs into formal forms. Secondly, if the final syllable of a verb stem doesn't have a patch in, then we add peer to the final syllable as a patch him. And then we add Nida at the end to make it into formal form. So in this verb combo, Hedda, the final syllable off the verbs them is hot and it doesn't have a patch in. So we add pupils patches. And then we add the that at the end to make this verb into a formal form. So the formal form off combo Hatta is kombu Hamida. Let's look a few other examples. The verb chador means to sleep and the verb stem chat doesn't have a patch him. So we add pube as patch in and then we add need A at the end. So the former form off chador is Tom Nida. Another verb is machida, which means to drink the verb stem The final syllable. She doesn't have a patch in. So we had pupils pat him and then we had a leader. So the formal form off Machida is mashing leader. Finally we have the verb shida which means to rest and its formal form is Shim Nida. Okay, so let's do a speaking practice off applying the second way of changing verbs into formal forms. Repeat after me Kombu had a combo Have Anita Cada Cam Nida, my CDA Bison Nida she die. Shame, Nida, That was great! Whoa dung! Now we've learned the two main ways of changing verbs into formal forms. But as with many things in grammar, there is always an exception. The third way of changing verbs into formal forms is an exception to the rules we've learned so far. Now, when the final syllable over verbs then has Leela's patch him, we don't simply add some Nida to the verbs. Then we actually remove Lear about Tim and replace it with pure but him. And then we add leader to make that verb into a formal form. For example, the verb Pirata means to sell. But we don't simply add Sunita to power. We actually remove Lille but him, replace it with pube and then add leader at the end. So the former form off Prada is Canada. Also to that means to lift something and its formal form is Tim Nida. And another verb is Qaeda, which means to change or replace. And the formal form is Cam Niedere. Now it's always better to practice to learn these difficult rules. So let's do a speaking practice on the third way of changing verbs into formal forms. Repeat after me Pirata, Pam, Nida Qaeda Come Nida To that Tim Nida Luda Nida. That was great. Wot done. Let's move on to the final practice. In this final practice, we're going to do one independent speaking practice and you have to apply the rules we've learned today and change the verbs on the screen into the formal forms. Remember that if the final syllable off the verb stem has a pattern, then we simply add Cindy that to the verbs them. If the final syllable of herbs then doesn't have a patch him, then we add pube as patch in and then add Nida in the final rule, which was an exception, was that if the final syllable of a verb stem hasn't Lear last patch in? Then we replaced Lille with Pierre and then add indeed a to make that verb into formal form . Okay, so with those rules in mind, if you're ready, let's do this Independent speaking Practice box Boxing Nida It is simply there Daughter does Cimini there Chadha Tam, Nida she die him Nida Machida Marcin Nita to the Tim Nida Buddha Nida Great effort today. Well done. Okay, so in today's lesson, we learn three different ways of changing bulbs into formal forms. In the next lesson will look at how we can change verbs into polite forms. So I'll see you soon again in that lesson. But why 20. Present tense - Polite 1: hello there. So in this lesson, we're going to learn about making verbs into polite forms. Now, polite verb endings are the most commonly used in Korean language, so this is going to be a very important lesson. There are two ways you can make verbs into polite forms. One is by adding, are your to the verbs then and the other is by adding or your to the verbs. Then, in this lesson will focus on learning toe add. I owe to the verbs. Then now we add, I owe to the verbs them to make that verb in so polite form when the verb stem has the vowel letters are. Or however, even when the verb stem has the vowel letters are or there are certain rules to follow. When conjugating these words, let's go through each one first. If the verbs them has the vowel letter are or and has a patch in, we simply add are your to the verbs them to make that verb into a polite form. For example, the verb parada means to sell the verb stem has the vow Letter R and Lille as patching. So we simply add, I owe to the verbs them to make this verb into polite form. So the polite form off Prada is Parro patio, the verb notes. That means to put away the verbs. Them has the vowel letter or and here as patron. So we simply add, I owe to the verbs them. So the polite form off Datta is the y o y o. Let's look at two more examples. Book That means to Fry and his polite form is poor Chiyo, Chiyo and Tap. That means to find or look for, and it's polite. Form is tattle tale tattle io. Okay, so let's practice the first way of changing verbs into polite forms. Repeat after me, Pyla patio daughter. Do I owe booked? I poke io. Check their Taddeo. That was great. Now let's look at the second way off changing