Korean Pronunciation Masterclass | Keehwan Kim | Skillshare

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Korean Pronunciation Masterclass

teacher avatar Keehwan Kim, Language teaching professional

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

59 Lessons (5h 48m)
    • 1. Course Introduction

      2:16
    • 2. Course overview

      3:27
    • 3. Consonant sounds

      5:18
    • 4. Korean and English consonants

      3:38
    • 5. ㄱㅋㄲ Basic sound

      9:25
    • 6. ㄱ voiced G sound

      6:01
    • 7. ㄱㅋㄲ 받침

      8:34
    • 8. ㄱㅋㄲ Review

      5:04
    • 9. ㄷㅌㄸ Basic sound

      8:28
    • 10. ㄷ voiced D sound

      5:00
    • 11. ㄷㅌㄸ 받침

      8:37
    • 12. ㄷㅌㄸ Review

      5:27
    • 13. ㅂㅍㅃ Basic sound

      8:11
    • 14. ㅂ voiced B sound

      4:13
    • 15. ㅂㅍㅃ 받침

      7:11
    • 16. ㅂㅍㅃ Review

      5:04
    • 17. ㅈㅊㅉ Basic sound

      8:12
    • 18. ㅈ voiced J sound

      4:37
    • 19. ㅈㅊㅉ 받침

      6:26
    • 20. ㅈㅊㅉ Review

      5:01
    • 21. ㅅㅆ Basic sound

      6:04
    • 22. ㅅ SH sound

      5:03
    • 23. ㅅㅆ 받침

      7:18
    • 24. ㅅㅆ Review

      3:11
    • 25. ㅎㅇ Basic sound

      5:13
    • 26. ㅎ 받침

      5:51
    • 27. ㅎ Aspirated sound

      9:14
    • 28. ㅎㅇ Review

      3:54
    • 29. ㅁㄴ Basic sound

      5:10
    • 30. ㄹ Basic sound

      6:12
    • 31. ㅁㄴㄹ Review

      2:11
    • 32. 겹받침 1

      11:25
    • 33. 겹받침 2

      7:20
    • 34. 겹받침 Review

      3:11
    • 35. Korean Vowels

      2:40
    • 36. Korean Vowels ㅏㅑㅓㅕ

      7:20
    • 37. Korean Vowels ㅗㅛㅜㅠ

      6:32
    • 38. Vowel Review 1

      4:01
    • 39. Korean Vowels ㅡ & ㅣ

      5:41
    • 40. Korean Vowels ㅢ

      5:56
    • 41. Korean Vowels ㅔㅖㅐㅒ

      6:38
    • 42. Vowel Review 2

      4:02
    • 43. Korean Vowels ㅘㅝㅟ

      8:39
    • 44. Korean Vowels ㅚㅙㅞ

      7:28
    • 45. Vowel Review 3

      2:50
    • 46. Contraction 1

      8:22
    • 47. Contraction 2

      6:43
    • 48. Vowel Reduction

      6:20
    • 49. Disappearance of ㅎ

      4:56
    • 50. ㄴ and ㄹ Pattern

      7:24
    • 51. Nasalization 1

      5:51
    • 52. Nasalization 2

      6:19
    • 53. Nasalization 3

      4:52
    • 54. Adding ㄴ sound

      5:48
    • 55. Tensing consonants

      8:10
    • 56. Natural pitch

      6:37
    • 57. Focus

      6:42
    • 58. Intonation

      5:35
    • 59. Final farewell

      0:46
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About This Class

Hi, and welcome to the Korean Pronunciation Masterclass!

In this class, you're going to learn everything you need to learn about Korean pronunciation rules. This class is divided into five units

  1. Course introduction -  Lessons 1 to 2
  2. Consonant sounds - Lessons 3 to 34
  3. Vowel sounds - Lessons 35 to 45
  4. Connected speech -  Lessons 46 to 55
  5. Pitch and intonation - Lessons 56 to 58

This class is designed to develop your understanding of how and why Korean language is pronounced in such way, and each lesson is accompanied with interactive practice activities, so be prepared to practice what you're learning in each lesson.

See you in the lesson.

Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

Keehwan Kim

Language teaching professional

Teacher

Hi everyone!

My name's Keehwan Kim and welcome to my teacher profile page.

I have been a language teaching professional since 2005, and I have been working as a language learning content producer, working for the likes of BBC Learning English as a content producer.

I love everything about teaching and learning languages. I think best analogy of language learning is of trying to go up an escalator that's coming down. You have to work hard to make forward progress, and if you stop trying, it's easy to lose all that progress you have made.

Many of us live in environments where interacting with the language you're learning is extremely difficult, but I hope my courses help you to engage with the language you're trying to learn and help yo... See full profile

