Korean for Absolute Beginners 1 | Keehwan Kim | Skillshare

Korean for Absolute Beginners 1

Keehwan Kim, Language teaching professional

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53 Lessons (5h 42m)
    • 1. Course Introduction

      2:28
    • 2. Introduction to Hangul

      2:47
    • 3. Syllable formation

      4:55
    • 4. Writing Korean

      2:59
    • 5. Consonant pronunciation

      6:10
    • 6. Consonants ㄱ & ㄴ

      5:33
    • 7. Consonants ㄷ & ㄹ

      6:34
    • 8. Consonant ㅁ & ㅂ

      7:00
    • 9. Consonants ㅅ & ㅇ

      7:15
    • 10. Consonant Review Lesson 1

      6:38
    • 11. Consonants ㅈ & ㅊ

      5:01
    • 12. Consonants ㅋ & ㅌ

      6:23
    • 13. Consonants ㅍ & ㅎ

      6:44
    • 14. Consonants Review Lesson 2

      6:41
    • 15. Vowels ㅏ & ㅑ

      5:47
    • 16. Vowels ㅓ & ㅕ

      6:04
    • 17. Vowels Review Lesson 1

      4:51
    • 18. Vowels ㅗ & ㅛ

      5:03
    • 19. Vowels ㅜ & ㅠ

      6:22
    • 20. Vowels Review Lesson 2

      5:15
    • 21. Vowels ㅡ, ㅣ, & ㅢ

      6:54
    • 22. Vowels ㅔ, ㅐ, ㅖ, & ㅒ

      7:19
    • 23. Vowel Review Lesson 3

      5:24
    • 24. Tense Consonants ㄲ & ㄸ

      5:43
    • 25. Tense Consonants ㅃ, ㅆ & ㅉ

      7:45
    • 26. Tense Consonants Review Lesson

      5:12
    • 27. W-glide vowels ㅚ, ㅙ, ㅞ

      7:47
    • 28. W-glide vowels ㅟ, ㅘ, ㅝ

      8:14
    • 29. W-Glide Vowels Review Lesson

      5:31
    • 30. CVC Combination 1

      6:22
    • 31. CVC Combination 2

      6:24
    • 32. CVC Combination Review 1

      6:30
    • 33. CVC Combination 3

      7:28
    • 34. CVC Combination 4

      6:46
    • 35. CVC Combination Review 2

      8:08
    • 36. 겹받침 1

      6:25
    • 37. 겹받침 2

      5:53
    • 38. 겹받침 Review Lesson

      7:28
    • 39. Reading Practice 1

      8:36
    • 40. Reading Practice 2

      11:00
    • 41. Reading Practice 3

      8:22
    • 42. Reading Practice 4

      9:27
    • 43. Honorific Language

      4:33
    • 44. Sentence Structure

      6:37
    • 45. Particles 1

      6:44
    • 46. Particles 2

      5:32
    • 47. Particles 3

      3:30
    • 48. Particles Review Lesson

      6:29
    • 49. 이다

      6:59
    • 50. 이다 Three levels of formality

      9:36
    • 51. 아니다

      5:11
    • 52. 아니다 Three levels of formality

      8:38
    • 53. 이다 & 아니다 Review Lesson

      8:56
140 students are watching this class

About This Class

Hi! Welcome to my course on Korean for Absolute Beginners.

This course is aimed for those who have decided to start learning Korean for the first time. In order to help you develop the all important skills, we're going to help you develop important skills and knowledge in the following areas.

  1. Learn Hangul - By learning Hangul, the Korean alphabet system, you can start reading Korean, which will ultimately help you to develop your skills at a much quicker pace.
  2. Understand the sentence structure of Korean - Find out the key differences between Korean and English.
  3. Learn about honorific language - Learn the different types of honorific language and its importance when using Korean.
  4. Start forming basic sentences - Learn the use of be-verb and start forming Korean sentences.

This is an interactive course, so you're not going to just sit there and listen to lectures. You will be instructed to listen and repeat, or even try to speak by yourself, so make sure you're in a quiet place so you can practice speaking.