verbs into polite forms. Now the second way of adding are your to a verb. To make that verb into polite form is when the verb stem ends with a vowel letter R and has no patch in. We simply add your to the verb stem to make that verb into a polite form. For example, the verb chador means to sleep. The verbs, then chat ends with a vowel letter are and there is no patch in. So we add your to the verb stem. So the polite form off chador is Chae. Oh, let's look a few other examples. The verb cada means to go and it's polite form is Kaio Chiyo. Another verb is Manetta, which means to meet and the polite form off Manetta is banned. Nao, my nail! Finally, the verb Kanada, which means to finish the polite form is good nail. Good nail. Okay, so let's practice the second way off. Changing verbs into polite forms. Repeat after me. Cada Cheil Cada Chiyo Mlada man, I o good nada. Good, Niall. Excellent job. Whoa! Done. Now let's look at the final way of adding hyo. Okay, So the final way is when the verb stem ends with a vowel letter or and there is no patch in than the volatile or combines with the valets are in our and then we add your to the combined form. For example, the verb poor. That means to see the verbs that has the vow letter or so this all combines with our to make par and then to the combined form. We add you so the polite form or porta, is piau pile. Another example is the verb order, which means to come. The verb stem ends with a vowel letter or and there is no Pattyn. So all combines with our to become why and then we add your to the combine form to make that verb into polite form. So the polite form off order is while why 01 last example is the verb solder, which means to shoot as in shoot guns or shoot arrows and the polite form off soda is cyle cyle. Okay, so let's practice this final way off changing verbs into polite forms. Repeat after me poured a pile order while soda sile. That was great woda. In this final practice, we're going to do one independent speaking practice, and all you have to do is change the verbs on the screen into polite forms. Remember the three different ways of adding Ayotte evolves to make those verbs into polite forms. First, if the verse them has the vow, letters are or in a Pattyn, we simply add, I owe to the verbs. Then, if the votes them ends in our and there is no patch him. Then we simply add your to the verbs. Then finally, if the verb stem has the vowel letter or and there is no pattern than all combines with our and then we add your to the combined form. So with that in mind less to the final speaking practice Dota the y o put the book I o Pirata Potter, you tadaa Cheil cada Chiyo Sada. Hi. You for the pyro or there. Why you're so that silo. Great effort today. Well done. In this lesson, we looked at how we can change verbs into polite forms by adding I or to the votes. Then in the next lesson, we have a review lesson and will review formal verb endings and everything we learned in this lesson. So Susan again, in that lesson, But why 21. Review Lesson - Present tense 1: hi there, and welcome to the review lesson. Now, in this lesson, we're going to review what we learned about formal and polite verb endings in the last two lessons. So let's begin. First, we learned that all formal verb endings and with leader. But if the final syllable off of herbs them has a patch him, then we add some Nida. If it doesn't, then we add people as pat him, and then we add leader. At the end, However, there is always an exception because if the patches is Lear, then we remove Lille and then add people as patch him and then we add Nida at the end. Okay, so with that in mind, let's first to a listening repeat practice or formal verb endings. Mocked our boxing. Nida it. That is some Nida Congo had a tadaa cam Nida Qaeda Come Nida to that Tim Nida. That was great. Now let's do an independent speaking practice. I'd like you to change the verbs you see on screen into formal verb endings. So if you're ready, let's begin book the box in Nida, suck their socks. Um Nida Kombu Hatta kombu ham Nida Masi di by some Nida Partida, Pam Nida Luda whom? Nida That was great. Well done. Now let's look at how we can add I or two verbs to make those verbs into polite forms. Now we had iota verb stems to make those verbs into polite forms. When the final syllable off the verb stem has the vow, letters are or but there were three main rules to follow. First, if the verb stem ends with a pat him, then we simply add I owe to the verbs them. Second, if the verb stem ends with a violet are and there is no pattern, then we simply add your to the verbs them. Lastly, if the verb stem ends with a vowel letter or then all combines with our to become what and then we add your to the verbs them to make that verb into a polite fall. So with those rules in mind, let's first to a listening repeat practice off changing verbs into polite forms by adding ill repeat after me Paradigm patio, Gupta Poke io cada Chiyo, manana man I o. Pour their pile. Or that while great job well done. Now let's do an independent speaking practice and this time Samos. Before I'd like you to change the verb you see on screen into polite forms