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Transcripts

1. Course Introduction: Hi, everyone, and welcome to the Korean pronunciation masterclass. I'm new instructor Kim Gi. So this course is all about the rules on Korean pronunciation, and through this course, I'm going to help you learn just about everything. You need to learn to speak Korean naturally, with first going to go through each constant sound in Korean and learn how and why. The sounds change when they used in different positions in words. We'll then explore how each constant sound is pronounced when they used as practice. And we're round off the learning on continents by going through all 11 combating patterns and how they're pronounced in Korea. After that, we'll learn about Korean vowel sounds were first beginning with their basic sounds, and we'll also look at how certain vowel sounds are pronounced differently, depending on the position they're used in and also depending on the Constance they used with. Then towards the end of the course will move on to more advanced stuff and take a deep dive into connected speech. We learn about contractions in Korea, changes in vowel sounds and the effects off nasal ization, which causes constant sounds to change into other nasal cells. Finally, we look at the use off pitch focus and intonation at sentence level so that you can speak Korean in a more natural way. Now this course is designed to be interactive, so each lesson is accompanied by speaking practices and there are also review lessons to help you recall what you learn in previous lessons. Now this causes aim for a levels. However, you should ideally have a working knowledge of anger so that you can read the words and sentences in the lessons. Okay, so if you're keen to learn how to improve your Korean pronunciation, jumping the calls and I'll guide you through everything you need, I look forward to seeing lessons. 2. Course overview: hi, everyone. So in this lesson, I'm going to go over the overview off this course to that. You have a better idea off what this course is about, and I'll mainly talk about two things. First, I'll talk about required prior knowledge to take this course, and second, I'll talk about the general aim off this course. So, as I mentioned in the course introduction video, you should have a working knowledge off hunger to take this course. Throughout this course, we will make references to letters in the alphabet to compare sounds, but all the example, words and sentences will only be written in hunger. Therefore, it is quite important that you're able to read, Hang, go to fully understand the lesson content and participate in practice exercises. Additionally, changes in Korean pronunciation depends on specific combination off continents and vowels. So if you're unfamiliar with letters in hunger, then it may be difficult for you to fully understand what we're teaching in this course. Also, for this reason, it would be beneficial if you had some basic awareness off Korean sentence structure. Ah, lot of the factors that influence Korean pronunciation is whether certain syllables are used with noun particles or verb suffixes. So in order for you to fully understand the pronunciation rules off Korean, it would really help if you have some basic awareness off these concepts in relation to our other courses. If you have taken our absolute beginners one and two courses where we teach you hunger and fundamental aspects of Korean language, then you are ready to take this course. Okay, so let's now move on to the general aim off this course Now, as much as I believe that this is the best online pronunciation course you will find, I am not going to make force promises on how much your pronunciation will improve after this course. And the main reason, of course, is because what you get out of this course were largely depend on what your current level of Korean is. Having said that. Here's what you can expect to learn from this course now. If you started learning Korean with our absolute beginners, one course where you first learned the basics of hunger, you will have learned about 30% off what you need to know about Korean pronunciation, which is a good starting point for absolute beginners and by taking this course, your knowledge off Korean pronunciation will increase to about 90%. So by the end of this course, your knowledge off Korean pronunciation will be at a very advanced level. Furthermore, you will be guided through speaking practices so that you can put into practice what you learned in the lessons. So as well as developing awareness off Korean pronunciation rules, we will help you to speak Korean in a more natural way. Now, this doesn't mean that you will overnight sound like a native speaker. But you will make significant improvements in the way you speak Korean. So by the end of this course, you will develop advanced awareness off Korean pronunciation rules, and you will have improved your Korean pronunciation through guided speaking practices. Okay, so I hope that's giving you a better idea off what this course is about and will now move on to the unit on the Continent sounds. And before we get into the lessons on the continent, sounds will first go over some technical aspects off how constant and sounds are produced. So Susan again in the next lesson. But by 3. Consonant sounds: hi and welcome to the lecture on the constant sound production. Now, before we get into the lessons on Korean Continent sound, we're going to do a couple of things so that you're better prepare for what we're going to cover in each of our lessons. First, in this lecture, we're going to talk about how constant sounds are produced, so we'll go over some technical stuff related to a sound production in our vocal tract. Then, in the next lecture, will relate what we discussed in this lecture to compare in Korean and English constant sounds. So in this lecture, we're going to look at three important concepts, and they are one place of articulation, as in where the sound is produced two voiced or voiceless, as in whether the sound is produced with vocal cord vibration and lastly aspiration, which relates to the amount of air being expelled when we produce a sound. First we have place of articulation, and this refers to the starting position off sand production. Now, as you can see in this diagram, there are altogether eight places of articulation. For example, the continent's B and P in the worst beach and Pete are both produced around the lips by closing and opening the lips. So we say beach beats Pete Pete. On the other hand, the constant eight is produced deep in the throat and effectively. The whole of the vocal tract is left open to make this sound. So this is so as we go through different continent sounds in Korean, we'll be talking about where the starting position is for each continent by describing the position off lips, tongue and teeth. The second important concept is whether our continent is voiced or voiceless. The key difference between voiced and voiceless continents is that with voice continents sounds are produced by tightening and vibrating the vocal chords, so the airflow is restricted. However, voiceless constants are produced with no vocal cord vibration, so air flows much more freely. An example of a voice constant is the English be sound when you say be if you put your finger on your Adam's apple and say that be sound, you should feel your vocal core vibrating. So it's but. But on the other hand, the constant p which we produce using the same articulator, is by putting our lips together is a voiceless sound so there is no vocal core vibration. The distinction between voiced and voiceless continent is really important not only for constant sounds but also in Milan. Aspects of connected speed, however, do keep in mind that at this stage I am just introducing the concept. So don't worry too much about trying to understand it fully, as everything will naturally come together when we get into the lessons. What's important to remember is that voice continents use vocal core vibration. Why are voiceless continents do not? Okay, so the last important concept related to constants and production is aspiration. The two previous concepts we discuss were related to how the constant sounds are produced. However, aspiration is essentially a byproduct off sound production. It refers to the burst of air that is released when a sound is produced. Some sounds air heavily aspirated. While there are those that are mildly aspirated or not at all, consider the be sound again. When we say be the sound is accompanied with little to no aspiration. Now, if you put your hand in front of your mouth when you say be, then you should feel little to no air coming out of your mouth, so it's be be be. On the other hand, if you say P and you put your hand in front of your mouth, you should feel a lot of air coming out of your mouth. So it's P P p. This difference in aspiration is related to two things. One is whether our continent is voiced or voiceless as voiced continents use vocal cord vibration and this naturally leads to less air being expelled as the airflow is restricted and at a world level, the length of delay between constant and vow sounds also affect the level of aspiration. The longer the delay between the continent and a vowel sound, the heavier the aspiration. Now, this difference in level of aspiration is also another key distinguishing difference between Korean and English constants. So to keep that in mind. Okay, so in this lesson, we've looked at three important aspects off constant sound production, and they are the place of articulation, voiced or voiceless continents and level of aspiration as mentioned before, This was a brief overview off these important concepts, and we will refer to them again and again throughout this course. In the next lesson, we're going to relate what we discussed in this lecture to Korean and English continent cells. So I'll see you soon in that lesson, but by 4. Korean and English consonants: hi and welcome to the lecture on Korean and English constants that when we compare English and Korean continents, it's important to note that very few sounds are exactly alike. The ones that do sound pretty much the same are nasal sounds, and nearly all other sounds are similar to each other, but not exactly the same. And what differentiates them are related to the three concept from the previous lesson. Let's first consider the differences between Korean and English in terms off place of articulation and will consider the differences between Lille and the English continents, l and R. Although some textbooks refer to the Korean Leer as being similar to the English L and R sounds, depending on where the Lille is used, the career Lille is far more closer to the English l based on the place of articulation. The Korea Leo is articulated with a tongue position around the dental ridge here and for English L. The tongue is positioned right behind the upper front teeth, so the difference is quite subtle between Lille and L. On the other hand, the English are sound is produced, with the tongue curling backwards and although in certain positions the lira can be pronounced with a tongue touching the roof off the mouth a little further back. This kind of English, our tongue positioning doesn't exist in Korean. And for this reason, Korean people find the pronunciation off. The English are sound very difficult, so these differences are what we will be highlighting in this course. Another important factor is the voiced and voiceless contrast between Korean and English constants in English, their arm or voice continents than voiceless continents, However, in Korean, their arm or voiceless continents. And as we discussed before, voiceless continents do not use vocal call vibration. So these sounds are produced Maura around the front of the mouth, whereas voice constant sounds are produced more deep in the throat. Moreover, because voiceless continents do not use vocal core vibration, airflow is less restricted than voice continents, and this can affect the kind of sound we produce. Finally, we have aspiration, and the level of aspiration differs between Korean and English constants. In general voice constant sounds are produced, with little to no air being expelled. On the other hand, voiceless continents tend to be more aspirated, and this is what differentiates the English G and the Korean Cheok and the English J and the Korean Tear. Although the place of articulation is similar between these pairs of continents, what distinguishes them are the differences between voiced and voiceless and the level of aspiration. And this is why Cheok and T it sounds are produced with a hint of K and C eight sounds. So over Korean and English continents do share certain similarities. The different ways in which these sounds are produced causes them to sound a little different from each other. And developing this awareness will really help you to speak Korean in a more natural way. Okay, so I think you now have a pretty good overview off how Korean sounds are produced and how these concepts relate to the differences between Korean and English continents. The next lesson is our first lesson on the Korean continents on. We're going to learn the sounds off key up Q and sangria. So Susan again in that lesson, But by 5. ㄱㅋㄲ Basic sound: hi, everyone. So in this lecture, we're going to look at how we produce the Korean continent. Sounds Cheok, Cheok and Cingular the sound of Cheok Cheok and Sang Deok are all produced in the same place. In our vocal tract. They all involve closing off the flow of air by lifting the tongue up to the roof off the mouth, and the sound is produced when the tongue comes off toe, open the closure and release the air this way off. Producing the sound is similar to the English, G and K. Now let's consider each continent sound more carefully will consider each Korean constant in relation to its similar sound in English. The first pair of continents are Cheok and the English G. First, the English G is a voice continent, so the sound is produced with vocal cord vibration, which means that airflow is restricted. The sound of G is produced with little to no aspiration, so it's good, good, good. On the other hand, Cheok is a voiceless constant. There is no vocal cord vibration, so airflow is less restricted than the English G. Chiat is a mildly aspirated sound, and it is this passing of air that causes key up to be pronounced with a hint of K sound. So it's okay. Could could listen to the two contrasts. Good, good, good could now listen to a Korean word using cheok Key Key key. Let's practice saying that. Repeat after me. P key key. Greater well done. Let's now look at the key. It and the K comparison Que is a voiceless continent, and the sound is produced with moderate aspiration. So the English K is Kerr Could could. Kia in Korean is very similar to the English case sound, but Cheick sound is made with heavier aspiration than K, so the sound of key it is could could now, as you could probably tell, the differences in the aspiration between these sounds are very subtle. So while there are certain differences in the way these sounds are produced, it's not something you need to overly worry about. As the two sounds are very similar. Listen to the following word using Keokuk Key Key Key. Okay, so let's now do a minimal pair. Practice off key and key. Repeat after me. Key key Key Key Key key. Excellent job again. Wot done. The final constant in this lesson is Cingular. Cingular is called a tense continent because of the way this sound is produced. If you compare sandy up to Cheok, the two sounds are produced at the same position in the mouth, with the tongue lifted onto the roof off the mouth. However, at this position, when we make the cheok sound, the muscles are relaxed and the tongue comes down relatively softly so it's. Could, Could could. On the other hand, when we make the Cingular sound, the muscles are in a much more tense position. And to make the sound, the tongue comes down much more sharply. So it's good, Good, good For this reason, these Korean double continents are called tense continents, and the relaxed single version is called a lax continent. And although Cingular is a voiceless constant, it has no aspiration. And the reason for this is because of this sharp release. Generally, the level of aspiration is greater when there is a greater delay between the continent and the vowel sound. But with tens continent, there is much shorter delay due to the sharp release to open the closure, so there is little to no aspiration, with sang hyuk, listen to the following word with Cingular G de key. Okay, so let's now do a practice with key key and G Repeat after me. Key key G Key key key key key G Great job again. Let's move on to the practice session. In this practice, you're going to practice the constant sound from this lesson in three minimal pair practices. And at the end, there is one long practice on all three continents. Sounds There are four practices in total. So if you're ready, let's begin with the 1st 1 Could him could him? Que die? Canada Coun comb t t coun! Come on, Quot gordy Coun Gooden que die! Get die! Okay, Gay. Cool! Cool. Get that kid I de que then can. Good Could call you Carlisle de t de couldn't coming. Good, Cool, Cool, Cool. Okay, that Kida Gaeta when you do so well, man, Yes, aside from Thomas is gonna take a okay. So in this lesson, we learned the basic sounds off the Korean continents Cheok Cheok and sang Yuck! In the next lesson, we're going to learn how the Korean Constant Chiappe becomes a voice that she sound So I'll see you soon again in the next lesson. But why 6. ㄱ voiced G sound: hi there. So in this lesson, we're going to learn how the voiceless Cheok becomes a voice to t sound in Korea now. As we learned in the previous lecture, Cheok is a voiceless continent, and it is mildly aspirated. So it's pronounced with a hint of a K sound. However, in certain positions, it can become a voice that g sound. For this to happen, Chiat must follow voice that sounds so they can follow either syllables ending in vow letters. And remember that all vows of voiced sounds, and they can follow syllables with the patch him. Bm nian you and Leo as these are voice continents, let's first consider how Chiat becomes a voice to cheese sound when it follows a vow. First, consider the word corgi Corky, which means meat in this world. The first syllable contains the voiceless Chiat with mild aspiration, its core cool. However, the Chiat in the second syllable becomes a voiced G sound because it follows the voice vow sound all. And this happens because the second Kira catches the vocal cord vibration from the vow. Or so this is pronounced corgi Korky. The second key up is pronounced as a voice G sound now for you to hear true pronunciation. It was important for me to say this fast as saying it slowly means that the second Chiat can sound like a voiceless constant. Here are a few more examples off Cheok becoming a voice that g sound. Notice how the Chiat in the second syllable becomes a voice that g sound Kagel que go cool , Get cool, get kugel Kugel. So following the same pattern, the Chiat in the second syllable becomes a voice that g sound due to the voice vowel sounds that come before it. Okay, so let's now do a speaking practice off these words. Think about how the second key up becomes a voice to D sound. Let's begin. Corgi, Kagel Cool, get Cougar. That was excellent Woda. Now, the second instance, when Chiat becomes a voice G sound is when Chiat follows one of the four voice continents, and they are bm being Ian and Leo. When Chiat follows these continents just like the vows, the Chiat catches the vocal core vibration made by these four continents and becomes a voiced G sound. A good example is the word Can g can G, which means a cold in this world. The first syllable ends in B m. Ah, voice constant. So the cheok in the second syllable becomes a voiced G sound. So it's can G candy. Here are a few more examples. Don't go. Don't go sing g Sing G sit a gun silk. Um So in each of these words, the cheok in the second syllable becomes a voice G sounds as they follow one of the four voice continents. Bm beon yung or Lear. Okay, so let's now do a speaking practice all these words and saying this before Think about how the key up becomes a voice that g sound because of the voice constant patching before it. If you're ready, let's begin. Come G dongle sing G city A gun. That was great. Swot Don, let's move on to the practice session. Okay, so in this practice will do a listening repeat practice off the two patterns in which Chiat becomes a voice to t sound. So if you're ready, will begin with the first practice. Kugel Ja gu we go toga Cool, Get come g angle mango you d thing got when they told merciful Banias a queer sometimes gonna do away care. Okay, so in this lesson, we learn how the voiceless Cheok becomes a voice that g sound when it follows either a vow letter or a voice constant Pattyn being Deion Year Old Lear. In the next lesson, we're going to learn how to pronounce Cheok Cheok and Sandhya as pat him. So I'll see you soon again in the next lesson, but by 7. ㄱㅋㄲ 받침: Hi everyone. So in this lecture, we're going to learn how to pronounce key up, kick, and Sandia as patching. Now, when we use QA, QC and Sangiovese as Patch him, they are all used as unreleased a kiosk sound. And this means that the patch him is not sounded. And this unreleased sound of keyup differs from equivalent English sounds which are sounded even if their word ending consonants, such as bag and kick. The starting position of all the sounds is the same. They all begin with a tongue lifted and touching the roof of the mouth. And that's where the sound stops. To make their basic sounds. The closure formed by the tongue touching the roof of the mouth is released. But when these consonants are used as Patch him, the closure isn't released. Listen to these examples. So J poor pack these unreleased. The key OK sounds generally occur at the end of words or before a consonant other than Ian or hear it. Now this same unreleased sound creates a lot of confusion for young Koreans who are learning how to spell Korean. For example, the Korean word for to fry is that that and Korean children find it difficult to spell this word as it could easily be written like this, this, or this. So the important thing to keep in mind is that as you learn new words with these consonants as Patch him, you need to learn the spelling carefully to, okay, so let's now do a speaking practice of words ending with these consonants as patching. Repeat after me. So J, poor, PAC. Pac. Excellent job, well-done. Okay, so let's now consider how these consonants linked to the following syllable when they used as patching. In Korean, when the final syllable ends in a patch him and the following syllable begins with an e and consonant. The patch him sound is generally carried over and takes up the position of the year. For example, this word is pronounced as yoga. Yoga as the QIAT, but shame carries over and takes up the position of Ian. So it's pronounced yoga. Yoga. Now, there are two important patterns to remember when linking pattern sounds. First is the linking of unreleased kiosk sound, and second is the linking of the consonants basic sound. Let's look at the first pattern for linking potassium sounds. Listen to the following examples. Yoga. Yoga and their blog. Your pair. Plug your pair. Plugin Messiah, Messiah. Now in each of these phrases that year, in the syllable after the patch him, I replaced by the unreleased key OK sounds. And this occurs in two specific patterns. First is when a word using a patch him is followed by a noun. And second is when a word using Apache him is followed by a verb. In these patterns, the unreleased kiosk sound replaces the EN consonant in the following syllable. Now this is obviously not as significant for the first word, since the potassium is already a keel. But in the second and the third examples, the key links to the following syllable as an unreleased key up. However, it's important to note that there aren't that many nouns ending in a cube or Sangha. So it's good to be aware of these patterns, but you may not come across too many situations where you are applying these patterns with nouns ending in care or Sangha. Okay, so let's practice saying these phrases, bearing in mind that the linking sound is the unreleased kiosk sound. Let's begin. Yoga and their poor gear pair. Plug Isiah. Great job, well-done. Let's now consider the second pattern, which is when a consonants basic sound carries over. Here are some example phrases. Poor care, poor care. Doc, book, Gay, dot bookie, sub-goal, your sock, Goryeo. Now these examples show three specific patterns in which the patch hymns basic sound that carries over. First, if a noun is used with a particle, then the basic sound of the patch him is carried over. So it's not plug, but it's poor care. Poor care. Second, if the linking pattern occurs within the noun, then the basic sound of the patch him is carried over. So it's not dark, boggy. It's doc, bulky, doc bulky. And lastly, if the linking pattern occurs between verb stems and they're suffixes, then the basic sound or the patch him is carried over. So it's not so Goryeo, but it's sock. Sock Goryeo. In Korea, there are many Korean verbs whose stem ends in Sangha. So in all these verbs, the Sangha carries over when you say the verbs platform, So they are pronounced. Got Goyal, put GAO, GAO. So do keep that in mind. Okay, So let's practice saying these phrases. Keep in mind that the linking sound is the basic sound of the pattern. Let's begin. Poor care. Dot, bulky, sock, Goryeo. Fantastic job load on. Let's now move on to the practice session. In this practice, we're going to do three listen and repeat practices of reading and Sandia as Patch him. As always, the practice session is with me. So if you're ready, we'll begin with the first practice. Plug, plug, plug. Hi guys. So my name data just attend their cues and mania Josiah compounds again a domain name. Okay, so in this lesson, we learned how the consonants QA, QC and sang yacc are pronounced as pats him. And how they link to the following syllable that begins with a consonant. In. The next lesson is a review lesson. And we're going to review everything we learned in the previous three lessons on the consonants key up here, and Sandy, OK. So I'll see you soon in that lesson. Bye bye. 8. ㄱㅋㄲ Review: could him could him? Que die? Canada Coun comb key t coun! Come on, Quot gordy Couldn't Gooden que die get die? Okay? Gay could cool. Gedda kid. I de que then couldn't Good. Could call you call you will de t de couldn't come. Good. Cool, cool, Cool Queda kida Gaeta kugel Ja gu me Go toga Cool game. Come G angle mango you d thing got pad. Cool. Yell. Pull that Singa Yoga on a Plawecki Sile plug up Pay pull gun A pack! Gay! Okay, the bookie. So call you piu Chiyo. 