Transcripts

1. Course Introduction: Hi, everybody, and welcome to my calls on Korean for absolute beginners. My name is key one, Kim Kim do Han, and I'm going to be your instructor on this course. I've been a language teaching professional for over 10 years with a background in linguistics, and for the last three years I have been creating language learning content online. And part of that time was also spent at BBC Learning English, creating English language learning content for learners in Korea. Now, as the title of the course would suggest, this course is for absolute beginners, meaning that is ideally suited to those who are starting to learn Korea for the first time . And for anyone learning Korean for the first time, the first thing they have to do is to learn to read. Therefore, we look how the Korean alphabet known as hunger is written into syllable blocks, and I will then guide you through a little constants and 1000. The lessons are designed to be interactive. So rather than just sitting there and listening to me talking, I want you to take part at times by listening and repeating after me and at other times having a go at reading by yourself and then listening to me to see whether you read correctly. We'll also show you how to write hunger, and you can download writing practice sheets to have a go at writing hunger by yourself. By the end of this course, the aim is for you to completely master every aspect of 100 so that you're ready to pick up a book and start reading. So don't expect to understand everything just yet. Now, this course won't just end with mastering how to read once hunger is mastered, will then guide you through the basics of career language. We look at the sentence structure off Korea and understand the basic differences between Korea and English. We'll explain what honorific language in Korean is, and it's important when speaking to career. Finally, we're going to learn the use off the beaver being Korean and begin to form basic sentences . So if you want to step by step approach to learning hunger and the basics of Korea sentences, enjoy these calls. I'll be waiting for you to use it 2. Introduction to Hangul: hi there. So this video is all about the Korean alphabet, which is called hunger hunger. It was created in the 15th century by his head on Tehran, said Young is the king's name. Tear means great and one means King. Hence the name, said Young. They were Now. If you ever get a chance to visit soul, you see a great big gold statue off, said John Doe, one near Campbell Palace. Now, linguistically hunger is a relatively new writing system, but spoken Korean has existed for thousands of years before prior to hunger. Koreans use Chinese characters for reading and writing, but Chinese characters are based on meaning rather than sound, so you can learn to read one character. But that only means you've lasted one character and you have to learn thousands mawr to be able to read Chinese proficiently As a result, illiteracy was common in Korea, and that's why I said John. There one created hunger on alphabet system based on sound rather than meaning to enable Koreans to be able to read the announcement. Off Hungers creation was published in a document titled Who Minjiang Them? The proper sounds of the education Off the people in the dates off its publication. October 9th is Hangul a Hungry Day in Korea, and this day is a public holiday. So Koreans have more than one reason to be thankful to King schedule. Okay, so I think that's enough history lesson now. The important thing I want to tell you is that hunger is relatively easy to learn because similar to the Roman alphabet is made up of continents and vowels in Korean, there are 19 constant letters and 21 vowel letters. Now, in terms of actual number of letters, Handle has more than English, as English has 21 continents and five vowels. However, the two languages are very similar in terms of the number of constant and vowel sounds, as Korean generally has, the same number of sounds as the letters in hunger and English has 24 constant sounds and 20 vowel sounds. So to read Korea, you have to learn the constant in vow litters and then learn to combine them to make the proper sounds. Being able to read is an advantage when trying to learn a language. As once you can start reading, you confined any Korean text and start reading, and this will help you to develop vocabulary knowledge more quickly. Therefore, as you begin your journey to learn Korean, we want to help you develop your reading skills first, as this will help you to develop more quickly in the future. Great. Before we start learning how to read Korea in the next lesson will look at how Korean syllables informed. I'll see you in that lesson, but by 3. Syllable formation: Hi, and welcome to the lecture on Korean syllable formation. Now, Korean is what we call a syllable timed language, as opposed to English, which is called a stress timed language. In English, within a word with many syllables, we place greater emphasis on certain syllables. And these syllables with greater emphasis are called strong sounds, and the less emphasized syllables are called weak sounds. The emphasis on strong sounds is called stress, hence the name stress time language. Take a look at this sentence. This is a problem. This is a problem. When we say the sentence, we put more emphasis on the word this, and the first syllable of problem. And other words and syllables become weak sounds. So we say, this is a problem. This is a problem. However, Korean language puts more or less equal emphasis on every syllable. There is no strong sound or weak sound in Korean. And this aspects of pronunciation is perhaps the single biggest difference between Korean and English. And this difference is also reflected in the way hunger is written. Hunger is written in blocks of syllables. Each block contains a combination of consonants and vowels. The basic constructs of Korean syllables is a consonant and a vowel combination, a CV combination. Here's an example. Car, car. This syllable is made up of the constant letter, key up and a vowel sound. So together, this syllable is red, car, car. In car, the vowel letter R is positioned next to the consonant. However, in some syllables, the vowel letters can be positioned below the constant letter. Here's an example. Cool, cool. This syllable is made up of the constant letter key OK. And the vowel sound oo. So this syllable is cruel. Cruel. Vows that have a horizontal bar are always positioned below the consonant, whereas vertical vowels, such as a position next to the consonant. Now, one of the important differences to note is that unlike English syllables which can begin with a vowel letter such as and or air, Korean syllables must begin with a constant eta. So do keep that in mind. Now, Korean syllables can also have a CVC combination, a consonant, vowel, consonant combination. Here's an example. Come, come. Here we have the constant letter key up the vowel letter r and a consonant letter beam. When we have a CVC combination, the final consonant letter is always positioned at the bottom of the syllable. So everything has to be squeezed in a little to fit them in as syllable block. This final consonant letter is called patching. Patch him, which literally translates to support. Patch him is a really important concepts in Korean as it can dictate which particles are used with certain nouns. And it's also related to the pronunciation of Korean. Finally, we can also have a CVC, c combination, a consonant, vowel, consonant and consonant combination. And a final cc part is called a cup batch him and it translates to layered support inquiry. And there are all together 11 types of kelp batch him and Capuchin are always made up of two different consonants. Now the important thing to note with Capuchin is that we only pronounce one of the two consonants in the cup Batson. For example, this word is made up of the consonant p good. The vowel, and the cup batch in Lille, key up. And Lear is similar to the English ELL and keyup is similar to the English tea. But when we read this word, Lille is silent and we only pronounce the key up. So this is read, tap, tap. In the old days when Korean was first created, rather than sounding out one consonant, only, these capuchin were a blend of the two consonants. But in modern Korean, we only read one consonant. So in these eight carapace him, we read the first consonant. And in these three cup, but Shem, we read the second consonant. Now in the next unit, we will start learning all the different letters in hunger. But I think it's good to have an overview of how Korean syllables are formed before then. In the next lecture, we'll take a look at how hanger is written. See you soon again. Bye-bye. 4. Writing Korean: hi there, and welcome to the video on how to write hunger. Now the basic concept of writing hunger is that every writing stroke has to go from either left to right or top to bottom. And what that means is that no stroke can ever go from right to left or bottom to top. So the starting point of any stroke is the most top left points off a letter or wherever it is that allows you to follow the principles off, left to right and top to bottom. So here's how you write. Kick it as you can see, we first, right, left right. Then in one stroke, we go top to bottom and then left to right now wherever possible, mostly for efficiency reasons. We would complete the lines in one stroke. As long as we're following the principles off, left to right and top to bottom. Let's look at another example. This time it's Lear now. Obviously this one has more lines than before, but again we start from the top left point and we go left to right and then top to bottom in one stroke. And we can do that because we're following the principles off, left to right and top to bottom. Then, as you can see, we come back to the left again so that we can go from left to right in a single stroke. And since we can't continue the stroke from this point, we come to where the stroke began and 1/3 stroke moves from top to bottom and then left to right in one stroke to complete the constant again. The important aspect of this is that we're continuously following the principles off, left to right and top to bottom. Let's look at some vowels. First we have the vow are This is fairly simple. We go top to bottom, and as we can't continue the stroke, we come back to the middle point and complete the vow with another stroke. This time left to right, let's look at a slightly more complex vow. This vow is why we still follow the same principle. But we begin with this stroke from top to bottom. Then we come back to this point and make the second stroke left to right. Then we go to the top to bottom here, and the fourth stroke completes this foul with a left, right and again just to reiterate. The key to writing hunger is that every stroke goes from left to right and top to bottom. The principles off, left to right and top to bottom is something every career loans when they start to learn hunger. And in all of our video lessons on continents and vowels, there are short video clips showing you how to write all the letters. And there are also writing worksheets, which you can download and practice writing hunger by yourself. Okay, so the next lesson is our first lesson on learning hunger and will begin with constants. I'll see you in that lesson, but why? 5. Consonant pronunciation: hi, everyone. So before we get into the actual lessons on learning about hunger, I wanted to explain a little bit about Korean pronunciation. Now the major aim of this course is for you to learn the Hangul letters so that you can start reading hunger, which ultimately will help you to learn Korean more quickly. And in order to learn the Hangul letters, I'll point out of Roman alphabet letter that produces a similar sound to the hunger letter so that we can make that connection and learn the letters quickly. However, there is a slight problem with this because ultimately Korean constant don't match up well with continents in the Roman alphabet. So I'm going to explain why they don't match up well so that you have a better idea off how Korean Continent sounds are produced and also so that you're not confused when I say this sounds like this in English. But then it sounds a little different. Okay, so to better understand that differences in the sounds of constants in Hangar and the Roman alphabet, we need to understand two very important concepts related to how the sounds are produced. One is the concept off voiced and voiceless confidence, and the other is whether a constant sound is an aspirated sound or on on aspirated sound. Now, when a constant sound is voiced, it means that the sound is produced by a vibrating the vocal chords. And this also means that a voiceless, constant sound is produced without vibrating vocal chords. So in English, these are the voice continents, and these are the voiceless confidence quite often to find out whether or constant is voiced or voiceless. If you put your hand on your throat and make a voice continent sound, you should feel some vibration, whereas for voiceless confidence, there is no vibration. Let's try that together. Let's try to say the voice th sound, it's ah ah! And now let's try to say the voiceless th sound Can you feel the contrast? So it's Ah ah Now the second important concept is whether a constant sound is an aspirated sound or on a NATPE aerated sound and aspirated constant sound is produced with a burst of air coming out of your mouth. A typical example of this is the case sound in English when you say Kay, uh, just before the sound is produced. You should feel air pressure buildup as your tongue blocks the air passing through and the K sound is produced when your tongue makes way for the air to pass through. This blocking of air can happen with a tongue, as in the case sound. But it can also happen with your lips, such as it does for the P sound, huh? Now, one thing to note is that in general is difficult to make a distinction between aspirated sounds and a nesp aerated sounds. Because most sounds are aspirated, the question is more to do with whether a sound is heavily aspirated or very lightly aspirated in English, the sounds most commonly associated with being aspirated sounds, R, H, P, T and K. So we now have good awareness, all the two very important concepts related to how the constant sounds are produced. Now the big question is how are Korean Constant sounds different from English constant sounds. Let's find out to understand why and how Korean continents are different from English constants. Let's do a comparison off the English letters G and K and the Korean constant letters Cheok and CUC. Now, if we put G and k in a range of aspiration. Que is a moderately aspirated sound. So we'll put it here. And G is a very lightly aspirated sound, so we'll put it here. So where do the Korean constants go? In this range? First kid is the most heavily aspirated sound off these four continents. So it goes here, and Chiat is mildly aspirated continent. So we'll put it between G and K. So I shouldn't see. All four continents are aspirated differently. Also, the only voice continent is the G sound in English. Listen to me saying these four continents and see if you can hear the difference. God, God! Car. Uh huh. Car. Huh? Car, huh? Okay, So were you able to tell the difference now Because the G sound is a voice continent, it means that the sound is produced with vocal core vibration. So therefore the sound comes more deep within the throat. And because Cheok sound is moderately aspirated, it has a slight hints of the K sound as well as the T sound. Lastly, the distinction between Kay and kids are mild, but you should feel extra burst of air when you say the cheick sound because the release of air for the Cheick sound is more explosive than the K sound. So in the next lesson, while we do detonate the letter G as a sound that's similar to the Cheok sound in hunger, there is some difference in the way these sounds are produced. And in truth, the Cheok sound is somewhere between the G and the K sound in English. This type of comparison between English continents and Korean constants can be made with all the other constant letters. And we've made a reference sheet, which you can refer to to check how the Korean constant sounds are produced. So, as I mentioned earlier, the major focus of this course is on learning the letters in hunger. But I wanted to highlight the key differences in the constant sounds in English and Korean so that you're better able to sound out the letters you're learning in this course. Okay, so that's it for this lesson. In the next lesson will start learning the letters in hunger. See you then, But why 6. Consonants ㄱ & ㄴ: Hi. Welcome to the first lesson on learning the constant and vows in hunger as we mentioned before. Angle has 19 constants and 21 vowel letters. And off these there are 14 basic continents and 10 basic valves. And over the next seven lectures, we're going to focus on learning. The 14 basic continents in this lesson will focus on the 1st 2 which are Cheok and near. The first constant letter is called Cheok and Chiat is written like this. Chiat is similar to the hard T sound in give and cap. Let's try to make the Cheok sound together, and as we do, make sure to look at the letter so that you can make the connection between the sound and the letter. Could CU who? Great. Now I think it's important for us to practice combining the continent and vows and reading the syllables together. So that's what we're going to do. And we're going to introduce the Vow letter A Z. You can probably tell it's similar to the A sound in bag and cat. So when we combine cheok and, uh, it's coup, uh, cu uh, car car. Let's try to read this syllable together. And just as we did before, make sure to look at the syllable as we read the syllable so that you can make the connection between the syllable and the sound. Here we go. Car. Ah, car. Ah ah ah! That was great. Now let's learn the second constant and its neon and noon is written like this. Dia is basically a flipped over version off Cheok and its sound is similar to end sound in nail and snow. So it's No, no, Let's make that sound together. Repeat after me. No, no, no. Okay, So similar to the previous practice will combine the in and the vow Sound are so is new. Uh, new Ah, Nah, no. Repeat after me now. Nah, nah, nah now. Nah. Excellent job. Now let's read the two syllables together. Repeat after me, Carla con, uh, Karla con, uh, Karla con, uh, you think really well, well done. Okay, so in this final practice, you're going to do some independent reading. You're going to read two syllables containing Cheok Indian and you're going to go first, and then you can listen to me reading them to see whether you've read them correctly. Let's go straight into it. Here we go. Kana! Kana! Naga! Naga! Kaga! Kaga! Con a con! Ah na na na na Naga. Naga! That was fantastic. Wot done. Okay, great. So in this lesson we've learned two continents Cheok Indian and we practice reading them by combining with the vow sound in the next lecture will learn two more continents. So I'll see you then. Bye for now. 7. Consonants ㄷ & ㄹ: Hi. Welcome back. And this is the second lecture on learning the basic continents, and we're going to focus on TV. And Leo. The first constant letter is ticket, and it kind of looks like a square with one of its size missing. Take it is written like this dig. It is similar to the D sound in English in day and doctor. So it's the there. Let's say that together. Repeat after me and make sure to look at the letter as you make the sound. Yeah, the the Okay. So similar to the previous lesson we're going to combine ticket and the vowel sound are and practice reading the syllables. So we combine TV it and ah, it's dear. Uh, did, uh uh uh Let's read that together. Repeat after me. Ah ah ah ah ah ah, That was great. The second constant for this lesson is Lille and Lille is written like this. Leo is similar to the l sound in lie and snow. So it's le Let's make this sound together. Repeat after me and make sure to look at the constant letter Le le le great. So let's do a similar practice. Let's combine Lille and the vowel sound are so is look, uh, let, uh, la la Repeat after me. La la la la la la That's fantastic. Let's read both syllables together. Repeat. Off to me. God. Uh, Todd, Uh God, uh, God, uh, God, uh, God, uh, that was fantastic. Moana. Okay, so this is the final practice time. Now, in this final practice, we're going to do to independent reading practice in the 1st 1 will practice reading the constants that we've learned in this lesson and in the 2nd 1 will bring back the 1st 2 constants that we learned in the previous lesson and practice everything together. Okay, so let's do the first independent reading practice on ticket and Lear Cada tada Lada. Lada Got ta ta da! A lotta lotta kinda Khanna Ta da! Ta da! That was fantastic. Well done. Now, before we get into the second independent reading practice, let's bring back the 1st 2 constants. We learn with a vow letter R, and do a couple of listen and repeat practices as a warm up. Here we go con, uh, con con uh, Karla, that was fantastic. Now let's move on to the second Independent reading practice. We're going to practice reading all four syllables together. But we're going to mix them around, so it is going to be a little bit tricky. But let's give it a go. Here we go. Let's start. Cada kada Lana Lana Kat. Ah, Kata Kana Tana Lada. Lada! Naga! Naga! That was fantastic. Wot done. Okay, so in this lesson, we learn to more basic continents which were t good and Leo. And we practice reading them in syllable forms. So now you can read four basic continents. Let's continue and learn to more basic continents in the next lesson. See you then. Bye for now. 8. Consonant ㅁ & ㅂ: Hi. Welcome to the third lecture on learning the basic constants in hunger. In this lecture, we're going to learn to more basic continents and they are medium and pure. The first constant letter we're going to learn is medium and medium is written like this medium is really easy to remember because it just looks like a square block medium is similar to the end sounded English. So it's similar to May and remind. So it's no, Let's make that sound together. Repeat after me. No, no, no. That was fantastic. Now, just like in the previous lessons we're going to combine, the constant letters with a vowel letter are So it's, uh well, my nah, let's read that together. Repeat after me. Ma, my ma, my ma my, that was brilliant. Well done. The second constant letter in this lesson is pupil and pupil is written like this. Now people is also kind of easy to remember because it looks like a bunny. I don't know whether you can see the resemblance and the fact that it resembles a bunny is helpful because pube is similar to the P sound in English as in by and Bunny. So it's but But let's make that sound together. Repeat after me. But But But that was great. Now let's combine Pube and the vow letter are So it's a book. A book? Pa. Pa. Let's read that together. Ah, uh ah ah ah! Uh, Excellent job. Now let's read both syllables together. Repeat after me My by my by my by my by Ma by my by That was fantastic. Well done. Okay, so this is the final practice time and similar to the previous lesson we're going to do to independent reading practice the 1st 1 on the constants that we're learning in this lesson in the 2nd 1 collective practice with all the constants that we learned in the previous lessons. So let's do the first practice first. Remember that in this practice you're going to try reading the two syllable combinations by yourself first, and then you can listen to me reading them to see whether you've read them correctly. Let's begin. My by My by Thoma Palmer Mama Mama Power Bi Taibei My by my by Mama Mama, That was great. Now, before we get into the second independent reading practice, let's do another warm up and do some listening. Repeat off the constant letters that we learned in the previous two lectures. Listen and repeat after me. Kana Kana! Ta da! Ta da! Kana Kana! Ta da! Ta da! Great! Let's try reading all six syllables together. Try reading them by yourself first and then listen to me reading them and check whether you read that correctly. Let's begin. Mata Mata! Caramba! Caramba! Nada! Nada! Mina! Mina Laba Laba Taga Taga! Fantastic job! Well done. So, in today's lesson, we learn to more basic continents which were boom and pure. And we practice reading them in syllable forms using the Vow letter. Now we've learned six off the 14 basic continents and there are eight more to go. So we'll learn to more basic continents in the next lesson. I'll see you soon again. Bye for now. 9. Consonants ㅅ & ㅇ: Hi there. And welcome to the fourth lesson on learning the basic constants in Korean. In this lesson, we're going to learn to more basic continents, and they are shield and young. The first continent is shop, and it's written like this. She is traditionally written with one longer stroke and a shorter stroke supporting the other. But in modern Korean, a lot of people and also word processes like word we show funds where it looks like a triangle without a base shot is similar to the S or the S H sound in smile or shower. It sounds like so, sir. Let's make that sound. Repeat after