Knitting II: Learn Stitch Widths with a Triangle Scarf | Davina Choy | Skillshare

Knitting II: Learn Stitch Widths with a Triangle Scarf skillshare originals badge

Davina Choy, Yarn Wrangler at Sheep & Stitch

Play Speed
  • 0.5x
  • 1x (Normal)
  • 1.25x
  • 1.5x
  • 2x
8 Lessons (38m)
    • 1. Trailer

      1:20
    • 2. Introduction and Materials

      4:54
    • 3. Considering Yarn Weights

      3:24
    • 4. Demonstrating the Cast On and Increase Stitches

      9:35
    • 5. Planning for Color Blocking and Mixed Yarns

      5:09
    • 6. Demonstrating Color Blocking

      8:36
    • 7. Finishing with Weaving Off

      4:38
    • 8. More Creative Classes on Skillshare

      0:33

About This Class

Learn to knit with Sheep & Stitch founder Davina Choy's fun 36-minute class for beginners. With friendly and clear instruction, she introduces three easy techniques to expand your repertoire: stitch increases so you can shape stitched fabric into alternate shapes, color blocking for visual interest, and weaving in loose ends for that polished final touch. She demonstrates each technique in a Skillshare-exclusive triangle scarf pattern specifically designed for a beginner, and the zoomed-in video lessons make it easy to see each move. By the class's end, you'll have a fun triangle scarf to throw on any outfit or share with a friend.

For basics, check out Knitting I: Learn the Basics with a Simple Scarf.

Explore the other classes in this series:

Transcripts

1. Trailer: For me, knitting is really relaxing. Its kind of meditative. It's a great way to decompress. Hi. My name is Davina Choy and I run a site called sheepandstitch.com where I teach people how to knit through simple patterns and video tutorials. In this Skillshare class, we're going to learn how to knit this really cool triangle scarf. We're going to do this with a really simple increases. So, you'll learn how to increase and also learn how to color block so that you can make cool stripes and blocks of color in your scarf. Color blocking is really cool because it's really trendy right now and it also adds a lot of visual interests. It's super fun. It's really amazing to be able to make something with your own two hands. Most of us don't really use our hands for very much these days beyond typing on a keyboard or sort of picking up things. Our hands are not really part of any production. But with knitting, you can use your own two hands and you can actually make something that you can wear or give to someone else. You can make something that's beautiful and useful. For me, that's completely magical, and I would love for other people to experience that, too. 2. Introduction and Materials: So, when you're knitting, increasing is really important, because if you didn't have increases, you wouldn't be able to shape your fabric. So, for example, if you didn't have increases, you would only be making a straight tube or just a flat piece of fabric. When you can increase your work, you can go from a smaller number of stitches to a larger number of stitches. So, for example, if you have a cuff of a sleeve, you would start small at your sleeve and then you would increase upwards, your sleeve would go larger and larger to accommodate your arm, and you can do that with increases. Increases are also really great with socks or mittens. Basically, any kind of knitting that starts small and expands outwards would use increases. With this scarf, we're going to be increasing from this tip right here, you can see this is a tiny little tip here, and we'll be using increases to increase upwards into this giant base that you see here. So, we're actually going to be going from two stitches down here, all the way to 200 stitches up here. That's how we're going to be incorporating increases. Now, you can see on this scarf that the increases are kind of angled. So, on this side, we have increases going this way, and on this side of the scarf, we've got increases coming up this way. So, we're going to be using two kinds of increases so that we can angle the increases in a triangle shape, this way and this way. So, in order to knit this scarf, you need to know the foundational skills of knitting. So, you need to know how to cast on, cast off, knit and prawl. I'm going to show you how to do the increased stitches so that you can make these increases that we just talked about. So, the materials that you'll need to knit the scarf are actually quite simple. What you'll need is some worsted weight yarn, and we're going to talk a little bit about yarn weight in the next unit, but for now, just keep in mind that you'll want a worsted weight yarn or any kind of yarn that is heavier than worsted wight. So, an Aran weight would be great, a chunky weight, a bulky, a super bulky would be very interesting for the scarf, but I want to give you a lot of flexibility for this project. So, you can choose any weight that you like as long as it's above worsted weight. The reason for this is because worsted weight is a nice medium weight yarn, and because this is still kind of a beginner project, it's good for you to use a thicker yarn so that you can maneuver your yarn better when you're knitting, because it's really hard to knit with a really fine weighted yarn. However, if you feel comfortable using, say, a fingering weight or even a lace weight yarn, feel free to do that. But if you're just getting started, you're still a little bit nervous about knitting, you're still a little bit finicky with the needles, then I would suggest a worsted weight yarn or anything heavier than that. Okay. So, you're going to want about 200 yarns of worsted weight, 200 to 250, I would say. That's a really good kind of general estimate for you because we're working with different yarn weights. Okay. So, the next thing that you're going to need is a pair of circular needles like this. So, we're not actually going to be knitting in the round with these circular needles, but because our scarf is really long, you're not going to be able to knit your entire scarf on a pair of regular flat needles, right? So, these circular needles are 24 inches in length. So, from this tip to this tip, it's 24 inches and that's probably the smallest length that you should go for. So, if you have a 36-inch circular needle, that's fine too. All right. So, the next thing that you're going to want is a tapestry needle. Now, a tapestry needle just looks like a giant sewing needle. It's like a sewing needle for a giant. This is great for weaving in your end, so if you're going to be doing any color blocking, you're going to have a lot of loose threads at the end of your project. So, you don't want those loose threads hanging out. So, that's why we're going to use a tapestry needle to weave in all of those ends so that your scarf looks really nice and pretty. Okay. So, we're going to talk a little bit about how you're going to choose the size of your needle. So, because I said that you can choose any kind of yarn weight that you like, the size of your needle is going to vary. So, the best way to decide what needle size to use, is to look at the yarn label. So, if your yarn label suggests a five millimeter needle, or sometimes, they give you a range like a four to five-millimeter needle, then I would just choose either a four-millimeter needle or five-millimeter needle. The gauge for this scarf doesn't really matter so much. So, you can just go right with what the yarn label tells you to get for your needle size. So, that's all of the materials that you'll be needing for this project: circular needle, tapestry needle, and a yarn of your choice. 