9. ㄷㅌㄸ Basic sound: Hi everyone. So in this lesson, we're going to learn how to pronounce the Korean consonants c0, good, teared and sang the gut. Now the sound of t get teared and San Diego are all produced in the same place in our vocal tract. These sounds are made by first positioning the blade of the tongue behind the upper front teeth and blocking the flow of air. And then we make the sound by opening the closure to release the air. This place of articulation is similar to D and T in English. Let's now look at these Korean consonants in relation to similar English consonant sounds. First d and t get are often considered similar to each other. However, d is a voiced consonant, meaning that the sound is produced with vocal cord vibration. And there is hardly any aspiration. So is the, the, the, on the other hand, the good is a voiceless consonants. So there is no vocal cord vibration and there is light aspiration. And this light aspiration causes ticket to be pronounced with a hint of t sound. So is to, to, to listen to the two contrasts. The, the to, to listen to this Korean word using ticket. Ta-da, ta-da. Okay, so let's practice saying that. Repeat after me. Ta-da, ta-da, ta-da. Great job, well-done. Okay, So let us now consider the two consonants, t and t. It, both T and tiered are voiceless sounds, but t is moderately aspirated, so it's tr. Tr. Tr. However, Korean tiered is heavily aspirated. So is tr. Tr. Tr. Now similar to the Q and K contrasts, the difference in the level of aspiration between these two consonants is subtle. So it's a difference you need to be aware of, but not something you need to make an effort to distinguish when making the sounds as they are so similar to each other. Listen to the following word using tiered. Ta-da. Ta-da. Okay, so let's now do a minimal pair practice with taller and taller. Repeat after me. Ta-da, ta-da, ta-da, ta-da, ta-da, ta-da. Excellent job again, well done. The final constant in this lesson is sang digger. Now, similar to the Sankey UC San Diego is a tense consonant, meaning that the muscles are more tense at the beginning position of the sound. And that release of the closure is much sharper with the. And as mentioned before, this shot released means that the delay between the syndicate and the vowel sound is very short. So although this consonant is a voiceless consonant, there is no aspiration. Now listen to the following word using San Diego. Dada. Dada. Okay, so let's now do a practice with 03 consonants. T good, tiered and sang Diego. Repeat after me. Ta-da, ta-da, da-da, ta-da, ta-da, ta-da, ta-da, ta-da, da-da. Fantastic effort. Well done. Let's now move on to the practice session. In this practice, you're going to practice the consonant sounds from this lesson in minimal pairs, as well as one big practice on 03 consonants. There are four practices in total and we will begin with t and t it to neon. Neon pan tool. Don't know. Toe, toe, toe. So most ago and is a CYA column tabs in a debate. Okay, so in this lesson, we'll learn how to make the basic sounds of the consonants T good, tiered and sang the gut. In the next lesson, we're going to learn how the consonant t Good becomes a voiced d sound in Korean. So I'll see you soon again in the next lecture. Bye bye. 10. ㄷ voiced D sound: Hi there. So in this lecture, we're going to learn how the constant ticket becomes a voice that d sound in Korea, similar to what we learned with Cheok Ticket becomes a voiced D sound when it follows either a vow or one of the voice continents. Bm Deion Young or Liel. Let's first take a look. Awesome example. Words where he good becomes a voice that d sound after a vow to that to that Poddar party, Ki Dong Qi doom. So in each of these words, that ticket in the second syllable becomes a voice that d sound because the previous syllable ends in a vowel letter and, as mentioned before vows are voiced sounds. So the second T good catches the vocal chords vibration caused by these vowels, making them to sound like the voice that d. Okay, so let's do a speaking practice following this pattern. Repeat after me to that pie. That key doom that was great swollen. I'm let's now look at some examples where the ticket becomes a voice that d sound, because it follows one of the voice constant sounds b M d in Young and Leo Canda camp on door on door sand, um sang them poor, that poor there. So in each example, the first syllable ends in one of the four voice Continent sounds as such. That ticket that follows becomes a voice that d sound. However, in the first word, the lax T good is actually pronounced as tense sang, bigot sound and in Korean lacks confidence are often pronounced as tens continents after certain constant letters. And although it's actually not as common for lax continents to become tense continents after BM if the following constant is T good, it is often pronounced as a tense continent. So this is pronounced as Kanta and not Kanda. Other examples include Cynthia Tempter and Tampa. The second T good is all pronounced as the tents sang Dig it constant. Okay, so with that in mind, let's now do a speaking practice off this second pattern. Remember to pronounce t good as a tense continent if it follows on me and batch him. But with the other ticket sounds, remember to pronounce them as a voice that the sound If you're ready, let's begin. Kanta on door sang them Clue that great job today won't on. Let's now move on to the practice session we're going to do to practices. The first will be went T good follows vow ending words. And the second is when t good follows words the end in b m D in Young and Lille Batam. Both practices are with Meena. So if you're ready, let's begin with the 1st 1 Paata had that paddle Tedo Total under Pampa Bolder Angle Ton Dong Homeowner does a kobani eyes Oakwell? Sometimes he gonna do my Nike air. Okay, so in this lesson, we learned how the constant ticket becomes a voice that t sound in Korean in the next Listen, we're going to learn how to pronounce tea. Good tea it and sang Dig it as patch in. So it's Houston again in that lesson, But why? 11. ㄷㅌㄸ 받침: hi there, and welcome back. Now in this lesson, we're going to learn how to pronounce tea. Good tea it and sang Dig it as patches. Firstly, Sang Digger is not used as patch him, but we do use ticket and tear as patch him. When t good and tears are used as patch him, they become unreleased ticket sound. Remember that the starting position off ticket and tiered is the front played off your tongue, positioning behind the front upper teeth, and that's where the sound stops. The closure isn't released. Here are a few examples, but by pot cut that. So in all these phrases, you can probably hear that all the pattern are red in the same way the ticket and tear used as patch him A. Pronounced as an unreleased ticket sound, this unreleased Tigger sound is similar to the English T sound in words like Got and hat. This unreleased Tyga sound can occur at the end of a word or before constant other than year. And here. Okay, so let's now do a speaking practice off these words using ticket and tear as patch him. Repeat after me, but But that cut that Graito wot done. Now let's consider how these patch him cells linked to the following syllable when they begin with a constant year. The rules we follow on how these patterns sounds linked to the following syllable is similar to what we learn on the Cheok Cheok and sang your pattern first. If the ticket and tiered Pattyn are used either with Bob's or with other now owns than the unreleased ticket sound carries over, here are some examples. So Donna, so down there, Saudi sire, Saudi sire Cold or Koya cold or Goya. So in the first phrase, the noun salt is used with a noun on. So the unreleased D sound carries over and becomes a voiced D sound. So it's sort on there. So down there and in the second phrase, the noun salt is used with a bob s soil. And again, the unreleased T sound carries over and becomes a voice d sound. So it's Saudi sire, Saudi Celje, in the final phrase, and this example is not a significant as the patch him is already a ticket, but the adverb court is used with a verb old Goya, and the unreleased ticket sound becomes a voice d sound. So it's called Orca Cold or Goya. Okay, so let's now do a speaking practice following this pattern. Repeat after me. So down there, Saudi sire called Orca greater well done. Let's now look at the second pattern when words with tear bottom are used with particles and weird verb suffixes, the basic sound off tiered carries over to the following syllable that begins with an Ian Constant. Here are a couple of examples, sort there, sort there. Cattaneo Cattaneo. So in the first example, the noun salt is used with a particle a So this is pronounced sotto sotto. And in the second example, the same thing happens again. But this time the verbs then cut is used with its Suffolk's I Oh, so this is pronounced cattle cocktail. Okay, so let's now do a speaking practice following this pattern. Repeat after me. So Tay can tell you my tie. Oh, greater well done. Now there is one exception to the t good and tear Batam when the ticket anti it, but him sound carries over to the syllable e. They are either pronounced as a tiered or t it sound. Here are some examples cootie quot mighty my tea. Qazi Qazi. I could see Good. See. So as you can hear that you Batam carries over to the following syllable and becomes a tear , sound and tear. Batam carries over and becomes a cheer sound, and this pattern can apply to various word forms. Now, although we're trying to learn the most common rules and patterns found in Korean pronunciation, there are also certain exceptions like this. So do keep that in mind. Okay, so let's now do a speaking practice off this pronunciation pattern. Repeat after me. Quot Baji. Qazi. Good. See, that was excellent again. Road on. Let's now move on to the practice session. In this practice, we're going to do four listener repeat practices off reading tea. Good and tear. Batam. As always, this practice is with Meena. So if you're ready, let's begin with the first practice. That so court pat the pat. The so don a So the soil. Cool dial code or Chiyo? So Tay, meet a cattail. But tile crudity My I d head o d cutie! Good tea! Could Sida tomorrow talent or so you don't get your civil Banya senior terrorist bases it Goya from times gone by now. Okay, so in this lesson we learned how to pronounce t good and tear as patch him. And we also learned how they linked to the following syllable that begins with an E incontinent. The next lesson is a review lesson, and we're going to review everything we learn on the continents key Good tiered and sang Dig it. So see you soon in that lesson, but by 12. ㄷㅌㄸ Review: coital total 10 10 two Team Ted him to Myung to Myung polar Pun tell it all Know it all, Tom them tall go pie Die Comb, comb Don't tone Total puddle Goal told. Did I? Too bad Dada Pata Call it all Poodle Total tomb cone Stone Tall toll Dole Pie pie by pata Hot that paddle Tedo total under Pampa Bolder Angle Ton Dong That so? Court Pat the pat The So don a So the soil. Cool dial code or Kaya? So Tay, meet a cocktail. Matteo Crudity My I d head o d cutie Good tea could Sida? 13. ㅂㅍㅃ Basic sound: Hi there. So in this lesson, we're going to learn how to pronounce the Korean constant sounds. Pube p up and sang beom The sounds off peer p up and sang be up are all produced in the same place in our vocal tract. The starting position off all three sounds is with the closure off the lips and the sound is produced by opening that closure. This is similar to the English continents, B and P less again, consider the differences between Korean and English continents by comparing similar pairs of sounds. First, we have B and peel B is a voice continent. So the sound is produced with vocal cord vibration and there is hardly any aspiration, so would be is. But But however, Pierre is a voiceless continent, so there is no vocal cord vibration, and there is mild aspiration. And as with the other sounds, it's this aspiration that gives people a hint of p sound. So people is, uh, uh, Pa, listen to the contrast between P and P A. But But but, uh, uh, uh listen to the following word using p up, pay down, paid a pair that Okay, so let's practice saying this word Repeat after me. I had, uh, had I I had, uh that was great world on Let's now compare p and p up The English P is a voiceless continent and is moderately aspirated. So with P is a pack. On the other hand, the Korean Pierre is a similar kind of sound. It's a voiceless continent, but it's more heavily aspirated than P. So with Pierre is huh? Huh? Huh As with the other continents, we have learned so far the degree off aspiration between P and P up is very slight. So again, it's not something you need to make an effort to distinguish too much. Listen to the following word Using P up, PETA paid out panda. Okay, so let's now do a minimal pair Practice with PETA and Peta. Repeat after me had Pedder I had pedal had I Pedder excellent job owed on the final constant in this lesson is sang beer. Sang beom is a tense continent, so like other tens continents, the muscles around your lips should be tense at the starting position and the release off that closure should be sharp. So it's but But but and just like other tense continents. Sang beom is a voiceless continent and it's not aspirated. Atal, listen to the following word. Using sang beer bad that bad? That better. Okay, so let's now do a speaking practice with the continent's P up. P up and sang be up. Repeat after me pay that Pedder bad that pay that Pedder bad that pay that peta bad that excellent doctor I rode on. Let's move on to the practice session In this practice, you're going to practice the continent sounds from this lesson in minimal pairs and also one long practice at the end with all three continents there are four practices in total and will begin with p up and peer put poor p p paid there peta pan pen porn palm poor poor pound bung poem bone paid I bed I p be fuller Poon bed peta be p Boehm palm by that paid, uh, put poor good paid I peta Beida p p be poem Palm Balm. They told us How does a Sir Thomas you gonna to my neck area? Okay, so today we learned how to pronounce the continent's peep Peep and sang beom In the next lesson, we're going to learn how the constant Pierre becomes a voiced, be sounding Korean. So Susan again in that lesson, but by 14. ㅂ voiced B sound: Hi, everyone, and welcome back in this lesson We're going to learn how peer becomes a voice to be sounding career similar to what we learned with Cheok and ticket. When Pierre is positioned after a voice sound that is a vow sound or after the continent's BM being young and liel, it becomes a voice to be sound. Here are few examples off p up following a vowel sound Yobo Yobo Not be not be Tapia tabular. So, as you could hear, the pube in the second syllable becomes a voiced be sound due to the first syllable, ending with a vow which is a voice sound. So they are yobbo, Garbey and tabular. Let's practice saying that Repeat after me. Yellow Bull not be Tapia. That was great. Swole done. Let's now look at the second pattern. Listen to the people that follows the continent's BM Dian Dian and Leah Hambor Hambor. Some bear some bear tumble tumble. I buy. I buy. In these examples, Peer follows one of the four voice continents bm Deion young or earlier. So the P it becomes a voice to be sound also in the second example, and we will go into this in more detail when we go through connected speech. But when the in comes before appear, it is pronounced as a medium. So this is not pronounced sun bear sun bear, but it's some bear some bear. We will look into this pattern in much more detail in the unit on connected speech. Okay, so let's do a speaking practice on this pattern. Repeat after me, Palm Bay, some Bay Tom Bull I, uh that was great. Swell. Done. Let's move on to the practice session we're going to do to practices and they are based on the two pronunciation patterns where Pierre becomes a voice to be sound. So if you're ready, will begin with the first practice. Yelp Bowl Bull bum. Too bad Sabam, Our body combo Young bull, Some bay timber durable. So was this a media come promising attacks? Human nail. Okay, so today we learned how the constant Pierre becomes a voice to be sound. In the next lesson, we're going to learn how the continent's P up pube and sang be up pronounced as patch him So Susan again in the next lesson. But by 15. ㅂㅍㅃ 받침: hi, everyone. So in this lesson, we're going to learn how to pronounce peer p up and sang beer as patch in. Firstly, Sang beom is not used as a pattern, So we're going to focus on P up and p up when we use pube and peer as pat him, they become unreleased p up sounds remember that the starting position off pube and Pierre is the closure off the lips and that's where the sound stops. The closure isn't released. Here are a few examples It it it it Keep that eat that cupped, uh, cut that. So as you could hear, both pupil and people are unreleased peep sounds. So the lips are closed at the end off the words this unreleased peeps and occurs at the end of words or before a constant other than an young or hear it. Okay, so let's practice saying these words that use puke and pee up as unreleased peep sounds. He eat that cup there. That was great. Well done. Now let's consider how these patterns sounds and linked to the following syllable that begins with a constant year. And as with the continents, we have learned so far they follow to patterns. First, If the pupil or the pier Batam are followed by an ounce off jobs that begin with an E incontinent, then the unreleased peep sound carries over to become a voice to be sound. Here are some examples. Poppy Soya poppy, Celje, E v SIA e b SIA Boudou, Bonnie A Pyro Boudou Bonnie A pyre. Now the first example is not a significant as the patching is already a B continent. But in the second example, the word that follows the pew Pattyn is a verb. So the unreleased B sound carries over, so this is pronounced E b soya e B SIA. In the third example, the pier button is followed by a noun on. So again, the unreleased B sound that carries over. So this is pronounced brew Bonnie a pyro buh bunny a pyre. Okay, so let's do a speaking practice where the unreleased B sound carries over. Repeat after me Poppy Celje E v SIA Boudou Bania pyre. That was excellent. Well done. Let's now look at the second pattern, similar to what we learned before with the other continents, the pube and peer Batam maintained their basic sounds when the preceding syllable is a particle or a verb Suffix. Here are some examples e by our e bio cap i o Coppolillo. He put you casa. He put you got CYO. So in the first exam port the verbs them eat is used with the suffix oil. So the pew patching maintains its basic sound. So it's e bio e by your in the second example, develops them Cap is used with a verb suffix io. So the pier Batam maintains its basic sound. So this is pronounced Cappio Cap I o. In the final example, Ip is used with a topic particle in So in this case, the pier Batam maintains its basic sound. So it's pronounced he put into God's Soyo he put into Casio. However, when Pierre bottom is used with particles, some Koreans still used the unreleased pube sound rather than the basic p sound. So many Koreans might say this sentence as even to go so And although this is not correct, it's commonly said in this way in everyday career. Okay, so let's now do a speaking practice that follow this pattern. Repeat after me e bio cap i o e print yoga Seo Great efforts world on. Let's move on to the practice session. In this practice, we're going to do three listener repeat practices off pronouncing pupil and pupil as patch him. As always, this practice is with meaner. So if you're ready, will begin with the first practice jury Buddha top that. Keep that K pop e bill Pay cape about Ohio e b sile suban A sale No peo help polio. He'd be call you supplemental Gay Sile greater today Well done till my talent just so I can promise you gonna ties human now. Okay, so today we learn how popup up and Sang beom are pronounced as patch him and how they're pronounced in linking sounds. The next lesson is a review lesson and we're going to review everything we learn on the peep, peep and sang be of continents. So I'll see you soon in that lesson. But why 16. ㅂㅍㅃ Review: poor Putin P P paid there Paid I pan pen porn palm poor poor pound balm palm bone paid I bad guy p be fuller Poon bed there peta be p boom palm by that paid a poor poor good paid i PETA Bay that p p be Pullman poem Boom Yelp bowl bull bum Go back It's happened Our body tumble Young bull some bay timber Adorable Jury Buddha Tap that Keep that k pop e bill pay que pebereau e b sile suban a soil No peo top polio e p call you super anti gay sile. 17. ㅈㅊㅉ Basic sound: hi, everyone and welcome back. So in this lecture, we're going to learn how to pronounce the continent's Teoh tear and sandy it. So by now you've probably noticed a certain pattern toe. How these continents sets are working and tear cheered and sandy. It also follow the same pattern. First, a starting position off cheer, cheer and Sandia constants are similar to teeger Tear and sang again, but the blade off the tongue is positioned a little further behind the upper front teeth, and this forms a closure, and this closure is released just slightly to let the air out and produce the sound in this way. Tear tear Sanjay, it sounds, are produced in a similar way to J and C eight sounds in English. Let's now consider the differences between the English and Korean continents. First we have t it, and Jay Jay is a voice continent, so the sound is produced with vocal cord vibration, and there is hardly any aspiration. So it's do you? Yeah, however tiered is a voiceless continent, and the sound is produced with no vocal cord vibration, meaning that we make the sound somewhere around the front. Off the mouth also there is mild aspiration which gives tear a hint off ch sound. So it's here. Yeah. Uh, listen to the to contrast. Yeah. Teoh Teoh Teoh, listen to the following word using tear Tam. Tom Tom, Let's now do a speaking practice off this word. Repeat after me. 10 Tan Tan. That was great. Swot done. Let's now look at the cheered and ch comparison. The English C eight is a voiceless continent and is moderately aspirated. So ch is too to To she it is a similar kind of sound. It's a voiceless continent, but it's more heavily aspirated than ch sound. So chit is too to to now similar to the other continents we have learned in this course, The distinction between CH and cheered is very subtle. So it's not something we need to work on to distinguish the sounds. Listen to the following word using TCI it TEM TEM TEM. Okay, so let's now do a minimal pair practice with Tom and Tim. Repeat after me can 10 10 10 can 10. That was great, Baudone. The final constant in this lesson is Sandhya. Sanjay. It is a tense continent. So as we have learned where the other tense continents. The muscles are much more tense at the starting position and the release off the closure is much sharper. So it's Yeah, yeah, Sandy, It is a voiceless continent, and it's not aspirated. Listen to the following word using Sandy it, Tim. Tim them. Okay, so let's now do a speaking practice with Tam, Tim, and some Repeat after me. Tam TEM some Tom TEM Dumb Tom TEM Damn great effort today World on Let's do the practice. Okay, so in this practice, you're going to practice the constant sounds from this lesson in three minimal pair practice. And as before, there is one long practice at the end will begin with cheered and cheered Town. Yeah. 10. 