me, sir. Sir, Sir. Great. Same as before. We're combined shield and the vow letter R and practice reading the syllable. So it's, uh su ah ha. So repeat after me. So, uh, So, uh so, uh, fantastic job. Well done. The eighth continent Now we're going to learn is hell And you is written like this. Young is a unique constant in Korean, and a lot of textbooks call this than nothing sound or the placeholder. And the reason why we have eating in Korean is that Korean syllables cannot be written with a vowel letter In English, words can begin with a vow letter so we can have words like air and end. However, Korean syllables must begin with a constant letter. So if we were to write the word air fanatically in Korean, we will write a are a O ale A. Uh And as you can see, each syllable begins with a constant letter. He'll as a placeholder. OK, so we're going to practice reading young. But since young doesn't have a sound, we're going to combine it with a vowel letter R and practice reading the syllable straight away. So is Ah, yeah. Repeat after me. Uh ah ah ah ah ah, That was great. Now let's practice reading two syllables together, which contained the continent's shield. And Ian Uh uh uh uh uh uh Fantastic job Oda. In this final practice, we're going to do to independent reading practices, the 1st 1 on the constants that we've learned in this lesson and the 2nd 1 on although constants that we've learned so far. So we're going through the 1st 1 But remember that this is an independent reading practice . So you're going to have to read first and then listen to me reading them. Let's begin. You can do it. Uh uh. Ah! So, uh uh huh. Sasa! Sasha! Ah ah Ah! So, uh, saw Ah, Asa Ossa! Fantastic job. Now, before we move on to the second independent reading practice, let's do a little listening. Repeat practice with a six constants that we've learned so far. Listen and repeat after me. Kana Kana God! Uh, kind of Mabhouh. My, uh Kana Kana. God, Uh I got, uh Mabhouh My by That was great. Now we're going to do the second independent reading practice. But remember, you're going to practice reading eight continents together, so it is going to be a little bit tricky, but I'm sure you can do it. Let's give it a go. Cars are cars are on. Ah, on ah Larga larga Parsa Parsa My, uh my uh No. I saw no excellent job Well done. That was really tricky. But you did really well. So in today's lesson, we learn to more basic constants which are shield and young, and we practice reading them in syllable forms by combining them with a vowel letter are now before we move on to learning another two basic continents. We have a review lesson coming up on the eight constants that we've learned so far. So I'll see you then. Bye for now. 10. Consonant Review Lesson 1: Hi there, welcome to the review lesson on the eight basic consonants that we've covered so far. Let's go straight into it. Okay, let's read the first four basic consonants which were key up, Nin, t, Good. And later, we're going to combine these consonants with the violets are in practice reading them in syllable forms. Let's do some listening repeat practice first. Here we go. Rna, RNA, tada, tada, Carnap, pada, pum pada. Okay, now let's do some independent reading practice on these four basic consonants. Try reading the two syllable combinations by yourself and then listen to me beating them. Let's begin. Con, con ta-da, ta-da, nada, nada. That was fantastic, well-done. Okay, next review the next four basic consonants, which are mu, p, shield. And again, we're going to combine these consonants with the vowel letter R. Do listener repeat practice first. Let's begin. Madaba, baba, baba. Great. Now let's do some independent reading practice. Try reading the two syllable combinations by yourself and then listen to me reading them. Here we go. Marsha, Marsha, Marsha, Marsha. Saba. That was fantastic. So in this final practice, we're going to review all a consonants together. And there are going to be two independent reading practices. The first one is a two syllable combination reading practice. And the second one, which will be quite tricky, is a three syllable combination reading practice. So let's get straight into the first one. Try willing the two syllable combinations and then listened to me reading them. Let's begin. Khanna. Task. Task Marsha, Marsha, Sama, Sama. That was fantastic. Woulda. Now let's try a three syllable combination reading practice. This is going to be a little bit tricky. So the first two lines are going to be listening, repeat practice, and the remaining six will be independent reading practice. Are you ready? Let's begin. Con la, la, la, la, la. Ppar gamma, gamma. Now God, Nagar. Ma, ma, la, la. By great effort undoing that fantastic woulda. It's always good to do a review of everything we're learning because it helps us to remember things in the long run. And as we continue learning in this course, we will revisit the consonants and vowels throughout the course. So there'll be more practice of everything we're learning. But for now, let's move on and continue learning the basic consonants in hunger. I'll see you soon again. Bye for now. 11. Consonants ㅈ & ㅊ: Hello there. And welcome to another lesson on learning the basic constants in Korean. In this lesson, we're going to learn to more basic continents, and they are here and here. The first constant that we're going to learn is cheered and cheered is written like this. He it is quite similar to shield, but it's got a flat hat on top of shot. It sound is similar to change in juice and job. So it's Yeah, let's practice making that sound. Repeat after me. Yeah, yeah, yeah, that was great. Now let's combine Cheered with the vowel letter R and practice reading kit in a syllable form. So it's your Ah, you Ah, yeah. Uh, repeat after me. Uh uh uh uh, Yeah. Uh, that was fantastic. Well done. Now let's learn the second constant in this lesson and it's cheered. Chip is written like this. She It looks a lot like here, except that it's got a little stick on top of it. So you should be able to remember this one quite easily. Now, as its name was suggest she it makes a ch sound in child or tree. Let's make that sound together so it's too so repeat after me to Sure, Sure. Great. Now let's come by and cheered with a vow letter Are so it's true, Are sure Ah, char uh Repeat off to me. Uh uh uh uh uh uh, That was fantastic. Now let's practice reading both syllables from this lesson together. Repeat after me. Char char char car. Excellent job. Well done. Okay, so in this final practice, we're going to do one independent reading practice on the continents. Chick and chit have a go at reading the two syllable combinations by yourself and then listen to me reading them. Let's begin. Chata Chatah charger charger Charge. Ah! Tada chatter. Charter charger, charger. Chata Chata. That was fantastic. Well done. So in this lesson, we learn to more basic continents. And they were chip and chit and we practice reading them in syllable forms with a vowel letter Are now we have four more basic continents to go, and in the next lesson we learn to more, which are CUC and t it. And I was hearing that lesson bye for now 12. Consonants ㅋ & ㅌ: Hi there. Welcome to another lesson on learning the basic constants in hunger. In this lesson, we're going to learn to more basic continents and they are CUC. And here the first constant is CUC and CUC is written like this kid looks a lot like yuck, but it has an extra dash in the middle. It sound is similar to K in kick and koala. So it's cool. Okay, let's practice saying that. Repeat after me. Kerr Kerr Kerr. Great! Let's combine. CUC and the vow are so it's cool. Ah Could Ah, car, car Repeat after me. Car, car, car, car, car, car That was great. Load on the second constant we're going to learn is t it. T It is written like this t it looks a lot like ticket but like Yuk, it has an extra trash in the middle key. It sound is similar to t in table and meter, so it's too. So let's practice making that sound Repeat after me. So to so great let's combine t it with a vow Are so it's too, uh to Ah huh huh Repeat after me. Uh uh huh uh uh huh Huh Uh fantastic job Now let's practice with both syllables containing the constants we're learning. Repeat after me. Carta, Carter Carta. Carter Carta Carter. That was fantastic. Well done. Okay, so it's final practice time we're going to do to independent reading practices. The 1st 1 is on the constants that we learned in this lesson. And the 2nd 1 will be a combined practice with the constants that we learned in the previous lesson. Remember, this is an independent reading practice. So you're going to try reading by yourself first and then listen to me reading them. Let's begin with the 1st 1 Kata kata, taca, taca, caca, caca, tacka tacka data data kata kata. That was great. Now, before we move on to the second independent reading practice, let's do a listening repeat practice off the constants that we learned in the previous lesson which were cheered and cheered. Repeat after me. Uh huh. Shot, huh? Uh huh. Charge. That was great. Let's go straight into the second independent reading practice. Try reading the lines by yourself first and then listen to me reading the lines. Here we go. Kharja Carta Chata Chata Tada Tada, Qatar Qatar Chaka, Chaka Pata Pata That was fantastic, well done again. So in this lesson, we learn to more basic continents which were CUC and t it and we practice reading them in syllable forms with the volatile are the next lesson is the final lesson on learning the basic constants in Korea. And we're going to learn pure and here, so I'll see you soon again, but by 13. Consonants ㅍ & ㅎ: Hi there. Welcome back. And this is the final lesson on learning the basic constants in Korea. In this lesson, we're going to learn Pierre and hit. The first constant we're going to learn is pure. Pierre is written like this. A simple way to remember Pierre is to imagine a ladder that's been flipped around sideways . Now Pierre is similar to pee in pie and lapel. So it's pop, huh? Let's make that sound Repeat after me, huh? Huh? Huh? That was great. Now let's combine Pure and the vow letter are so it's her. Ah, Put Ah huh Pa Repeat off to me, Pa Pa Pa Pa pa pa, That was fantastic! Well done. The second constant we're going to learn is hit. And here is written like this. Now, the easiest way to remember here is to imagine an Ian with a hat on that normally helps. Remember, here here is similar to eight in hat and house. So it's her, huh? Repeat off to me, huh? Huh? Her? That was great. Now let's combine here with a vowel letter. Are so is her are her Ah ha! Huh? Rip it off to me, Huh? Huh? Huh? Huh? Huh? Huh? That was great. Now let's practice reading the syllables containing the constants that we've been learning in this lesson. Repeat Off to me. Uh, uh huh. Uh huh, uh huh, Uh huh. Uh huh. Fantastic job won't. Um Okay, so it's final practice time. And in this final practice, we're going to do to independent reading practices the 1st 1 on the constants that we learned in this lesson and the 2nd 1 By bringing back the constants from the previous two lessons and doing a combined practice. Let's get into the 1st 1 This is an independent reading practice. So you go first and then listen to me reading them. That's speaking power, huh? Per huh? Harper Harper. Huh? Huh? Huh? Huh? Papa? Papa Hopper Hopper, Pa! Huh? Hahaha! That was great. Wot done. Now, before we move on to the second independent reading practice, let's do a listening repeat practice off the four continents from the previous two lessons . This is a listening repeat. So let's begin, Chad. Huh? Time Carta. Carter Kat! Uh, time Carta Carter. That was great. Now this is the second independent reading practice on the six basic constants from the previous three lessons. Try reading the lines by yourself first and then listen to me reading them. Let's begin. Chaka Chaka Taha Taha Pata Pata Kata Kata Harper Harper Charter A charter You did really well today. Well done. In this lesson, we learned the last two basic constant P up and hear it, and we practice reading them in syllable forms by combining them with a valid are that asset for the basic continents. But before we move on to the vows less to a review off the six basic continents that we've been learning since the previous review lesson, I'll see you in that lesson bye for now. 14. Consonants Review Lesson 2: hi there, and welcome to the review lesson. Now, in this lesson, we're going to review six basic continents and they are cheer, cheer, keep ticket and P up and hit. Let's get into it the first pair of constants that we're going to review our tears and she it. Let's combine these continents with the valets are and do some listening. Repeat practice first. Here we go. Chata Data Chata Data Chata Data. Okay, now let's do an independent reading practice. Try reading the lines by yourself first and then listen to me, reading them to see whether you've read them quietly. Let's begin. Chatter. Uh, chata charger, charger, chatter, chatter. Chata Chata grates up, wot done. The second pair of constants. Are we going to review our CUC and t it? And as before, let's combine these constants with a volatile R and do a listening repeat practice. Let's begin. Carta Carta, Carta Carta, Kata kata Great. Now let's do an independent reading. Practice off these syllables containing the constants. Cute anti it. Try to read the lines by yourself first, and then listen to me reading them. Kata kata, caca, caca, caca, caca, kata kata, Fantastic job well done. Okay, so these are the last pair of constants that we're going to review, which we learn in the previous lesson. So it shouldn't be that difficult. These constants are pip and hit. Now let's first begin with a listening repeat practice by combining them with a volatile are Here we go, pa. Huh? Pa? Huh? Power, huh? Pa? Huh? Power, huh, Pa? Huh? That was great as we did with other constants. Let's now do an independent reading practice. Read the lines by yourself first, and then listen to me reading them to check whether you've read them correctly. Let's begin, Pa. Huh? Car, huh? Hopper Hapa Papa! Papa Hopper. Hacker. Fantastic job. Well done. In this final practice, we're going to do to independent reading practices. The 1st 1 is a two syllable combination reading practice in the 2nd 1 which will be a little bit tricky. A three syllable reading combination. Let's begin with the 1st 1 Here we go. Chaka! Chaka Taha! Taha Pata Pata! Harder, harder! Chata Chata Copper Kappa! That was fantastic! Well done. Now, the second independent reading practice is going to be a little bit tricky. It's a three syllable combination reading practice, but have a go at reading the lines by yourself first and then listen to me to see whether you've read them quietly. Let's begin her posture. How? Pata, Takata, Takata, Karpa, Gia Top Arte Chart Hakka, Hakka Pata Her pata huh? Kharja per car Joppa. Great job is difficult reading three syllable combinations. But you did really well. So that's it. We're finished learning 14 basic continents in Korea. As you progress through the course, there will be many more opportunities for you to practice what you have learned so far. But for now, let's move on and start learning vows in Korea. So you seen again. Bye for now. 15. Vowels ㅏ & ㅑ: Hello and welcome to the first lesson on learning vows in hunger. Now in hangar, there are 21 vowel letters. It's quite a lot when you compare it to only five in English. But remember that English also has 20 vowel sounds. It's just that in English, the five hour letters can represent different sounds, such as put and shop, and they can also be combined to form different vowel sounds such as pear or feet budding Korean. Each vowel letter generally represents a single vow sound. So pronunciation is a little easier, though there is quite a lot to remember now. First, we're going to focus on the six basic vowels and their five wide glide a variety. Now you might be wondering what is a white glow variety, But don't worry about that for now, because we're going to explain all this shortly. In this first lesson, we're going to learn the vow letter Ah, which you've seen many times already, and it's why Glide Variety. Yeah, let's begin. So the first foul let's up, which we really seeing many times, is this is a vertical val, so it's always positioned next to the constant letter. Ah, is written like this. The valets are is similar to a in cats and had So it's our, uh let's practice making that sound. Repeat after me. Ah, ah, ah, Great. Now let's practice reading it in syllable forms will begin with an easy start because the constant letters going to be here. So let's combine you. And, uh, so it's ah ah. Repeat after me. Uh uh uh uh uh uh, that was great. Load on the second vowel letter is Yeah, and this is called a wide line because the sound has a y sound. Yeah, is written like this. Hunger recognizes the y sound as a vow sound rather than a constant sound and to convert some of the other basic vows into a white light. We add this extra dash this dash is what makes a wide light and you'll see in future lessons how we convert some of the basic vows into a wide light by adding an extra tests, less practice, making out this sound. So it's Yeah, yeah. Repeat after me. Yeah, yeah, yeah, that was great. Now let's combine it with a constant letter here and reading it in syllable forms. So It's Yeah, yeah. Repeat after me. Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah Now let's read both syllables containing the vow. Litters are Enya. Pay close attention to the vow. Litters, Repeat after me. Uh, yeah. Uh, yeah. Uh, yeah, that was fantastic. Wot done. As always, this is the final practice, and it's an independent reading practice time. Now, we're already going to do one independent reading practice. And this practice is obviously on the vow letters that we've been learning in this lesson. So let's get straight into it. Try to read the lines by yourself first, and then listen to me reading them. Let's go. Ah, yeah Ah, yeah, yeah Ah, yeah Ah, ah ah yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah Hi. Uh ah, uh, yeah. Ah, yeah. Ah, great job. Well done. So in this first lesson on learning vows in hunger, we learn to vow sounds Ah, and its wide lie variety. Yeah, and we practice reading them in syllable forms using the constant Let's that year. In the next lesson, we'll learn to more vows in hunger and they are all and yeah, I'll see you soon A gay, But like 16. Vowels ㅓ & ㅕ: Hi there. Welcome back. This is the second lesson on learning vows in hunger. And in this lesson, we're going to focus on the vow are and it's wide light. Yeah, let's begin. The first vow is all and all is basically Ah, that's been flipped around. Oh, is written like this. Oh, it's similar to you in Cut. And but let's practice making out this sound. Repeat after me. Ah, ah, ah! Great. Now for syllable reading practice, we're going to combine our where the constant letter p up. And if you recall, pube is similar to be in English, so it's boot. Oh, but all Tom, uh, repeat after me. Paul. Paul? Uh huh. Oh, Uh huh. Huh. That's great. Well done. Okay, so let's learn the second vow in this lesson. And it's the wide glide off, which is your Yeah, is written like this Now, just as we made yeah, from our we add an extra tax to all to make your remember that this extra cash is what makes a vow a wide light. Now this year is similar in sound too young and yummy. Let's practice making out this sound. Repeat after me. Yeah, Yeah, Yeah. Okay. That was great. Now let's combine your with a constant letter P up. So it's book? Yeah, but yeah. Pure kill. Repeat after me. They are. We are, They are. That was great. Now let's practice reading the two syllables we've been practicing, which contained The vows are and yet repeat after me. Pull up your popular pull up your poppy are Paul pr Poppy are fantastic. Effort. Well done. Okay, so it's final practice time and we're going to do to independent reading practices the 1st 1 on the vows we've been learning in this lesson in the 2nd 1 on the vows would be learning in the last two lessons. Try reading the syllables by yourself first and then listen to me reading them. Let's begin with the first practice, Paula. Pure pour Pure, pure Paul Pure Paul Paul Bar Paula pr bar pr bar. Pop your popular PR pr PR PR. That was great. Now, before we get into the second independent practice, let's have a little warm up listening. Repeat, practice off the vows. We learned in the last lesson. Repeat after me. I, uh ah, yeah. Ah, yeah. Ah, yeah. Okay, so Now that you're warmed up, let's get into the second independent reading practice. We're going to practice the four vow letters we've been learning in the last two lessons. Remember, this is an independent reading practice. So you go first and then listen to me. That speaking Paul Yeah. Paul? Yeah. A p o a p O! Yeah, hell, yeah. I b o pure are pure Ah ah Bo Ah ball. Yeah, Bo yobbo Great work today. Well done. So, in today's lesson, we learn to more vows are in your and we practice reading them with the constant Let's appear before we move on to learning horizontal vows. Let's have a review lesson off. The four vowels would be learning in the last two lessons. So I'll see you in that review lesson. Bye for now. 17. Vowels Review Lesson 1: Hi there. And welcome to the first review lesson on learning vows in hunger. In this review lesson, we're going to focus on the four vows we learned in the last two lessons. And they are Ah, yeah. Oh, yeah. Let's begin the 1st 2 vows we learned. Well, uh, and yeah, let's pair up these vows with the constant Let's a year and do a listening repeat practice . Let's begin. I, uh ah. Uh I, uh ah, uh, that was great. Now let's do an independent reading practice. Tried reading the two syllable combination first, and then listen to me reading them. Let's start. I, uh I, uh Yeah, yeah. Ah, ah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. Great job. Well done. Okay, so the second pair of ours, we learned where are in your and Samos before we do a listening repeat practice, and this time will pair up the vows with a constant letter. P up. Are you ready? Let's begin. Paula Br Paul? Yeah, Paula Br Paul Young. Okay, great. Now this time is gonna be an independent reading practice. Tried reading the syllables by yourself first and then listen to me reading them. Pombo, Pombo P Arba Arba Paul Bar Baba Paul Biya Paul Biya Good job won't on. Okay, so you're doing really well. Now, in this final practice, we're going to do to independent reading practices. The 1st 1 on reading two syllable combinations in the 2nd 1 will try reading three syllable combinations. Let's begin with the 1st 1 Are you ready? They start. Kolia! Paul? Yeah, a bill a bill Yabba yabba Oh, yeah. Oh, yeah. Paul Biya Poppaea. I, uh I, uh That was excellent. Well done. Now, the second independent reading practice is going to be a three syllable combination reading practice. It is going to be a little bit tricky, but we're gonna have to start some point. So let's give it a go. Are you ready? Let's go. Ah, yeah, Bo Ah, yeah, but, uh pure arbol. Pure eyeball. Ah, pop your Apapa Yeah Bureau. Ah, yeah. Your, uh Paul Pio. Yeah. Popeo. Yeah. Oh, yeah. Oh, yeah. Uh, fantastic effort today won't on in this lesson. We review the 1st 4 vow letters we learned, and they are ire and oil, and we practice reading them in suitable forms with a constant letters young and be up over the next two lessons will learn four horizontal vowels and they are or your and you. I will see you in the next lesson. But why? 18. Vowels ㅗ & ㅛ: hi there. And welcome to another lesson on learning vows in hunger. I do have a much shorter hair today, but don't let that distract you from the lesson in this lesson. We're going to learn to horizontal vowels and they are all and your let's go straight into it. The first foul is all and all is written like this or is similar in sound, too. Oh, in stop and hot in British English. So it's all, huh? Let's read this vow letter together. Repeat after me. Oh, oh, Ah, that was great. Now, when you write syllables using horizontal vowels, the horizontal vows are always positioned below the constant letter. And the constant letter in these syllables has to change its shape in position a little to accommodate these horizontal vowels. Now, in this syllable reading practice, we're going to combine all with a constant letter B um which is similar in sound to em. So it's both or more or mawr mawr. Repeat after me More, more, more, more, more, more! Great job, water. Let's learn the second vowel for this lesson and it's the wide glide off all which is your your is written like this you'll just like other white lies is made by adding an extra dash to the basic vow. Or so this vow is Read your you're Let's read this file together. Repeat after me, you'll you'll you'll. That was great. Now let's combine this vow litter with a constant letter B um, and read the syllable form together. So it's more your murder, your mule mule. Repeat after me. Mule mule, mule, mule, mule, mule That was fantastic. Now let's try reading two syllables containing the vowel letters or and your repeat off to me. More mule, More mule, More mule, more mule, more mule, more mule. Excellent job loader. Okay, so in today's final practice, we're going to do one independent reading practice. And of