3. Considering Yarn Weights: All right. So, now let's talk a little bit about yarn weight. So, I've got a collection of different yarns in different weights right here. So, let's go through them together. I don't have the whole family, but I've got a selection so that you can get an idea of the different types of yarn weight out there. So, let's start with the thinnest yarn weight. So, this is lace weight. So, you can see it's really, really fine. It almost looks like a thread that you use when you're sewing. It's very fine, and it's typically used to knit up lace. So, when you have this in lace, it has really nice open lacework. It shows up really, really well. I wouldn't suggest this for the triangles scarf just because it's so thin and when you're using a thin yarn, you're also going to be using a thin needle. So, if you use this for your scarf, you're going to be needing for a really long time, and it's also going to be tricky to work with. So, I wouldn't suggest a yarn weight that's this light. All right. So, moving up from that, we would have fingering weight. So, this is fingering weight yarn, and it's just a little bit thicker than lace weight. It can be really pretty if you use this for the triangles scarf, but because it's so thin, you are going to be needing for awhile, and it is a little bit finicky to work with. So, if you're still feeling a little bit clumsy with your needles, I would not suggest using fingering weight for this scarf. So, one up from fingering weight is going to be something called DK weight. So, this is a DK weight yarn, and it's just a slightly bit thicker than fingering weight. This would be okay. If you're feeling adventurous, you're feeling really confident about your knitting, you could totally use a DK weight. If you're still feeling a little bit unsure, then I would put this aside and move up to a worsted weight. So, this is a worsted weight yarn. Worsted weight yarn is great. It's basically a medium weight yarn, and it's probably the most popular yarn weight out there because it's just a nice solid yarn weight, and this is the weight that I would suggest that you choose for your triangle scarf. So, a worsted weight or anything above a worsted weight would be great because you can grip it really easily and you won't be fumbling around with it. It's a nice solid weight. All right. So, one up from worsted is aran weight. So, here we go. Aran weight is just a little bit thicker. It's got a little bit of bounce to it. It's a nice weight. You can totally use this for the scarf. No problem. All right. So, we're going to skip a couple of weights and move up to a chunky weight. So, this is the yarn that we used in the first knitting course, where we knit a garter stitch scarf. This is a nice great beginner weight yarn. You can grab it, and it's not going to slide around too much because it's so thick. It's really easy to maneuver and work with. So, if you wanted to use a chunky weight, that would be really interesting for the triangle scarf. All right. So, above a chunky weight, we've got a bulky weight and a super bulky weight. I don't have that here, but you could definitely use that for the triangle scarf. All right. So, just to recap, worsted weight and above is my suggestion for the triangle scarves, and this is your little intro to yarn weights. 4. Demonstrating the Cast On and Increase Stitches: Alright. So, let's start casting on, but before we do it's a good idea to download the pdf of the pattern in the project notes. Once you do, you can follow along with this demonstration. All right. So, the first thing that we want to do is cast on two stitches. We're just going to use a slipknot to do this. So, I'm going to make a loop with my yarn, and I'm going to bring the yarn with the tail end to the back of this loop. Then, I'm just going to pick up that loop just like that. So, here we've got a slipknot. I'm going to put it right onto my needle, and then tighten it up. Just like this. All right. Cool. So, we're only casting on two stitches. We're going to use a very simple cast on that we learned in class one of the how to knit video. So, we're just going to make a loop and twist that onto our needle. Cool. So, now we have two stitches. All right. So, the next line of our pattern says that, we need to knit across these two stitches. So, what we're going to do is just turn our needle round. Of course I'm knitting this on my circular needles, and I'm just going to knit across these two little stitches right here. So here we go. Here is one stitch being knit up. Whoops! What's going on here? Here we go. Here's one stitch and two stitch. Here we go all right. So, now we've just done row one of our pattern. We're going to move on to row two. All right. So, row two is going to be our first increase. This is a pretty unique increase. This is called the KFB also known as the Knit Through the Front and Back. So, it sounds, it is exactly what it sounds like. We're just going to take our needle, go into this first stitch, and knit into it. All right. But we're not going to pop it off offer a needle as we normally would. Instead we're going to take our needle and knit into the back of that very same stitch. By doing this, we're going to actually increase by one. So, here I've just gone into the back of that same stitch and I'm gonna bring my yarn loop it around. Bring it through that stitch same stitch and then drop it off the needle. So now you can see that what was once one stitch is now two stitches. All right. So, we've increased by one stitch. So, let's do that again, we're going to do another KFB. So, I'm going to take my right needle, and go into the stitch on my left needle, knit into it like this. I'm not going to drop it