10 team. Tim Tad, I chad to that to that. Yeah, Dad. Tom Down team. Tim! Tada! Dad, I t did. I did that, Dad. Uh damn. 10 dim Tim. Dad, that it's had that Dida see there? Uh, yeah. Duh Tom TEM Dem Tim Tim Tim Tada Taba Dada. Good job today Told my cell is a cell from Paris Granito Maneka. Okay, so today we learned the basic sounds of the continent's t It cheered and sandy it in the next lesson, we're going to learn how the continent here becomes a voiced J sound in Korea. So Susan again, in that lesson, but why? 18. ㅈ voiced J sound: Hi, then welcome back. So in this lesson, we're going to learn how t it becomes a voiced J sound in English, similar to the previous continents that change into voice sounds. That year, Continent becomes a voiced J sound when its position after a vow sound or after continents bm, Deion Young and Lear. Here are a few examples off Cheered following vowel sounds. Listen to how the second tier becomes a voice j sound charger charger saga saga toward Jaggi towards Aggie. In each of these examples, that cheered follows a vow sound and in this pattern that she it becomes a voiced j sound. Okay, so let's do a speaking practice following this pattern. Tajae Sada towards Aggie. That was great. Low done. Let's now look at the second pattern where Cheered follows one of the voice continents bm dy in Young or Leo Kanda Kanda Mind Joke Man Joe Song Jail Song, Jer Carton Heighten. Okay, So in these examples that she had follows one of the four voice continents medium the yin yang, or leer, so that she it becomes a voice to chase sound. However, in the last example, the cheered is pronounced as a tense Sandhya sound, and this can happen when she had follows a little batch in. Here are a few more examples off this pattern. PIJ on page on Berry Jon, Barry, John So, as you could hear, the cheers is pronounced as a sandy. It sound, but do keep in mind that this only happens within a single word in words like Pareja and Kijiji. These a verb stems combined with suffixes, and in these patterns, the second tier is pronounced as a voice That J sound now lacks continents. Being pronounced as tens continents is something we were going to in much more detail in the unit on connected speech. Okay, so let's now do a speaking practice off this pattern. Remember to pronounce teared as Sandy it in the world. Cajun. Let's begin, Kamdar Mine. Joe Salinger Chitin. Excellent effort World on. Let's move on to the practice session we will do to practices, and they are based on the two patterns we have learned on t it becoming a voice to J sound . So if you're ready, let's begin the practice. Sadah cheating. Would you? Yours in poor Jaggi, Come down comes in on done tone deaf. Sorry, don't. So much has also come times you're gonna die semen now. Okay, so in this lesson, we learn how the voiceless cheer sound becomes a voice J sounding Korean. In the next lesson, we're going to learn how to pronounce Chip cheered and sang ship as pat him. So I'll see you soon again in that lesson, But why? 19. ㅈㅊㅉ 받침: hi there. So in this lesson, we're going to learn how to pronounce to you cheered and sandy it as patching. Firstly, Sanjay, it is not used as a pattern, but we do use cheered and cheered as patron. When we used tear and tear as patch him, they become unreleased ticket sounds. Remember that the starting position off, cheered and cheered is similar to pick it. The plate of the tongue is positioned a little behind the front upper teeth to former closure, and that's where the sound stops. The closure is not released. Here are a few examples. Pete, Pete, Pete Cool, Go it That it that so I should could hear. Both cheer and cheer are unreleased Tigger sounds, and in some ways we can also think of them as the English T sound as in Bit and got these unreleased Iger sounds happen at the end of words all before constant other than you or hear it. Okay, so let's first to a speaking practice off these phrases, Pete, go it die excellent your world on. Let's now consider how these patch him sounds linked to the following syllable when the syllable begins with an E in constant similar to the other continents we have learned in this course, there are two patterns to follow. The first is when cheered and chip but him come before a bob or a noun. Listen to the following examples. Pete Upside Pete Upside Gordon Gordon. So in the first example, Gee, it But him in the first word carries over to the following Bob as an unreleased ticket sound and becomes a voiced D sound. So this is pronounced Pete up Sile, Pete up CYO. And in the second example, the unreleased ticket sound carries over to the noun and becomes a voice that d sound. So it's Gordon. Go then. Okay, so let's first to a speaking practice following this pattern. Repeat after me. Pete up, sire. Go then. Chad is Celje. Excellent job. Well done. Let's now look at the second pattern. Tears and cheers. But him maintained their basic sounds when they're followed by particles or verb suffixes. Here are some examples Pizzey paga Pizzey paddock i o p. Diddy got peo Peter got peo each ir each I, uh so in this first example cheer batam is followed by the particle e and in the second example to you, Pat him is followed by the particle. So they're pronounced PT and Peter however, do know that sometimes Koreans read PJ as Pisa. And although this is not the correct way of pronouncing this combination in spoken Korean, some people do say this in this way. And in the final example, the verbs. Then it is followed by the suffix Are you? So we pronounce this as each I owe each other. Okay, so with that in mind, let's now do a speaking practice off this second pattern. Repeat after me. Pizzey by a guy. Oh, Peter got piau each io Excellent job. Load on. Let's now move on to the practice session In this practice, we're going to do three listener repeat practices or reading Cheered and Cheered Button. As always, this practice is with Mina. So if you're ready, let's begin the practice p build that Ted that cut the go, then build our Pete up style Daddy coil Good t a bio pizza pie. Chiyo That's a hiss Soil p d by nail. They wouldn't go cruising Banya just so Grandpa Michigan. It has him. And now Okay, so today we learned how to pronounce, cheered and cheered as patch in and how they linked to the following syllable that begins with a constant here. The next lesson is a review lesson, and we're going to review everything we learned on Cheered Cheer and Sandia continents. So our Susan again in that lesson. But why? 20. ㅈㅊㅉ Review: town. 10. 10. 10 team. Tim Tad, I Chad that to that. Took that. Yeah, Dad. Tom Down team. Tim Tada! Dad, I t do that. Did that. Dad? Yeah, Down, Tom! Dim tin Dad that it's had that. Did that. See that? Uh, Tara Dad. Tom TEM Dem Tim Tim Tim Tada Taba Dada Sadah Cheating Would you yours in poor Jackie, Come down Comes in on done doom that. Sorry, don't p build that, Ted, that cut the cool, then build our Pete up. Sile that big oil Good t a bio pizza pie. Kyle, That's a hiss Soil P d by nail. 21. ㅅㅆ Basic sound: hi there. So in this lesson, we're going to learn how to pronounce the Korean constant shock and sanction. Distinguishing between these two continents sounds can often prove to be very difficult for many Korean learners. However, what proves to be more difficult for many people is the standard Korean shield rather than the Sang shot. If you think about the sound of s in English, it's actually always pronounced as sang shot when it's used with vowels. Here are some examples soul So satin Satyan sell. So so in these words, that s sounds starts by closing the teeth together, but not completely. And then you raise the tongue onto the roof off the mouth. However, your tongue shouldn't touch the roof of the mouth. And this leaves a partial opening for the air to flow through the flow of air. Passing through this narrow passage is what makes the hissing sound. So it's But from here there is a sharp release off the tongue and the teeth. So we say, sir. So So it's sore satin sell. So when s is used with vows, it sound is very similar to the Korean Sang shot. However, when s is used in constant clusters. As in groups of Constance. Together they're pronounced more like the Korean Shield. Here are some examples. Smile, smile, slide, slide. Spice, Spice. So, as in these words when s is used in constant clusters is pronounced in a sound that's more similar to shop than sanctions. Okay, so let's now consider how we pronounce shot and sanction. Firstly, like the English s both shot and sang shot are voiceless continents. So neither sounds are produced with vocal cord vibration. And like s the sounds are produced by closing the teeth together, but not completely, and then raising the tongue onto the roof off the mouth. This forms a partial closure, and the flow of air passing through this narrow passage makes the hissing sound. And the key difference between shield and sang shot is the tenseness shot is a lax continent. So is produced in a relaxed way. Listen to these example words using shop some some it's hard. Uh, Saad, uh, Sire, Silent. So, as you can hear, it doesn't have that tense Sang shil sound. So they sound is similar to the s found in constant clusters in English. Let's first practice saying these words Repeat after me Some Sada. So that was great. Well done. Let's now look at the tense constant sang shot. Now, as Sang Short is a tense continent right from the starting position. The muscles are much more tense around the vocal tract and the closure is released much more forcefully. So Sang shot is Here are some example was using sang shot some some Sada Sada. So sad. Okay, so let's now do a minimal pair. Practice with shell and sang show. Repeat after me some son Sada. Sada, Sire. Son. Excellent effort today. Well done. Let's now move on to the practice session. In this final practice, we're going to do one long practice off shot and sang shot in minimal pairs. So let's not waste any more time and begin the practice. This practice is with me now as a ways Hi, Sad some some It's all so hung San Kozel Castle. So soglio. So soil. I pass oil. I passed Soyo. The weather is a cell from promising and into my nail. Okay, so in this lesson we learned the basic sounds of the Korean continents shield and sang shot in the next lesson we're going to learn how she hot can be pronounced like Shh, sound in English. So I'll see you soon in that lesson, but by 22. ㅅ SH sound: Hi there. So in this lesson, we're going to learn how the Korean consonant shield is pronounced as a sound similar to the SH sound in English. Now, it's important to note that when shield is pronounced like an SH sound, it's like an SH sound and not exactly like the SH sound. When we made the SH sound in English, our lips come in and make a round shape. So it's ssh. She. However, with the Korean SH, like she ought, we still maintain the same position as the other Shield sounds. The End of lips spread out and we say, so is listen to the following pair of words. She, she, she, she. Some of the differences in the lip positioning is related to the differences in vowel sounds. But the shape of the lips is more rounded with the English SH sound at the beginning of xi. And when Korean shield sounds like an SH sound, the lips spread apart and the mouth doesn't open up as much. Okay, so with that in mind, let's now look at some examples of Chios being pronounced like an SH sound. And then we'll explain when we pronounce shot like this. And here are some example was she, she masses saw, masses saw Marsha, Marsha your channel, channel. Ship, that ship that. She goes ship there. She goes ship that. So first we pronounce shield like an SH sound when it's used with the vowel e. So it's x0 and bashes saw. And even in this last example, we have a ship that, where shield is used with a vowel e. Secondly, we pronounced shield like an SH sound when it's used with why Glide vowels. And here we have two examples. But why Glide vowels would include, yeah, your, your, you, yea and yey. Finally, we pronounce Shield as an SH sound when it's used with a vowel, we so is shipped there. And she goes ship that. The sound of the vowel we is generally quite weak and is often pronounced more like an E vowel. And this is something we will go into in more detail when we look at vowel sounds. Okay, so with those rules in mind, let's now do a speaking practice of these phrases. Repeat after me. She masses saw varchar, Shannon ship that. She goes ship that great job, well-done. Let's move on to the practice session. Think about the three rules where shield sounds like an SH sound is when she ought is used with a vowel, e, when it's used with why Glide vowels. And also when it's used with a vowel, we, this practice is with. So if you're ready, let's begin the practice. Sinbad. Creasing. Helping Xiao Xin. He he that comes out of hazard on the ground housing and okay, so in this lesson, we'll learn how to pronounce he'll like an SH sound in Korean. In the next lesson, we're going to learn how to pronounce. She sang shot as pattern. So I'll see you soon in that lesson. But why? 23. ㅅㅆ 받침: hi, everyone. So in this lecture, we're going to learn how to pronounce Shield and Sang Chul as pattern now, although she ought and Sang Shil sounds are produced with a narrow opening in the mouth. When we use these continents as patch in the air flow must be fully blocked and this results in an unreleased A ticket sound. So the tip of the tongue is positioned behind the upper front teeth. Here are some example phrases or or put put. Not that Not that not that Not that so in ALS. These examples, both shot and Sang's Your Pattyn, are pronounced as unreleased ticket sounds. These unreleased Tigger sounds happen at the end of words and also before constant other than you or hit. Now. In this course, there are some pattern sounds still to go over, but the patch him, we have learned so far can be summarized in this way so these 11 continents can be categorized into three kinds of unreleased sounds. Pube, Peak it and Cheok. Now there is a resource sheet with this table, which you can refer to for further self study, and this table will be useful later. When we learn about connected speech. For now, let's first to a speaking practice off using shield and sang shot as patching. Repeat after me or put Not that not that greater wot done. Let's now look at how shield and Sang's Your Pattern linked to the following syllable when it begins with a constant here, as with the other pattern we have learned in this course shot and sang shot linked to the following syllable in two ways. First, if the following word is a verb or noun with an Ian Constant, then the unreleased he good sound carries over and becomes a voiced D sound. Here are a couple of examples or desire or the sire Todd I. Todd. I So in this first example, the word after the patch in is of ob. So the unreleased Tigger sound carries over, and this is pronounced or decir or desire. And in the second example, the following word is a noun. I. So the unreleased Tyga sound carries over, and this is pronounced Saudi today. Okay, so let's first to a speaking practice following this pattern. Repeat after me or Desire Todd I, Chaddy Celje Greater World on. Let's now look at the second pattern. She'll and Sang's Your Pattern maintained their basic sounds when they're followed by particles or verb suffixes. Here are some examples or c yet by our always See it by our Pucillo SIA, Pucillo, SIA Pass ilya past soil. So in the 1st 2 examples, the Schioppa Tim is followed by two particles E N little. And in these instances, the basic sound off shot carries over. So we say all she apoyo and put zero SIA. And in the third example, the Sang Shil patching is followed by a verb suffix or you, and in this instance, the basic sound off sang short carries over to the following syllable. So this is pronounced pass oil pass oil. There are, however, certain exceptions to these rules. For example, this word means to be delicious, and Matt is a noun, and Soyo is of ob, so they should follow the first pattern where the unreleased, eager sound carries over. So it should be body, soil, body soil. However, because Basseterre itself is commonly used more like a descriptive Erben, everyday Korean in everyday speech bashes, soil is actually more common than body soil. Nevertheless, most she up and sang is your patch him? Do follow the patterns we have highlighted in this lesson. Okay, so let's now do a speaking practice off this second pattern. Repeat after me or C yet by our Lucido SIA pass Oyo Great job owed on. Let's now move on to the practice session. In this practice, we're going to do three listener repeat practices off reading shield and sang shot as pattern. As always, this practice is with Meena. So if you're ready, let's begin the practice. Mont Matt Court What the said that mold up soil My data Kugel Dan a kugel that a Bala stated polio cu goes a while, see Bay West soil. Eco's has Symone hail him that is just attended to almost double Bonanza style. Sometimes it does take a up. Okay, so today we learned how to pronounce she up and Cingular as Patch in. The next lesson is a review lesson, and we're going to review everything learned in the previous three lessons on the constant shot and sank shot. So our Susan in that lesson, But by 24. ㅅㅆ Review: so I So some some It's all so sound Sung Kozel Castle So soglio So soil I pass oil I passed Soyo Cynda assassinated Crease in Cheil Show Ping shall wall seen see Shida But Matt called. What? That sad huh? Mode up Sile My data Kugel Dan a kugel that a Bala stated Polio. Google's a while. See Bay West soil. Eco's has Symone Hail. 25. ㅎㅇ Basic sound: Hi everyone and welcome back. So in this lesson, we're going to learn how to pronounce the Korean consonants here and Yang. And we'll also look at how Ian is used as a pattern. First, the way here sound is produced is the same as the English age. The vocal cords are partially closed and we simply allow the air to pass through. And even, as you may know already, is what we referred to as a place holder. As Korean syllables cannot begin with vowels. So here effectively functions as a consonant to allow words to begin with vowel sounds. Here are a few example was using these consonants. Him, him. How goal, how goal. So, so jag rule, Iago, Ollie, Ollie, Auden. Auden. So in the first three examples, we have the chorion here, which is sounded like the English h sound. When here is used in the first syllable, the sound is very clear. But when it's used in second or third syllables, the sound weakens. We will look into this in more detail when we go through connected speech. In the last three examples that Ian effectively functions like a place holder, only allowing the vowels to be sounded. And in effect, this example only is made up of only vowel sounds. Okay, so let's now do a speaking practice of these words that use the consonants here. And you can repeat after me. Him. Hi, goal. So our Iago order. That was great. Well done. Let's now look at how Ian is used as patching. Now, in terms of patching is quite straightforward. Even functions in the same way as mg in English. It's a nasal sound, and this means that the vibrating air passes through the nose rather than through the mouth. Here are some example words that use even as Patch him. Yang, Yang, Su, Yang Su Yang, Yang Zhang Kuang Dang. So it's pretty straightforward. When Ian is used as a patch him it equates to an NG sound in English. Now here, on the other hand, is a lot more complicated when it's used as a patch him. So we'll cover how here is used as Patch him in detail over the next two lessons. Let's now do a speaking practice of these words that use year as patched him. Repeat after me. So Yang Huan Dang. Fantastic job, well done. Let's now move on to the practice session. In this practice will first practice the basic sounds of here and young. And then we'll practice the E and M. So if you're ready, let's start the practice. Had gill Hen law. Hello? Yeah. Yeah. Way. Pan. Yeah, man. Puma. When it's on my server Manager Korea plant. Okay, so in this lesson, we learned the basic sounds or the consonants here and young. And we also looked at how Ian is used as patchy him. In the next lesson, we're going to learn how heat is used as patching. So I'll see you soon in that lesson. Bye bye. 26. ㅎ 받침: Hi, everyone. And welcome back in this lecture, we're going to learn how here is used as patch in. Now the biggest effects here it has as patch him is how he combines with other continents nearby to make those continents aspirated sounds. However, since that such a big topic will leave that to the end and in this lesson will consider three other ways. Here bottom is used first. If the syllable after the here begins with an Ian Constant, then the here constant is dropped entirely. Here are few example words. So why you tu y yo the woman doorman dialling now and so in each of these phrases here but him is followed by the Ian Continent and in this case, the here button is dropped. So these words pronounced Joyo, Doman and island less first to a speaking practice following this pattern. Repeat after me two y o dorman, 91 That was great. Wot done. Let's now look at the second use off here as pattern. Now another common pattern we see with here but him is that when the syllable after begins with a shot, then the shield sound becomes a tense continent sang she'll sound. Here are a few examples. Cool. Awesome Nida Cool! Awesome Nida past Saudi past Saudi Monsen Nida buying Cimini die. So in these examples, that shot in the syllable after the here But him becomes a tense, constant Cingular sound And this also happens in the last example with help patch in. So these words are pronounced could awesome Nida past Saudi Bronson Nida Okay, so let's now do a speaking practice off this second pattern. Repeat after me could awesome need I past Saudi Monsen Nida Great job! Well done. Let's now look at the third use off here as pat him. Lastly, if the syllable after the here Pattyn begins with a knee incontinent then the here button takes on the knee and sound. Here are a few examples to nail till Nao could on Nyayo could on no son and God Sundin God . So in each of these phrases the here patch it is followed by an Ian and as a result, the here takes on a knee and sound So they're pronounced as to Nao could on Ohio and Sundin God, Now this is what we call nasal ization, which is when a nasal sound such as Nian changes other sounds nearby. This is quite common in Korea language, and we'll deal with this in more detail in the unit on connected speech. But first, let's do a speaking practice off this last pattern. Repeat after me. Chill. Nail could on Nyayo son and got great job. Well done. Let's move on to the practice session. In this practice, we're going to do three practices, and each practice is based on the three pronunciation patterns we have seen in this lesson . So let's not waste any more time and begin with the first practice. CIDA. Dolan No, I o tunes. Adam Paris, Amita SAS. Amita to Sumida Serious Soul Sunday known then Bhuiyan Nay, Buy a gun. Nay, when you do causing body. And just so sometimes in Manitoba now, in this lesson, we learn three different ways of pronouncing here as pat him in Korea. In the next lesson, we're going to learn how here combines with other continents nearby to form heavily aspirated sounds. So I'll see you soon in that lesson. But why 27. ㅎ Aspirated sound: Hi, everyone. So in this lecture we're going to learn how they're here. Batam combines with nearby continents to form aspirated sounds. When here. But Jim is followed by certain constants here combines with the continent that follows to become heavily aspirated sounds. So he had combines with Chiat to become a cheick sound. It combines with Digger to become a t it sound any combines with cheered to become a t it sound. And although he had also combines with P up to become a peep sound, there is no combination where here But him is followed by a peep sound. Let's take a look at some examples could okay, could Okay Kudat time Kudat tie I could not see Kudat see So as you could hear, care becomes K car becomes tar and G becomes CI. Okay, so let's first to a speaking practice off this first pattern. Repeat after me could Okay, Kudat time Kudat See Great oboe Done Not for these combinations to occur. The huge Batam doesn't always have to come first. In fact, Chiat, t good p up anti. It can be followed by here to form same heavily aspirated sounds. Here are some examples. E kita iki die by tone but young Thida taught Sida could pee, could pee. So, as you can see from these examples here can be positioned behind these four continents and they can still combine to form heavily aspirated sounds. However, if you recall an earlier lesson on ticket and tiered, pat him. We mentioned that T good pattern is pronounced as a t it when the following syllable is e Therefore in this world, when this ticket Batam combines with a here in the following syllable because of the vow e the sound that's produced is t it rather than t it as the combination that happens is between t it and hit. So this word is pronounced boo Cheetah would see that So be mindful off this pattern also. Okay, so let's now do a speaking practice off this second pattern and will also practice the word boo cheetah Repeat after me e key die But young taught CDA I could pee Bucci die Fantastic efforts Well done. Now, as we have seen already with Butch Ada, that combination that takes place is not necessarily all about the pattern itself. It's more to do with the sound that's produced with the patch in. So another way of forming aspirated sound is with other unreleased ticket sounds, which happens when these continents are used as Patch him. When he had combines with these unreleased ticket sounds, it becomes a T. It sound. Here are some examples. Go Otago, Otago. That's our goal, not Toggle or Tambor or Tambo. Gauteng G. Gauteng G. In the 1st 2 examples that she had NT, it are unreleased ticket sounds. So they combined with here to produce t it sound. So they pronounced Got Taco and that tackle Now. Earlier, we learned that in Tschida Jupiter, Tim combines with here to form a cheer sound, and this happens when the combination occurs between the verb stem and its suffix. However, in this example, the unreleased ticket sound combines with here to become a tear sound, and this occurs when the combination is between a noun and another word, such as a particle, as in this example, in the third and fourth examples, the unreleased Tigger combines with here in the following words, which announced. So these phrases a pronounced or Tambo and Gauteng G Okay, so let's now do a speaking practice off this pattern. Otago not toggle or timber. Gauteng G. Excellent work. Well done. The final way here combines with other continents to form heavily aspirated sounds is with capital. Here are a couple of examples. Manti. Oh, Manziel, I don't see that anti die. So in these examples they're here or the tear in the capital m combined with here or that year in the following syllable to form CI it. So they're pronounced Bonci Oh, and and cheetah when continents in carpets in combined with the following confidence, it's always the second continent that combines with the following constant letter. Here are two more examples Uchida could keep that dopey di no Peter. This time Chiat combines with here to become a cheick sound and p up combines with here to become a peep sound. Okay, so let's now do a speaking practice off these words that use cup at him. Repeat after me. Mild CEO. I don't see that. Could you keep that? No. P die. Excellent job, Odone. Let's now move on to the practice session. There are four practices in this session, each one related to one of the four patterns where here combines with nearby sounds to become an aspirated sound. Okay, so if you're ready, let's begin with the 1st 1 to a toggle I could not see. No Kula Pat Sida pop Our goal had to that saying, You two, Kale, don't be too citta. Get good tale Otago Kada Door. It'll boo tail Syrian path. Pioppi, Ada, Chicago Clinton, Timon Multi and total him did it just attended to almost double Bonanza style. Sometimes it does take a up. Okay, so in this lesson, we learned how the continent here combines with other nearby continents to form aspirated sounds. The next lesson is a review lesson on. We're going to review everything we learn on the continents young and he it. So I'll see you soon again in that lesson, but by 28. ㅎㅇ Review: hot Gil him A who to On my Yoda. Yeah. Way. Kung Huaorani tung ma coy ham. Yeah, Among Puma lol cida Nolan No, i o tunes Adam Paris Amita sas Amita to see me that serious soul Sunday known then Bhuiyan Nay buy a gun day to tackle I could not see No Kula Pat Sida Pap Our goal Ted, to that saying you two kale, don't be too citta Get good tale Otago Kada Dorial boo tail Syrian path para pita Who cargo? Clinton T man multi and total. 29. ㅁㄴ Basic sound: Hi, everyone, and welcome back in this lesson. We're going to learn the basic sounds of the continent's beom Andean, and we'll also look at how they're used as pattern. Beom Indian are similar to the English EM and end bm Indian are both voiced nasal sounds and this means that air passes through the nose rather than through the mouth. With me in the lips are firmly pressed together and then this is released to make the sound . So it's ma. Ma, on the other hand, with me in the blade of the tongue, touches the space just behind the front operative. And then this is released to make the sound. So it's no, no, no. However, don't worry about remembering the specifics of where the sound is produced as BM Indian sounds are very similar to the M and N in English. Here are some example words using BM Andean by so by so Omani All money do go do go on a on there. So as you could hear the sound off BM Indian are pretty straightforward as they're similar to the M and N in English. Let's first to a speaking practice all these words that use bm endia Repeat after me, my suit Oh money do go on a greater world on Let's now consider how beom Indian are used as patch in. Now when bm Indian are used as patch him, they're generally used in the same way as M and N in English here. Awesome example Was that used? Beom Indian asked Ezchip all my desire on this higher more May Boorman on J one day, Pawnee Pawnee So in each of these phrases, BM Indian are used in a similar way to English continents and end. And if the following syllable begins with an E incontinent the basic sound of the patch him carries over. So these are pronounced warm, a warmer and pani pani. Nevertheless, depending on what sounds a nearby, the sound off bm Andean can change. And as we learned before in the world, some bear D and changes to be, um and there are a lot of different combinations that can affect this, and we'll deal with this in more detail. When we look at connected speech later, let's first to a speaking practice off using BM Andean as patch in. Repeat after me homicide Bull man on day. Pani. Great job world on Let's move on to the practice session in this practice will first practice the basic sounds off bm Indian, and then we'll practice how they're used as pattern. So if you're ready, let's begin with the first practice. My name. Palmer. It's Hamlin. Negga tan. Yo, Kambanda. Simms are commune. Um, man Ton do Yeah, on a they wouldn't go suburban. Yes, from Tom Sanitizing. Okay, so today we learned the basic sounds of the continent's B M nd in, and we also looked at how they're used as pattern. In the next lesson, we're going to learn about the Korean constant, Leah. So I'll see you soon in that lesson, but by 30. ㄹ Basic sound: hi, everyone. So in this lesson, we're going to look at how we produce the constant Sound Lear and how it's used as pat him . The sound of Lear changes depending on other sounds nearby, but let's first consider how it can sound similar to the English L First, the sounds of leer and the English l are similar to each other, and here we're referring to the light. L sound in worse, like light and late for your reference in English. We different shade the L used in front of words such as light and late from the dark l used at the end of words such as ball and power. There is, however, a slight difference in the tongue position between Lille and L. With L. The tongue is positioned right behind the teeth, whereas with real, the tip of the tongue is position a little further back. Now, the Lear sound is similar to the light l sound when it's used as the first constant in a word, and when it's used as a pattern, here are some example words. Limey on lime. Yon pilot are piled I blue poor. So in the first word, Lille is the first continent in the world, and this sound is similar to the L Sound in English. However, not many Korean was. Begin with Leo and those that to tend to be loan words from English such as Large Your and Lemon. Then in the last two words, Lear is used as patch in, and they're also similar to the light. L sound as the tongue position finishes with a tip of the tongue touching the roof off the mouth rather than just hanging in the middle of the mouth like dark elves in English. Okay, so let's first to a speaking practice off using Lear like the L Sound in English. Lanyon Pirated I blue. That was great. Well done. Let's now look at another way off using leered now, Lira can sound like the R sound in Japanese. Worst like your do when it's used between vowels. Here are some example Waas Call it a call it a hudl hadel in the first word. Lille is used between the vows all and a, and the sound of Lille is similar to the R sound in Japanese words like Euro. Now it's important to note that this use off Lear is very different from the English are sound, which is made by curling our tongue backwards. When career Lear sound is used in this way, the tongue moves back a little further, but it's still touches the roof off the mouth, and this is a key distinction between Lear used in this way, and the English are sound in the second World. Lille is used between the vows are, and so the sound is again similar to the R sound in Japanese. Let's listen to a few other examples. B day be there Saudi, Saudi tal. You'll taleggio. So in each of these examples, Leo is used between two vows, and the sound is similar to the R sound in Japanese worst like Euro. However, this lira sound can also be found in the first syllable for Lille itself and also other loan words such as liberal. Okay, so let's now do a speaking practice off pronouncing leer in this way. Repeat after me called a hudl Meet a 40 taleggio. That was excellent. Swoboda. Let's move on to the practice session in this practice, we're going to do to speaking practices, the first on pronouncing Lear like the light. L sound in English. And the second where Lily is positioned between two vowels and the sound is similar to the R sound in Japanese words. Okay, So if you're ready, let's begin with the first practice load day. Lego Ty soared. I did that could be body paddle. Sooty Adah battered. I Siegel had that. So was this a media come promising attacks? Human nail. Okay, so in this lesson, we learned how to pronounce the Korean constant sound. Lille, Like the light l sound in English and also like the r sound found in Japanese words. The next lesson is a review lesson, and we're going to review everything we learned on the constant sounds bm Deion and Leer. So our season in that lesson, But why? 31. ㅁㄴㄹ Review: my new Palmer Hamlin Negga tan yo Hamda Simms are commune. Um man ton do Yeah. On a load day Lego tied soul I would die. Could be body paddle. Sorry. Adah batted. I Siegel had that. 32. 겹받침 1: Hi then welcome back. Now, over the next two lessons, we're going to learn the pronunciation rules off Cup Batam now cop in cup. But Tim means layer in Korean and culpa TEM is basically a patent made up off two constants . We've already seen a couple of copper atoms, and they were Cingular and sanction. However, when we refer to combat him with generally talking about those that are made up off to different continents, this means that Captain can be a little trickier to pronounce than other pattern we have learned in this course. In total, there are 11 types of cup at him, and although it seems like a lot each cup, but it is only used with a handful of words. So while there is quite a lot of combinations to learn in truth, cut button isn't used that often in Korea. In general, we only pronounce one of the two continents and the other remains silent with some get back Jim, we pronounce the first continent, while with others we pronounce the second constant. So in this lesson we will learn the carpet him where we pronounce the first continent, and in the next lesson we will learn the other cup at him where we pronounce the second continent. So let's get straight into it. There are eight got but him in total in this lesson. And here are the 1st 3 No, no boat both and the under on their on that cut cup up there up there, the 1st 1 is made up off Cheok and Shield, and this is quite rare in Korean. It's generally used in these single syllable now owns and one other. Now it is used with is Sac. The second group, A team made up, off knee and NTN, is slightly more common, and it's generally used with verbs such as on that And on that, the last one pube and shit is used in common words like cup, which means price and the verb up that which means not, have Okay, so let's first do a speaking practice with these cup button. Repeat after me. No and, uh, cut. That was great. Wot done. Let's look at the next three. No, that don't there, Joe Their job there. Cool core. Where Gore Where Gore, How it that height there Hit that hit that now in total. There are seven Coppa Tim that I made up off a Lille and another continent. The three on the screen are pronounced with the first continent and will also learn another one later in this lesson. And there are also another three which pronounce with a second constant, which we will learn in the next lesson. The first couple Tim is one of the most commonly used cup at him, and it's used with various descriptive bulbs which function like adjectives and also the verb pay later. There is, however, one exception with this capital. Consider the following two words Don't that don't that not Takata Dr Okada. In the first word, we pronounce the first continent leer. So it's note that note that however, in the second word we pronounced appear. So this is Dr Okada, Dr Okada, and this pattern of reading the pew Pattyn occurs with knocked up Daddy Doctor Dr Addy and Dr Gupta adopting grew that so there are exceptions with this cup button. The second, your bottom is very rare and it's only used with this word. Cool and old, however cool is commonly used with where to form waggle, and this word is quite common in Korean. The final Gurbachan is Lille and t it. And although Heitor is a common word in Korean, this couple Tim is generally only used with these two words. Okay, so let's now do a speaking practice using these kill patch in. Repeat after me giant that wag or height that excellent job. Well done. Let's look at the last two cup at him. Monta Monta Guinta, Didn't I? Senator Celta, Greta Greta First the Carpet Indian and here is used commonly in Korean. There is only used with these verbs and also with a Bob Antah Lille and here is much more commonly used. And there are many verbs that use this cup at him. Both of these capital use here asked the second continent, and you can hear how here combines with ticket in the following syllable to form the aspirated tear sound. And this can also happen with other continents, such as key up to become a cheick sound. Okay, so let's now do a speaking practice using these two cup match in. Repeat after me Kinta, Senator Mank Luna. Good teal. Great job. Well done. Let's now consider how call Button is pronounced in connected speech. Now, one of the features of capital is that they always make the following continent a double continent. Unless, of course, the following constant is one of the nasal continents, such as medium D in Lille or young. So these words ending entire other verb infinitives and they're always pronounced as that. Additionally, other continents such as cheok t it and shield can also become double continents. So these was a pronounced an koyo, An Koyo. Don't you know t o absolutely there obstinately that. So, as you could hear, Cheok cheered and she'll become Cingular. Sandy, it and Sancho. Okay, so let's now do a speaking practice where a lax continent after the cup pattern becomes a tense continent. Repeat after me on Koyo. Don't deal, Upson! Nida, That was great! Well done. Let's now look at one more aspect off cup, Tim in connected speech. Now the final aspect we're going to look at is that the silent cup at him can carry over to the following syllable. If that syllable begins with an Ian Constant, here are a few examples. Knock, sir. Knock, sir. Up Silo Opsail. Hi, Ty. Oh, hi. To tell you no bio now, you boyo. So as you could hear, the second continent carries over and it's pronounced as their basic sound. If the following syllable begins with a constant Ian. Okay, so let's do a speaking practice. All this pattern repeat after me knocks it. Upsilon, how to tell you? No, by you. Greater Well done. Let's move on to the practice session. In this practice session, there are three separate practices. First, we'll practice the basic pronunciation off cup at him from this lesson, which is to pronounce the first continent. Second will practice how the lax continent becomes a tense continent after a cup at him. And lastly will practice how the silent constant in the cup. But him links to the following continent when it begins with either on Ian or hear Constant . Okay, So if you ready, let's begin with the first practice. No, on that, Kaya. Yeah, it that we're cool. Hurry, Taboada. Good path. Good path. Chi up. Demon? Yes. Amita on day the Takata No, Till daddy Kaya Thompson under Jiddah? Yeah, by you can t my good Couey's soil. One of those little Banias a style. Bye. See you next time. Okay, So in this lesson we learn that with certain cup atom, we pronounce the first continent. And we also looked at the way these cuppa tea more pronounced in connected speech. In the next lesson, we're going to learn about Cabot him where the second constant is pronounced. So Susan again in that lesson, but by 33. 겹받침 2: hi there. So in this lesson, we're going to learn about Cabot him, where he pronounce the second continent and the first continent is silent. Now there are only three Cup a team where the second continent is pronounced and the first is silent. And here are some example. Was using these cup button? Yeah, that cook that. Could that Tunc there, Tom there coun tah dah that up there. The first couple Tim made up off Lille and Cheok is probably the most commonly used cup at him, and it's used with many different evolves now, although the correct way of pronouncing this cup but him is to pronounce the second continent many Koreans pronounce the first continent with certain words, consider the following Bob's part of that parrot that requests IA Sayah. So although the correct way of pronouncing these words is to pronounce the second continent packed there and decoy sire in everyday speech, these words as well as other words using Leo and Chiaki about Tim are often pronounced with the first continent. So it's actually more common for people to say that, and it'll Coy's the second. Your bottom off liel N B. M. Is commonly used with verbs and also descriptive bulbs. However, the final iaapa Tim made up off Lille and Pierre is only used in this world, Gupta. And it's pronounced in an unreleased pube sound. Okay, so let's now do a speaking practice off these cup Patton, listen and repeat after me. Uh, cook that Tom there, Clint there. I hope that pilot that you go a CYA Excellent job. Well done. Let's now consider how these copper Cheema pronounced in connected speech First. If the constant after the cut button is not a nasal consonant such as me and the yin yang or liel all the here constant, then that constant is pronounced as a tense, constant sound. Here are some examples could corset pi r could corset pi r fema Oops in need I Epsom Nida. So, as you can hear in these examples the Cheok Tijd and shield that follow the cuppa Tim ah pronounced as sang deok sandy it and sanction. However, an interesting pattern arises when the constant after the capital is either and young or here in these patterns, we actually read the first continent and the second continent links to the following syllable here are some examples. Could you keep that Uchida crew Masa Clue Masa Paraguana five oclock lawyer In the first example, we read the first constantly ill and the second constant Cheok combines with here and forms the aspirated cheick sound. So this is pronounced kuh kita kita. In the second example again we read the first constant Lille and the second constant BM carries over to the second syllable. So this is pronounced cool Mazar clearly muscle however, in the last example with a noun pack. Although the correct way to pronounce this sentence is para group lawyer According to this pattern in everyday speech, Koreans will always say paddock lawyer And the main reason is because Pak is a noun and this pattern can also be found in the noun hook which means soil. So this sentence is generally pronounced as hunger to our soil who go to Assyria. Okay, so we went over quite a few patterns in relation to connected speech. Let's now do a speaking practice off what we have just covered could gossip ir Conte MMA, Epsom nida Could a key die crew Muscle Pagoda, Goya. Fantastic effort. Well done. Let's now move on to the practice session. In this practice, there are three speaking practices. Will first practice the basic sounds of cup button from today's lesson in the last two practices are related to how these Cuppa Tim are pronounced in connected speech. Let's begin with the first practice, but that the that on there some there group that. But he and the goal on T and total some key oop FEMA by Kita they're called Taco is soil Almunia on andale started my ash A Paige GP so so much has also come times you gonna die semen now. Okay, so today we learn three kinds of combat in where we pronounce the second constant and not the first continent. And we also looked at some important patterns in relation to connected speech. In the next lesson, we're going to review everything we learn on all the different kinds of cup at him over the previous two lessons. So I'll see you soon again in that lesson. But why 34. 겹받침 Review: no on that, Kyle. Yeah, it that we're core. Hurry, Taboada! Good path. Good path. Chi up. Demon? Yes, A media on day The Takata No took Daddy Kaya Thompson Until Jiddah? Yeah, by you can t my good Couey's style. But that the that on there Some there. Who? That But he and the goal on t and total some key oop FEMA by Kida They're called Taco is soil or a movie in Andale. I started my hey Paige e p so. 35. Korean Vowels: Hi, everyone, and welcome back. We're now in the Korean vow section. Now. In many ways, Korean vows are a lot easier to learn than the constant sounds. Both Korean and English vows of voice sounds. So when we make vowel sounds, we should feel vocal called vibration. Ah ah ah! So this means that we can make different vowel sounds mainly by changing the position off our lips, tongue and jaw. So if I say the vow are in Korean, I say with my mouth wide open like this. Ah ah. However, if I say the vow or in Korean that I say with the lips contracted into a smaller circle like this Ah, um, and the position off lips tongue enjoy is similar between Korean and English vowels, and for this reason, learning vows is less of a challenge than learning Korean constant sounds. Nevertheless, while there are certain similarities, there are also certain differences We need to be aware off. For example, the Korean vow or in the English vow oh, are considered to be similar. However, there are also subtle differences between them to listen to the following contrast. Cool, cool. Go, go Now, as you can hear the Korean or is a much truer sound of all, whereas the English vow, Oh, the sound is a mix off the O and A W sound to the shape of the mouth changes while making this sound. This is why, when English speakers say, Brugge or G, they say boo Gogi because they pronounce the Korean viol as to English vowel O. So the key point to note is that there are certain similarities in the way the vowel sounds are produced in Korean and English. But there are also certain differences, and we will highlight these differences in our video lessons so that you can sound at the Korean vows more naturally. Now there are altogether 21 different vowels in Korean, and in the first lesson on Korean valves, we're going to learn about the vows. Ah, yeah and soya sauce. Houston again in that first lesson on Korean vowels. But by 36. Korean Vowels ㅏㅑㅓㅕ: hi, everyone, and welcome to the first lesson on Korean valves In this lesson. We're going to learn about four Korean vowel sounds and we'll begin with Ah and yeah, the Korean vow sound are, is similar to the A sound in art and car. It's one of the basic vows in Korean, and learning it sound is very simple for many Korean learners, are is said with the mouth wide open, the tongue kind of sits in the middle of the mouth. So this vowel sound is Ah, uh, here, awesome example was using this foul Hung hung, um on I go are cool. The next foul is Yeah, and we call this a white light. As is basically r plus the English y sound. There are altogether six wide light vows in Korean and compared to their basic counterparts , they all have this extra cash, which indicates that this vow is a wide light foul. Now, because of this extra, why sound? The mouth first starts from this wife sound position where the mouth closes a little, the lips are spread wide and the tongue touches the roof of the mouth in the middle. So this position is you, You, you Then it moves to the position off. So this vowel sound is Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah Here are some example Was using this wide glide foul hen Ken Yam Yem Yeah. Cool. Yeah. Cool. Okay, so let's now do a minimal pair. Practice with the vows are and yeah, repeat off to me. Hung Kang um young I go, Yeah, go. That was great. Swot done. Let's now look at the vow Sounds all And your first our is similar to the U sound in ugly. And but when we say are the mouth comes together to form a small circle like this and the tongue is positioned in the middle of the mouth. So this vowel sound is all Oh, here are some example Was using this foul Saul. Soul partner partner taught there, taught there. Then we have the white glide. Your all Why glides begin in the same y sound position than from this position. We move on to the r sound position. So to make this sound, we say Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. Here are some example was using this white light vow, So show pr PR shot That taught that now with wide glide vows. Sometimes the vow sound can lose its wide light aspect and sound more like their basic counterpart. And this is particularly noticeable in the word Chatah, which sounds very similar to taught there. Now, this white lie sound weakening is actually not as common with this white light vow. But do keep in mind that this is a feature off Korean vowel pronunciation. Okay, so let's now do a minimal pairs speaking practice with the vows. All and your repeat after me, it's whole show, Paul. It pr taught there. Chop there. Excellent job today. Well done. Let's now we want to The practice session in this final practice we're going to do to practice is the first on the vows are and yeah, in the second on the vows are in your The practice will consist off minimal pair practices as well as phrases that contain the vowels from this lesson. So if you're ready, let's begin with the first practice. Hung Young? Uh, yeah. So uh so yeah. Ads are Yeah. I San Lung San Young Kaaya Hey! Yeah, We car can giggle toe partner Mom Young Holger Helga Auriga, Your Ridha caller Cold yogis Hall. Tall Yoda. Aggie got Keogh. Daniel O. The weather is a cell from promising and a human male. Okay, so in this lesson, we learned how to pronounce four Korean vows. Ah, yeah, and all you in the next lesson, we will look at the vows or your end, will you? So it's using again in that lesson, but why? 37. Korean Vowels ㅗㅛㅜㅠ: hi, everyone. So, in this lesson, we're going to learn how to pronounce the Korean vows or your and who you first we have the vow Or and as we mentioned in an earlier lecture or is similar to the English vow. Oh, but the English vow Oh, has the extra w sound at the end. Or, on the other hand, doesn't have that extra w sound to make this vowel sound. We make a very small circle with our lips, which protrude significantly and the tongue hangs in the middle of the mouth. So we say, Hello. Uh, here are some example was using this foul Psagot toggle Corman corm in the next vow is your and just like the other wide glide vows we learned in the previous lesson. The sound first begins from the UAE sound position. Then it moves to the or position. So it's your you're you're you're Here are some example was using this foul your your sack . You'll zag. You'll cumin. Cumin. Okay, so let's now do a minimal pair speaking. Practice with the vows or and your repeat after me. Oh, you're Saigal sag, You core men, Cumin greater well done. Let's now look at the vows who and you first, who is similar to the double o sound When we say good or two to make the sound off Who the lips protruding again But rather than forming a small circle the lips are more flat together and the tongue again just hangs in the middle of the mouth. So this sound is Here are some example was using this foul Mm clue who groom young gloom young Then we have the y glide you and again the sound begins from the white sand position and then it moves to the position off. So this sound is you. You you you Here are some example was using this foul You, you cuter que que myung kyu myung. Okay, so let's now do a minimal pairs speaking practice with the vows. Who and you repeat after me. Oh, you clue. Cure crew Myung Kyu Myung That was great. Swot done. Let's move on to the practice session in this practice session we're going to do to practice is the first on the vowel pairs or and your in the second on the vowel pairs who and you And like before the practice will consist off minimal pair practices as well as phrases that contain the vows together. Case, if you're ready, will begin with avows or and your Oh, you're cool. Mean kill Mean Quartey Security. Hodo your door bogey mule G Croton tickin Kohei was Hail Tonin Chiyoda twat. Hail coun killing cooler cure. Suzanne, you son, Who is kill you? Single, single. Ooh, You eat and tingle Riga. You redid case soil Tonin carried a to good A hail. So most people just sometimes you get so big. Okay, so in this lesson, we learned how to pronounce the vows or your and who? You. And in the next lesson, we're going to have a review off the eight vows, we learn to pronounce over the last two lessons. So I'll see you soon in that lesson. But why 38. Vowel Review 1: Hung Young? Uh, yeah. So, uh so, Yeah. Adah? Yeah, I San Lung san Young Kaaya Hey. Yeah, We car younger toe partner Pound among young Holger Helga Auriga, your Ridha caller Cold yogis hall. Tall Yoda. Aggie Got Keogh. Daniel O Oh, you're cool. Mean, Que mean. Quartey Security. Hodo your door Bogey Mule G Croton tickin Cool hair was Hail Tonin Chiyoda Twat. Hail coun kun Cooler cure. Suzanne, you son! Who here kill you? Single single. Ooh, You eat on a single Riga. You redid case soil Tonen Curie do a to good a hail! 39. Korean Vowels ㅡ & ㅣ: Hi there. So in this lesson, we're going to learn how to pronounce the Korean vows. Who n e The first foul we have is who and this is a vow that doesn't exist in English. In English. We generally make this sound in constant clusters and constant clusters are when we have multiple continents together in words. So in words like spice s in the constant cluster SP is pronounced with a like vow sound. So we say spice, spice constant clusters can also occur at the end of was like just and similarly T in S T is pronounced with an like sound. So we say just just however, in English since these constant clusters of regarded as not having a vow sound that extra constant is a week sound. It is not stressed, but in Korean, the vowel who is much more pronounced consider the word smart which is also used in Korean and pronounced Samata. When we pronounce the English word the S and the T in the constant clusters are weak sound . So we say smart, smart. There is no stress on these continents. On the other hand, in Korean, these continents are used with a vowel letter do so so And to regard it as being a syllable , which means that they're pronounced with equal amount of stress as two syllable in the middle. So this is pronounced see matter Samata to say the Korean vow. The we move the tongue back a little in the mouth, and we open our mouth slightly. So to make this vowel sound, we say, Ah ah, here are some example was using this bow that that third him to him. Sue that sue that. Okay, so let's try saying these words that used about the repeat after me that to him, Suda, that was great. Well done. Let's now look at the second vowel in this lesson and it's E. He is similar to the vow E in words like B and C. However, whereas E in English is considered to be a long vowel, the Korean E is not a long vowel to make this sound the position off lips and the tongue is similar to be in English. The tongue is slightly high up in the mouth, and the back of the tongue may touch the roof off the mouth and you open your mouth in a slightly rounded shape. So it's e e. Here are some example words using this foul key key. You you g there g that. Okay, so let's now do a speaking practice with these words that used a vow E Repeat after me Key , you G die. Great effort today. Well done. Let's move on to the practice session. In this final practice, we're going to do to practices one on the sound of the vow who and the other on the vow Sound E. So if you're ready, let's begin with the first practice. Could good. I, um duh. Take him. Could email Patty that I led a geek guy is Ciman madsen Pill nuttall Kyle. See p See that, e g There Qadi de buys Hail Yogi Guy a neo Kitana and Yogi a sale. So much has also come Thomas is gonna die semen now. Okay, So today we learned how to pronounce the Korean vows and e in the next lesson, we're going to learn how to pronounce the Korean vow, Lee, which is formed by combining the two vows from this lesson. So Susan again in that listen, but why 40. Korean Vowels ㅢ: hi, everyone. So in this lesson, we're going to learn how to pronounce the Korean vow. Now the vow is formed by combining the vows who n e together. And the basic idea off this foul sound is to say these two vows together quickly. So this vow is pronounced the really the. However, depending on where this vow is used, we can actually be pronounced in the three different ways. So let's take a look at each sound in more detail. First is pronounced as a when this vow is used with a constant year, and it's used in the first syllable. For example, we can say the jar these are these her video video. However, as you can probably hear in this last example, although the correct way of pronouncing this vow is to say we in certain words and also in far speech, we can sound like the vow. So be mindful of this aspect off this foul sound. Okay, so let's now do a speaking practice off this vowel sound. We repeat after me the guy these are todo That was great. Whoa! Done the second way off, pronouncing the is when it's used as a possessive form in Korean. We use the as a possessive form so we can say the air to mean my and beans aware to mean Min Soo's. And, as you could probably tell already when is used in this way, is pronounced as a. Here are a few more examples. Sooty air Suji Air Hack your way, Hack your way Oman. The A home on the A So as you could hear the is pronounced as a when it's used after announce to indicate possessive meaning. Okay, so let's now do a speaking practice off pronouncing three as a in possessive meaning. Repeat after me. Sooty air hack your way. All money. A excellent job Well done. The final way of pronouncing three is as e and this happens when is used with a continent other than you in the first syllable and when it's used in second or third syllables with any continent, Here are some examples Hemon, He mine Di di, di di, Connie Connie. So in the 1st 2 words, the is used in the first syllable with continents here and sang dig it So these words are pronounced human and Dida, Then in the last word is used in the second syllable, and in this position, it doesn't matter which constant it is used with. It's just pronounced as e. So this word is pronounced Connie. Connie. Okay, so let's now do a speaking practice where Lee is pronounced as e Repeat after me. Human Di di, Connie. Great job today. What would on let's move on to the practice session? In this practice, there are three practices for the three patterns we learned on pronouncing the vow be So if you're ready, we'll start with the first pattern. The data Rebeuh remove. We have really tough. And I, Woody a yes, I tingle way aboudi a he sing Hey, soc, honey, Chewy boonie so much How does it so I can promise you gonna die soon by now. Okay, so today we learned how to pronounce the Korean Violet, depending on where it is used. In the next lesson, we're going to learn four more Korean vows and they are a yeah, and also a year. So I'll see you soon in that lesson. But why 41. Korean Vowels ㅔㅖㅐㅒ: Hi, everyone. And welcome back in this lesson. We're going to learn how to pronounce the Korean vows A yeah, and also a Yet now all these pairing A and A A pronounced in a similar way and yet and yet a pronounced in a similar way many, many years ago. Like hundreds of years ago, the sound of air and air waas differentiated. However, in modern Korean, these vowels are pronounced in the same way. There is really no difference at all. Let's first look at the basic vows, air an air and then we look at the white lie vows yet and yet these sounds are produced with a tongue low and sitting behind your lower teeth, and you open your mouth a little. So this vowel sound is air A. Now, although the pronunciation all these vows is the same in writing, it's very important to distinguish them as many words that sound the same half different meaning. Here are some examples there se Okay, A Although these words sound the same, they mean different things. So, in writing, it's important that we use the correct vowels. Okay, so here, awesome example was that used these vows air and a eggy eggy. How you may pie in May Hong Jae Kyung jae says Sue San Suu. Okay, so let's now do a speaking practice. All of these Waas Repeat after me, eggy Higher man. Young day Says who? Great job. Well done. Now these two vows also have their wide light vows and these are year. And yet like all other wide live owls, the sound starts from the wide glide position. And then we moved to the air position so we can say Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. However, these wide glide vows offer lose their y glyphs sound and often pronounced as air. And the only time they're pronounced as a wildlife vow is when they're used with Ian Continent in the first syllable. Here are two examples of this Yeah, G yeah, g Yemen. Yemen. So in these words, the wildlife sound is very clear. However, when these vows air used with other continents in the first syllable or with any other continent in second or third syllables there pronounced like a Here are some examples of this. Okay, okay. Pay pair Say gay. Say gay Harry Koyo Harry, go! Yo! So in the 1st 2 examples The two years I used with a constant other than Ian. So they're pronounced as a so it's OK pay. And in the last two examples, the wide glide vows were used in the second syllable with a constant Kia and year. So they're pronounced se que se que and high recoil recoil. So whether someone saying okay, care or care, it's actually impossible to differentiate based on sound alone. And the meeting can only be understood from the context. So this is an important point to note regarding the Zweig light vowels. Okay, so with that in mind, let's now do a speaking practice off these phrases that used a wide light vows. Yeah. Repeat after me. Yeah, G yeah, I'm one. Okay, pay say gay. Hi, Koyo. Fantastic effort. World on. Let's move on to the practice session in this practice we're going to do to practice is the first on the vows air and air and the second on the vows. Yeah, and yet, But do keep in mind about how the y glyphs sound weakens in the second practice Pen Hey, way a key key day. Young day ale con means there Monday se Yes, sir. Jamie Nada Key gay de Hay case and G single whale. They told us. How does it, sir? From Thomas Egan into my nightmare. Okay, so today we learned how to pronounce the Korean vows A Yeah and a Yeah. And we also learned how the y glyphs sound weakens in certain positions. The next lesson is a review lesson, and we're going to review the seven Korean vows We learn over the last three lessons. So Susan again in that lesson, but by 42. Vowel Review 2: cu good. I, um duh. Take him. Could email Patty that a letter G r Simeon Madison pill Nuttall Kyle. See p See that e g There. Cuddy de buys Hail Yogi Guy a neo Kitana and Yogi A sale the day Rebeuh remove We have ni woody A Yes, I tingle way aboudi a he sing Hey, soc honey chewy boonie pen Hey, way a g key day Young day ale con these a Monte se Yes, sir. Jamie Nada Key gay de Hay case and G single whale. 43. Korean Vowels ㅘㅝㅟ: hi, everyone. So in this lesson, we're going to learn how to pronounce the Korean vows. Why war and we in Korean. There are six W glide vowels, and they're called W glyph hours because these vows begin with the English W sound, and some people find W glide vows difficult to memorize. But the key thing to note is that W glide valves are essentially a combination off to basic vowels. Let's begin with what this power is a combination off all, and and to make this sound, the position of your lips move from all to our. So it's wow. Why Why, Why here Awesome example, was using this foul. Why? Why Quadra quads? It's agua agua Now in far speech, when the vow what is used in the first syllable with constants other than year and in the second or third syllables, the sound of white can either become weak or sound more like the vow are so quiet in kwacha and saga can sound a little bit like car in far speech so it can sound like kwacha. Quanta saga, saga. Here are two more examples. Young y young one means Wachati means watch e now It's a subtle change in pronunciation, but in far speech the sound of wire weakens when the vow is used in the first syllable with continents other than Ian and also in the second or thirst syllables and this aspect off wgal I sound weakening happens with all w glyph hours and we'll pay close attention to this over the next two lessons. Okay, so let's now do a speaking practice off these phrases that used of our what? Repeat after me. Why Cuadra saga Young one Beans are catchy. That was great. Well done. The second vile we have is what? And to make this sound, the position of your lips move from who to call. So is war. Wow Wall wall Here. Awesome Example Words using this about? No though Kwan Kwan one piece one piece Now these words used a vow war in the first syllable and the weakening off wgal I sound is quite significant, particularly in the first word. More. However, when what is used in second and third syllables, the vow sound almost completely changes to all. Here are two examples Joyo to are you gradual crew A Joe. So in these examples, the syllables. War and char are used in second and third syllables and the vowels war sounds almost like. Or so these words are pronounced Choi Oh, and Quijada. Okay, so we're now going to do a speaking practice. But these are subtle differences in the change in the vowel sound. So please listen carefully as we do the speaking practice. Let's begin more Kwan one Pistor Joyo Fragile. Great efforts Well done. Finally we have the vow we and just like the other w glide vows to make this sound the position off your lips Move from who to e so to make this vowel sound, we say we we we we here are some example was using this foul We we ship that ship there Creature creature In the first word we is used with a constant ian and the sound of the vow We is very clear However, in the next two examples in far speech the sound of we can weaken so we can sound like the vow E So they are shipped their ship there. Creature creature. Here are two more examples Cowie, Cowie, Tetons and tongues on. So in these words, the sound off we and teat weakens and sounds like e and kit. And the weakening off this w glide vowel sound is more pronounced in kid than we. So in far speech they are Cowie Cowie Tetons on Tetons hand. Okay, so let's now do a speaking practice off these phrases that used a vow we and Samos before. Listen carefully and repeat after me. We ship there, Peter Qawi, keep dogs on. That was great. Well done. Let's now move on to the practice session. In this practice, we're going to do three practices on the three w glide vows y war. We keep in mind that the WGAL I sound can weaken when it's used in the first syllable with constants other than Ian. And also, when the vows air used in second and third syllables Okay, so with that in mind, let's begin with the first practice. Wow. Quieted. So how long boiled bio you are The man Kwan Tim Tile Joe Celje? No, they were every day Datable Hail cree She there, Shehata. Peapod um Shia, go see pile great up today. Well done from Comet Ison, man. Now Okay, so today we learned how to pronounce the w glide vows. Why war? And we And we also learned that these wgal I sounds can weaken. And in the next lesson, we're going to learn about three more w glide vowels, which are all pronounced in the same way. And they are where, where and way. So Susan again in the next listen, but why? 44. Korean Vowels ㅚㅙㅞ: Hi, everyone. And welcome back in this lesson. We're going to learn how to pronounce the Korean vows where, where and way Now with these three vows. Although they are formed by combining different vows together, they're all pronounced in the same way where, where and way. Let's consider the first w glide vow where this vow is formed by combining the vows or an E . So this is an unusual sound as the blend off these two vows, or N e producer sound more similar to we than where, however, this vow is pronounced as where in Korean here are some example. Was using this foul Where go where. Go Kraemer Kraemer paid. I paired I que away que away Now, as we mentioned in the previous lesson that W glide vowel sound can weaken and in far speech. This also happens with all three vows that a pronounced as where so, although generally when these vows they're used with a constant year, there sounded as they should with other continents. The sound weakens and can sound like a listen to these three words in far speech. Kraemer, Kraemer, peta, PETA cool a cure way The wgal I sound is a lot weaker in far speech. And the weakening is more pronounced in the words PETA and kill way. Okay, so with that in mind, let's now do a speaking practice. Listen carefully and repeat after me. Where Go Kraemer head. I cool way. Great efforts. Well done. The second of the way W glide Val, is this one Where? And this combines the vows or an air. So the mouth starts from the pole position and moves to the air position. So this is where Where? Where? Where the vow wear is not common in Korean, but here are few. Was that do you use this foul way? Do keep in mind that the sound of where can weaken in fast beat Where way? Sago, Sago Contento contento. Okay, see my dad. Okay. See Mata. So again, the wgal I sound weakening occurs in syllables that use continents other than Ian But this weakening is particularly evident in the second World. So it's seg or Sehgal. Okay, so let's now do a speaking practice. All these phrases that used a vow way Listen carefully. Repeat after me way Sago Contento. Okay. See my dad. That was great low done. Finally, we have the third vow that we pronounce as where, and this vowel combines who and air together. So to make this sound, the position of lips moves from pool to a. So it's where way. Where, where, now. This vow is even less common than the previous foul, where and is often used to fanatically right English words that have this vowel sound in Korean. Here are some example words that using this foul, K and K and when near when near weapon weap turn ways Way, sir. So these are some of the words that use this foul where and, as you can see in the last two examples, the via where is used in Worse, that either come from another language, such as Web toon or to write for in words in names like whales phonetically in Korea and in the first Word, where where is used with a constant cheok, the vow sound can weakened slightly. Okay, so let's now do a speaking practice. All these phrases that used a vow way. Listen carefully and repeat after me. Okay, young when you weapon ways Fantastic effort today. Well done. Let's now move on to the practice session. In this practice, we're going to do three