course, it is on the vows that we've been learning in this lesson. Try reading the lines by yourself first and then listen to me reading them. Let's begin more Muir. More mule mule, More mule. More, more, more, more, more mule, More mule. More mule mule mule meal, more Muir. More meal. That was great Well done in today's I sent, we learn to horizontal vows or nual, and we practice reading them in syllable forms with a constant letter. B, um, in the next lesson will learn to more horizontal vowels, and they looked like, flipped over versions off what we learned today. These vows are you and you. So I'll see you in the next lesson. But why? 19. Vowels ㅜ & ㅠ: Hi there. Welcome back. Now in today's listen, we're going to learn to more horizontal vows and they are who and you Let's begin. So the first foul is who and who is written like this. This vow who sounds like double O in food and good. So it's who Oh, let's practice reading this Well, repeat after me. Oh, oh, oh, that was great. Now let's practice reading Who in a syllable form remember that horizontal vows are always positioned below the constant letter and we're going to combine with a constant letter. Kia so is good or cool. Cool. Repeat after me. Cool, Cool, Cool, Cool, Cool, Cool. That was great. Cool actually means number nine. So we've just been saying 99 in Korea. Let's look at the second vow in this lesson and this vow is you. You is written like this. You is a white light off the basic value. So we make this foul by adding an extra cash to do you Sounds like Why? Oh, you in English? So it's you. You. Let's practice reading this about. Repeat after me. You, you you! That was great. Now let's combine this foul with a constant letter Cheok. So it's good. You good? You que que let's practice reading the syllable. Repeat after me. Que que que que que que? That was fantastic. Now let's practice reading both syllables from this lesson containing the violators. Who and you repeat after me. Cool view. Cool, You cool view. Cool. You cool, You cool. You Wilson joke. Well done. Fantastic. So is the final practice time. Now, in today's final practice, we're going to do to independent reading practices, the 1st 1 on the vows We've been learning in this lesson and the 2nd 1 on the four horizontal vows that we've learned in the last two lessons. Remember that both practices are independent reading practices, so you will go first and then you can listen to me reading them. Let's begin with the 1st 1 Kruky you, Krug you Q Q Q q que cool? Que cool? Could you cook you que cool que cool Google Krugel? That was fantastic! Well done. Now, before we get into the second independent reading practice, I think you know what's coming. We're gonna have a listen and repeat warm up practice off the two vows we learned in the last lesson and these vows were or and your will combine these vows with a constant that's immune. Let's start more mule, more mule, more Muir More mule. That was great. Now let's do the second independent practice on the full horizontal vows that we've been learning. You go first and then listen to me reading them this. Begin Crume or grew more mule. Goal! Your goal. Que more que more mule, you mule goo crew Meo crew Mule Morgue You morgue You excellent job world on great effort today So in today's lesson, we learn to more horizontal vows and they are all and you and we practice reading them in syllable form using the constant letter Kia. Now, before we move on and learn more vows in hunger, we're going to have a quick review off the four horizontal vows we've been learning and they are or your and will you? I'll see you in that review lesson. But why 20. Vowels Review Lesson 2: Hi there. And welcome to the second review lesson on vows in hunger. In this lesson, we're going to review the four horizontal vows that we learned in the previous two lessons . And these vows are or you and who you. Let's begin the 1st 2 horizontal vows that we learned were or and your Let's combine these vows with a constant letter B m and do a listener Repeat practice. Let's begin. More mule, More mule, more mule, more mule. That was great. Now let's do a quick independent reading. Practice off these two vowels. Try reading the lines by yourself first and then listen to me reading them. Let's start more Muir. More mule, Mule, mule, mule mule More, more, more, more mule, More mule, more fantastic job Well done. The next two horizontal vows we learned were who and you this time will combine these vows with a constant That's a key up and do a listening repeat practice. Let's begin cook you cool. You cool que cool you, That was great. Now let's doing independent reading. Practice off these two vowels. Try reading the lines by yourself first and then listen to me reading them here we go, Krug, you kook. You que cool, que cool google google que google que cool. Excellent job. Well done. Okay, so in this final practice, we're going to do to independent reading practices on all four horizontal fouls. The 1st 1 is a two syllable combination reading practice in the 2nd 1 A three syllable combination reading practice. Let's begin with the 1st 1 Try reading the lines by yourself first, and then listen to me reading them. Here we go. Crew. Mule crew Mule Que more que more mule ghoul Yeogu. More mule, More mule Morgue. You morgue. You grew more crew more. That was amazing. Well done. Now let's do the second independent reading practice. This is a three syllable combination reading practice. It's tricky, but I know you can do it. Tried reading the lines by herself first and then listen to me reading them. Let's begin crew more que crew. More que mule crew More your cool more Mork, You cool, Mork, You cool Que more mule. Que more mule? Crume! Yokel groom! You're cool. Mork, You Muir Mork you Muir. That was amazing. Load on. Thumbs up! Two thumbs up even. Fantastic. So that's the end of this review lesson as we continue to move forward in this course, you will come across all the continents and vows we've been learning and have more opportunities to practice reading them. But if you do want more practice off the four vowels we've reviewed in this lesson, I don't think it's such a bad idea to watch this video again. But for now, we're going to move on and learn more vowels in hunger. In the next lesson will focus on who e and we. So I'll see you in the next lesson, but by 21. Vowels ㅡ, ㅣ, & ㅢ: Hi. Welcome back in this lesson. We're going to look at three more vows in hunger. The 1st 2 vows are do n e. And the third vow is a combination of these two vows. And that's the Let's begin. The first foul is who is a horizontal vow and it's written like this. Now the vow doesn't exist in English, but a sound similar to appears when there is a constant cluster A constant cluster is a group of continents without a vow. For example, in the world smile. We have a constant cluster at the beginning. So, sir, is similar to in Korea. Here are a few more examples. Climb, Strike Brave Now, of course, the sound of continents in constant clusters are not very pronounced. But the Korean vow out is very pronounced. So it's Ah, this practice reading this fell. Repeat after me. Ah, ah ah, That was great. Now let's combine this vow letter with a constant shot. So it's sir. Sir. Sir. Sir, Repeat after me. Sir! Sir. Sir! Sir! Sir! Sir, That was great load on. The second vow in this lesson is a vertical vow and this vow is e e is written like this Now the Vow e is similar to I in Sip and Mitt. So it's e Okay, let's practice reading this foul. Repeat after me. Hey, hey, hey, That was great. Now let's combine this vow letter with a constant shield again. So it's so e so e she see. Repeat after me. Si, si, si, si, si, si. That was great. Now, before we move on to the third vow, let's practice reading the 1st 2 vowels We've been learning so far. So it's an E, combined with a constant shot. Repeat after me. Sushi Soucy Sushi Soucy Sushi Soucy. Great job. Well done. Okay, so the third vow in this lesson is a combination off the 1st 2 vowels. And this foul is three. He is written like this now, the basic idea off saying he used to say who and e very quickly. So it's three. Okay, now this vow. He is very unusual because most Korean vowels are pronounced in one way, but we can be pronounced in three ways, depending on how it's used. But for this lesson, we're going to focus on the most common in the standard way of reading. Three which is the But as you continue to learn Korean with us, we will show you how we can be pronounced in other ways. Now, let's practice reading the as repeat after me. Okay? Okay. Okay. Great job. Now, this value is commonly used with a constant here. So let's practice reading this vow in a syllable form with you. So it's we okay? Repeat after me, E. See? Okay. Okay. Okay. Fantastic job, Baudone. In this final practice, we're going to do one independent reading practice, and we'll practice all three vows. We've been learning in this lesson. All the lions are two syllable combinations. Try reading the lines first and then listen to me reading them. Let's speaking, E c. We see sushi, sushi. She she these Louisa. She's a she, sir. Certainly. Surgery. That was great again. So in this lesson, we learned three more vows in hunger who e and a and we practice reading them in suitable form with a constant shield. And you now, in the next lesson, we're going to learn four more vows in career. But don't worry, it's not going to be that daunting, and you'll soon find out why. I'll see you in that lesson. But why 22. Vowels ㅔ, ㅐ, ㅖ, & ㅒ: Hi there. So in this lesson, we're going to learn four more vows in hunger. Now, these four vows share a lot of similarities in how their red so it won't be that difficult . These full vows are a A and yeah, yeah, Let's begin now. The 1st 2 vows will look at our A and A, and these vows are written like this. These two vowels look very similar. They both have vertical bars, but one of them has a dash in the inside bar towards the continent and the other has a dash between the two vertical bars. In the old days, when Korean was first made, people did distinguish between these vows and use. Readers still do. But in every day speech, people read these vows in the same way. And you really have to distinguish them in writing since care and care. Although there pronounced in the same way mean different things, one means dog the other means crap. Okay, so let's practice reading these valves now. They sound similar. So we're going to practice thes two vowels together. The sound is a Yeah. Repeat after me. Ah ah a a ah ah! Excellent. Will keep the syllable reading practice simple And combine these vows with a constant eel. So again is air air a A Repeat after me Ah ah ah ah ah ah! Fantastic job, Woda. The second pair of owls are Yeah, and yet they are written like this. Now these two vows are wide lies off the two vows that we just practiced and a and we made these vows in tow. White lies with an extra dash. Let's practice reading these vows. They are? Yeah, Yeah. Repeat after me. Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, That was great. Now let's combine these vows with a constant ian in practice, reading them in suitable forms. Yeah, Yeah. Now, this word, Yeah, he's actually a polite form of Yes, in Korean is actually quite a useful word. Repeat after me. Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, That was great. Now let's practice the two sets of ours together. Repeat after me a a a Ah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah! Fantastic job, Oda. Great is final practice time. Now, in this final practice, we're going to do to independent reading practices, the 1st 1 on the vows. We've been learning in this lesson in the 2nd 1 combined practice with the vows that we learned in the last lesson. Both are independent reading practices. So you go first and then listen to me reading them. Let's do the 1st 1 You ready? Let's begin. Yeah, yeah a Yeah, Yeah, yeah, yeah a Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah A Yeah, A That was excellent. Well done. Now, before we move on to the second independent reading practice, we're going to have a warm up listening Repeat off the three vows that we learned in the last lesson, the vows were who e and speaking. So she really so she so she really so she That was fantastic. Now let's do the second independent reading practice. You're going to read two syllable combinations, but we are going to practice seven veils altogether. Let's begin, Sue. Yeah. So the Yeah, Yes, she air? Yes, He air s she s she a the sa the sa She air? Yeah. See a Yeah. Eso yeah s Yeah, that was fantastic water. So in this lesson, we learned four more vows in hunger and we practice reading them in syllable form using the constant Ian. Now that's it for the basic vows and the wide lives. But before we go on and continue to learn about double continents and W. Clive Owls will do a quick review off the seven vows we've been learning over the last two lessons. So I'll see you in that review. Listen, but by 23. Vowel Review Lesson 3: Hello there. So in this review lesson, we're going to review the seven vows that we learn in the previous two lessons. And they r E Lee, okay. And yeah, yeah, Let's begin the first set of vows that we're going to review our e. And and just as we did in the lesson, we're going to combine these vows with a continents shell and you and do a listening repeat practice first. Are you ready? That speaking. So she really So she Great effort. Now let's do an independent reading practice. All these veils were going to do two syllable combination reading practice. You go first and then listen to me reading them, That's begin. Sushi, Sushi E c e c She she re Siri Siri. Great effort, motor. Now the second set of values that we're going to review Ah, a and yeah, yeah, has combined these vows with a constant year and do a listening repeat practice first. Let's begin. Ah and yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, that was great. Load up. Now let's do an independent reading Practice off these four vowels, you're going to read two syllable combinations. But there are four vowels, so pay close attention to the vow that you're reading. Are you ready? Let's begin a Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah A Ah, excellent work. Well done. In this final practice, we're going to do to independent reading practices. The 1st 1 is a two syllable combination reading practice. And the 2nd 1 a three syllable combination Really in practice. Let's do the 1st 1 You try reading the lines first and then listen to me reading them. Let's begin Su air suit A. Yeah, We? Yeah, a She a she Yeah. Sue a Sue A. We see. We see. Yes. Ah, yes. Ah, Fantastic job. Well done. Now we're going to do the second independent reading practice. But remember that you're going to read three syllable combinations. Plus, we're going to practice all seven vowels. There's gonna be a huge challenge, but let's give it a try. Are you ready? Here we go. Sushi. A sushi? A the s e E s E. Yes. Ah, yes. Ah a a three c a e c the s e C s she? Yeah, she's Yeah. She's, uh, amazing job won't on. You did really Well, now, in this review lesson, we went over the seven vows that we learned in the last two lessons and these vows R e ah and yeah, yeah, now we have five more continents and six more vows to learn in anger. So let's get straight into those. In the next lesson, I'll see him that lesson bye for now. 24. Tense Consonants ㄲ & ㄸ: Hi. Welcome to the first lesson on the tense continents in Korean now the tens continents are also called sang town. Sung means pale and town means constant. So sang Joan roughly translates to double continents. And there's a reason why they called double constants. We've already learned these continents Cheok ticket P up shield and cheer and the double continents or the tens continents Oh, in Korean Sang town are basically made up. By doubling up these continents like this you become Cingular. He could become sang Dig it People become sang view shot becomes sanctuary and she it become sank it So all in all there are five tens continents And over the next two lessons, we're going to focus on learning these tens. Continents in this lesson will focus on learning sangria and sang ticket. The first tense continent is sang yoke. Sang deok is written like this. Now tens continents are made with the harder and stiffer sound So instead of good is good. Okay, and remember that there is no equivalent sound in English. So as we practice reading this continent is really important for us to make the connection between the sound and the letter. So let's now practice reading this tense constant. Repeat after me. Good, good, good. That was great. Now let's practice reading this continent in a syllable form with a vow. Or so it's good. Oh, good. Oh, go, go! Repeat after me. God! God! God! God! God! God, that was great! Well done. The second tens constant in this lesson is Sang ticket Sang ticket is written like this sanity. It makes this sound there. Duh. And again, there is no equivalent sound in English. So as we practise, please make sure you're making the connection between the sound and the letter. Now let's practice reading Sang Dig it. Repeat after me. Uh uh uh. Fantastic job. Samos before will combine Sang dig it with a vowel letter. All in practice reading the syllable form. So it's the o the r. No, no! Repeat after me. Duh duh duh duh duh duh! Fantastic job. Now let's practice the syllables we've been reading in this lesson which contained the tense confidence Sang deok and sang Dig it! Repeat after me God, Don God done God Don God done God, don God! Duh Fantastic job today. Well done in this final practice. We're going to do one independent reading practice reading the syllables containing Sandia and sang to get have a great reading the lines by yourself first and then listen to me Reading them this begins Got the got the Dhaka Dhaka Gaga Gaga Dunkel DACA Got the got the dot The data. That was great. Well done in this lesson we learn to tens continents sangria and sang ticket And we practiced reeling them in syllable forms with a vowel letter are in the next lesson We'll learn three more tense continents and they are sang Be up, sank you and send you so I'll see you in that Listen, but why? 25. Tense Consonants ㅃ, ㅆ & ㅉ: Hi there. Welcome back to another lesson in this lesson. We're going to learn three more tense constants and they are sang Be up, sank you and send you. Let's get into it. The first tense constant is sang p up. Sang beom is written like this again. Sang beom doesn't have a direct equivalent sound in English. But Sang beom makes this sound. But But let's practice reading this continent Repeat after me, huh? Huh? But that was great! Now let's practice reading this constant in a syllable form and were used of our letter. So is but Ah but uh huh But repeat after me. Bye bye Bye bye. Bye bye. That was great! Well done! The second tens Constant is Sang Shield Sang Shield is written like this now sang She does have an equivalent sound in English and it's similar to the s sound in sour and source So it's so sir, there's practice reading this constant Repeat after me sir! Sir! Sir, that was great! Hold on now let's practice reading Sang shot in a syllable form and again we'll use of our letter. So it's sir. Sir Sir Sir Repeat after me Sigh, son Sigh, son. Sigh, son, That was great! Well done! The third and last tens constant in this lesson is sang to you. Santa is written like this. Now again, Sanjay. It doesn't have a direct equivalent sound in English, but it makes this sound to Yeah, let's practice reading this constant letter. Repeat after me. Teoh! Teoh! Teoh! Okay, that's great! Now let's practice reading this continent in a syllable form and we use the vowel letter are again. So it's, uh ah! Uh Ah! Uh John, repeat after me. Uh huh. Uh huh. Uh uh. That was great. Well done. Now let's read all three syllables containing the tense continents sang beer sang shop and Sandy Repeat after me. Satya Satya by Satya Bisaccia by Satya Satya Great work today. Well done! Okay, so it's final practice time. And in this final practice, we're going to do to independent reading practices the 1st 1 on the three tens continents from this lesson in the 2nd 1 on all five tens continents. Let's get into the 1st 1 read the lines by yourself first, and then listen to me reading them. Let's begin. Just, uh, Jasa, but, uh but ah SAPA, SAPA Jabba Joppa Satya Satya Barsa Barsa Brilliant work again. Well done. Now, before we get into the second independent reading practice, let's have a warm up listening. Repeat off the two tens continents from the last lesson. Are you ready? Yes. Speaking. God, uh, gotta God. Duh God. Okay, great. Now let's do the second independent reading practice. This is gonna be on all five tens continents, but you're going to read two syllable combinations. Are you ready? Let's give it a try. Gaza, Gaza, But ah, but ah! Dhaka. Dhaka Data data, SAPA, SAPA got got, uh, fantastic job. Well done. Now, I know it does. Put a lot off strain around your mouth to, say the tense continents. But normally you don't have to say so many tens constants together as they're mostly used with other lacks continents. So it's not gonna be this difficult. Always. Okay, so in this lesson, we learn three more tense continents and they were sang be up, sang, shot and sank it, and we practice reading them in syllable forms using the Vallat. Now, before we move on and learn about W glide vows, we're going to have a quick review off the five tens continents. So I'll see you in that review lesson season, but by 26. Tense Consonants Review Lesson: Hello there. So it's good to see you again in this lesson. We're going to review the five tens continents we've been learning over the last two lessons. And these tens continents are sang deok sand digger, Sangu sanction and sang. Cute. They're not that easy to say. OK, let's begin. The first pair of tens continents were Cingular and sang Dig it. Let's combine these with a vow litter all and do a listening repeat practice. Let's begin. God Duh God! Uh great. Now let's do an independent reading. Practice off these syllables, try to read the lines by yourself first, and then listen to me reading that. Are you ready? Let's start. Got, uh God! Uh Dhaka. Don't go, Dr Datta. God, the gotta That was great. Well done. The second set of tens Continents were sang bia sang shot and sandy it. Let's combine these tens continents with a vowel letter R and do a listening repeat practice. Are you ready? Let's start by uh by Assad. Basat by Assad That was great. Will now do an independent reading practice, but it's going to be on two syllable combinations. You know the drill have about reading the lines by yourself first and then listen to me reading them. Let's start Bassa by Sir Jabba Chiappa. Satya Satya. But ah, but ah, fantastic job again. Well done. In this final practice, we're going to do to independent reading practices. The first is a two syllable combination reading practice, and the second will be a little bit trickier. It's a three syllable combination reading practice. So we'll begin with the 1st 1 A two syllable combination reading practice. You go first and then listen to me. Are you ready? Let's start, Sacko Sacko dot uh thought, uh, but the data got, uh, got Ah! Dorsa dosa Job by job, huh? Fantastic effort world on that will do the second independent reading practice a three syllable combination reading practice. It's gonna be a little trickier. Not just in terms of reading, but in terms off the strain that it's gonna put around your math area. Are you ready? Let's start. Go. Sata got Satya, But Jackal barks Taco da casa Don't go, Sir Jack topped by jacked up Subiaco Sap, aka God Data Got data. Fantastic job. You deserve a break. Pause the video Take a break for 30 seconds and come back and listen to the lesson summary . Older. So that's the tens continents otherwise known as Sang Town, covered in this review lesson, we now only have six W glide vows left to learn in Korean and from the next lesson will start learning those I'll see you the next lesson, but why? 27. W-glide vowels ㅚ, ㅙ, ㅞ: hi there and welcome to the first of two lessons or learning w glide valves in hunger. Now some people do call these w glide vows did thongs, but I think calling them dip thongs can cause confusion. And the reason why I say that is because English tip songs are very different from the W glide vows in hunger. Now the English dipped songs essentially have two vowel sounds. However, we emphasize one of the vow sounds, and the other is a week sound in this word thigh. There are two vowel sounds, but we emphasize the first vow sound, and the 2nd 1 is a week sound. So we say thigh thigh. However, although Korean Wgal eyes are formed by combining two basic vows together, the vow sound is essentially a blend off the two valves, so it sounds like a single vowel sound. Therefore, rather than calling these tip thongs, I will call these W glide vows, since they have a single vowel sound, and they also have that w sound at the beginning, similar to the white lies which we learned earlier in this lesson, we're going to learn the 1st 3 off the W glide vows. And although these are all different vowels there red in the same way these vows are where , where and where. Let's begin. The first W glide is made up off the two