off. Okay. I'm going to knit into the back of that same stitch. So, here we go. I'm going to take my needle and go into it there, we go, and then knit into the back of it. Just like this. Here we go. So, now I've got four stitches on my needle. I started with two and now I've got four. So, we've increased by two stitches on this row. All right. So let's turn our work around and knit across. So, now we're on row three of our pattern. We're just going to knit across these four stitches that we've created. Here we go. Three and four. Okay. So, now we're going to move on to row four of our pattern. Now, row four, we're going to knit one, and we're going to do a brand new increase. All right. So, pay attention. Here we go. We've just knit one, and then we're going to do an M1R are. That stands for Make one Right. So, we're going to make an increase that slants towards the right. All right. So, in order to do this, I'm going to take my right hand needle and go under this stitch or actually it's not really a stitch. I should correct myself. Between the first stitch here in the second stage you see a bit of yarn here. Right. There's a bit of a bridge, and what we're going to do is we're actually just going to pick up that little bridge of yarn with my right needle. So, I'm going to pick it up from Front to Back like this and I'm just going to drop it onto my left needle just like that. Okay. Then, I'm going to knit into this little bridge that my yarn, this little loop, has made. So, you're going have to maybe pinch this little bridge like that, because it's going to be really hard to just knit into it like this. Right. It's kind of finicky. So, I'm just going to pinch it a little bit and slip my needle underneath it like that. I'm going to push my needle through, and just knit into that piece of yarn that we've just made, and I'm going to pop it off. So, there I have just increased by one stitch. Cool. All right. So, let's keep going in our pattern. So, it says that we need to knit to our last stitch. So here we go. We're going to knit these two stitches. Now, we're at our last stitch. It says that we need to do an M1L which means we need to make one towards the left. So, we're going to do more or less the same thing. Between this stitch and this stitch you can see that there's a little bit of yarn in between. Right. There's this little yarn bridge. So, what we're going to do is we're going to take this little yarn bridge, and bring it onto our left needle. I'm going to take my left needle and go in from the front to the back. Just like this. Okay. So, previously, we had gone from Back to the Front like this, but for our M1L, we're going to go from the front to the back. So, I've just picked up that little bridge. I'm going to go from the Front to the Back just like this. Then, I'm going to use my right needle to knit into this stitch, but I'm not going to knit into it like this. I'm actually going to knit it into the back of this stitch. So,again, we're going to pinch this little loop that we've made a little bit, and I'm going to take my needle, and just drop it into the back of this loop, just like that. I'm going to knit into it like this, and then pop it off my needle. Then, we've got one stitch left, and I'm just going to knit into this stitch. All right. So, let's move on to row five of our pattern. Row five requires that we just knit across this whole row. So, let's do that. That's a nice easy row. Here we go. Just going to knit across it like this and there we are. So, if you look at the next part of our pattern, it says that we need to repeat rows four and five until we have 16 stitches. After that we're going to move on to the one-line repeat of our pattern. All right. So, go ahead and do that. Repeat rows four and five until you've got 16 stitches and meet me back here, and we'll continue on with the rest of our pattern. Okay. So, now that you've got 16 stitches we can move on to the next line of our pattern. This is actually the last line of our pattern. We're just going to repeat this line until you get to the width of scarf that you want. All right. So, what we're going to do is, we're going to do a knit one, here we go, and then we're going to do an M1R. You should be used to this by now. Right? So, we're going to take that strand of yarn between our two stitches. I'm going to take it up and put it over my left needle like that. All right. Then, I'm going to pinch it a little bit so that I can knit into it. Cool. So, this is our M1R. It's an increase that slants to the right side. That's great because our scarf is slanting to the right side right over here. All right. So now, we're just going to knit two the last stitch of our row. That's pretty much what we're going to be doing. We're going to need to the last stage of our row, and then we're going to do an M1L. Then a knit one, and then that's it. That is just going to be the repeat for your entire scarf. Pretty easy. Right. So, here we go. Here's the last stitch, and now we're going to bring our right needle to pick up the strand of yarn between our two stitches. We're going to bring our left needle from the front to the back to pick up that strand of yarn. Then, we're going to take our right needle and knit into the back of it. Right here. So here we go. I'm going to push my needle in, and then knit into it. That is our M1L which makes a left left-leaning increase. Then I'm going to knit that last stitch. Cool. So, now I've just increased by two stitches on my row. I'm just going to repeat that. I'm going to repeat that row till my scarf is as big as I want it. Pretty easy. Right? So, again knit one, make one right. Here we go, picking up our strand, putting it on our needle knitting into it all the way, and we're going to knit until we reach the last stage of our row. We're going to do an M1L. So that's just a one-line repeat. This is a one line repeat Pattern. It's simply easy and if you wanted to knit your scarf in one color you would just continue in this manner all the way until you get to the width that you like. Now, if you want a color block, then you can watch the next section of this video, and I'll show you how to do it. But first let's do our M1L. So, here we go, we're at the last stage of our pattern, and we're going to take this strand of yarn between our two needles, and I'm going to pick it up from the front to the back. Just like that. I'm going to knit it into the back of it. Right. So, this is our M1L, our left-leaning increase. I'm going to knit into it, and then knit the last stitch. Cool. All right. So just keep on repeating that one line in your pattern until you get up to the width that you like. If you want to color block, then watch the next part of this video. 