by adding I o So if you're ready, let's do this Independent speaking practice. Paolo di Pado, Your poor guy Piau my nada man Nao Chata Tadzio Sauder Sile Tadaa Tile. That was great. Well done. Okay, So in today's lesson, we reviewed how we can change verbs into formal forms and also into polite forms by adding I or to the verbs. Then in the next lesson, we'll look at how we can change verbs into polite forms by adding, Are you so I'll see you soon again in that lesson, but by 22. Present tense - Polite 2: hi there. So in this lesson, we're going to continue learning about making verbs into polite forms. But this time we're going to do that by adding oil to the verbs them. Before we learn that if the final syllable off the verb stem has the vowel letters are, or then we add our your to the verbs them. But if the final syllable of the verb stem ends in a vowel letter other than our or then we add, are you? There are, of course, some rules. We have to follow Celestica each one carefully. First, if the verb stem ends with a patch him, then we simply add oil to the verbs Them. A good example is the verb Baca, which means to eat the verb stem. Bach ends with a patch in Cheok, so we simply add all your to the verb stem. So the polite form off box that is mogul you, let's look a few other examples. The verb it that means to read devotes, then ends with a cup at him. So we simply add oil to the verb stem. So the polite form of it that is in Nagoya. Another example is the verb doctor, which means to mix. And here again we add oil to the verbs then. So the polite form off doctor is Sock Oyo and finally the verb to that which means to lift . And we saw this verb in one of the earlier lessons. The polite form of to that is to die. Oh, to Dahlia. Okay, so let's do a listening repeat practice off the first rule off adding oil. Repeat after me book that ball, Goyo it that in a Goyo so that sock oyo food I t lawyer that was great. Now let's look at the second way off adding oil to Bob's. The second rule is on the verb stems, ending in violators air and air and all. And your When the verb stem ends in these vows and there is no patch him, then we simply add your to the verb stem to make those verbs into flight forms. However, there aren't that many verbs that end in all or your, so it's more important to remember about the verb stems that end in a Oh, let's look at some examples. Sever means to count, as in count the number of things and the polite form offs Header is sale and another example is the verb Saadeh, which means to stand and the polite form off Sada is soil. We also have cada which means to turn on as in turn on the light and the polite form off Kata is Kaio. And lastly, the verb data which means to pay the polite form of data is Dale. Okay, so let's do a listening repeat speaking practice off applying the second rule off adding oil to verbs. Repeat after me said, uh, Sale Saada, Saar Yo Skalde, Calio, NEDA Dale. That was excellent. Load on. Let's look at the final way of adding oil to Bubs. The final rule is on the verb stems that end in the Vow letter when the verb stem ends in a vowel letter, who then who combines with all to become wall and then we add your to the combined form to make that verb into a polite form. For example, the verb cure that means to raise as in, raise animals and raise Children. The verbs them ends in a vowel letter away. So who combines with all and then we add your to the rest of the verb stem. So the polite form off Cuba is key, will you? Another example is the verb pale, that which means to learn, and the polite form of pale that is Pedroia. Also the verb to that means to delete. And the polite form is cheap Arroyo and finally, the verb choda means to give. And the polite form is oil. Okay, so it's always better to do a speaking practice for complicated rules to stick. So let's do a list and repeat practice off the third way off adding oil to Bubs. Repeat after me, Kilda Key Y o paled uh, pain, will you? You die fuel oil to that oil. Excellent job. Load on unless we want to the final practice. In this final practice, we're going to do one independent speaking practice, and I'd like you to change the verbs you see on screen into the polite forms. Remember that today, we learned to add, are your two verb stems when the final syllable off the verb stem ends in a vowel letter other than our or but there were some rules we had to follow first. If the verb stem ends with a pattern then we add oil to the verb stem. Second, if the verb stem ends with a vowel, letters, air or your, then we add your to the verbs them. And lastly, if the verb stem ends with a vowel letter, all then walk combines with our to become war. And then we add your to the verbs them to make that verb into a polite form. Okay, so with those rules in mind, let's do this speaking practice book that ball go you it that it Goyo to die to dollar Your Saadeh saw you, Kilda Calio Ned Ah, there you paled are pay Arroyo qudah T y o Cuba Key, will you great effort today won't on. So in today's lesson, we learned to add are your two verbs to make those verbs into polite forms. In the next lesson, we're going to learn to more