basic vows or an E, and it's pronounced way this where is written like this now This vow is an exception among all the W glide valves, because it sound isn't really a blend off the two basic vows that its formed by this vow is formed by all and e. And if you say these vows quickly is boy, we read we so it sounds more like we then where? But this vow is actually read way. Let's practice reading this file its way way. Repeat after me. Where, Where? Where that was great. Now WGAL eyes are frequently combined with a constant young. So in the syllable reading practice will combine this foul where with a constant year. So it's way where let's practice reading this syllable. Repeat after me Where Where where where Where Where That was great! Well done. Now the second w glide vow is made up off all and a and this vile is red way. This way is written like this now with this w glide vow. If you say the basic vowels quickly, it becomes way. Listen. Oh away Where? Where? Let's practice reading this fell. Repeat after me. Where? Where? Where? That was great. Now let's combine this vow with constant year and do syllable reading practice. Rip it off to me. Where? Where? Where? Where, where? Where? That was great. Okay, so the final W glide Val is also pronounced where and this foul is made up. Off who? And a This way is written like this similar to the previous W glide vow. If you say the basic vowels quickly, we produced aware sound. So it's who air Where? Where? Where? Let's practice reading this syllable. Repeat after me. Where? Where? Where? That was great. Now let's combine this vow with constantly in, and as we do the syllable reading practice, please pay close attention to the value reading and trying to remember the vow that produces the way sound. Are you ready? Let's go Where? Where, where where, where where? Fantastic job. Well done. So in this final practice, we're not going to do an independent reading practice since all the veils in this lesson produce the same sound, so it'll be a little pointless doing an independent reading practice. However, we're going to do a listening repeat off the vows again and try to memorize the vows, the actual shape of the vows that produced aware sound. This is because in the next lesson, when we do a combined practice, we are gonna have to work out which vow produces where sound and which Val produces other sounds. So it is really important that we remember or memorize the vowels, the shape of the valves that produced aware sound. So as we do the listening repeat practice, please pay close attention to the vows that you're reading. Are you ready? This is a listen and repeat practice, and we're going to do two syllable combination reading practice. Let's begin where? Where, where? Where, where, where, where, where, where, where, where? Where? That was great. Well done. In this lesson, we learn three W glide vows, which are already in the same way where, where, where? Now, obviously reading them is going to be quite easy because they're all pronouncing the same way. But in the future, when you're right words, it is important that you write them in the correct way because this way and this way, obviously both where but one means except the other means why. So it's important that we spell words correctly now in the next lesson will learn three more w plies, and this time they're all going to be read very differently. I'll see him that lesson, but why? 28. W-glide vowels ㅟ, ㅘ, ㅝ: Hi. Welcome to the second lesson on the W glide vows. In this lesson, we're going to learn three more w glide vows and they are we Why and what? Let's begin. The first w glide vow is we and this vow is made up all the two basic vows. Who and e we is written like this. Now if you say the two basic vowels quickly, we get we So it's e we we we we There's practice reading this foul. Repeat after me we we we that was great. Now let's practice reading this vow in a syllable form with a constant letter. Cheok. So it's going to be good. We good, We key key and Cui is a Korean word for here. So in this syllable reading practice, we're going to be saying here, here in Korea, Are you ready? Let's go. Cree Key Cree Key Cree Key. That's no easy to say, but you didn't really well, well done. The second w glide in this lesson is what what is made up off all and what is written like this. So the planned off and our becomes Oh ah wow! Wow! Why? Let's practice reading this vow. Repeat after me. Why? Why? Why? That was great. Now let's combine what with constant key up. So it's good. Wa wa Quah Ah, let's practice reading the syllable. Repeat after me, Quat, Quat, Quat, Quat, Quat, Quat Great job! Well done! The final w glide in this lesson is what What is made up off who and all what is written like this the two basic vows Who and, uh, if you read them quickly, it becomes who are war Wow wall. Let's practice reading this vow. Repeat after me. Wow! Wow! Wow! That was great. Now let's combine this foul with a constant cheok so it becomes good. What good. What? Lol, Let's practice reading the syllable. Repeat after me Kwa Kwa Kwa Kwa Quat Quat Fantastic job. Now let's do a listener. Repeat off all the vows that we're learning in this lesson. Repeat after me Creek Wok, Wall Creek Wok, Wall Creek Wok, Wall Creek Wok, Wall Creek Wok, Wall Creek, Wok wall These violence are really tricky to say So you did really well, Well done in this final practice we're going to do to independent reading practices. The 1st 1 on the three W glide vowels from this lesson in the 2nd 1 on all six w glide vowels. Let's do the 1st 1 This is an independent reading practice. So you go first and then listen to me. Are you ready? Let's go! Kouachi Quality Creek Waugh Creek Wa Kuala Quiet Qala Clock Quality Quality Quacka Client Claw Key Kwa Kik Wa Fantastic job. Well done. Now, before we get into the second independent reading practice, let's have a warm up listening Repeat off the three w glides from the previous lesson. They're all red wear and they're going to combine with a constant year. Let's begin where, Where, where? Where? Where Where? Okay, so we're going to do the second independent reading practice. But remember that the three vows which are all red, where from the previous lesson will combine with a constant ian, whereas the three vows from this lesson, which are we are war were combined with a constant cheok. This is going to be a two syllable combination reading practice, but it's an independent reading practice. So you go first and then you listen to me. You ready? Let's figure where gua where gua quarrel where quo where where I agree. Where g Kuala way choir away Where? Go where. Go clear where? Clearly where? Fantastic job. Well done the combinations. A little strange, but it's just so that we can get used to saying these valves well done. So in this review lesson, we learned three more w Glide Valles, which were. We watch what? And we practice reading them in syllable form, using the constant Cheok. The next lesson is a review lesson on all six w glide fouls. So I'll see you in that review lesson. But why? 29. W-Glide Vowels Review Lesson: Hello there and welcome to the review lesson on the six W. Glide Vowels as a ways will review the vows in groups first, and then we'll do a combined practice at the end. Best begin. The first set of W glide vows are all red in the same way they are where, where, where? So we're not going to do an independent reading practice with these vows along, so we just do a listener. Repeat, let's combine these vows with a constant Let's a year. Are you ready? Let's begin Where? Where? Where? Where, where, where, where, where? Where that was great. Now, in this lesson, all the W glide vows are going to combine with a constant ian. So when we do, the combined practice later is going to be quite tricky, because you're gonna have to distinguish between the we Wile War in the three way of owls. So do try to remember how the vows look and the sounds that they associating with. Okay, let's move on the second set of W glide vows were we watch what? Let's combine these vows with a constant year into a listening repeat practice. First, let's begin. We were war We watch. We were war. We watch. That was great. Now let's do an independent reading practice on these three vowels. We're going to do a two syllable combination reading practice. Tried reading the lines by herself first and then listen to me reading that. Let's begin. We were We were were we were we while we while we woah woah! That was fantastic water. In this final practice, we're going to do to independent reading practices. The 1st 1 is a two syllable combination reading practice, and the second is a three syllable combination reading practice. Remember, Always six vowels are going to be combined with a constant here, so we're gonna have to work extra hard to work out which one is where and which one is. We were what? It's gonna be challenging, but let's do a two syllable combination reading. First you go first and then listen to me. Let's begin while wear while wear. Where were where were we were? We were where we where we war where war. Where while wear while where fantastic effort. I hope that two syllable combination reading practice has primed you for the second independent reading practice, which is going to be a three syllable combination reading practice. Naturally, this is gonna be much harder, but I'm sure you can do it. This is an independent reading practice. So you go first and then you listen to me. Are you ready? Let's begin. While we were while we were, where were were where were well, where we You are where we you are War where we war Where we where while where? Where? While where we were, where we were aware, Fantastic job, Well done. This type of practice is obviously very challenging. But we do need to do this type of practice to improve our reading off hunger. Botha. So in this lesson, we review the six W glide valves and that's it for the constants and vows in hunger. We obviously need to carry on practising reading hunger so that we just get better at it. But I think we've laid very strong foundation for the future. In the next lesson, we're going to carry on learning about Korean syllables. Now we're going to learn about CVC combinations. These are constant vow continent combinations. So I'll see you in the next lesson. Bye. For now, 30. CVC Combination 1: Hi there and welcome to the first lesson on CVC combinations in Korean. Now so far we've been learning to read only CV combinations. So we've seen how certain vowels can be position next to the continent. And a certain vowels can be positioned below the consonant. And with WTI vowels, they can wrap around the consonant. Now in a CVC combination, the final consonants, also known as patch him, is positioned below the consonant vowel combination, as in these examples, patch him in Korean means support. So in these examples, patch him literally supports the first CV combination above. Now there are altogether 19 consonants in Korean, and of these only sang bib, Sunday, good, and sang geared on used as patching. Now, the rules on writing patching is quite simple, but the rules on how Pachomius red can be quite complex. Particularly when you start looking at how the patch him the final consonant assimilates to the following syllable. So over the next few lessons, we are going to first focus on learning the basic concepts on reading patching. And as we do the reading practice later, we will highlight some important pronunciation rules on reading patching. Now, in this lesson we're going to first take a look at the overview of how Pachomius red. And then we'll focus on how to read keyup Sandia, and keep watching. Let's begin. Now, the key concept regarding patch him is that we generally regard patch him sound as an unreleased sound. So this means that the sound of patching stops at the points of released and the sound is not audible. So in this syllable mock map, the sound stops at the point of release and we never actually here the key OK sound. So we never say mug. Mug is always Mach bands. And apart from nasal sounds, which are medium, the Lille and young, which we'll cover later when consonants are used as patch him, they are regarded as following unreleased sounds. Now, in this lesson, we'll first take a look at how key Sandia and QC are read as unreleased kiosk sounds. And we'll cover the rest in the next lesson. Now, all the consonants in this table become unreleased sounds when the potassium is the final consonant in a word. Or if the following syllable begins with consonants other than young or here. So let's take a look at some example words that use these consonants as patching. Listen carefully to how the consonants are. Unreleased key OK sounds at the end. Sac, sac, pack, pack, poor, poor, chat, Bella, Bella, poll, poll data. In the first three examples, the key sang Jak, and keep watching our unreleased sounds. The sound stops at the point of release and we never hear the sound of these patching. So these Korean words are sack, pack and poor. In the last two words, the keel and the Sandia, but Tim followed by syllables that begin with consonants other than Yin or here. And in these patterns, the keyup and the sangha, again pronounced as unreleased key OK sounds. However, if the constant in the following syllable has a tense consonant pairing and these are k0, t, good, peop, shield and cheered. They are often pronounced as a tense consonant sound. So check is not just chat panel, but more like checkbox. Checked. And Pope is pronounced as Pope. Pope that. So do keep in mind of how certain consonants can be pronounced as that tends consonant pairing. Okay, so let's do a speaking practice of these words. Sac, sac, pack, pack. Excellent job, well-done. In this practice, we're going to do one independent practice on reading Sandy OK, and keep watching. Think about what we just learned on reading this pattern as unreleased key OK sounds. And as always, this is an independent practice. So you're going to read the words by yourself first and then listen to me after. Okay, so if you're ready, let's begin. Chew, chew. Go, go. Tap, tap, tap. Nazi. Nazi. Not, not check. Check BR. Excellent efforts that I wrote on. Ok, so today we learned the basic overview of how Pachomius red, and then we focused on reading keyup sangha can keep as unreleased Qiang sounds. In the next lesson, we're going to learn about patches that are read as unreleased PIP and ticket sounds. See you soon again. Bye-bye. 31. CVC Combination 2: Hi there and welcome to the second lesson on reading patch him. In this lesson, we're going to learn how to read unreleased PIP and triggered sounds. Let's begin with unreleased peop sound. In the previous lesson, we learned that consonants other than nasal sounds can be categorized into three unreleased sounds. And the consonants and Pip are read as unreleased peop sound. Now, these two consonants are read as unreleased peop sounds when they used as the final consonant in a word, or when the following syllable begins with a consonant other than young or here. So let's take a look at some example words that use PIP and peer as patch him. Listen carefully to how the consonants p, 2p and peers are read as unreleased peop sounds. Pop, pop, ep, ep. Top key, top key. Keep, keep down. So in the first two examples, the PIP and Pip, our final consonants in words. So they are read as unreleased peop sounds. In the last two examples, the patches are followed by syllables that begin with consonants other than young or here. So pip and peers are read as unreleased peop sounds. And as mentioned before, after unreleased sounds, consonants k0, t, good, peer, shield, and cheered are often pronounced as tens consonants. So they are top geeky, top key, keep that, keep that. Okay. So with that in mind, let's now do a speaking practice of reading these words that use PIP and Pip as patching. Repeat after me. Pop, pop it, it. Top, top key. Keep, keep data. Now scrapes, well-done. Now, we then have a group of consonants that are all red as unreleased Tegel sounds triggered and tiered are easier to understand. But we also read shield, sang, shot, cheered, and cheered as unreleased ticket sounds. Here are some example words. Pat, pat, pat, part. Chat, chat. What g, what G? Chat, chat, geeky. Quote, quote. So in these single syllable words, tiered, shield and cheered our final consonants in the world. So they are read as unreleased ticket sounds. In the two syllable words, ticket, sang, she'll end tiered consonants are followed by syllables that begin with consonants other than him or her. So they also pronounced as unrealistic sounds. And the consonants in the following syllable are pronounced as tens consonants. So they are pad, pad, what t, what, g, n, chat the chat. Okay, so with that in mind, let's now the reading practice of these words that use patch him as unrealistic sounds. Repeat after me. Pad, pad, pad. Chat, chat. What G, one, G, chat, chat. Quote, quote. Excellent job, well-done. In this final practice, we're going to do a combined practice of reading words that use patch him as unreleased PIP and sounds. Now only PIP and peers are unreleased peop sounds. So if you see other consonants used as patch him, remember that they are going to be unreleased ticket sounds. Some of the words are from this lesson, but there will also be some new words. This is an independent practice. So as always, try reading the words by yourself first and then listen to me afterwards. Ready, let's begin. Chip, chip. Buddha. Buddha. Called cut, cut. Mad, mad. That chat, chat. Taut, taut. Fantastic job today, well-done. Ok, so today we learn to read peers and peer as unreleased peop sounds when they used as patch him. And then we learn to read t good, THE shield Sanjeev and cheered and cheered as unrealistic sound when the read as patch him. In the next lesson, we're going to review what we learned over the last two lessons on unreleased keyup, PIP and ticket sounds. So I'll see you soon in the next lesson. Bye bye. 32. CVC Combination Review 1: Hi there and welcome to the review lesson on reading patch him in Korean. In this lesson, we're going to review everything we learned over the last two lessons on reading patch him as unreleased keyup, PIP, and Tegel sounds. Two lessons ago, we learned that consonants other than nasal consonants are categorized into three types of unreleased sounds. And in that lesson, we learn to read key up, Sandia, and kick as unreleased key OK sound when they used as final consonant in a word, or when the following syllable begins with a consonant other than Ian OR here. So let us first do a listening repeat practice or worse that use key up sang, EEOC and Qi as patching. Chu, Chu, Guo, Guo, Naxi, lack Shi. That was great. Let's now do an independent practice of reading words that use Q and Q as patch him, tried to read the words by yourself first and then listen to me afterwards. Let's begin. Sac, sac, pack, pack. Plot, plot. Chuck, Chuck, poke, poke down. Fantastic job. Well done. In the previous lesson, we learned to read peer and Pip as unreleased peop sounds. And then we learn to read t, good, tea it. She'll sang shield and cheered and cheered as unreleased ticket sounds. And just like unreleased key OK sounds, these patches are read as unreleased sounds when the US as a final consonant in a word, or when the following syllable begins with a consonant other than an EN or here. So let's first do a listening repeat practice of words that use these patching as unreleased cells. Repeat after me. Cheap, cheap. Quote, quote. C-a-t. C-a-t. Matt. Matt. Tab, chat gay. Excellent job, well done. Let's now do an independent practice of reading words that use these Patreon as always, try reading the words by yourself first and then listen to me afterwards. Let's begin. Pat, pat, chat. What G, G, chat, chat. Quote, quote, amazing job, well-done. Now the aim of this practice is to give you more reading practice than anything else. So we're going to do one long independent practice of reading words that use patch him as unreleased keyup, PIP and sound. All the words are from this lesson, so it shouldn't be too difficult. And this is an independent practice. So as always, you go first and listen to me afterwards. So if you're ready, let's begin the practice. Jew, Jew. Naxi, Naxi. Cheap, cheap. Cut, cut. That. Chat, chat, BGI, taut, taut. Amazing jobs that I wrote on. Hope that was a useful practice. Ok, so in this review lesson, we went over how to read consonants other than nasal sounds as unreleased keyup, PIP and triggered sounds. Now, there are still quite a few patching we haven't covered yet. And in the next lesson, we're going to learn how to read Young and here as patching in Korean. So I'll see you soon again in the next lesson. Bye bye. 33. CVC Combination 3: Hi everyone and welcome to the third lesson on reading patching. In this lesson, we're going to learn how to read Ian and he'd watch him, will begin with you. Now the use of young as patching is quite easy to learn as the main function of yin as the NG sound in English. Here are some example words that use even as patch him. Cong Ju, Zhong Ju, Hangzhou, Hangzhou, young girl, a young girl. So in each of these examples that even by Tim In the first syllable functions as an NG sound in English. Now, one thing to note with the ION consonant is that when a patch him other than young or head is followed by an ION consonant, the patch him sound carries over and assimilate into that sound. Here are few examples. E ban, E.coli, ban chalcogen, chalcogen pi o. So in each of these examples, the PIP and key up and lived about shim in the first syllable, followed by a syllable that begins with the EN consonant. So the pats him sound carries over and they are read E ban, chalcogen, n patio. Okay, so let's now do a speaking practice of reading words that use eun by chim as an NG sound. And also when patching assimilates with syllables that begin with an EN consonant. Cong Zhu, Cong Ju. Hangzhou, Hangzhou. Young girl, young girl. E N E ban. Jargon. Jargon. That was excellent, well-done. Now the Here button can be read in two ways. First, if the here, but Tim is followed by a syllable that begins with a consonant, then he backs him is silent. Here are some examples. Chihuahua Your joy, you know, Y0, low Y0. So in these examples, the here but Tim is followed by syllables that begin with you, so that here but Tim is silent. However, when here batching is followed by certain consonants. It combines with those consonants to form aspirated sounds. And aspirated sounds are sounds produced with more air coming out of one's mouth. Here's an example. Shortly. So in this word here, but Tim combines with the target consonants to form the aspirated TO sound. And if you put your hand over your mouth, as you say the sound, you should feel hardly any air coming out of your mouth. So this 22. But if you do the same thing as you say the sound, you should feel a burst of air coming out of your mouth. As tiered is an aspirated sound. So it's to serve. Now in Korean here it can also combined with key up to become a kick sound, with cheered to become a cheer sound, and with pip to become a PIP sound. And while in Korean here is never followed by a peer to become a PIP sound, it's also important to note that these aspirated sounds can be formed when he'd follows these four consonants. Here's an example, epi, epi data. So in this world, the Pier but sim combines with here in the following syllable to become the aspirated sound. Here are a few more examples. Show, show. Show care had choke, care had not tar, tar, EK, EK data. Much IDA, Bathsheba. So regardless of the order of these consonants appearance, if you have combination of heat and what are the four consonants? These consonants combined to become aspirated sounds. Okay, so let's now do a speaking practice of reading here. Bastian, repeat after me. Chihuahua, your joy, your Y0. D0, Y0. Chook, chook, chook, chook care. Huldah, data, Data, IQ, IDA, Iike die. But cheetah. By Cheetah. Excellent efforts, well-done. Okay, so in this final practice, we're going to combine practice of reading words that use even. And here, this is an independent practice. So as always, you go first and then listen to me afterwards. If you're ready, let's begin. Ooh. Ooh. Handbook. Hang Book II, ban E.coli, ban CAG, CAG and no, IO know, io. Ti E qui di, di, di, di, di, di, di. Fantastic efforts that I well-done. Ok, so today we looked at how we read Young and hear it as patching in Korean. And in the next lesson, we're gonna learn how to read BMI, DNN, legal aspects him, and the effects of nationalization. So I'll see you soon in the next lesson. Bye bye. 34. CVC Combination 4: Hello there and welcome back. Now, this is the final lesson on reading CVC combinations, reading patch him. And today we're going to learn how to read the BAM DNN legal aspects him and the effects of naturalization. So let's begin. Now. The reading of medium and Indian and Lille is relatively simple as they're read in a similar way to the English consonants they resemble, which are M, N, and L. Here are some examples. Jim, Kim, con, con, tone, tone, SON, SON, pile, pile. Cool, cool. So the beam dn and Lear by Tim are generally similar to English M, N, and L sounds, but the only difference is that similar to other unreleased sounds in Korean, these sounds also stop at the release point and are not audible at the end. Okay, so with that in mind, let's go straight into speaking practice. Repeat after me. Jim. Jim, can, can, tone, tone. Son, SON. Cool, cool. That was great. Rodin. Now in Korean, there are three nasal consonants which are medium. But we'll also consider the consonant Lear, as Leo plays an important role in the effects of naturalization. Now, naturalization is when these consonants cause other consonant sounds to change or when the sound of these consonants themselves change. And the effects of nasal ionization occurs when certain pats him is followed by a syllable that begins with a certain consonant. So it could be a nasal consonant, pats him Followed by a certain consonant. Or it could be a nasal consonant, pats him followed by another nasal consonant. Or it could be a certain consonants followed by a nasal consonant. So let's take a look at some example words where nasal ionization occurs. Think about how I read these words differently to how they're spelled. Hangzhou, hanbok comin in ammonia, ammonia in neither in Nida. Xi La, Shi law. So in the first word DNN key, OK, I used in sequence. And regardless of the order of these consonants appear in the patch him in the first syllable changes to an eating sound. So this is red, Hangzhou, Hancock, and this word is read. In the second example, when we have key up followed by a meme consonant, keyup patch him in the first syllable is also read as an eating sound. So this is Kunming. Kunming in the third, fourth examples that peer but Tim changes to a beam sound because of the deal and leader in the following syllables. And in the third example, the legal itself changes to a d'un sound. So they are and, and, and in Nida, in Nida. And in the last example that dm by Tim changes to a little sound because of the Lille in the following syllable. So this is Sheila, she'll love. Now these are some of the ways in which nasal ionization occurs. And there are also many other patterns where we see the effects of naturalization. However, rather than going through each combination at this stage as we do the reading practice later, we'll go through some of the more common consonant patterns when net's realization occurs. Okay, so let's now do a speaking practice of these words when naturalization takes place. Repeat after me. Hangzhou, Hangzhou. Kunming. Kunming. And in need. In need. Sheila. Sheila. Excellent job. Well, in this final practice, we're going to do one independent practice of what we learned today. Now this is an independent practice. So as always, have a go at reading the words by yourself first and then listen to me afterwards. If you're ready, let's start the practice. Him him. Son, S-O-N in Nida. Him Nida. Fantastic efforts today, Rodin. Ok. So today we looked at how we read mmm DNN Lille as patch him. And we also learned about the effects of nasal ionization. In the next lesson, we're going to review what we learned over the last two lessons on reading CVC combinations. So I'll see you soon again in the next lesson. Bye bye. 35. CVC Combination Review 2: Hi there and welcome to the second review lesson on reading CVC combinations. Today we're going to review what we learned on reading Yin and here as patching and also on reading beam the Yin and legal aspects him, the effect of naturalization. Let's begin to lessons ago, we learn to read even as an NG sound in English. And we also learned that when EN follows a patch him other than I even or hear, the pattern sound carries over to the following syllable. So lets first do a listening repeat practice of using, even in these ways, hacks sang, hacks sang your hang your Hang on yang Yang. Todd IO, tardive. Oh, that was great, well-done. Next, we learned that he had Batson is silent when the following syllable begins with an EN. And when he had either comes before or after, key up, t, good, PO4 cheered. The two consonants combined to form aspirated sounds, cleared THE peer and here. So lets first do a listening repeat practice of using here in these ways. To I0 to Y0. Do call loco Septima, sat, fema, chat, chat, PDA. Could, can, cook, can. That was excellent, well done. Let's now do an independent practice. And as always, you're going to read the words first and then listen to me afterwards. If you're ready, let's begin. Hang BL E ban E.coli band. Do IO. Epi, epi data. Fantastic job, well done. In the previous lesson, we learned to read medium, near and legal aspects him. And we learn that they are read in a similar way to the English consonants they resemble, which are m, n, and l. So let's first do a listening repeat practice of reading beam near and dear batching. Come, come. Cham Chang. Tone. Tone. Nows greater, well-done. Next, we learned that consonant combinations that involve mu, m and can lead to naturalization, which changes how certain consonants are red. So let's first do a listener repeat practice of words when nasal ionization occurs. And young and young. In India. Some neither. Too low. That was great, well done. Let's now do an independent practice of reading mu d and n by n words when naturalization occurs. As a ways you go first and then listen to me afterwards. Let's begin. Him. Him San San Juan, Gu Xi La. Fantastic job, well done. Okay, so in this final practice, we're going to do one long practice of everything we learned over the last two lessons. This is an independent practice. So as always, you're going to read the words by yourself first and then listen to me afterwards. If you're ready, let's begin. Hangzhou. Hang bull on Yan, Jiang, Chu Lai Yo, Yo dot core, dot core. Such cima, such fema. Can, can him, him. Sand, sand. Min, min. Should the law, civil law. Some need some Nida. That was a long practice, amazing job, well-done. In this review lesson, we reviewed everything we learn on reading, even here it BMD and layer by Tim and aspects of connected speech and naturalization. In the next lesson, we're going to start learning more about cutbacks him, which are double consonant patching made up of two different consonants. So I'll see you soon again in the next lesson. Bye, bye. 36. 겹받침 1: Hello and welcome to the first lesson on reading calc batch him in Korean. Now in Korean, there are a total of 11 kept batch him. And as we mentioned in an earlier lesson, when we read cup button, we only read one of the consonants and the other is silent. And of the 11 capuchin, we read the first consonant in eight of them and in three jump button, we read the second consonant. And in this lesson, we'll practice reading cutbacks him, where we read the first consonant. Now, before we start practice reading cup button, it's important to note that not all kept batch him are commonly used in Korean. Of these eight kilobytes him for which we read the first consonant, only two are quite common, and the rest are not common at all. And some of them, especially leery shield kappa Tim, is only used with words that are not common. So seeing some of these kelp batsmen, Korean is extremely rare. So while it's important to have some awareness of what kelp batching is and how it spread is not hugely important to memorize how each cup button is red because many of them are only used with few words. So you can just learn them as you develop your vocabulary knowledge. However, let's take a look at some example words that you use cut batch him, and learn about some important rules to follow when reading words that use batching. Now, as I read each of these words, listen carefully to how the kelp batching is red and also think about aspects of connected speech. How the potassium sound can assimilate the following syllable. Not, not cut, cap. And GI Joe, and GI Joe. 1a. 1a. And she died. And she died of that. Of that. Okay, so let's consider some important points to remember when reading these kelp batching. First, if the cow batching is used in the final syllable in a word, the first consonant is pronounced as an unreleased sound. So at the point of release, the sound production stops. So it's dot, dot, cup. And that's the most important feature. However, there are also three additional features of reading cutbacks him in relation to connected speech. First, if the syllable after the kelp Batson begins with an EN consonant, then the second consonant in the kelp batch him carries over. So this is pronounced and johayo NGO. Second in the fourth, fifth examples, we form aspirated sounds because the second consonant in the cutbacks him combines with a consonant in the following syllable. So these words are red, mantle, Montana, and cheetah, and TDAP. Lastly, in combinations where the second consonant in the kelp by Tim, doesn't assimilate with a consonant in the following syllable, such as in this last example, the consonant in the following syllable is read as a tense consonant if it has a tens consonant pairing. So this is red up there, up that. So these are the key features of kelp button we need to be aware of when reading cutbacks him. Okay, so with that in mind, let's now do a speaking practice of the words we have seen in this lesson. Repeat after me. Not, not cup, cup and GI Joe Montana into k. And that fantastic job, well done. Okay, so in this final practice, we're going to do one independent practice of reading words that use cup button where the first consonant is pronounced. This is an independent practice. So as always, you go first and then listen to me afterwards. If you're ready, let's begin. Boc. Boc and cheetah. And cheetah. On, on the upside. Who top Buddha. Who? Tabu that good, good, good, good. Great efforts that I well-done. Okay, so in this lesson, we learned about eight kg, but shame, we will read the first consonant and the second constant is silent. We also learned about some important pronunciation rules related to connected speech. In the next lesson, we're going to learn about the three cup batching. We will read the second consonant. So I'll see you soon in that lesson. Bye-bye. 37. 겹받침 2: Hi everyone. So in this lesson, we're going to learn three kept batch him where we read the second consonant and the first is silent. Let's begin. Ok, so there are three carapace him where we read the second consonant and the first is silent. And of these three capuchin, the most common is the Lille and key, aka patching. This cup button is used in many different words and they also used in many common words in Korean. The Lear and boom gulp, watch him is also quite common and it's also used in some common words in Korean. The last COP batch him, Lear peer, is extremely rare and is only used in two words, which themselves are actually very rare. So you may never actually have to read this cop, watch him in the future. Okay, so let's take a look at some example words that you use these capuchin and listen carefully to how I read the carpeting in this world's pack. Pack. Curatorial colleague, pile, pile key data. Chomp, chomp. Glutamine. Glutamine. Ok. First, if the cow batch him is the final consonant in a word as in this first example. Or if the cow batching cannot assimilate to the following syllable, as in these two examples. Then we read the second consonant in the cutbacks him as unreleased sounds. And the constant in the following syllable can be read as a tense consonants. If it has a tens consonant pairing, they are pack, pack, chomp, chomp, dat, dat, dat. However, in these three words, the syllable after the cut button begins with either EM or heared consonant. And when this happens, we read the first consonant in the kelp button, and the second consonant carries over to the following syllable. So this is cool Goryeo, query Goryeo. And this is pi, pi key data. So here, keyup combines with a here to form the aspirated QC sound. And lastly, this word is cool, Mario Korematsu. Now there are however certain exceptions because if we had a phrase like this, which combines the noun pack, meaning chicken, and the particle. We should follow the rule and read the Lille in cutbacks him and the CHEOPS should carry over to the following syllable. So this should be read Pi Girl, piratical. However, this is more often read as toggle. Toggle. So Qiang carries over and we don't pronounce the first consonant layer. Additionally, in these words, many people will actually read the first consonant rather than the second consonant. So these words are often read as pilot, pilot data and it die, is that rather than n. So do keep in mind of these exceptions as you continue to learn Korean in the future. Okay, so I think that's enough explanation for three Batson. Let's now do a speaking practice of the words we have seen in this lesson. Pack, pack. Click, Goryeo. Could you Goryeo, Pied, Piper, kDa, chomp. Chomp. Clearly Mario. Mario. Excellent job, well-done. Okay, so in this final practice, we're going to do one independent practice of reading three kept bastion, where we read the second consonant and the first is silent. Think about what we learned in today's lesson, and this is an independent practice. So as always, you go first and then listen to me afterwards. Let's begin. Goddamn, goddamn. By C0, by key. Tiamat. The fantastic job today, well-done. Okay, so in today's lesson, we learned about three carbon chain, where we read the second consonant and the first is silent. And we also learned some important rules regarding connected speech. The next lesson is a review lesson, and we're going to review the 11 Kabat-Zinn we learned about over the last two lessons. So I'll see you soon again in that review lesson. Bye-bye. 38. 겹받침 Review Lesson: Hi there and welcome to the review lesson on reading cup batch him. In this lesson, we're going to review everything we learned about carapace him in the two previous lessons. Let's begin to lessons ago we learned that there are 11 cup batch him in Korean, and 48 of them, we read the first consonant and the second is silent. However, there were three very important rules related to connect to speech. First, if the syllable after the kelp batching begins with an EN consonant, then we read the first consonant in the cup button and the second consonant carries over. Second, if there is a combination of a heat and one of these four continents, then we form aspirated consonant sounds. Lastly, in combinations where the second consonant in the top-bottom doesn't assimilate with the following syllable, then the consonant in the following syllable is read as a tense consonants. If the consultant has a tense consonant pairing. Okay, so with that being said, let's first do a listener repeat practice or worse that use these cup batching. Repeat after me. More. Bow and cheetah and TDAP on bad on that. That was great, well-done. Let's now do an independent practice. And as always, you go first and then listen to me afterwards. So if you're ready, let's begin. Hi, hi, mantle. Mantle. Shi Ci Xi Ci. Amazing job. Well done. In the previous lesson, we learned about three kept batching where we read the second consonant and the first is silent. And as with the cow, batch him when he read the first consonant, there are three important rules to follow related to connect to speech. First, if the following syllable begins with an EN consonant. Then we read the first consonant in the cutbacks him and the second consonant carries over. Second, if we have a combination of heads and one of these four consonants, then we form aspirated consonant sounds. Lastly, same as before. If the second consonant doesn't assimilate to the following syllable, then the consonant in the following syllable can be read as a tense consonant if it has a tense consonant pairing. Okay, so same as before. Let's first to a listener repeat practice of words that use these cut batching. Repeat after me. God jack. Jack. The Reagan. The Reagan. That was great, well done, less than do an independent practice of words that you use these kelp button. As always, this is an independent practice, so try reading the words by yourself first and then listen to me afterwards. Let's begin. Chomp. Chomp. Great efforts. Okay, so in this final practice, we're going to do one long independent practice of reading words that use all 11 cup batching. And as this is an independent practice, so as always, you go first and then listen to me afterwards. If you're ready, let's begin. Not. Not. And and on the on the no barrio. W0 high pi pi key Tiamat. Amazing job today, well-done. In this review lesson, we reviewed how to read 11 Capuchin, where 48 of them will read the first consonant. And for three of them, we read the second consonant. And that's it for learning all the different letters in hunger. But over the next few lessons we are going to do some additional reading practice. And in those lessons you can apply what you learn in this course so far, but will also give you some hints and tips on reading Hangul properly. So I'll see you soon in the reading lesson. Next. Bye-bye. 39. Reading Practice 1: Hi there and welcome to the first reading practice lesson. In this lesson, we're going to practice reading words that don't use patch him. And we'll mainly focus on reading two syllable words. All the practices are independent practices. And as you do, the reading practice will also explain certain pronunciation features which we didn't go through in our previous lessons. Now, we're going to do three independent practices. First, we practice reading words using these eight vowels. Then we'll add further seven vowels in the next practice. And then lastly, we'll add the W glide vowels into the practice. Or the world's consists of two syllables. And in this practice will focus on these eight vowels and these 14 consonants. And as we are doing an independent practice, you will read first and then you can listen to me reading the words. Okay, so if you're ready, let's begin. Kaggle, Kaggle. Yada, yada, Yacco, Jaco. Package or agile. Corso, causal. Huge, huge. That was excellent, well-done. In this practice, we're going to add further seven vowels as well as the five tens consonants. So there are more consonants and vowels to think about in this practice. Ok, so if you're ready, Let's start the practice. Eu, EU. Sergey, Sergey. Now, as you can hear in this word, the vowel year is pronounced more like a. So this is pronounced Sergey. Sergey, the vows, yeah and yeah, often weaken and are pronounced as air when they use with consonants other than you tried to read the following word. Pam. Pam in this word, pair means lungs and I'm means cancer. And the vowel yet weakens. So it's pronounced like air. So this is Pam. Pam. So do keep in mind all the weakening of the vowels year when they use with consonants other than Yin. Let's continue with the practice. The Regia Cody. Cody. Body, body, yankee, Yankee. T, G, air. Excellent job, well done. Okay, so in this practice, we're going to add the W glide vowels into the mix. So now we're going to practice reading every letter in hunger. We're still going to practice reading two syllables. So without further ado, let's begin with G. With G. Sagwa, savoir, body, body. These are, these are Que Gei, UGA. She that she data. Now in general, W glides vowels tend to weaken when they use with consonants other than young. So in natural fast speech, Shi Dan can often sound like she that she does. This weakening is often heard. In other words like key up that which means to be queued. So in natural speech, this sounds like key up, that key up down. Here's another word. Try reading this by yourself. Gee, that cheetah. So in slow speed, we can enunciate the sound of the vowel clearly, but in natural speech, we often weakens to E, So is T, g data. Let's continue with the practice. Cloud. Cloud. So, so far in this word, the here sound is barely audible in natural fast speeds. And this happens when here it follows a syllable that doesn't end in patch him. Try reading the next word by yourself. To where? To where. So again, here is barely audible in natural speech. So do keep this in mind of his sound weakening when it follows vowels. Ok, so this is the last word in the practice. She, me, jamie. Excellent job. Well done. Let's move on to the final practice. In this practice, we're going to practice reading words that have two or more syllables that don't use patch him. As you read each word, think about the different tips we have learned in today's lesson. Okay, so let's begin the practice. Q. Q more key, where keyword T, T, k ag, ag, cookie, cookie b. So b, so b, Jan, Agile. Agile. C. We had, we do our daga, daga, daga warrior. Excellent job today, well-done. Ok, so today we practice reading words without patch him, and we also learned some useful tips on certain pronunciation features. In the next lesson, we're going to practice reading words that use pattern. So I'll see you soon again in the next lesson. Bye bye. 40. Reading Practice 2: Hello there and welcome back. In this lesson, we're going to practice reading words that use patching. And as before, we'll mainly focus on reading two-syllable words. And similar to the previous lesson, as we practice reading the words, I will provide you with some hints and tips on how we read words with pat him. Okay, so let's begin. In this practice, we're going to do two independent practices. In the first practice, we will practice reading words that use Qia, Qia and Songjiang, which are read as unreleased key OK sounds. And PUB I and PUB II, which are read as unreleased peop sounds. In the second practice, we will practice reading words that use six patch him, which are all red as unreleased ticket sounds. Or the practices are independent practices. So as always, you go first and then listened to me reading the words after. Okay, so if you're ready, let's start. Cut, cut. Now, one thing we mentioned regarding the patch him is that if the patch him sounds to not assimilate to the following syllable, the consonant in the following syllable maybe read like a tense consonants if the consonant has a tense pairing. So in this word, cheered in char can sound like char in fast speeds. So it's cata, cata. And you'll also notice this kind of pattern. In other words two. Okay, so let's continue the practice. Chalk gum, talkin, CBSA, up cima, up cima. Okay, so that was great. Now we are going to read these patching when they're followed by the consonants mu or dn. Let's first read these two words. Unmet. Need, in need. So as we learned earlier, the first word is read unmanned, unmarked, and the second word is read in need. In need. And this is because of nasally causation. If unreleased key OK is followed by mu or didn't, it changes to an eating sound. And if unreleased, Pip is followed by beam or the end, then PIP changes to a beam sound. Let's continue reading words that follow these patterns. Chongyang, Chongyang. Two men to women. Pang MOOC, Guan, Pangu Guan AMO. Amo. That was great, well-done. Let's now read words where the patch him is followed by syllables beginning with consonants being or here. If the following syllable begins with an iamb or heared consonant, then the potassium sound carries over, or they can combine with a consonant to form aspirated sounds. Okay, so let's begin. Tab. Tab key that we, HM, had we armada II been chalk P. P. That excellent job, well done. In this practice. We're going to practice reading the six consonants as patch him, and they are read as unreleased ticket sounds. Okay, so let's begin chat. Chat that now same as unreleased c0 n p m. If the patch him cannot assimilate with the following syllable, then the consonant in the following syllable is read as attends consonant if it has a tens consonant pairing. Let's continue the practice. Gi, quote GIP courtship. Woo Jin Qu Qin, GMR, which schema? That was great, well-done. Let's now take a look at some words where these patches are followed by medium or D and consonant. Listen to how this patch him sound changes. Pin, pin will in, in. Now as you heard when patch him that are read as unreleased trigger sounds are followed by either beam or dn. Then the patch him is read as a Nian sound. Let's practice reading more words that follow this pattern. London, London. Gone, gone, mena. In your NIO. Good man. Good match the data. That was greats, well-done. Lastly, if these patch him a, followed by syllables beginning with consonants yield more heat. The potassium sound carries over, or they can combine with a heel consonant to form aspirated sounds. Let's practice reading these words. Be the V them. Good, ci that, good. See that. Now there are various exceptions to how certain sounds carryover. And one of them is when tiered patch him is followed by the syllable e. In this pattern, the tear batch him carries over and is pronounced as a cheered sound. So it's good. She could see that. However, if the following syllable is air, it will be read as good care. Good tech. So the T8 batch him carries over and is pronounced as a T at sound. So this cell can only happen when the following syllable is e. So do keep that in mind. Let's practice one more word that has this pattern. Try reading the following example. So again, this is red, catchy, catchy. So do keep in mind of the TOP chimp, followed by the syllable e And a t Apache him being pronounced as a tiered sound. Let's continue the practice. But young man, young, charge your bio. But she that match IDA saw, saw you, saw sayo. Excellent job, well-done. In this final practice, we're going to practice