5. Planning for Color Blocking and Mixed Yarns: Okay. So, you can knit up your triangle scarf in a nice simple solid color that's totally great. If you find a yarn that you really like and a color that you fall in love with then, knitting up your whole scarf in that one color can be awesome. However, color blocking is really cool, because it's really trendy right now, and it also adds a lot of visual interest. Having different colors and sort of mashing them together and seeing the visual effect of that you can play around with that and that can be really cool. It also allows for a personalization, so, if you're really into greens and reds and pinks you can just choose the colors that really speak to you and use those in your scarf. So, that's one reason why color blocking is a really cool option in addition to knitting your scarf in a single color. Okay. So, when you're choosing the colors that you want to work with you can go into a store and just sort of pick a color that speaks to you, that can be really cool and if you go to a really cool local yarn store with a lot of really sumptuous yarns it can be an amazing experience. However, if you want to really think carefully about the colors that you're going to use you can rely on a little bit of color theory. Now, when you're thinking about color theory there are some basic principles, and I've got some notes in the project notes that you can take a look at, but basically if you want something with a lot of bold bright colors you might think about using complimentary colors. So, you might think about using a red and a green, or a blue and an orange, or purple and a yellow. So, those are complimentary colors and if you mash those two colors together you have a really bright bold look. So, here I've got some examples of analogous colors. We've got colors all in the same sort of range on the color wheel, and here I've got complimentary colors. I've got a blue and an orange and I've kind of staggered different stripes and chunks of color on the scarf. Here this scarf was kind of inspired by nature. This is what I think a leopard would look like. So, I used leopard colors to draw out some colors here. Then I also drew out some colors using stripes. This was inspired by the nautical theme that just doesn't seem to be going away ever and I'm really happy about that, but I've just got blue and white and red just striped up. Here of course we've got big bold blocks of primary colors. We've got blue, red and yellow and this has a very different effect than say the stripes. So, all of these allow me to really visualize what my scarf is goning to look like. So, if you want to get really specific you like planning then this could be something that you can do. However, if you're really spontaneous you might just choose colors that you like and just start switching stripes and blocks of colors as you feel like it, as the mood moves you, and that's definitely something that you can do. One thing that I've done with friends is I've knit a couple rows of my scarf and I've passed it on to them, a friend and they've knit a couple rows and we just kind of work on the scarf together switching between colors, and that's a really fun kind of spontaneous thing to do and when you have your scarf done, you've got a scarf that was made between you and a friend and that can be really fun too. So, decide what you want to do, whether you want to plan out your scarf and have your color set out really specifically or whether you just want to choose some colors and play around with it as you go. So, another thing that you can do with your scarf is mix and match different yarn weights. So, we just talked about yarn weights and I had mentioned that using a worsted weight is a really good idea, and you can choose worsted weights throughout your whole scarf if that's what you want. So, if you're working with three different colors you can use a worsted weight for all three different colors, that's great, then you have a really uniform looking scarf. But if you want to play around with texture and with scale that can be really cool too. So, you might want to choose one color is a worsted weight and another color can be in say a chunky weight like this. So, that's a really interesting texture and you can definitely play around with it. The scarf allows for a lot of experimentation and flexibility. So, think about what you want your scarf to look like. Do you want a really uniform looking scarf? If so, then you would just use one yarn weight and stick with it throughout all of your color blocking. But if you want to play with texture with scale, you want to experiment a little bit you can think about using different types of yarn weight to achieve that, but here's a little tip, if you're going to play around with scale you should probably use two different yarn weights that are quite dramatically different. So, you don't really want a yarn weight like in worsted weight and then another yarn weight in aran weight, because they're really very similar, they're really similar in size, and if you do that sometimes it just looks like it's an accident. Like you just couldn't find