ways to make verbs into polite forms. And we'll also look at how we can make verbs into casual forms. So I'll see you soon again in that lesson, but by 23. Present tense - Polite & Casual: hi there. And welcome back. Now, Before we get into today's lesson, I just want to mention that so far we've learned many ways of changing verbs into formal and polite forms. And trying to remember all these different rules can be quite tricky. And clearly it's not going to happen overnight. And I know this because I am also taking a photo shop course, and I always find myself watching the same lecture again and again because I'm not using that skill on a daily basis. So even if you can't clearly remember what you learn in one of the earlier lessons, don't worry, because it's quite normal. But what I would advise is for you to take that lesson again and do the speaking practice in that lesson so that you build up familiarity with difficult concepts. So with that in mind, let's go into today's lesson where we're going to learn to more ways of changing verbs into platforms, and we'll also look at how we can change involves into casual forms. Okay, first, if the verb stem ends in a vowel letter E, then e changes to yard and then we add your to the verbs them to make that verb into polite form. For example, the verb machida means to drink, and here the verb stem ends in the volatile E. So we change e to yard and then we add your to the verbs them to make this verb into polite for so the polite form off Machida is by show you my show. You let's look a few other examples. The verb Talita means to stop someone from doing something. And the polite form of Barletta is my oh my yoyo. Another example is the verb candida, which means to own something, and the polite form is casual. You catch Joyo. The final example is the verb cheetah, which means to hit something. And the polite form is child child. Okay, so it's a pretty simple rule, But let's do a speaking practice off applying this rule. Repeat after me, my Sita, my show You my leader, My yo yo Qaida cajole you Si Di choi. Oh, that was great. Let's look at the final way off changing verbs into polite forms in Korea. Now, one of the most common verbs in Korean is had a which means to do something, and in Korean. We often combine and now and had a two former verb that describes doing that. Now, for example, the noun kombu means study, and this now combines with Hata to become Congo Hedda. And this is a verb that means to study. Let's look a few other examples. The word chung's or is a noun meaning cleaning but tongues or had a is a verb that means to clean. Another example is the word your D, which is a noun meaning cooking. But you already had a is a verb that means to cook. And finally, the word so young is a noun that means swimming and so young had a is a verb. That means to swim now, to change these verbs into polite forms. We change how to hair, and then we add your So we go from Hodder to hail. So kombu Honda is kombu. Hail, tongues or Hodder is tongues or hail. You already had a his your e hail. And lastly, so young Haida is so young. Hail. Okay, so let's do a speaking practice off applying this way off, changing verbs into polite forms. Repeat after me. Kombu had a combo. Hail tongues or had a tongues or hail. You already had a your d hale. So young had a so young hail. Okay, that was great. Now let's look at how we can change verbs into casual forms. Now changing verbs into casual forms is really simple All Korean verbs in their polite form and in your and to make these verbs into casual forms, we simply remove your from the polite form. So the casual for mothball Goyo is Margo para you is patter key Wyo is Chihuahua, and your e hail is your hair. It's really that simple. So let's do a speaking practice off changing verbs into casual forms. Repeat after me ball Go, You boggle T Y o Kiwa patio Pata. You already hail Yordy hair. That was great. Well done. Unless we want to the final practice. Okay, so in this final practice, we're going to do one independent speaking practice on what we learned today. So remember that to change verbs into polite forms. If the verb stem ends in a vowel letter e, then e changes to yard. And then we add your at the end for verbs that end in Hader Hader changes to hail into form casual verbs. We simply remove your from the polite form. So with those rules in mind, let's do this. Independence speaking Practice by Leader by yo yo Carty Die Kodjoe, you Tschida child Kombu had a kombu Heo Chung's Ohata tongues or hail you already had. Ah ut Hail pat I you pata t will you tur ut hail ut hair Great job today. Well done. So in today's lesson, we looked at two more ways of changing verbs into polite forms. And we also looked at how we can change Bob's into casual forms. In the next lesson, we're going to learn how we can use objects in Korean sentences. So our Susan again in that lesson, But why? 24. Object particles - 을 & 를: Hi there. And welcome back now, You've already seen how objects are used in sentences in previous lessons, but we're going to have a little bit more focused on learning the object particles will and blue in this lesson. Now, the