reading words that have unreleased key up, peop or ticket sounds. This is an independent reading practice. So try reading the words by yourself first and then listen to me to check if you read the words correctly. Okay, so let's begin the practice. By your tab. Tikki, Tikki chip. Chip. Given, given p. P, Yo, Yo Yo, Yo ma Thida, Butt cheetah. Fantastic job today, well-done. Ok. So today we practiced reading words that use unreleased keyup, cube and ticket sounds as patch him. And we practiced and learned more about the effects of naturalization. In the next lesson, we're going to practice reading words that use nasal consonants as well as being, and he'd as patching. See you soon again. Buh-bye. 41. Reading Practice 3: Hi there and welcome back. In this lesson, we're going to practice reading words that you use Yang and hear it as patch him. And we'll also practice reading nasal consonants as patch him. In this practice, we're going to do three independent practices. In the first practice, we will practice reading words that use Yang and here as patch him. In the second practice, we will practice reading words that use medium near Lille has patch him. And in the third practice, there'll be a special practice on worst that used Nian and Lille as patching. As with the other lessons, all the practices are independent practices. So try reading the words first and then listen to me afterwards. The first practice is on words that use N here as patching. Let's begin. Tangun. Tangun ie. Yo, Yo. By Barry gotta. Puma. Boy, boy, yotta. Tang, Tang Ti man. A man that was greats, well-done. In this practice, we're going to practice reading words that use mu as patching. Let's start the practice. Mango. Kim, Kim's Tammy. Now, when we have medium, the nearby Tim followed by a syllable beginning with a consonant, then these consonants assimilate with the following syllable. So this is read as Tammy. Tammy Reid. The next two words, Chai, man ha, Mandla. So in these words Lille and dm, but Tim assimilate to the following syllable. Let's continue the practice. On your own door. Monkey, monkey. Now, this is something we learned in an earlier lesson. But if we have near and n combinations, then the dM by Tim is pronounced as an e sound. Try reading the next two words that follow this pattern. Pang goal, tangle. Chang, Chang De. So in a near and n qi of pepsin that Dn is pronounced as an E Ink sound. Let's continue the practice. Kill, kill, ginger, ginger. Mom to mom to that. Great efforts, well-done. In this practice, we're going to practice words where there is a neon plus or Lear plus D And combination. Try reading these two words. Sila, Sheila, Marianne, Marianne. Now we actually saw this word silla in an earlier lesson and we learned that in dn plus Lear pattern, dM by M is read as a little sound. However, as shown by this second example in Lear plus Nian pattern, that Dn changes to a little sound. So these words are similar. Sheila and Marianne. Marianne. Okay, so let's practice reading words that have these patterns. Kyle, lighter, color, alien to lumpy to lumpy. Ilya, Ilya, homeland, homeland. Pulley, pulley. Mildly. Tang Song by Li Jiang. Great efforts while we're done. Okay, so in this practice, we're going to do one long practice of reading words that use EM here. Medium, near and n layer by Tim. This is an independent practice. So you go first and then listen to me afterwards. Ie neon, neon. Yo Yo. Chromium. Chromium. Kim Kim pap, Chang De Chang De Chu, lumpy, too long. Hurrian, child, you child you. Tile limb, pile limb. Excellent jobs re, well-done. Ok, so today we practice reading words that use Yin here, medium and Lear as patch him. In the next lesson, we're going to practice reading words that use cutback Tim. And then were round things off by practice reading Korean sentences. So I'll see you soon again in the next lesson. Bye bye. 42. Reading Practice 4: Hi everyone. This is the final reading practice lesson, and we're going to practice reading words that you use kelp batch him. And then we'll round off the entire reading practice by reading Korean sentences. Let's begin with cow batch him. Now, we're going to do three separate practices for reading cup. But shim, the first is on reading cup batch him where we read the first consonant. And the second is for cow batch him where we read the second consonant. Then we'll do a final practice on reading words that use all the cup batch him. All the practices are independent practices. So let us start with the first practice of reading cutbacks him, where we read the first consonant. Child, child, Munchie man by man. Where we're going. And not, not hide, hide that. Silicone. Silicone. No burden, no button. That was great, well-done. This time we're going to read the second consonant, but in connected speech will read the first consonant and the second consonant carries over. Okay, let's begin this hack. Hack. Some, some chomp, chomp. Your Korematsu MOOC. Kim became great efforts, well-done. Let's now do a combine practice of reading both types of cutbacks. Him. Bill Clinton, tab I call I call DIA guy your neither Gei, Wo kooky, kooky. Ooh. Ooh. That excellent job today. Woad on. I'm sure that wasn't easy, but you did really well. Do you remember that it's always good to do extra practice. So do come back and try the practice again in the future. As repeat practice will help to develop greater familiarity with cutbacks him. Okay, so let's now move on and do the final practice on reading sentences. Now, we're going to practice reading Korean sentences and the sentences were going to read, we'll have English translations. However, as this is just a reading practice, we won't go into what each word in the sentence means. So please focus just on reading the sentences correctly. Now this is an independent practice, so you go first and then listen to me afterwards. If you're ready, let's start. Coy Yang IGA keoyo. Quagga keoyo. They peak hour means hack go means Messiah. Sushi in Hangzhou. Yamaha guanine. Guanine. K is hadn't Cheonan peer-to-peer case. Hangul. Cheonan, soup Jagger in hexane in Osaka. Excellent job today. Well-done. Hope you able to read most of the sentences correctly. Ok, so today we practice reading was that used cup batch him and we completed the reading practice by practicing reading Korean sentences. Now that's it in terms of just focusing on learning to read hanger. And we're now going to move on and start learning more about Korean sentences. So I'll see you soon again in the next lecture. Bye bye. 43. Honorific Language: hi there. And welcome to the lecture on honorific language in Korean. Now, honorific language is a really important part of the Korean language, and it is perhaps a reflection off the hierarchical nature off the Korean society. Now. In Korea, a person can be regarded as having seniority based on a number of factors such as age, the position within an organization and also within the family. And when we speak to people with seniority, we have to use respectful language. And this respectful language is called Tom them. And the casual language used with friends is called Pamela, because using the wrong language can be deemed in polite and can cause serious offense. Koreans learned very early on what language that she used to show respect. Also, because honorific language is such a broad topic, it would be impossible to cover everything in this single lesson. So the aim of this lesson is to raise awareness off what honorific languages and to cover some of the most important aspect off honorific language. Let's first look at the most important aspect off honorific language in Korea, the verb endings, the most important and the most common way of showing respect in Korea is by conjugating the verbs. Let's first consider the verb box that which means to eat. This is the infinitive form, the base form off. The verb is made up off the verbs than Mark and Pat, and we can change evolve into either pana or tuned in my by adding elements to the verb stem. For example, the casual form off Baca is Bogle, and this is Pamela. Now. The casual term is generally used with close friends and family. Now this aspect of closeness is also an important factor, As if you're not familiar with someone, it's always important to use respectful language, which is tuned in now when it comes to verbs. There are two forms of tuned in my and the first is the polite form and the polite form off box that is Bar Goyo. And the second is the formal form and for Bach that it's boxing Niedere. We use the formal for when we're in very formal settings, such as in job interviews and also often in business settings. So it's not commonly used in everyday speech, and this means that the most commonly used form of urban things in everyday situation is the polite verb ending. Now it's important to note that all verbs change into casual, polite and formal forms. So whenever you learn verbs, you should always think about how they congregate into different forms and the way verbs change into casual, polite and formal forms. It's something will cover in one of our later courses. Now there are also other ways we can change verbs to be even more respectful. But the three ways that I mentioned are the main ways we can change verbs to be respectful or casual. Let's look at one of the important aspects of honorific language now. It's easy to learn conjugation patterns, and change involves into casual, polite and formal forms. But some votes have an entirely different formal version. For example, the verb to sleep in Korean is chatter. But the honorific form off Tada is to machida. So when we need to be respectful and say goodnight, people with seniority, we have to use the honorific form off the verb. Another example is the verb to that which means to give, but its formal form is Chillida now. Like these examples, there are also other verbs that have an entirely different formal form. And when we learn Korean, it's important to learn not only the standard form of the verb but also the honorific form . Also announce can have honorific forms to, for example, name in Korean. His Eden and it's honorific form is sung, Um, and another example is the noun sang it, which means birthday and it's honorific form is sanction. So as we learn vocabulary in Korean, we have to learn both the standard and the honorific form so that we're able to use Korea in the right way. As mentioned at the start, The aim of this lesson was more about raising awareness off the Korean honorific language, also known as tuned in. And as you continue to learn Korean with us, we will highlight what is turned them my and what is so that you know what languages you use with different kinds of people. That's it for this lesson, and I'll see you soon again in the next lesson. But by 44. Sentence Structure: So you're finished with learning the elements of hunger, and now we're going to move on and learn about the Korean sentences. So over the next few lessons, we're going to learn about the Korean sentence of first. We'll look at the Korean sentence and learn about the different elements that make up the Korean sentence. Then we'll look at how the subjects are used in Korean sentences, and then we'll learn about the Korean be verb either, so that we can form basic sentences using that verb first. In this video, we're going to learn about the Korean sentence structure. So let's dive right in. We're first going to look at two important aspects of Korean sentences, and they are word order, and the other is the use of particles. Now the basic structure of a Korean sentence is not too different from an English sentence . A Korean sentence can have a subject and a verb. Here's an example. Sentence. Dannon Kombu. Hey, Dinan combo. Here in the sentence, we have the subject. That and this is the casual form of the pronoun I, and it's attached to the part Koonin. The verb is combo here, and it's infinitive form is come. Brugada, which means to study now to clarify an infinitive form of the verb, is an unchanged form of a verb. English verbs also have infinitive forms. For example, the verb to study is an infinitive form, and we can change this into studies, depending on what the subject is and studied and studying so similarly kombu here is the present and the casual form off the infinitive form who had a Therefore, this sentence means I study and as you can see, the world order is the same for both English and Korean sentences. However, when we had an object to the sentence, we see a noticeable difference in the world order between the two sentences. So let's add Korean to both sentences to make them. I study Korea. Here are the sentences Dan in Hungary Kombouare, I study Korean then hunger, Godric Kombouare. So the new element is Hangul Ghadir and here Hangu guard means Korean, and it's used with the object particle little. So while the object in an English sentence comes after the verb in a Korean sentence, the object comes before the verb. So this difference in world order is one of the key differences between English and Korean sentences. Let's look a few other example sentences and focus on the world order and particularly the positioning of the object. Dannon When John Hey, I drive Dannon When John Hey, none in Tarun John. Hey, I drive a car. Dannon Taro on John Here. Dan in your d here, I cook Dannon. You already here? Nine in approval. Getting you ready here. I cooked approval G Dannon Frugal getting you ready here. So the first key aspect of Korean sentences is the word order. Now, the second key aspect of Korean sentences is the use of particles. In this lesson, we've already seen two particles used and they were known and live. Now, Korean language has many different particles. Particles essentially have no meaning on their own, but they are used with certain words and they can help to give structure to the sentence and they can play. An important role in giving meaning to the sentence is awful. The particles in Korean two of the most common types of particles are those that indicate the subject of a sentence and those that indicate the objects off the verb. The two types of particles that indicate what the subject is are called topic marker particles, which are then end them and subject marca particles e n car. The particles that indicate what an object is are called object marker particles, and they are new and little. In this course. We're going to focus on learning about the topic and subject marker particles, and in our next course, Korean for absolute beginners to we will cover the object particles. And the reason for this separation is quite simple. In this course, we're going to focus on learning just one verb the beaver, either and with the beef up that we don't use object particles. And in our second course for absolute beginners, we're going to focus heavily on learning about Korean verbs. So it makes sense to focus on object particles together in the same course with the verbs. So once this lesson is over, we're going to spend quite a bit of time learning about the topic and subject particles. Another important feature of a Korean sentence is that the only permanent part of a Korean sentence is the verb, so this means that a Korean sentence can omit the subject and the object and still former grammatically Korean sentence in Korean. If the subjects off the sentence is obvious to the people in the conversation, we can just drop the subject. So in this sentence than in Hangu God, if it's obvious that I'm talking about myself, then I would drop Lannan and just say hunger Godric Combo here. Additionally, if someone's questioned focuses on the action rather than the object of the action or who's doing the action, then we can just answer by using the verb. So if someone asks, What are you doing in Korean? I can simply respond and say, Come bouquet And this Ferb alone can form a sentence in Korea. However, what makes verbs really important in Korean is that how you conjugated verb endings will lead to different kinds of statements. For example, kombu hodja means let's study Erica means should we study and kombu hace oh means please study so as well as the verb being the only permanent parts of a Korean sentence. It's also important in changing the meaning of a sentence. And as we learned earlier, we can also conjugated verbs to be respectful. Okay, so it's been a really long lesson. So to sum up in this lesson, we've looked at three key aspects of Korean sentences. Word order, the use of particles and the importance of verbs in Korea. In the next lesson, we're going to look at how we use topic and subject particles. So our Susan again in that listen, but why? 45. Particles 1: Hi, then welcome back now, as we mentioned in the previous lesson, Korean language uses two different types of particles to indicate what a subject is topping market particles and subject market particles. And although these particles are used to indicate what a subject is in everyday speech, careers actually speak without using these particles. Now that doesn't mean that they're dropped all the time, because there are times when you absolutely have to use these particles because these particles give extra meaning to the sentence. So over the next few lessons, we're going to look at how these particles are used in sentences and how they give meaning to the sentence. Let's first look at the structure aspect of these particles now, whether you use the topic particles in and then or subject particles, E N car depends on whether the syllable before the particle has a pattern or doesn't have about him for the now and hack saying, because the final syllable sang hasn't you but him? We use the topic particle been. But for this subject now, which only has one syllable, there is no pattern. So we use the particle and then similarly with the subject market particles. E n car. If the syllable before has a part imp, then we use the particle e. But if the syllable before doesn't have a pattern, we use the particle car and with the pronoun. Now it changes to that. When it's used with a particle car. Let's look a few other examples, Sons Inc Neiman something Lehman Helminen can then a man in oh man in tingling then tingle . And then so as you can see in all these examples we use, if the syllable before has a patch him. If not, then we used. Then here are the examples using E car something Me, me, something Me, me, young, me, young me Oh my God! On my God single guy single guy. So likewise. If the syllable before the particle has a part in, then we use e. If the syllable before the particle doesn't have about him, then we use the particle car. Okay, so that's the structure off how these particles are used. But let's look at how they give meaning to the sentence now. The key difference between topic particles and subject particles is what their focus on in the sentence the topic particles focused on what the subject does or what's being said about the subject, whereas the subject particles focus on the subject itself now to better understand what this means, consider these two questions in English. What's means we're doing Who's studying now. The first question focuses on the action. What means Who is doing? And the second question focuses on who's doing the action. So this subject. So if we answer the first question in Korean, as the first question focuses on the action by the subject, we can use the topic particles and say beans on in kombu here means who is studying means and then combo here. So we use topic particles than and then to describe what the subject is doing. On the other hand, to answer the second question, which focuses on the subject, then we would use the subject particles e or car and say beans Ooga combo here means who is studying means a guy come wear so, although in English they mean the same thing in Korean, depending on whether you want to focus the attention on the subject or what follows after the subject, you will use either the topic or subject particles. Let's look a few other examples. What's means? A eating means and then Bangor. Montoya Menzah is eating bread Means, and then Bangui. Montoya, who's eating the bread, means a guy by their multi means. A Is eating bread means yoga. Bangor McCoy. Oh, so as you can see, if the focus is on what the subject is doing, then we use topic particles. And if the focus is on the subject, then we use subject particles. Okay, so let's move on to the final practice and read some of the phrases and sentences we have seen in this lesson. In this final practice, we're going to do one independent reading practice off some of the phrases and sentences we have seen in this lesson. As you read, the phrases and sentences do keep in mind about the structure aspects, off topic and subject particles, and the key difference in the way they focus on different elements off the sentence. So if you're ready, let's begin. Dinan nine. In Huck Sangin Huck, Sing in Single guy, Single Guy, Young, Me, Young, Me Benzon and kombu. Hail means own and kombu. Hail means Oh, God, Congo hair, beans. Oh, guy Congo Hail Young and Bhangra Ball Goyo Hong in Bang Rebo Goyo Young Ipanema, Goya Count Me Vanimo, Goyo Great Job Today. Well done In today's lesson, we learned the structural aspect off topic and subject particles and how they used to focus on different elements in the sentence. In the next lesson, we'll learn another way. We use topic and subject particles. So I see you soon again in that lesson. But why? 46. Particles 2: hi there. And welcome to another lesson on the use off topic and subject particles in this lesson will first look at how these particles air used differently, and then we'll also look at a distinct use all the topic particles than and then. So let's begin now. Another way that these topic and subject particles air used differently is that sometimes we use subject particles to introduce a new topic, and we use topic particles to refer to something mentioned earlier. For example, let's imagine that your friend studies Korean and you want to tell your parents about this . The topic of your friend means who is new in the conversation. So to tell your parents about means, Ooh, studying Korean, you can say beans. Ooga Hungary Kombu Hail means Who is studying Korean means Yoga Hungary Combo Here. Now we've really seen this sentence before, but hang Gougar means Korean language and kombu. Heo is made from the verb kombu had a which means to study. So coming back to the main point, we use the subject particles e n car to introduce a new topic in the conversation. However, let's say that you want to tell your parents why I'm into studies Korean. And that's because he likes Korean movies. So to refer to being zoo, who you've mentioned already in the conversation, you can say means and then hang Union wanted toe here means who likes Korean movies means and then hang Gagne wanted to our hair. So here we have hang Group young, huh? Which means Korean movie and guajillo is made from the verb to WADA, which means to like and here, because I've already mentioned means a in the conversation to mention Benzo again, I can use the topic Particle men. So the second important use off subject and topic particles is that we use subject particles to introduce a new topic in the conversation, and we use topic particles to refer to something mentioned earlier in the conversation. Let's look at one other important use off topic particles and now another important use off topic particles in and then used to show a contrast information. To better understand this, let's imagine that you live in Seoul. It's the summer, and the weather is always hot and sunny. And so you're on the phone to your parents and your parents tell you that the weather back home is always cold and wet. So to tell your parents that the weather in Seoul is always hot and sunny, which contrast the weather back home, you can say sold in oil. Seoul is hot Holden Toyo So although it seems like it's introducing a new topic in the conversation, as in Seoul, wasn't mentioned before. So therefore, it's a new topic. We actually use the topic particle because it helped to show a contrast in detail, which is that in Seoul it's tall oil, which means to be hot. To give you another example. Let's imagine that you are at your friend's house and your friend is offering everyone a drink. Everyone tells your friend what they want, but you don't want a drink. So to tell your friend this contrast in bit of information, you can say Dannon Quintana, I'm okay. Dining Quintana. So again we have the topic particle and then, which is used to show a contrast ing information, which is that I'm Quintana and Clinton. That means to be okay. So another important use off topic particles in and then used to show contrast ing information. Let's move on to the final practice in practice, reading some of the sentences from this lesson. In this final practice, we're going to do one independent reading practice off the sentences we have seen in this lesson. As you read the sentences, think about whether the subject particles a used to introduce a new topic and where the topic particles are used to refer to something mentioned earlier. Also, think about whether the topic particles are used to show a contrast in bit of information. So if you're ready, let's begin with a practice means OGA hunger. Ghadir Combo beans, OGA hunger Ghadir combo Been Zuman hangem Young water To our hail Been Zuman hangem young water to our hail solid in toil, solid in toil. Dannon Quran, China. Dannon Quran, China. Great effort today. Load on. So in today's lesson, we learned that sometimes we use subject particles to introduce the topic, and we can use topic particles to refer to something mentioned earlier. And we can also use topic particles to show contrast ing information. In the next lesson, we'll look at how we can use topic and subject particles in the same sentence. I'll see you soon again in that lesson, but why 47. Particles 3: Hi, then. Welcome back now. So far, we've looked at how topic particles and subject part schools are used separately in sentences. But in this lesson, we're going to look at how these particles are used together in the same sentence. Now because these particles are called topic particles and subject particles. When they used in the same sentence topic particles introduced the topic and subject particles introduced the subject. Let's find out what this means. He is an example. Sentence. Dannon Sony Koyo, My hands A big Nannan Sony Koyo. Now a simple translation Off this sentence, Bannon's Honey Koyo could be I have big hands or my hands are big. But when Lyndon I used to introduce the topic, they are interpreted as meaning as for or regarding. So in this sentence, Dannon, which is made up off the pronoun meaning I and the particle men can be translated as meaning. As for me, so they sentence actually means As for me, my hands are big in the sense were announced are attached to eager. They are more similar to English subjects than when downs are attached to, and then because topic particles essentially introduced the topic and subject particles essentially introduced the subject. Let's look a few other example. Sentences wounded in Nice. You got y O. As for today, the weather is good. Wounded in dicey. Gotcha Y o soup 10. In there. God, has Soyo ask for the homework? I did it. Soup 10 in Their guy has Soyo. So as you can see in both sentences, we introduce the topic with topic particles and then introduce the subject using subject particles. Okay, so let's move on to the final practice and practice reading these sentences similar to the previous independent reading practices. We're going to practice reading the sentences from the lesson. And as you do the reading practice, think about how the topic particles introduced the topic and how subject particles introduced the subject. So if you're ready, let's begin. Nan and Sony, Chiyo, Nan and Sony Chiyo own it. And I see Gotsche y o own it! And I see Gotsche y o subtenant. Vega has soil subtenant. Dega has style. Excellent job today. Load on. Okay, so in this lesson we looked at how we used topic and subject particles in the same sentence and how the topic particles introduced the topic and subject particles introduced the subject. The next lesson is a review lesson. So we're going to review every aspect all the topic particles and subject particles we have learned in this course. So I'll see you soon again in that review lesson, but why? 48. Particles Review Lesson: Hello there and welcome to the review lesson on topic and subject. Particles will first review the structural aspects off these particles, so let's begin first. Whether we use the topic particles in on then or subject particles. E or car depends on whether the syllable before the particle has a patio or not. So let's first to a listening repeat practice off using these particles with downs. As you say, the phrases pay close attention to whether the syllable before the particle has a pattern or not. So if you're ready, let's begin. Done and done. And Huck singing hacks. Angan Single guy, Single guy Helmi Count Me. That was great. Well done. Let's now do an independent speaking practice, and this time the phrases will have blanks and using the prompts on the screen. I'd like you to complete the phrases with appropriate particles. So if you're ready, let's begin. Single guy, single guy Huck singing Huck singing Tell me, Tell me nine and nine in That was great Baudone. Now the first distant use off topic and subject particles is the different areas of focus they have on the sentence. The topic particles focus on the details related to the subject while the subject particles focused on the subject itself. So in this practice you will see questions on the screen that focus on different elements and depending on whether the question focuses on the detail or the subject, I'd like you to complete the sentence. Is that respond to these questions using appropriate particles. So if you're ready, let's begin. Once means we're doing benzene in Congo. Hair benzene in Congo hair Who's studying means yoga? Kombu hell being Sukha, kombu. Hail. What's means a eating means in in Bangor. McCoy Oh, benzene in Bangor. McCoy. Oh, who's eating the bread beans? Aka. Panama Goyo Beans, aka Panama Go Great job. Well done now, another important use off topic and subject particles. Waas that subject Particles can be used to introduce a new topic and topic particles can be used to refer to something mentioned earlier, and we also learned that topic particles are used to show contrasting information. So in this practice, with just going to do an independent reading, practice off the sentences from the lesson. But as you read, the sentences will mark on the screen the different functions off the particle so that you're reading and thinking about how these particles are used. So if you're ready, let's begin. Beans. OGA hunger Ghadir Combo beans oga hunger Gardere kombu Here been Zuman hanging young water to our hair. Been Zuman hanging young water to, ah, hail sold in Toyo. How'd in Toyo Nannan Ken China Dannon Crane, China. Great job load on. Finally, we learned to use topic and subject particles in the same sentence. And when these particles are used together in the same sentence topic particles introduced the topic and subject particles introduced the subject. Now, in this practice, we're going to do another independent reading practice. But as you read, the sentence is think about how the topic particles air used to introduce the topic and how the subject particles air used to introduce the subject. So if you're ready, let's begin nine and Sony Koyo nine and Sony Chiyo own it and I see Gotsche y o own it and I see God's y o subtenant. Vega has soil soup 10 in. Their guy has soil. Fantastic effort today. Well done. Okay, so I think we've had a lot of practice on how to use topic particles in and then and subject particles e n cut. We're now going to move on and learn our very first vote in Korea. The be verb either. I'll see you soon again, but why? 49. 이다: Hi there. So in this lesson, we're going to learn our very first verbing, Korean, and that's the Korean Be verb IDA. So let's begin. Now. The Korean equivalent of the English be verb is either, but these two verbs on exactly the same. So to better understand the differences between these two verbs, let's consider how we use the English before. Now, we can use the English be verb to say who someone is or what something is. So I can say I am a teacher or Korea is a country. In this type of sentence, the be verb is followed by a noun. But we can also use the be verb to describe the state of something. So I can say, I am happy or the weather is hot. And in this type of sentence, the be verb is followed by an adjective. Lastly, the be verb can be followed by a prepositional phrase to say where something is or what time it is. So we can say I am at home or the class is at two o'clock. So these are the three ways of using the English be verb. However, the Korean Be verb, EDA is only used to talk about who someone is or what something is. It's not used adjectives, and although it can be used to talk about what time it is, is not used with prepositions to describe where something is. So let's focus on how it's used to say who someone is and what something is. Let's begin with. I'm a teacher. In Korean. This is Dan n son Zheng Nim, IDA, Dannon son Zheng Ni me there. So first we have law, which is the standard way of saying I. And there is also a formal form of the pronoun I, and that's char. And we use that with a topic parts cu, none. Then we have sons and Nim, which means a teacher. And lastly we have the Korean Be verb, IDA. Now e, that is the infinitive form of the be verb. And in Korean, we can use the verbs infinitive forms to make sentences. And when we make sentences using the infinitive form of any verb, we're stating something as a matter of fact. So the infinitive form of verbs is not commonly used when we're communicating with people in dialogues, but it's more often seen in textbooks, newspapers, and journals. Now, an important aspect of the verb EDA is that unlike other verbs which are separated from the objects, IDA is always attached with announced they use width. So do keep that in mind. Let's take a look at few more example sentences now. And n, hexane EDA, I am a student. Dan and hexane IDA. None in some Sean, IDA, I'm an uncle. None and some tony that Hangul gun da-da-da. Korea is a country. Hungary when data other than n lambda, I'm a man, Nan and nam Jada. So in the first two examples we use IDA, but in the last two examples we use tab. And the reason for this is because when a noun ends in patch him, like hexane, which ends in an E, and by Kim and Sandstone, which ends in Indian. But Jim, then we use IDA. However, if a noun doesn't end in, pats him, like data and lambda. Although we can use either in speech is more common to use the shortened form of EDA path. Okay, so with all that in mind, let's now do a speaking practice of sentences that use the verb either repeat after me. Dannon, son Zheng Nim, IDA, Dannon, something in me that then hexane. Hexane eeta, eeta, eeta. Hang login, da-da, da-da, da-da, da-da, da-da, da-da, da-da-da. That was great. Let's move on to the final practice. In this final practice, you're going to see sentences with blanks. And depending on whether the noun ends in Apache will not. I'd like you to say the full sentence by adding either EDA or remember that if the noun doesn't end in patching, we can add EDA or. But for this practice will practice using just tab. If you're ready, let's start the practice. Narayanan Nam yada, yada, 9N son Zheng Nim, IDA, diamond, diamond causal DIA. 9n hexane EDA. Nine and some show Nida, hunger login, Narada, handgun, da-da-da. Great efforts today. Well, well-done. In today's lesson, we learned the Korean Be verb EDI, and EDA is the infinitive form, and we focus on how we use the infinitive form in today's lesson. And in the next lesson, we're going to learn how we change IDA into three levels of formality in Korean. So I'll see you soon again in the next lesson. Bye bye. 50. 이다 Three levels of formality: Hi everyone. So in this lesson, we're going to continue learning the Korean Be verb EDA. And we're going to learn how we change this verb into three levels of formality. The formal, polite and the casual forms. Let's begin. Now, In Korea, there are three main ways of changing verbs into different levels of formality. And it's really important to use the appropriate form depending on who you're speaking to. So let's first take a look at the formal form or the Korean Be verb IDA. Here's an example sentence. Chardin son Zheng NIM in Nida, I'm a teacher. Cheonan Xunzi NIM in neither the form of form of EDA is in Nida, him Nida. And because the verb is in its formal form, we use the formal form or the pronoun I, which is char. And because of naturalization, IEP needs is read as him Nida in need. And regardless of whether the noun before ends in a patch him or not, we only use him neither. Now, as mentioned before in our lesson on honorific language, we use formal verb endings in formal settings only, such as at workplace, job interviews, and when we're talking to people who are much older than us and how much more senior position at work. So the use of this formal form is actually not very common in everyday situations. However, one common setting where we use this formal form of the verb EDA is when we introduce ourselves to a new group of people. So if I meet a new group of people and I were to introduce myself, I would say Charmin Qingwen in Nida. I'm Kim given, Jon and Joanne in Nida, There's formal form does have a very important use in Korean. With that in mind, let's now do a speaking practice of sentences that use unita. Repeat after me. Cheonan son Zheng NIM in Nida, Cheonan Zhan Zheng him in neither char, none castle in Nita. Cheonan, Catherine need Charmin. Huck sang in need. Charmin hexane him neither. That was great, well-done. Next, let's take a look at the polite form of the verb IDA. Here are two example sentences. Chardin son Zheng, Nim yay, oh, I'm a teacher. Cheonan sunset Nemea. Cheonan damages. I'ma man, Cheonan damage. The polite form of E dash can be either a o or yo-yo. If the noun ends in pats him, we use eoyo, but if the noun doesn't end in pats him, we use yeoyo. Now one thing to keep in mind is that in natural speech, the vowel yea in jeo is pronounced as a o rather than jeo. So it's non-GMO, damn j. Also as this is the polite form of the verb e that we can use the formal program for eye chart, but we can also use the standard form that both are correct and it really depends on how formal you want or need to be. Okay, so let's now do a speaking practice of sentences that use eoyo and yea, you repeat after me. Charmin, son Zheng name jeo, Cheonan sunshine, Nemea. Tau then Huck saying yay, oh, Cheonan. Tau1 and tau2. Cheonan causes great job again, well done. Let's now take a look at the casual form of the verb IDA. Here are two example sentences. 9n, sunshine, Nim, Yeah, I'm a teacher. Dan in something Nemea 9N, damn Jaya, I'ma man, Nan and non Jaya. Now as you can see, the casual form of E, that is E, Or yeah, if the noun ends in part Tim, we use ear. But if the noun doesn't end in patch him than we use, yeah. And because this is a casual form, we have to use the standard pronoun of i. It would sound very strange if we use char because chore and yeah, contradict each other once formal and the other is casual. Okay, so let's now do a speaking practice of sentences that use a casual form of EDA. Repeat after me. Dannon, son Zheng Nim, eat Diamond something Nemea than n hexane, e, dynamic Sania, Dannon down Jaya, diamond down Jaya, Dannon, Passerea, Nan, and Caecilia. Excellent job today, well-done. In this final practice, we're going to do one independent practice. And you will see sentences with the be verb IDA missing. And depending on whether the prompt is telling you to use the formal, polite, or casual forum. I'd like you to complete the sentences by using the appropriate form of the verb IDA. Okay, so if you're ready, let's begin the practice. John in sentencing, Nim him, Nida Cheonan sensing Nim Nida. Hexane, him Nida. Taxing him neither. Something Nim jeo, Cheonan silencing the meal. John then Cheonan causeway, Xunzi, Nemea, the Mia. Now none, none Jaya. Char then hack saying jeo Cheonan Huck saying yay. Now. And then Huck saying yeah. And then Huck saying yeah. Now none. None then castle, yeah. Fantastic TO today. In today's lesson, we looked at three levels of formality for the Korean Be verb EDA, formal, polite, and casual. And as I mentioned earlier, we use the verb eat out when we're introducing ourselves. So depending on how formal we need to be or how formula I need to be. I may say Cernan Qingwen in Nita or Cheonan Kim, V1, Yale. But as well as introducing ourselves, we also use the verb IDA to say how old via what we do for living and when our birthdays. So it's a very important and basic verb to learn. In the next lesson, we're going to learn the negative form of the verb IDA, which is Anita. So I'll see you soon again in the next lesson. Bye bye. 51. 아니다: Hi everyone. So in this lesson, we're going to learn the negative form of IDA, which is Anita. Anita. Now the first part of this word, Arnie simply means no. And any can be used in many different ways in Korean to mean different things. But in this lesson, we're going to focus on how is used as Anita to mean it to be not in Korean. So let's begin. Now the use of an IDA is quite simple, but unlike IDA, which is attached to the noun is used with, anita is not attached to the noun is used with. Let's take a look at an example sentence. Dannon son Zheng Li Mi Anita, I'm not a teacher. Diamond sons only me, anita. So as you can see, an IDA is separated from the noun. And the noun uses the subject particle, which in this case is e, And similar to IDA because Anita is the verbs infinitive form. Sentences using this verb form are commonly used in textbooks, journals, and newspapers, and are not often used in dialogue. Let's take a look at a few other examples than n hexane any Anita, I'm not a student. Dan and hexane. Anita now and then your Jagger and eda. I'm not a woman. Diane and your jargon, Nida. So as you can see in the second example, because char in yeoja doesn't have a patch him, we use the subject particle car. Also in these sentences because we're using both topic and subject particles together, these sentences could be interpreted as meaning. As for me, I'm not a student, and as for me, I'm not a woman. Okay, so let's now do a speaking practice of sentences that use Anita, repeat after me. Some insanely me, Anita diamond and something we me, I need a nylon Huck, s0, Anika, Nine and Maximian IDA. Than your jogger. I need a dial and your jogger Nida than n UGA Anita, the island Karst. Uga Anita. Now scrapes well-done. Okay. So in this final practice, we're going to do one independent practice, and all the sentences are missing their subject particles. So depending on whether the noun ends in Apache Monod, I'd like you to use either E or car and complete the sentences. Remember that if the noun does end in a patch him, then we use the particle e. But if the noun doesn't end in a patch him, then we use the particle car. So with that in mind, let's now do the speaking practice. Now. And then yada, yada, yada, yada, yada, yada, yada, yada. Now n n hexane any Anita nine then the HUC s0, Anita causes UGA. Anita nine then Class2Go. Anita. Anita, great efforts that I well done. Ok. So today we looked at the negative form of the verb IDA, which is Anita. And in the next lesson, we're going to look at the three levels of formality for the verb Anita. So we'll look at the formal, polite and a casual form of season again in the next lesson, bye bye. 52. 아니다 Three levels of formality: Hi everyone and welcome back. In today's lesson, we're going to look at the three levels of formality for the verb Ali, that, that the three levels of formality for Anita is a lot simpler than IDA. So let's begin. Ok, so let's begin with the formal form. Here's an example sentence, char none sons AND me, Nim Nita. I'm not a teacher. Cheonan sons only me and him. Nida, the formal form of irony that is anime Nida, anime Nida. And we simply add this after the subject particle, which we've already learned. And just like in needed because of naturalization, this is pronounced and him and him Nida. And how we use this form of form is the same as any other formal forms. We use these verb forms in formal settings and with people with seniority. Here are two more example sentences. Cheonan, Huck, s0, anime Nida. I'm not a student. Jonathan Hex Sania anime Nida, Cheonan ga, ga, im Nida. I'm not a woman. Cheonan yoga, namely data. Okay, so let's now do a speaking practice of using the formal form of Anita anime leader. Repeat after me. Charlton sons only me and him, Nida Cheonan, sons only me and him, Nida, Cheonan hexane, any chimney that Cheonan arcsine I namely the Cheonan your jogger, chimney that Cheonan your jogger, Nim Nida. Cheonan, castle guy named Nita, Cheonan, UGA and amnesia. That was great, well-done. Let's now look at the polite form. Here's an example sentence. Cheonan neo, I'm not a woman. Cheonan yoga. And the polite form of Anita is aniyo, eobseoyo. And also with the polite form, we have to use the subject particles e or car, depending on whether the noun ends with a patchy or not. Here are two more example sentences. Cheonan, Huck, s0, and DAO. I'm not a student. John and arcsine or neo, Cheonan, UGA, neo. I'm not a singer. Cheonan castle guy and Yale. Okay, so let's now do a listener repeat practice of using the polite form of Anita and repeat after me, char Lin, Sun Zang, namely unio Cheonan, something we mean VaR. John, in your tone and your castle. Great efforts, well-done. Okay, so finally, let's now look at the casual form of Anita. Here's an example sentence. Dannon Castle. I'm not a singer. Nylon castle guy, Ionia. Now the casual form of Anita is Ionia anemia. And with casual form also we use the subject particles e, or depending on whether the noun has Apache more not. We also use the informal form with the pronoun I that with verbs casual form. Here are two more example sentences. Now an N, son Zheng Ni me and I'm not a teacher. Dan and Xunzi, me 9a, Dannon yogurt. I'm not a woman. Dan and yoga and yeah. Ok. So by now I think you know the drill. Let's do a speaking practice of using the casual form of Anita. Anita Dannon, Samsung, the me and the diamond, something really MY idea than n hexane Yi Dian ad-hoc s0 idea. That then causes your diamond yoga and the great effort, well done. Let's move on to the final practice. In this final practice, we're going to do one independent practice. And depending on whether the prompt is telling you to use the formal, polite, or casual form of Anita. I'd like you to fill in the blanks and complete the sentences. Ok, so if you're ready, let's start the practice. Cheonan surprisingly me and him Nida, Cheonan Zhan Zheng Ni me and him Ni Dan Johnson, yeoja, cinguga, eoddaeyo. And then your giga. Tons and tons. Huck, samey, samey Ionia. Me, me, me. Uga. Amazing job today. Well done. Ok, so today we looked at the formal, polite and casual form of the verb and eda, which means to be not in English. The next lesson is the review lesson, and we're going to review everything we learned on the Korean be verbs, EDA and a negative form, anita. So Susan again, in the next lesson, bye bye. 53. 이다 & 아니다 Review Lesson: Hi everyone. So in this lesson, we're going to review the positive and the negative form or the Korean Be verb EDA and Anita. Let's begin with eda. Okay, so let's first review the infinitive form, more polite and casual form of EDA by doing a simple listener repeat practice of sentences that use these forms. Remember that the verb EDR can change its form depending on whether the noun they use width and in Apache mode. So pay special attention to this change in form as you do the practice. Okay, so if you're ready, let's begin the practice. Data then suddenly me that Dannon, something in me that non-Java Dan and Dan data. Chardin son Zheng NIM in Nida, Cheonan Zhan Zheng him neither. Cheonan hexane. Hexane EAR. Your child in? Hexane? Yeah. Yeah. And then your dad and your Jaya. That was great, well-done. Let's now do the independent practice. And in this practice you will see sentences with blanks. And depending on the prompts, I'd like you to complete the sentences using the appropriate form of the verb IDA. Okay, so if you're ready, let's start the practice. Non-java. Dan and lambda. John n hexane, EEO, John and Huck saying yay, Cheonan son Zheng Nim him Nida, John and sensing naming Nida 9N, ya'll Jaya diamond, Georgia. John in Cheonan damage. Hexane saying, yeah, great effort. Okay, so similar to the listener repeat practice we did with IDA. Let's do the same thing with an IDA. Remember that in negative statements there is only one form of antidote for infinitive, formal, polite, and casual forms. But depending on whether the noun ends in Apache monel, we have to use the subject particles e or car. So to keep that in mind as you do the listening, repeat practice. Ok, so if you're ready, let's start. Suddenly saying the me, Anita, diamonds on Zwingli me, I need a 9N. Your jogger. Anita, dan and yada. Yada. Yada, yada, yada, Cheonan, something made me an amnesia. Challenge. Me and him. Nida, Cheonan, Huck s0 and Cheonan hacks s0. Now then nine, then castle guy. That was great, well done. Let's now move on to the independent practice and practice. You will see sentences with blanks and using the prompts, I'd like you to complete the sentences using the appropriate form of anita. Okay. So if you're ready, let's begin. Cheonan causes neo Cheonan Class2Go, neo Zhan Zheng Ni me and diamonds on zinc Nemea. Jonathan Nim Nida, Cheonan ga, ga, Jonathan hock, s0, neo, tons and arcsine. I, Neil Diamond, I'm juggling. Jonathan Class2Go, Nim Nida, Cheonan, Class2Go, Nim Nida Dannon Xunzi, me, me. Anita diamonds, Xunzi Nemea Nida, John in your Java, nio, Girondin, ga, ga, neo. Okay, so that was the last practice in this course and you did an amazing job. Well done. Ok, so today we will review the Korean Be verb EDA and its negative form, Anita. And that's it. This is the final lesson in this course. So in this course we started off by learning hunger, the Korean alphabet. And we finish things off by learning the basics of Korean sentences and learning to form sentences using the Korean Be verb EDA. I hope this course has helped you to lay the foundations for future learning. And I hope to see you soon again in one of our courses. Take a bite.