yarn weight in a similar size. So, if you're going to be playing around with different yarn weights you should choose kind of dramatically different types other than play around with your yarn weight in that way. 6. Demonstrating Color Blocking: Once you've knit up to a point where you want to add colors, you should get your new yarn out. So, here I've got this yellow yarn, and I've decided I want my stripe to begin right here. So, what I'm going to do, is just take my yarn and fold it in half like this. I'm going to put my right needle right into this first stitch right here, and then I'm just going to take my yarn and pop it over my stitch just like that. So, I'm not going to be knitting with my white yarn right here, I'm going to be knitting with my yellow yarn right over here. So, I'm just going to bring it into my first stitch and you can see that the white yarn is quite loose. So, I'm just going to pull on it like that and get it tight again. So, now I'm just going to knit into my second stitch. So, here we go. Because I want my fabric to stay in place, I might just take these two yarn strands, so the yellow yarn, the tail end of it, and my white yarn, which is my old yarn, I'm just going to clamp it between my two fingers like this. So, it stays put for these next few stitches. So, for my second stitch, I'm going to use my yellow yarn which is attached to my ball of yarn. I'm just going to knit into this second stitch like that. My third stitch. Oh! Wait a minute, we forgot to do our pattern repeat, okay. So, let's go back here a minute. Take this stitch back, and we're going to continue with our pattern repeat which we have been doing all along. So, we're going to take this strand of yarn between our first and second stitch, bring it over our needle like this, and then with our new yellow yarn we are going to knit into it. So, we still want to continue with that pattern repeat even after we've changed yarn colors. So, now we're going to knit across our row. So, we're going to knit across our row until we get to the last stitch, and then we're going to do our m1L. So, don't forget to do your pattern increase even when you're switching your colors like I almost did. So, here we go. Once we get to the last stitch, here we are, then were going to do our m1L or make one left. So, here we go. I'm going to take my needle pick up that strand of yarn between the two stitches, I'm going to take my left needle and go from the back to the front, or sorry, from the front to the back like this. Then I'm going to knit into the back of it. Here we go. With my brand new yarn color. Here we go. Then knit that last stitch. Great. So, now we've just added one row of new color to our work and we're just going to turn around and continue knitting with our new strand of yarn. Here we go. Again, we're going to continue with that pattern increase. So, here we go. We're going to knit one and then we're going to do an m1L. So, I'm going to bring that strand of yarn, pop it over my left needle, and then knit into the front of it, and I'm just pinching that, so I can get my needle under it. There we go. Cool. So, we're just going to keep on knitting till our last stitch and then we'll do an m1L. So, we're just going to continue in this manner. Let's say after I do this one row of yellow, I want to switch back to white. Well, I'll show you how to do that in just a second. So, we're knitting across this row and we're going to go to our last stitch, at which point we're going to do our m1L? So, here we go. Here's our last stitch and I'm going to take my needle and I'm going to bring it, get up that yellow piece of yarn, and then I'm going to bring my needle from the front to the back, pick up that yarn strand, and then we're just going to knit into that strand that we just picked up. Here we go. Cool and whoops, we only want that yarn strand and then we're going to knit into our last stitch. Great. So, now we've just completed two rows in yellow. Great. So, let's say I want to switch back to my white, I only want one stripe of yellow. So, what I'm going to do, is I'm just going to tug on my white right here. Just to keep it tight, I want a nice clean edge, and all I'm going to do is just take my yarn and knit with it into the next stitch. It's really that easy. The important thing to remember, is that you want your yarn in the back. So, or your old yarn in the back. So, you want your new yarn, the yarn that you're knitting with up in the front. So, there we go. Here's my white and I'm just going to pick it up and continue knitting. Oops! But I forgot to do my increase. So, here we go. Let's do our increase, let's pick up the yarn strand from between our two stitches which should be right about here, or no, right about here. Let's pick that up. Here we go. So, we want to go from the back to the front, that's right, and then it into it like this, here we go. Then just continue knitting. All right. Here we go. Great. So, now you can see that I've switched from yellow to white. That is how you would switch between your colors. If you want to knit a longer than one stripe of yellow, you would just continue to strand your yarn up the side of your work. So, now I've just knit two rows of blue into my work. But maybe I don't want a stripe it. So, if I wanted to stripe it, I would just bring my cream color up and then knit into the stitch and knit it with the green color. But maybe I want to keep going with blue and maybe I want a chunk of blue. So, what I'm going to do, is I still want my cream color to be carried up with me in my work, so I'm going to take my cream and bring it over on top of my blue yarn. Just like this. So, just hover my blue yarn and then I'm just going to continue knitting. So, just like this and then into my next stitch. I'm going to do my m1L, I'm not going to forget this time. Here we go. Here's my m1L, and I'm just going to knit a few stitches and show you what our cream