practices on the vows that a pronounced as way. Remember that in far speech, the W glide vowel sound can weaken and sound more like a. And this is more common when these vows are used with a continent other than you and when they used in second or thirst syllables. Okay, so if you're ready, let's begin with the first practice. We're go. Baesa paid I Solloway Bon A way to 80 space in Cranie Kepu were gone. Great goal way booth when media milkshake, someone's had a so so it Okay, you in suburban USA Myung Sometimes Harris's Sequoia from times gone, it has him at night care. Okay, so in this lesson we learned how to pronounce three W glide vows, which are all pronounced in the same way where where and way the next lesson is a review lesson and we're going to review the six W glide vows. We learn over the last two lessons, so I'll see you soon in that lesson. But by 45. Vowel Review 3: Wow. Quieted. So how long Boiled bio you are The man Kwan Tim Tile. So, Celia No, they were every day Datable hail cree she there, Shehata. Peapod um she a cozy pile. We're go. Baesa paid I solloway my name. Way to 80 space in Cranie. Yep. Buh were gone. Great goal way booth. When media miracles Jake. 46. Contraction 1: hi, everyone, and welcome back. Now, Over the next two lessons, we're going to look at some common contractions that are used in Korea. And in this lesson, we're going to look at contractions between towns and particles. One of the most common contractions in Korean is between now owns and pronouns and the topic particle. And then here are some examples of this nine and nine dawn. Then none can and can. Dugan Dugan. Morning one. So, as you can see in these examples, when now owns and pronouns contract with, then we simply attach a knee and bow Tim to the final syllable off the noun or the pronoun . And in these examples, bore is essentially a contraction off. What so this bone in could also be return as Boisson. Now there are many words that can contract with men, and these are just some of the examples off this contraction, and we have a resource sheet, which you can refer to for a more comprehensive list off this type of contraction. But let's first to a speaking practice off this contracted form. Repeat after me nine and nine. Don't and none can and Can Dugan Dugan Morning one Excellent job odor. Now, another common contraction in Korean is between the object particle low with now owns. Here are some examples off these contractions. Not a nighter, daughter, not Cara Cara. Do good. A do gooder border boil the contraction off the object Particle low works similar to the contraction off men. We simply add the little but him in the final syllable off the world's the particle is contracting with again. These are just some of the examples off this contraction and form or extensive list. Please check out the document in the resources sheet. One other point not regarding contractions is that their informal. So using these contractions is more common in spoken Korean than in written Korean. Okay, so with that in mind, let's now do a speaking practice off this contracted form. Daughter, knives, daughter, not Canada. Cata do good. A Dugal mortar More that was excellent road on the final contracted form we're going to look at relates to the worst that refer to this and that in Korean. The words that relate to this and that are represented by these adjectives e cook and char , and to refer to things meaning this and that we say he got who got and Target and in everyday speech there said as ego, cougar and charcoal. Now these words he, God who got and char God can also contract with topic subject and object particles like this. So first, when they used with the topic particles, we add Nian but Tim to the shortened forms. Eager cougar and cha go. So they are Egan who gone and talk on with subject particles. The vow e gets attached to the shortened forms Eager cougar and cha go. So they are eager Cougar and Target. And lastly, with object particles, we add a little batch into the shortened forms. Eager cougar and cha go So they are eager Coo Goh Chok Okay, so it's always important to do a speaking practice to internalize what we've just learned. So let's now do a speaking practice off contracting e God who got child got with different particles? Repeat after me Egos in Eagan Child goes in tel gone cu cause she kook a tell glossy Tolgay eagle said e gotta child also child, go Excellent job Road on Let's now move on to the practice session in this practice session . We're going to review the contractions from this lesson. In this practice, we're going to review the contractions from this lesson. But rather than just listening and repeating after Bina, I like you to try and say the contracted forms off the phrases you see on the screen after you've said the contracted form, you can then listen to be now saying the correct form to check your own response. Okay, So if you're ready, will begin with the practice on Contracting Mounds and topic particle and then Dannon. Then Canon can do Koonin. Dugan born in one that it die. Would he? Didn't Woody colleague Hidden Colin do good? A do good? Could Dawson could gone tell Clausen tell Gone. You go see e gay Could go see Could be a egos e guy Tell close it. Tell Gore so much has also come, Thomas, you're gonna die semen now. Okay, so today we learned how certain towns and pronouns can contract with certain particles. In the next lesson, we're going to learn how to contract certain verbs structures in Korean. So I'll see you soon again in that listen, but by 47. Contraction 2: hi, everyone. So in this lesson, we're going to learn how contractions can occur in certain verbs. Structures in Korean. First, some Korean vows combined the verbs them with the first syllable in the suffix to form a W glide vow and this occurs only involves polite form. Here are some examples Apoyo Piau So I o sile Joyo choi oil wiil coil in the 1st 2 examples the verbs them ends in the vow or and if the following syllable in the verb suffix is our then this vow are is combined with the verbs them to form the w glide y sound. So Ohio becomes pile and so I o becomes sile. In the last two examples, the verb stem ends in who and if the following syllable in the verb suffix is all then this vow are is combined with a verb stem to form the w glide war sound so true Oyo becomes Choi Oh, and Croix oh becomes Koyo. This can also occur if the verb stem ends in a here. Batam. Here's an example. Do I owe Daio? However, one important point to note is that this only applies to Bob's as Wyo is a descriptive ob, and this cannot contract in the same way now. One other thing to note is that while these W glide vows or more commonly used in everyday speech and can be used in polite language in formal settings, it's more appropriate to use the uncontracted forms off these verbs. Also in far speech, these w glides sounds can weaken, so Piau and Ohio can often sound like pie. Oh, and I o Okay, So with that in mind, let's now do a speaking practice off contracting these Bob's repeat after me. Poor you Piau So I o Sile Joyo Cheil Droid iol Koyo do y o Daio That was great, Baudone. Another form of contraction that occurs in Korean is when the verb stem combines with the first syllable in the Suffolk's to former wide glide fell. And this contraction also occurs only in the valves polite form. Here are two examples of this T i o Cheil key Io Calio. So when the verbs them ends in the Vow e and the first syllable in the verb suffixes all then they combined to form the Weigel. I sound Yeah, so g i o becomes chae Oh, and key Io becomes Calio. Here are two more examples. CEO Cha Yeo Pluto Calio. So again, following the same structure, the votes them combines with a vow or to form the wide glide vow. Yeah, and similar to the W glide vows we learned previously. The contracted forms are commonly used in everyday speech but informal setting. It's more appropriate to use the uncontracted forms. Okay, so let's now do a speaking practice off contracting Bob's in this way. Todo Toyo Key Elio Calio CEO Saw you p I. O Calio. Excellent job old on. Let's now move on to the practice session similar to the previous lesson. You will see uncontracted valve forms and I'd like you to say the contracted forms. After you have said the contracted forms, you can listen to Bina saying the correct form. Okay, so if you're ready, let's begin with the first practice Poile pile So Lyell Sile the while dial two Oil toil Croyle oil Loyal Poile T o oil Toil key oil Cal, You see Elio? Charlie! Oh, P i o pal, you'll So was this a media Grandpa Matile Bake sale. Okay, so today we learn how certain involved structures contract to form W glide vows and why, Glide vows in the next lesson, we're going to learn how certain vowel sounds are pronounced differently in far speech. So our Susan again in that lesson, but by 48. Vowel Reduction: hi, everyone. So in this lesson, we're going to learn how to vowels are pronounced differently to how they normally sound. One of the most commonly youth verb endings or even phrase endings, is the syllable your we can basically add your at the end off all Bob's and also many different phrases to make that particular verb or phrase polite. However, this your is never pronounced as your in natural, far speech. Here are some examples of verbs and phrases using you. Listen carefully to the sound of your at the end. Sciglio, sal, You two y o y o hesselboe Hess Oil, Tanya, Tanya. So, in each of these phrases, we use your at the end to make the phrase into a polite form. And, as you may have noticed, you're at the end is not pronounced as your but more like your. However, this is the important point is not a complete year, but it's a sound close to your than your to make the your sound. The final position off the lips is the or sound, however, when your is used at the end of phrases, the positioning off the lips is closer to the sound off all what carefully to the positioning off my lips. Ohio Ohio two y o y o Hess Soyo Hess soil. Tanya Tanya, as I've mentioned already, is not a complete sound of your, but it's a sound closer to your than your. However, it's important to note that it's not an easy sound to pick up right away. But to be able to say this right practice is going to be critical. So let's now do a speaking practice off these phrases that use your at the end. Listen carefully and repeat after me. Ohio two y o Hess Oil Tanya. Great Job, Odone. Let's now look at another vow that is pronounced differently to how they normally sell Now . Another vow that is pronounced different to its basic sound is, or and in certain structures, this vow is pronounced as you this way of pronouncing or as who is informal but is common in everyday speech. Here are some examples you are go bang. You are a good man. More quiza Baku, Isa Taro, Oso Chatto US saw super generous. So generally, sir, in each sentence, the highlighted vow or is pronounced like in the first phrase we have haggle, which means and and core in this phrase is commonly pronounced as cool. In the second phrase in the verb ending, Courtis so which we used to express a progressive action core, is again pronounced as cruel. In the third sentence, we have the particle law, and this particle has many different uses, and this is also awesome, pronounced as blue. Finally, we have the particle tour, which means to and also and in far speech. This is also often pronounced as to okay, so let's now do a speaking practice, whether vow or is pronounced as who in fast natural speech. Repeat after me who you are. Go bang book Quiza chatto us So soup Theresa Excellent job today. Well done. Let's now move on to the practice session in this practice we're going to do to speaking practices one on the pronunciation over bending your and the second on how the vow or used in particles is pronounced as Okay. So if you're ready, let's begin. The practice means you Yeah, bulk oil. Oh man, Anya Egan Gaia says Soil way good. I style tell do It's algunas all day. Oh, eagle, Lulu. Hi kiya pita goo him Boco tech to pass ill Kumbaya Good. See, Becker care so much has also come times you gonna die semen now. Okay, so today we looked at how the syllable, your and the vow or are pronounced differently to how they're normally pronounced in the next lecture, we're going to look at how the sound of the continent here can disappear in certain structures. So I'll see you soon again in that lesson, but by 49. Disappearance of ㅎ: hi, everyone. So in this lesson, we're going to look at how the hear its sound can disappear in certain words. When he had follows a voiced sound such as the continent's BM, Deion liel or young or vowel sounds. The here sound weakens, and sometimes the sound disappears entirely. Here are some examples Key May key May So nada, So not Die E day on Eat a on young y young y Bilin violin in the 1st 3 words where here proceeds the voice continents medium knee and end Lear the beer median and Leo sounds carry over, similar to how the constant sound link when there is an ian continent. So these words are pronounced, he may so not, uh, eat a lot. And in this third example, you can also hear how the w glide vow wa weakens and is pronounced as a in the fourth word that here proceeds the voice constant ian. And in this pattern, the sound of here becomes very weak and is only slightly audible. So it's young, young. Finally, we have here following a vow sound, and in this situation, the sound off here becomes very weak and is barely audible So it's violin. Violin. Okay, so with those patterns in mind, let's now do a speaking practice off these words where the here sound is barely audible. Listen and repeat after me. Key may. So another e Daeng Young. Why Bilin? That was excellent. Well done. Now. One other point to note regarding the weakening off the here sound is that you can also happen between words. Here are some examples. Tournament, CNN tournament, CNN in young and gay in young I'm Gay, Thomas Hale Paloma Sale. So as you could hear in these examples, although the Here Continent follows a voice sound in the previous word, the sound of here still weakens and is not clearly audible. For this, he it reduction to occur. The two words have to be pronounced together without a pause, and this is more common when he it proceeds voice, continents or vowel sounds. Let's practice saying these phrases repeat after me tournament and then in young gay Tell me a sale. Great effort. Well done. Let's move on to the practice session. In this practice, we're going to do to practices one on the weakening off here. Sounds within words, and the second on the weakening off here. Sounds between words. So if you're ready, let's begin with the first practice T May car Nosa paddle. How long? How way pattern on there. Power done. He's a one. Does that I owe when you do Superman. Yes, aside from Thomas is gonna take a okay. So today we looked at how the here continent sound weakens or disappears when it's used after voice continents or voice sounds. In the next lesson, we're going to look at the effects on the pronunciation. When the in and Leo I used together house use it again in the lesson. But why? 50. ㄴ and ㄹ Pattern: Hi, everyone, and welcome back in this lesson. We're going to look at the effect on the pronunciation when Dein and Leo are used together in a word. Now, when you have either an Ian and Lear pattern or Lille, Andean pattern, the knee and sound changes to a little sound. However, how that change happens depends on which constant comes first. Let's first take a look at the knee in and Lear pattern. In some words. One syllable ends in Indian, but him and the following syllable begins with Leo in these patterns that dein, but in changes to a little sound, here are some example. WAAS. As you listen to the words, listen carefully to how the sound of knee and changes Chilo General O Sheila Sheila Pearly pearly Alexa Alexa So I should could hear, in these words the Noon by Jim changes to a Lear sound. However, this pattern only exists when the two syllables are parts off One word. If the neon plus Lear pattern exists in compound downs and compound downs announced, formed by two now owns, then the Diem. Batam maintains its basic sound, and it can also cause the following Lear to sound like near here are some example. Waas Listen carefully. Cinnamon, cinnamon, tungsten, you tungsten yet So send me Terry Stanley. In each of these examples, the syllables shin yup, and Lee are essentially separate words that I've combined with the other word to form compound rounds. And in these situations the sound of the embattled is maintained, and the Lear sound changes a little to a knee and sound. In the second word. Chongjin Yack. The Lear sound completely changes to a knee and sound. But in the first and the third word, the Lear sound changes a little to a knee and sound. So it sounds like a combination off Lille Indian. So it's Sin Lanyon, Sin Lanyon. So, Stanley Stanley. Okay, so with that in mind, let's now they're speaking practice off wads where we have Deion Plus Lear. Pattern Till Law. Scylla. Carly I look, Sir Sin Lam Young telling sitting young her suddenly that was excellent road on. Let's now look at the lir plus knee and pattern in words where one syllable ends in a little but him and the following syllable begins with Deion than the D and sound changes to a little sound. Here are some examples. Listen carefully by young body young silence. A silence a soup. Generally are structurally are tallow. Montoya Hello, much with Lear plus Deion pattern. The effects of D and sound changing to a Lear sound happens in many different patterns. First, it can happen within the same word as shown in this first example. In the second example, we have a compound noun, and in this example, the Indian sound changes to a lira sound. So it becomes Salome's Salome's that in the last two examples that Dein sound change also happens even when the Lear Plus the in Patton is between words. So these two sentences a pronounced as sutera layer secretarial er, Paloma Gioia, Paloma Gioia again. For these sound changes to occur, the two separate words must be pronounced together without a pause. So if we say Paloma Gioia, then the Indian changes to a little sound. But if we say tired, almost higher than the sound of Nian is maintained because there is a pause between the two words. Okay, so with that in mind, let's now do a speaking practice off this pattern. My young Salome's Air Sutera Leo. It's Paloma Joyo. Great job. Well done. Let's move on to the practice session. In this practice, there are three practices. The first on Deion, plus legal pattern where the and changes to a Lear sound. The second on the plus Lear pattern in compound downs. Whether Deon Burton maintains its basic sound and Lear changes to a D in sound. And the third on the Lille plus Deion pattern, where deal changes to a Lear sound. Okay, so if you're ready, let's begin with the first practice till low. Aegaleo Paleo gun Well line Bali's young zone in nine Penn Daniel Tan. No pan egging. See? Well, um, colada problems tell agenda when they told merciful Banias a queer, sometimes going tobe a care. Okay, so in this lesson we looked at how we pronounce words that have knee and plus Lear Pattern and Leo, plus knee and pattern. In the next lesson, we're going to look at how nasal sounds affect other constant sounds nearby. So Susan again in that lesson, But by 51. Nasalization 1: hi, everyone. So in this lesson, we're going to look at how certain Korean continents become nasal sounds due to other nasal sounds. Nearby, in Korean, when an ordinary constant comes before a BM or Indian sound, then that ordinary continent becomes one of the three nasal sounds. And they are beom Deion. And here here are some examples as you listen. Listen to how the pattern sound changes in the first syllable, even now that in now that in i o in i o Tang one town one. So let's consider these phrases carefully. In the first word, the pew Pattyn is pronounced like a medium sound because of the Indian that follows it. So it's pronounced him now that you now that in the second example, because of the knee in in the second syllable, the Sang Shield, Batam is pronounced as a knee and sound. So this is pronounced in Niall in Iowa. In the final example, because off being in the second syllable, that key hot button is pronounced as an ian continent. So this is pronounced as tang one tang one and as shown by the first example, this nasal sound effects can occur between two separate words to now. Earlier in this course, we showed you a table where all 11 constant pattern can effectively be categorized into three unreleased sounds. Pube, Keegan and Cheok. And when these unreleased sounds on nasal ized due to either BM or Deon that follows, they become either being Deion or here. Let's take a look at a few more examples in Nida in Nida. I'm one Hamlin. I mean, I owe. I mean, I owe being young young young 10 in tendon you know una sunny honey longline flung one Kelemen killing then so as you could hear the patch him in. Each word changes to a nasal sound when it's followed by either a bill or Indian and depending on whether the patch it is related to unreleased Peep Ticket or CHEOK. The change sound is BM, BN or Ian, however, do know that the change in the sound can sometimes be less clear. And a good example of this is young, young, young, young, which can actually sound more like, um, young than young Young. And the similar pattern can be seen in P. Mull P. Moore and number number. So there are also certain exceptions to the rule. Okay, so let's now they're speaking practice where ordinary continents become nasal sounds. Repeat after me in Nida, I am one. Been nail young Young 10 in Yes, now Sunny flung one Kalman. Fantastic effort. Well done. Let's now move on to the practice session. In this practice, we're going to do one practice and I like you to read the words you see on the screen by reading the pattern. Inappropriate nasal sounds. Remember that the unreleased pube ticket and Cheok changed to be m D in and seeing sounds. Okay, So with that in mind, let's begin the practice. Come Nida Harrison and come my Makdah Palin Limbo Pamela Kim Nail flung naughty enamel Manama, Guangdong Canon Day It's so queer sometimes gonna do my neck Okay, so today we looked at how ordinary constant sounds changed nasal sounds when they followed by the continents being or Deon in the next lesson, we're going to continue looking at the concept off nasal ization in Korea. So our season again in that lesson, But by 52. Nasalization 2: hi, everyone, and welcome back in this lesson. We're going to continue learning more about nasal sounds in Korea and will focus on how Lear sound changes to the in sounds in Korean. The Lear sound changes to deign sound when the patch in Before is a continent other than the in or Lear. Let's first consider some words when the proceeding pattern is an ian or beom. A condom condom. Young, young, young, young come knee Come Knee Kanye, Kanye in the 1st 2 examples that leer in the second syllable is pronounced as Nian because it follows the constant young by Tim. They're pronounced as a condom and young young. In the last two examples, the same thing happens. But this time the syllable before has the constant being Batam and the Lear in company is a sam between Lille, Andean. So these words a pronounced come knee and Tanya Okay, so let's first practice saying these words repeat after me a condom. Young young company, Kanye. Fantastic efforts. Well done. Now this change from leer to the and sound also occurs with all the other regular continents. Listen to the following examples, but agile listen, think about how Lear changes to the and sound and also think about the change to the sound of the pattern before the lira sound. India India Pamela Poem. Tam nep um sing young single panorama, Alnami, Hamline, Hamline. In the first example, the leer in the second syllable changes to a knee and sound, but additionally, the Pupi Tim, which is pronounced as an unreleased pube, changes to the bm sound. So this follows the same nasal ization pattern we learned in the previous lesson. So this word is pronounced in your in York. Likewise, in the second example, the Lear changes to Indian sound and the P up changes to a bm sound. So this is pronounced Tom nep, um can nap. Um, In the third and fourth examples, the Lear changes to a D in sound and the Cheok on unreleased cheok sound changes to an EU incontinent sound which again follows the same nasal ization pattern from the previous lesson. So these words are pronounced sing yang sing yang panoramic, panoramic, and this same nasal ization pattern is seen in the last example to show patching, which is an unreleased ticket. Sound changes to a D in sound and the Lille in the second syllable changes to Indian sound . So this word is pronounced as hand nine hand nine So as well as the Lear changing to Indian sound, the previous by Jim changes to one of three nasal sound which we covered in the previous lesson. However, do know that while Cheok plus Lear and peer plus Lear patterns are quite common, other regular continents plus Lear pattern such as she Yacht plus Leo are quite rare. Okay, so with that in mind, let's now do a speaking practice. Listen carefully and repeat after me in Yeah, Tom nep um sing Yang PanAm a hand. Nine. Greater bowed on. Let's move on to the practice session. In this lesson, we're going to do to speaking practices, the first on Lear changing to be in sound when the syllable before ends in a BM or even by Tim. And the second practice is lira changing to d and sound when the syllable before ends in other regular continents. So if you're ready, let's begin with the first practice. Belling young tang lung tongue, Maisy, come knee who Niell hum young Kenya in that Romney yada sing Young Kyung Yo, Tanya Radha. So most of the valley just sometimes you get so big. Okay, so in this lesson, we looked at how Lear sound changes to deign sounds in Korean. We have one more lesson on the effects off nasal ization. So, Susan again in that lesson, but why? 53. Nasalization 3: Hi everyone. So in this lesson, we're going to learn how the neon batch him sound can change into a medium or an eating sound, depending on the consonants that follow. Let us first find out how the sound changes to a BM sound. Here are few examples. As you listen, listen carefully to how the dean bottom Sound changes. June be june BY campaign. Campaign. In these examples that Dean sound changes to a beam sound. And this occurs in words where the syllable after the DM, but Tim begins with a Pip. Pip sang beer or a meal. Here are a few more examples. And again, listen carefully to how the Nin buxom sound changes. Impact, impact. Come there, come their chin more, chin more. And budget and budget. So as you can hear, the DM batch him is pronounced as a beam sound, and I showed in the last example, this pronunciation pattern also happens between words. Okay, so let's now do a speaking practice of this pattern. Repeat after me. Jim B. Compound, empire, calm bay, symbol. And excellent job, well-done. Okay, so let's now look at how DM but him sound changes to an eating sound. Listen to the following examples. And again, listen carefully to how the deme but Tim sound changes. Hangul, Hangzhou, and Goryeo. And so in these examples that dm but shame is pronounced as an Young. And this happens when the syllable after begins with a key up, Sandia or Keel. Here are a few more examples. Xing He had Xing He hadn't yet been called. Yet. Boom got tagging call, chalcogen call. So in each phrase that Nian sound changes to an eating sound because the following syllable begins with the, the key up, Sandia or QQ. And as you can see in these last two examples, this pattern also occurs between two words. Okay, so with that in mind, let's now do a speaking practice. Repeat after me. Hen Bu Xing He had yet boom, got chalcogen call. Great job, well-done. Let's now move on to the practice session. There are two practices and you practice how the DM, but Tim changes to a beer and eating sounds depending on the consonants that follow. So if you're ready, we'll begin with practicing how DNA changes to a BM sound. Sample. Unmanned, tomato. Kim. Yet been caught. Hello, my name is Isiah crontab. Ok, so today we learned how the DM potassium sound changes to either a medium sound depending on the consonants that follow. In the next lesson, we're going to learn how the sound is added to certain words. So I'll see you soon again in that lesson. Bye-bye. 54. Adding ㄴ sound: Hi there. So in this lesson, we're going to learn how in some cream was the sound of Deion is added to certain syllables in Korean. In certain word combinations, the sound of the n gets added to a certain syllable. Here are some examples Listen to how the sound of the in gets added to certain syllables in each word in yet even Yup, Going in gonna nip Can you od Can you od pan young My pan young mind Now, in each of these phrases and me in constant is added to the second syllable that begins with a constant young And for this to happen, there are three important conditions. First, the word must be a compound noun, meaning that it must be made up off to separate now owns. Secondly, the syllable before where the neon is added must have a pattern. And lastly, the syllable in which Indian is added must use the Ian Continent and the Vow e or one of the six wide light vows. So these words are pronounced as in Europe in Yup, gonna nip nip January January pan young My pen young, my And as you could hear when we added the into the second syllable. This causes the pattern in the previous syllable to be nasal ized. So the pew but him in the first word becomes bm that she had But him in the Second world becomes Dian and the Cheok sound becomes young. And in the last word, the knee, um, bottom is a ready in nasal. I sound so it stays the same. This pattern of nasal ization follows the same pattern, which we learned in an earlier lesson. Here are a few more examples, pal. New Panyu saying Young Pierre saying Young Pierre two tone. Yeah, two tone yet so again in these words, when Indian sound is added to the second or third syllables, the patching before is nasal ized. Except for the third word, as young is already and nasal, I sound okay, So let's now do a speaking practice off these words where we add Indian sound and the patching before is nasal ized. Listen carefully and repeat after me in yet gonna nip Can you od fine young, my pal. New Ssangyong pill to talking yet Excellent oboe. Done. Now, before we move on to the practice session, it should be noted that there are certain exceptions to the rule off adding Deion sounds. Here are some examples Ton Tony up Toronto Yup, you'll get, I told Jack. Pay a Gipsy. They are Gipsy. All these words followed. The three conditions on the rich Andean sound can be added first. They're all compound downs. The syllable before where knee and sound is added, has a patch him and the syllable where knee and sound is added, begins with an e incontinent and has either the vow E or a wide line foul. However, rather than Indian sound being added, the pattern is carried over to the following syllable. So they're pronounced tanto Jac Tancho Yuck! Pull! Jack told Get They are Gipsy. They are Gipsy. So do keep in mind that there are also exceptions to the rule that we have learned in this lesson. Okay, so let's now move on to the practice session for more speaking practice. In this practice you will see a Siris of words that follow the knee in sound edition pattern, and the three important rules were one. The words air compound downs to the syllable before where near is added, must have a patch him. And three, the syllable where the nearness added to uses that Ian Constant and has the vow e or a wide light vow. I'd like you to say the words by adding that being sound and nasal izing the patching before appropriately. Okay, so if you're ready, let's begin the practice. Pam, Neil, Money in soon You, Penn your e hang out him Kanye Coup saying you empower so much has also come times you gonna die semen now. Okay, so in this lesson, we looked at how the sound of Deion can be added to certain syllables in Korean words. In the next lesson, we're going to learn how sometimes in Korean lacks constants are pronounced as tens continents. So our Susan again in that listen, but why? 55. Tensing consonants: hi, everyone. And welcome back in this lesson. We're going to look at how lax constants are sometimes pronounced as tens continents. By now, you should know that in Korean there are five lacks continents, which have tens constant pairs. And the key difference between these continents is that while the sound off lacks, consulates are produced with more relaxed muscles around the mouth. The tens constant sounds are produced with mawr muscle tension around the mouth area. Now, when these lacks confidence of position at the front of a word, they are usually pronounced as lack sounds. However, when a lax constant, it comes after a pattern other than one of the nasal continents, it is pronounced as a tens constant. Here are a few examples Yeah, go, yeah, go pat joke pet joke Ipsa ipsa. Fatima Fatima. So as you could hear the lacks confidence in the syllable after the patch, him a pronounced as tens constants. So these words are Yakoub, Pat Ipsa and Fatima. Let's take a look at a few more examples. Sick down, sick down Act four at four. But see that Bottega chill simply there. So simply there. So again, in each of these examples The lax constant that follows a patch him is pronounced as a tense continent. And as we learned before with a heared continent Pat Tim, When shield follows a here constant patch him shot is pronounced as a tense constant. Now, one other point to note is that when we pronounce lacks confidence as tens continents, the pattern sound before disappears, especially in natural far speech. Listen to all the examples again in natural far speeds And listen carefully to the sound of the pattern. Yeah, yeah. Go patio Patchogue ipsa ipsa Fatima, Fatima Sit down, Sit down. Act! Pull back! Pull Bottega Bottega Till simply there. Chosin Nida. Now, you could probably hear that the disappearance off the patch him sound is more obvious in some words than in others. We can still hear the pattern sound in IPSA sik, Dang and Akbel. However, in all the other words, the patch him sound pretty much disappears. So yeah, crook is Yeah, Coop and Pat. Juke is Patchogue. So do you keep in mind that the disappearance off the pattern sound is more prominent in some worse than others? Okay, so let's now do a speaking practice where lacks. Continents are pronounced as tens continents when they follow a patch in. Repeat after me, yeah, go pat Joke upside Fatima. Sit down, Makbul Ma Thida. She'll simply there. Excellent job. Well done. Now, while tensing Lex continents after a patch, him is an easy pattern to learn in Korean. Lacks constants are regularly pronounced as tens continents, even when there is no patching before or when the lax continent follows and nasal constant . Here are a few examples require require inky, inky Trittin through town. So in all these examples, the lax constant in the second syllable is pronounced as a tense continent, and sadly, for us, there is no pattern. They follow when lacks continents randomly, a pronounced as tens constants. So when we learn new words, it's important for us to listen to how the words are pronounced to find out if any lacks constants are pronounced as a tense continent. Now there are also certain words where a lax constant can be pronounced as a lax or a tense continent. Here are a few examples I said. I said that Charlie I o Calio pine on a bond I love. So in each of these words. The highlighted continent can be pronounced as a lax or a tense continent, and both will be correct. And this often occurs in loan words as in words that come from other languages such as Power Nana Banana and Tim Tim. Okay, so let's now do a speaking practice with these words, which do not follow any pattern of tensing. And also these words where lacks constants can be pronounced as lax or tense continents. Listen carefully and repeat after me tick wa in g True 10 said I channel i o by Lana Greater World on Let's move on to the practice session in this practice we're going to do to practice is one where the LAX constant follows a patch him and becomes a tense continent in another where lacks confidence. A pronounced as a tense continent without following any pattern and will also practice words where certain constants can be pronounced. Asked lax and tense constants, though in this practice, will pronounce them as tens continents. Okay, so if you're ready, let's begin with the first practice. Yeah, go book that that um up here. Sit down, Gadi Pil Corey, Back Battle Sica two down! You're done that guy? Oh, Busey game. They wouldn't go cruising Banya just so Grandpa Michigan. It has him. And now, Okay, so in this lesson, we looked at how lax constants are sometimes pronounced as tens constants in Korean. We're now going to move away from looking at pronunciation at a world level and start looking at pronunciation at a sentence level. So Susan again in the following lesson, but by 56. Natural pitch: hi, everyone. So in this unit we're going to focus on aspects of Prasit E, which refers to the rhythm of a particular language and in this lesson will focus on aspects, off stress and pit. Now, when it comes to pronunciation, perhaps the single biggest difference between English and Korean is that English is a stress timed language, while Korean is a syllable time language. And this means that in English, some syllables are given more prominence than others. This prominence is called stress, and stressed syllables are called strong sounds. While unstrapped syllables a called weak sounds. Consider the following words Hospital, hospital offensive, offensive engineer, engineer. All three words have three syllables, but the stress placement is all different in hospital. The stress is on the first syllable, inoffensive. The stress is on the second syllable, and in engineer, the stress is on the third syllable. So stress placement various between words in English. Also at sentence level. We tend to play stress on content words, and these are words like noun Zvi Bob's adjectives and adverbs, which give meaning to the sentence. Consider the following sentence. The Children play football for an hour in the park the Children played football for an hour in the park. In this sentence, there are five content words. Children played football our park, so these words are stressed while structure words the four unknown in and there again are weak sounds. So this sentence is the Children play football for an hour in the park. Now, in contrast, because Korean is a syllable time language except for the purpose off emphasis at certain times in natural speech, all syllables air given mawr less equal emphasis. However, what important feature related to stress is the difference in pit pitch refers to the rise and fall in our voice and in natural speech in Korean. The first syllable, or phrases and sentences, generally carry a slightly higher pitched than other syllables. Listen to the following phrases and sentences and see if you can notice a higher pitch in the first syllable heads. Soyo, Hess, Soyo, Pamela SIA, Pam Obasanjo Your salmon are Chiyo. You're seeing my neck, I o. So in each phrase and sentence, the first syllable carries a higher pitch than the other syllables. So they are Hess, Soyo, Hess, Soyo, Pamela Soya, Pamela SIA, your semen neck I O your share, Maneka. Okay, so let's now do a speaking practice. Listen carefully to the higher pitch in the first syllable and repeat after me. Hess, Soyo, Pamela. So Yoshi About America. Excellent job. Well done. Now, another important aspect of Korean phrases and sentences is that as well as the first syllable carrying a higher pitch. The final syllable off many career phrases and sentences is slightly longer than the other syllables. Listen to the following phrases and sentences. Cut shikata catchy kata Cvik heika She begged Gail Copy and generally copy and generally now, as we learned just before the first syllable carries a slightly higher pitch in the final syllable in each phrase and sentence is slightly longer than the other syllables. Now, if your first language is English, this is a significant difference. As generally, the final syllable, or phrases and sentences in English tend to be weak sounds. However, in Korean, they're given more prominence than syllables that come before them. Okay, so let's now do a speaking practice off these phrases and sentences, bearing in mind that the final syllable last a little longer than the syllables before them . Cat shikata. She begged Gail copy and generally great or well done. Let's now move on to the practice session. In this practice, we're going to do one long practice as you listen and repeat after meaner. Think about how the first syllable carries a higher pitch and how the final syllable last a little longer than other syllables in the phrases and sentences. Okay, so if you're ready, let's begin. How goes it there? Take away the recoil. Copy. Mice, Eczema, Tony Kun, Broadway style Leonard. I see the one toe don't and copy mice eczema to So one is all clean block away. So being sent into basil table recoil when you do. Civil manuals aside from Thomas is gonna take a okay. So in this lesson, we learned a key difference between English and Korean in relation to stress. And we learn two important aspects of Korean pronunciation in the next lesson. We're going to look at how we emphasize certain syllables and words in Korean sentences season again in that lesson, but by 57. Focus: hi, everyone. So in this lesson, we're going to learn how we emphasize certain words in Korean sentences. Now in English, we can emphasize certain information as being more important than others. This emphasis, on certain words, is called Focus. Consider how I say the following sentences. Think about the words I emphasize in each sentence. I wanted to buy the banana milk. I wanted to buy the banana milk. I wanted to buy the banana milk. So in each sentence we can emphasize different words to focus on that piece of information . You can also do this in Korea. Dannon banana leaders, anguish, pasa then and banana weirdos have wished pasa than in banana. Were is hogwash casa. So similarly in Korean, we can focus on certain words in sentences toe. Emphasize their importance. Okay, so let's now do a speaking practice off emphasizing certain words in Korea. Done in panel leaders. Habbush pasa done and panel now leaders I wish fossil than impanel were is Half Jewish apostle. That was excellent. Well done. Now, for the most part, rules on how we focus on certain words is similar between English and Korean. However, in certain question structures, what word we focus on changes, the meaning off the question. And this largely happens because Korean wh words such as Do Goo Born and Audie can also function as indefinite pronouns such as someone, something and somewhere. Consider the following two questions Both I saw Boss, I saw Boss has So Boss has, sir. In the first question, when we focus on the word bore, the question is an open ended question about what the other person has bought. However, in the second question, when we focus on the verb, Sassa, which is the past tense offs, had a meaning to buy. The question becomes a yes or no question. And Mawr is used as an indefinite pronoun, meaning something. This contrast exists when the question structure consists of a Korean wh word and a Bob. Here are a few more examples Do would you are here. Do good your hair do which Weihe do go to our hair on Jorquera on your choir, on your choir, on your choir, O Deka or D Guy or D Ca or Deka. So in these example, questions when the focus is on the wh words do goo on J and Audie that wh words are used as wh words. But when the focus is on the verbs, the questions become yes or no questions. And the wh words are used as indefinite pronouns, meaning someone some point in some way. Okay, so let's now do a speaking practice off these questions. Think about how your focus on different words to form different questions. If you're ready, let's begin. Bosaso. Both Hassa do good. Go ahead, do good. So I hear on your choir on your choir or D guy or D ca Greater well done. Let's now move on to the practice session. Okay, so we're going to do to practice is the first on focusing on different words to emphasize the importance and the second on focusing on different elements in questions to form different questions. Okay, so if you're ready, let's begin with the first practice being certainty. Basal ganglia. Beans in in si basil, Kumbaya. Tonin. Tom Junod wrote while I told him to, You know, really Toya sitting and a little tired today. Honda So didn't Dale, Beto, Toyota Honda? Oh, dear America Erica Bull Bogle a bobo Glenn Do go a so new girl I sell. Okay, So Okay has. So when they told merciful Banias a queer sometimes gonna do away care. Okay, So in this lesson, we looked at how we focus on different words for emphasis and how we form different questions. Depending on where the focus is in the next lesson, we're going to learn about intonation with different types of Korean sentences. So Susan again in that lesson, but by 58. Intonation: hi, everyone. So in this lesson, we're going to learn about Internation n Korean sentences. Firstly, in general, the way we change Internation to convey different moods is quite similar between English and Korea. For example, if we want to show a surprise or disbelief, we can raise the intonation at the end of statement So we can say really gente center. Or if we want to show excitement, we can say the statement with a rising tone at the end. So we can say tomorrow is my birthday dady days hanging tr They did this hang India. So in this lesson, as we learned, the natural intonation of Korean sentences were referring to how Korean sentences are spoken in a general sense. So let's first talk about the clarity of statements. Declarative statements, both positive and negative, are generally said with a falling tone at the end, though at times they can be said with a flat tone. Here are some example sentences John J. Hesse tone and took Hesse business in a longer Heitor bola beans in a younger Heitor Bola Children Hangu, Murtadha, Thanh and handle motor area. So, as you could hear, general declarative statements are mostly said with a falling tone at the end. And as we learned before, the first syllable carries a higher pitch, and the final syllable can also last a little longer than other syllables in the sentences . Okay, so let's practice saying these sentences listen and repeat after me, John, and took to Hesse beans in a longer, habitable ia tone and handle murtadha. That was great. Well done. Let's now consider different levels of intonation for different questions. Listen to these examples to go to our hair. Choco to our hair more Sessa boss has so Oh, my oh my more Sassa Bosaso. Now the 1st 2 questions are yes or no questions, and these questions always have a rising tone at the end. And this partly has to do with what we learned in the previous lesson, where we mentioned that to form yes or no questions, we focus more on the bob and in Korean sentences. The vote is always at the end now, in the last two questions, which are wh word questions, the tone still rises at the end, but it's less pronounced. And because of the focus on the initial wh word, you can sound like the tone force. At the end of the question, however, it's just that there is less focus on the final syllable than in yes or no questions. Okay, so let's now they're speaking. Practice all of these questions. Listen carefully to the differences in tone for yes or no questions. And wh word questions. Chuck, what you are here more, Tessa, or in my hair? Bosaso. That was great. Wot done. Let's now move on to the practice session. Okay, so in this practice, we're going to do to practices first on saying declarative statements with a falling intonation and second on wh word and yes or no questions. Okay, So if you're ready, let's begin the practice. I told them Pamela Sile Tonin, similar to azadi me that so did NT. People going so beans in into Google Musical Andhra here certain into basil corn, Broadway style. Pamela So sea bass. So they're young Globally. Ball hog weighs cell on Daisy Bell choir. So most of humanity. Okay, so in this lesson, we learned about natural intonation pattern in declarative and question statements. Okay, so that's it. That's the end of the course, But we have one last farewell video, so we'll leave our final goodbyes until then. I'll see you soon in that video, but by 59. Final farewell: Hi there. So this is the final farewell now. I think getting to the end of these long courses is really no easy it also completing it alone is a big achievement. So definitely if you give yourself a pat on the bank. Also, I hope you were able to improve your understanding off the key rules on Korean pronunciation. And all that's left to do is to practice speaking Korean regularly and also to listen to natural Korean speech as often as possible. Bearing in mind what you learned in this course, if you can practice Korean regularly, I'm sure that you will make great improvements on your Korean pronunciation. Okay, so that's it for this final farewell video will keep this video short. Thank you again for taking this course, and I hope to see you soon. A gain comes on the organ damage, Rebecca by