basic function off Alu is to indicate that the noun is they're attached to Are the objects off the verb in that sentence less the kind of example sentence that uses a little particle. Channon Pangaribuan, Goyo I eat bread tone in Bangor McCoy Oh, this sentence is made up off three components. The subject Thonon, which is made up off the pronoun i char and the topic particle. And then the verb ball Goyo, which is the polite form off Octa, which means to eat, and the object banner. And this is made up off bang, which means bread and the object particle, as mentioned before the basic function off a little is to indicate that the noun is they're attached to are the object of the verb in that sentence. And in this sentence, the verb is bald oil, which means to eat and the verbs object is banged bread. And to indicate that bang is the object of the verb. It is attached to the particle. Now we use the particle will when the now it is attached to ends with a pattern. And here the World Bank ends with an even back him. So we use it. However, if the now the particle is attached to doesn't end with a patch him, then we use a little. Here's an example. Sentence Tonin P Chetumal Goyo. I eat pizza. So then P chatter above oil. So as you can see the final syllable or Peter, which means pizza doesn't have a patch him. So it goes with a particle little let's look a few other example sentences. Tonin, PBM, Barbara, boyo. I eat PB in Pop John in PB and Barbara Malvolio Tonin Banana dribble Goyo I eat banana. Go on, then fine and addle above Ohio. So in the first sentence, peeping pap ends with Pierre button. So it goes with a particle. However, in the second sentence, banana doesn't end with a patch in. So it goes with a particle little. The last point regarding the particles alone is that in every day speech, Koreans often omit the object particles. So rather than saying Cornyn people improbable, Koyo. They will often say Tonin PVM Pam, a lawyer. Although there is no object particle in the second sentence, the fact that PBM bat is the object off the verb Margot is pretty obvious. So you can just omit the object particle. Okay, so let's do a listening. Repeat practice off sentences that use object particles. Repeat after me. Tone in Bangui. McCoy Oh, tone in Banbury Bergoglio shown in Guatemala Goyo, Tonin, Guantanamo Goyo, Tonin, Pizza Dribble, Goyo Tone in Pisa Everybody, Boyo. Tonin PBM Problem ago Tonin PB in Babylon. So and then find out that a ball boy, Tom, then by nine out of McCoy. Oh, so then limey on their body oil Tom, then limey on Imago. That was great. Now let's move on to the final practice. Now, in this final practice, we're going to do one independent speaking practice. You will see sentences on the screen, but in each sentence, the object particles will be missing. And based on whether the object ends with Apache more not I'd like you to complete the sentence is using either the particles or little. Remember that if the object ends with a pat him then use the particle. The if it doesn't, then you use the particle little. Okay, So with that in mind, let's do the final practice. Tonin Banana Turbo Koyo Chown in banana adobo Goyo Children in Bangui McCoy Oh Children in Bangor Imo Goyo shown in Peep in Barbary Ball Goyo shown in Peep Imbaba above Oyo Children in Sag Water Bowl Goyo Children in Saguaro Rebo, Goyo Tonin, Limey on their M O Koyo Children in Lima on everybody Oyo Children in Peach at a ball Goyo telling then P chatterbox Oyo. Great job today. Well done In today's I said we learned how to use the object Particles will end little. The next lesson is a review lesson, and we're going to review how we change verbs into polite and casual forms and the use of a little from today's lesson. So I'll see you soon again in that review lesson, But why 25. Review Lesson - Present tense 2: hi there. So in today's lesson, we're going to review what we learn in the three previous lessons on verb conjugation and the use off object particles. There's a lot to get through, so let's get going now. We can make verbs into polite forms by adding oil to the verbs them. And we do this when the verbs then doesn't end in a vowel letter. Or but there were three very important rules to follow. First, if the verse name ends with a Pattyn, then we simply add are your to the verb stem. Second, if the verb stem ends with the violators, air A or are your, then we add your to the verbs them. Finally, if the verb stem ends with a vowel letter, who then who combines with our to become a war? And then we add your to the combined form? Okay, so as a warm up, let's first to a listening repeat practice off adding value. Repeat after me both their ball Goyo it that Aegaleo said that Seo Sada Soyo Kelda Calio pail that pay Arroyo to you that t y o great job. This time, let's do an independent speaking practice this is a simple practice, and you just have to change the verbs you see on the screen into polite forms by adding value. So if you're ready, let's begin it. That it Bergoglio Sabga, Sock Goyo deadeye Nao Sada Soyo Kildare. Calio chilled. Uh, Arroyo Jude I. Choi. Oh, fantastic job. Well done. Now let's look at two more ways of changing verbs into polite form. And then also look at how we can change verbs into casual forms. Okay, so two lessons ago we learned to more ways of changing verbs into polite forms, and we also learned a very simple way off changing polite forms into casual forms. First, if the verb stem ends in a vowel letter e, then e changes to yard, and then we add your to the verb stem to make that verb into polite form. Second, for the verbs ending in Hader Hader simply changes to hail. And lastly, to make verbs into casual forms, we simply remove the your at the end of polite forms of verbs. OK, so let's first to a listening repeat practice on these ways of changing verbs. My Sita, my show, you Cartagena casual yo kombu had a combo Heo tongues or Honda tongues or Hail ball Goyo waga t Will you t wa That was great. Well done. Now let's do an independent speaking practice. And this time, Samos before I'd like you to change the verbs you see on the screen into either polite forms or casual forms. So if you're ready, let's begin the practice by CDA By show you she die. Choi Oh, tongues, Ohata, tongues or hail You already had a your e hail pado u patta t will you t wa That was great wot done. Let's now review the use off object particles in Korean sentences. We use particles little with downs to indicate those now as the objects off the verb in that sentence. But we use particle if the object ends with a pattern. But if it doesn't, then we use the particle little less first to a listening Repeat practice off using end little in sentences. Repeat after me, John in Banbury Ball Goyo Tonin by Neymar Goyo Tonin Keeping Barbara Bob Boyo Tonin PB improbable Oyo Tonin Lamb Janell Magglio It's on in Lima on their mobile tonen hard watery bog Oyo telling in hot water McCoy. Oh, Tonin. Pizza delivery boy. Oh, Tonin Peter McCoy. Oh, Tonin. Bilonog So and then by now not about oil. That was great world on. Let's now do an independent speaking practice using prompts on the screen. I'd like you to complete each sentence using appropriate particles. Think about whether the object ends with a pattern or whether it doesn't. So if you're ready, let's begin. John In Banbury McCoy Oh, Children in Bangui More Goyo Shonen Ciguatera Ball Goyo Tonin, Saguaro Bergoglio, Tonin Bananarama Goyo Tonin by nine Honorable Goyo Tonin Chicken animal. Koyo Jonan, Chicken Animal. Goyo Tonin Lie Munim Odoyo shown in Lima on El Mago. Children in Hemberger Dribble, Goyo John, then Hemberger Dribble Goyo. Great effort Today water In today's lesson, we looked at more ways of changing verbs into polite forms, and we also looked at how we can change verbs into casual forms. We also review the use off object particles and little in the next lesson. We're going to look at how we conform negative statements in Korea. So I'll see you soon again in that Listen, but why 26. Negative Form: hi, everyone. So, in this lesson, we're going to look at how we conform. Negative statements in the present tense. Now in Korea, there are two different ways to fall negative statements. So we'll begin with the 1st 1 now in our Korean for absolute beginners won cause. We learned that the negative form of the Korean beef up either is Anita. This part Annie means no, and we use the contracted form of Annie, which is on to form negative statements for all other verbs. Here's an example. Sentence John in Suitor and Mashallah. I don't drink alcohol. Tonin, Suitor and Mashallah. So, as you can see, we simply add on in front of the verb Azeglio to make this statement and negative statement . Let's look a few other examples. Tonin, Tigger and you go, I don't read books. Tonin. Tigger, I need to go. Tonin Peach Other. I'm logo. I don't eat pizza. John N. P. Data on logo tone in Colombo on a Oh, I don't study so then combo And now related to this final example. Many Korean verbs are comprised of noun plus had a such as Congo Honda, which means to study, and it's the verb used in the sentence. But there's also Chung's Ohata, which means to clean, and you already had a which means to cook. And for these verbs, we don't add on in front of the verb phrase, but it's added in front of had a So it's not on gumbo, Hedda, but it's combo another. However, there are two exceptions, and these air in the verbs to ah Honda, which means to like and Shirahata, which means to hate. And this is because the words to our and shadow are adjectives rather than ounce, so we can add on in front of the phrase, so to make these verbs into negative statements, it's not to one another, but Andrada, and it's no shadow. Another it's and Shirahata. Okay, so let's do a listening repeat practice or forming negative statements using on, and we'll practice forming negative statements. Informal, polite and casual statements. Tonin Sooner and Joe Anita Tonin Pseudo and Johann Nida Children Checker Newsome, Nida Sean in Tiger, I knew certainly die Children Peter and local Hill Charlyne P chatter and Mogo. Till then combo inhale. So then kuhm boo and hail nine in Sutor. I'm measure Ni Lin sooner and measure Now then peach, other arm mogul now and then p each other and moga. That was great. Now let's look at the second way of forming negative statements. The second way of forming negative statements is to use key and time and tap means do not. And we can use this structure tea and tough to form negative statements like this Tonin pseudo verbosity. And I are I don't drink alcohol. Tonin, Souder, Basiji and I owe. So as you can see, we ad t to the verb stem. And then we add anta at the end in the sentence answer is used in its polite form and i o let's look a few other example sentences. Channon, Checkered e g and I. Oh, I don't read books. Tonin Integrity and I, O Tonin come Bahaji and I Oh, I don't study Tonin. Kombu has a and I John in P chatterbox John I o I don't eat pizza. Tonin P chatterbox Tianna. Lastly, we can make these statements formal, polite and casual by conjugating untapped Like this Shonen Checker et and Cindy. There Children taken 80 and I owe none in check it in China So the formal form is handsome . Nida. The polite form is an I O. And the casual form is Anna. So with that in mind, let's do a list and repeat speaking. Practice off using T anta to form negative statements. Repeat after me, John in Sudan Rapacity and Sumida Tonin Soudelor battered G Answer me that Thonon Tegal Itchy and Sumida Tonin Checker Utensil Media Tonin P Chatterbox Tian Ohio Tolin P chatterbox Ya Nyayo Tonin come Buhagiar and I O John in Colombo nine in pseudo devices Guiana Don in Superbikes Jonah Now then P Chatterbox Tianna 9 11 p chatterbox Tianna. Great job. Well done. Let's move on to the final practice. In this final practice, we're going to do to independence being practices. The 1st 1 is on the use of on to form negative statements and the 2nd 1 is on the use off key and tap to form negative statements in the first practice, I'd like you to unscramble the words and form appropriate negative statements. Remember that these statements could be formal, polite or casual. So if you're ready, let's begin. John in Sutor. I'm mature. John in Sid on my show. John in checkered. I knew some neither. Tonin Tenggara, Nusa Nida down in p chatter on Muggle. Now and then, Pete added on Mogul Tonin combo and am Nida Tonin combo. And am Nida Nannan checker. I need to go nine and take what I need to go. John in Cedar and Maxim Nida Tonin Serial and Mass Media. That was great. Well done. Now let's do the second Independence speaking practice on the use off Key Anta and same as the 1st 1 I'd like you to unscramble the words and form appropriate negative statements. So if you're ready, let's begin. Tonin Sydor, Basiji and I O Tonin Suitor by C J and I O nine in p chatterbox. Jonah Now and then P chatterbox Jonah Thonon Tegra Each and some Nita John in Tigger Duty and simply there. Shonen Combo, Tonin Kombu Hodja and I O nine in Syria by Sudjana nine in Situ by Hannah John in P. Chatterbox Handsomely Day, John in P. Chatterbox Johnson Nida Fantastic job Well done In today's lesson we looked at how we conform negative statements by using on nt Antah in the next lesson, we're going to look at how we conform questions in Korean, So I'll see you soon again in that lesson, But by 27. Question form: hi there. So in this lesson, we're going to look at how we conform questions in Korean. Now questions in Korean differ depending on the level of formality. So we're going to first look at for more questions Now. Forming four more questions in Korean is really simple. You just have to change one syllable in the positive statement. So let me demonstrate this using this positive statement. Tonin Peter out of the box Simply there, I eat pizza John in P chatterbox in Nida. So to former question using this statement, I would change pat at the end to God and say the question with a rising tone at the end. And if I want to ask you, I wouldn't use a pronoun since I'm already speaking to you. So I would say P chatterbox and Nika do you eat pizza? P Chatterbox and Nika, however, for more questions are only ever used in very formal settings, and I personally very rarely use it, so you may never use it at all. But people who work in the service sector, such as flight attendants or people who work in the restaurant, often do use this type of question. So it's worth being aware off this question for, as you may be asked questions in this way, let's look a few other examples. Souder by Sinica, do you drink Soudelor biting Nika Hunger. Welcome, Dominica. Do you study Korean Hangu? Bakambu, harmonica, something? Dominica? Are you a teacher? Something you mean, Nika? As you can see in this last example, we also use the same way or forming formal questions for the Korean beef up. Okay, so let's do a listening repeat practice off saying formal questions. Repeat after me. P chatterbox in nica p chatterbox of Nika Sydor by Sinica Sudova Sinica Hang Google Com Boom Nika Hunger Girl Combo harmonica. Something name in Nica. Something you mean Nika. That was great. Now let's look at how we conform. Polite and casual questions Now polite and casual questions look the same as positive statements. So there is no change in the sentence structure, but there is a difference in the intonation. In positive statements. The tone falls at the end of the statement. Listen to the following examples. Tonen, Ph other bogo Tonin, Pediatric bergoglio nine in something in here done in something in here, so as you could hear the tone falls at the end of the statement, but in questions, the tone rises at the end of the question. And this rising tone is what indicates what you're saying is a question. Listen to the following examples. Peter Bo Goya, P. Jabalya. No guy. Something EMEA. No guy. Something EMEA. So clearly the tone rises at the end to indicate that these statements or these questions, are questions. One other point to note is that when asking polite and casual questions in speech is more natural to ask questions without using object particles. So rather than asking peace out Herbal Goyo, it's more natural to ask Peter Bergoglio. Okay, so with that in mind, let's do a listening repeat practice off asking polite and casual questions. Repeat after me, Pete Sabo, Goya P. Jabal Goyo Dog or something You mia No guy. Something Neemia Soon by So you sued by Show You Hangu. Garcon, Blue hair, Hangu, Bakambu Here. Great job. Let's move on to the final practice. In this final practice, we're going to do one independent speaking practice and using the prompts on the screen. I like you to form formal, polite or casual questions remember to say the questions with a rising tone at the end. So if you're ready, let's begin. Sydor by Sinica. Souder by Sinica No guy something in here. No guys hunting. EMEA, Hangu, Bakambu Hail, Hangu Bakambu Hail Something You mean Nika? Something in me, Mika Sued by Celje Syria My Celia P. J Bokel Peach Tebogo Fantastic effort today. Well done. In this lesson, we learned how to form formal, polite and casual questions. Now, before this course ends, we have one more lesson of review lesson on negative statements and forming questions. So our Susan again one last time before the end of the course. But why? 28. Review Lesson - Present tense 3: hi there. So this is the final lesson off this course, and we're going to review what we learn on forming negative statements and questions in Korean. Let's begin. We learned two different ways to form negative statements. One wants to use on in front of the verb, and the other was toe add T and tacked to the verbs. Then so we do a warm up listening repeat practice on both ways of forming negative statements, but we'll stick to using polite verb endings. Repeat after me. It's on in Suitor and Masha Ir Tallinn in Suitor and Masha telling. Then take a minute ago telling. Then take it. I need to go. Yo Tonen Ph. Other am mo Goyo Tonin piece added. I'm mug oil Tonin, kombu hottie and I o telling then kombu had you and I tonin taker ET and I o Tonin Take a treaty and I O Children, Valerie Books and I O Children in Banbury Box. That was great. Well done. Now let's do an independent speaking practice, and in this practice you have to unscramble the words and form correct negative statements . So if you're any, let's begin John in Simona et and I o Channon Simona, 80. And I owe China in Bangor boxy, and I Owe China in Banbury, Bachtiar and I O Conan Ph added. I'm more oil Tilman p chattel and Mogo John in When John Had A and I, uh, Tonin When John Hodge and I O. Tonen two. Super and Macho, Shonen Jucilei and MASH Children Checker and Bergoglio Tell Nen, Checker Aniko, Great effort. Well done. Now let's review how we form questions in Korean to form questions in a formal way. We have to remove Pat at the end of the positive statement and replace it with God. And we have to say this question with a rising tone at the end of the question, However, to say questions in a polite and casual way, the form doesn't change at all. But we have to say the question with a rising tone at the end, as this rising tone is what indicates what we're saying is a question. OK, so let's first to a listening repeat practice on saying formal, polite and casual questions. Repeat after me, P a chatter box and Nika P chatterbox in Nica, something name in Nica, something naming Nika P Tableau Koyo Peter Bergoglio Hunger Go combo here. Hangu Bakambu Hair serum. Aisha Sir By So check your ego. Take it ago. That was great. Low done. Now let's do an independent speaking practice and this time, using the prompts on the screen, I like you to form appropriate formal, polite and casual questions, making sure to say each question with a rising tone at the end. So if you're ready, let's begin, Huck saying in Nica Huck singing Nika PVM Barbara Boxer Monika PBM Barbara Boxer Monika Young, Oakland Boo Hail Young Oakland with Hair Pete Abba Lawyer. Peach Ambo Value Check It Ago. Take it Ago Big Jew by show MC two by show Fantastic Job Today. Well done. In this lesson, we reviewed how to form negative statements and questions in Korean, and that's the end of this course on Korean for absolute beginners to by now you've developed great knowledge on how to form sentences in Korean and some basic vocabulary knowledge. So far, the focus has mainly bean on developing your grammar knowledge, but do keep an eye out for beginner conversation courses so that you can start developing your communication skills in Korea. Thank you for taking this course, and I look forward to seeing you soon a game, but by