yarn is doing. So, here we go. Now you can see that our cream yarn is being carried up on the side our work. So, here it is. I can tighten it a little bit and it looks really messy now, but we can always weave this in later. But the point of this is that it's being carried up because at one point, I'm going to want to switch back to my cream yarn. So, if I have it being carried up along the side of my work, then when I decide I want to switch back to it, I can just take my yarn and start knitting. So, that's an easy way for us to strand our yarn along the side of our work. Now, if you're knitting like a super large chunk of blue, like let's say you want to knit like two inches of blue, then maybe it's not worth it to strand up your cream yarn in this way. Maybe it's a better idea to just take your scissors and cut it off, and then add in your cream when you're ready. It really depends on what you want. I'd say about two rows of the color and you can easily strand up your yarn four rows and that's fine. But anything more than four rows. So, if you want to knit like eight rows of blue, I would say just chop off your yarn. Then add it in as I showed you earlier when you're ready to introduce it. So, now you can see I've got a lot of strands here and this yellow that I added earlier is still attached to my ball of yarn and it's just hanging out. There's really no need for this yellow to be here right now. I've finished with my two rows of yellow, I don't really need it here anymore. So, what I'm going to do is I'm just going to take my scissors and chop it off. We're going to weave in all of these loose ends later. So, here we go. I'm just going to cut that off, because we don't need that yellow hanging out right now. We've finished with that two rows of yellow and we can move on. All right. So, that is how you would strand up your work if you want to. If you're knitting more than, I'd say four rows of the same color, then maybe don't strand up your work, maybe just cut it off and then introduce it when you are ready to go. 7. Finishing with Weaving Off: So, let's say you've knit up to a point that you are happy with and you're ready to cast off. So for me, maybe I'm making this scarf for my dog and it is the right length, so I want to cast off. For you, if you're making this for a human person, you might want to continue increasing until your scarf is quite large. But for me, I'm ready to cast off. So, this is going to be just a regular old cast off. So, there's really nothing fancy to this. We're just going to knit one and knit two, and then bring our needle under the first stitch and bring it over the second stitch. Just like that. It's just a regular cast off. The thing to keep in mind is, just to keep your cast off kind of loose. So, you don't want a tight edge, you want it to be nice and loose because at some point, you might want to stretch out your scarf a little bit and nobody wants a tight edge on their scarf. So, keep it loosey-goosey as you're casting off. So, we're nearing the end of our cast off right here and here's the last stitch. Cool. What we're going to do now, is we're just going to get our scissors out and here we go. Here our scissors and we're just going to cut a length of yarn, maybe six or seven inches in, cut that and we're going to bring our yarn up to the front of our work like this, and then we're just going to take our stitch, last stitch on our needle and bring it over that strand of yarn and then pull through and pull it tight. Here we go. So, now our scarf is off the needles. Pretty great, right? So, now we need to take care of these little ends that are hanging out. These are not so pretty, not so hot. So, let's get our tapestry needle out. This is its shining moment. Here we go. Here's our tapestry needle and what we're just going to do is, weave in these ends. So, let's start with the yellow down here. So, let's throw it up this yellow yarn that's hanging out and here we go. So, you can see on the front it shows in this little notch and I don't really want that. So, I'm just going to pull it tight like that. I'm going to turn my work over and I'm just going to thread it into my stitches right here. I'm going to follow the pattern of my row. So, you can see these little Purl stitches here, these little bumps. I'm just going to bring my yarn right into these little Purl bumps. I'm going to follow the flow of this row. I'm going to go down this Purl bump right here, and then up this one right here, and I'll do this maybe like four or five times just to make sure it's secure. I'll do this one more time. Cool. Let's look at the right side. That looks pretty good to me. So now, I'm just going to take my scissors and just snip it off pretty close to the edge of my fabric and there we go. You can stretch it out a little bit so it looks more integrated into your fabric and you would do that for all of these strands. All of these loose hanging strands, you would tighten it up a little bit so it looks good on the front and then weave it into the back of your work. Just like that. Now, with this little tip here, you would do the exact same thing. So, let's do this tip together. Let's just thread it through, and then we're on the backside of our work, I'll just push my needle through some of these Purl stitches here on the back. Try to make it in conspicuous. Let's go through one down here, we'll go up one, and let's do a few more, here is one, and then let's go through this guy over here, and go up one. So, this is not like an exact science. Basically, you want the strand to be secure and you want it to look nice on the front. So, it's not showing on the front, I think it is pretty acceptable. So, great. Now, I'm just going to get my scissors out and cut off this end right here. Great. Do this for all of the strands that you have hanging off your work and once you're done you can start wearing your scarf. 8. More Creative Classes on Skillshare: