Jazz Piano Chords - Rich sounding Jazz Chords for the Piano | Martin Cohen | Skillshare

Jazz Piano Chords - Rich sounding Jazz Chords for the Piano

Martin Cohen, Teacher, musician and composer

Jazz Piano Chords - Rich sounding Jazz Chords for the Piano

Martin Cohen, Teacher, musician and composer

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40 Lessons (3h 11m)
    • 1. Introduction

      2:40
    • 2. How to follow this course

      1:54
    • 3. Introduction to triads and other chords

      1:18
    • 4. Major triads

      4:05
    • 5. Minor triads

      3:56
    • 6. Diminished triads

      6:03
    • 7. Augmented triads

      2:21
    • 8. Inversions

      2:22
    • 9. Slash notation

      2:10
    • 10. Major 7th

      2:13
    • 11. Dominant 7th

      3:10
    • 12. Minor 7th

      6:10
    • 13. Diminished

      4:05
    • 14. Augmented

      2:39
    • 15. Minor major 7th

      1:29
    • 16. Chord Inversions

      1:48
    • 17. Slash notation - II

      1:16
    • 18. II-V-I progression

      15:01
    • 19. Playing the II-V-I progression in all 12 keys

      3:52
    • 20. Sus chords

      5:07
    • 21. Adding notes to chords Introduction

      4:15
    • 22. Adding notes to major 7th chords

      3:45
    • 23. Adding notes to minor 7th chords

      3:39
    • 24. Adding notes to dominant 7th chords

      5:34
    • 25. Add more than 1 note Altered

      7:39
    • 26. II-V-I progressions-II (A and B positions)

      4:37
    • 27. Playing the II-V-I's in all 12 keys (A and B positions)

      3:47
    • 28. Major 7th chord voicings

      5:55
    • 29. Minor 7th chord voicings

      6:12
    • 30. Dominant 7th chord voicings

      12:53
    • 31. Altered chord voicings

      6:13
    • 32. Diminished chord voicings

      3:41
    • 33. Augmented chord voicings

      1:59
    • 34. So What chords

      10:18
    • 35. Fourth chords

      4:22
    • 36. So What and Fourth-chords in other keys

      3:26
    • 37. Upper structures

      7:54
    • 38. Build your own chord voicings

      9:07
    • 39. Information about Comping

      4:30
    • 40. Tritone substitution

      7:38
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About This Class

THE COURSE THAT REVEALS ALL THE SECRETS OF JAZZ PIANO CHORDS

You always wondered how experienced jazz piano players create those rich sounding jazz chords? This course will teach YOU how to play them on the piano.

DISCOVER QUICKLY HOW CHORDS WORK AND HOW TO ADD THAT RICH JAZZ SOUND TO BASIC CHORDS

Detailed explanation by an experienced teacher (25+ years of experience) makes that you will quickly understand how to form even the most complicated jazz piano chords.

YOU WILL FINALLY BE ABLE TO PLAY ALL THE JAZZ TUNES YOU WANT ON THE PIANO, HAVE A "LIBRARY" OF CHORD VOICINGS AT YOUR DISPOSAL, AND EVEN CREATE YOUR OWN CHORD VOICINGS

You will be able to play every chord-type that exists in all the inversions possible, in close position and with the notes more spread out, so that with one and the same chord, you can create different emotions, with more or with less tension.

Topics covered in this class:

- All the 'basic' triads and 7th chords

- Slash chords

- Adding notes (and alterations) to the basic chords

- II-V-I progressions (basic and with added notes) in all 12 keys

- Sus chords

- Lots of different chord voicings for all the chord types

- 'So What'-chords

- Fourth chords

- Upper Structures

- Building your own chord voicings

- Comping

- Tritone Substitution

Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

Martin Cohen

Teacher, musician and composer

Teacher

Martin Cohen is since about 25 years a teacher of physics, mathematics and informatics.  

He taught at several schools in and around Amsterdam and at the European Schools of Brussels (Belgium) and Luxembourg.

He recently decided to quit his regular teaching job to concentrate only on online teaching.

Martin is originally from Amsterdam, the Netherlands.  

He is a passionate musician and composer. Since the age of 8 years, he plays the piano.  

He played in several rock, blues and jazz bands and he has now a jazz quartet.  

At the moment, he teaches (online) the piano, music theory and composing techniques.  

Martin has a masters degree in physics from the Free University in Amsterdam.

See full profile

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Transcripts

1. Introduction: Hi, welcome to, to just be an accord scores that's teaches you all the possible Jess chords commonly played in jazz and more. My name is Martin Cohen. I'm a jazz musician, composer, piano teacher ends method science teacher. I played the piano since I'm eight years old. And I've paid in several blues, rock, and jazz bands. At the moment, I'm creating it adjusts coordinates where we pay just them there and our own compositions. After completing this course, you'll be able to pay beautiful jazz piano chords that you can use to accompany other musicians or yourself when you're solely or printing. Now, let me give you some examples of basic course that we're going to transform into more jazzy sounding courts by simply adding extra notes to deport. Take for example, this simple G7. The court. By adding two extra notes, you can let it sounds more Jesse. You could also spread out to notes of this same court, which gives you a court even another more open sound. You could even make this G seventh chord sound differently by adding notes that are not into G-Major SKU. The so-called alterations like this G seventh chord that you can hear often also in blues and rock music. Or this G7 altered court. Or listened to this basic C minor seventh chord. And this C minor seventh chord with a much richer sound. Or this one, which sounds very warm. And listen to the next example where you will learn to play the so-called, so what courts, which are perfect in a situation where a piece stay secure and a lot of measures on the same court. Or this jazz piano of course, Course is for beginning to more advanced jazz piano prayers who want to be able to play nice Jesse courts in ingest on some or one thing alone. And who struggled to find the right notes to let the court summed them, the weighted won't be aware that you need at least some basic piano skills and that you know how to paint a major scale as the natural minor scale in as many keys as possible on the piano. I'd like to thank you for checking out this course, and I hope we will meet each other inside of this course. 2. How to follow this course: Hi, and welcome into suggests piano CT scores. In this video, I just want to quickly tell you how to use this course in the right way. Now, first of all, some video lessons contained resources. Now in order to get those resources, you have to download the resource zip file. And you can find the resource zip file under a video lesson. Just be sure that you're not in full-screen mode. And then just click undetected projects and resources. They're on the right side. You can download the resource zip file. So it just opened a file, and dare you see two subfolders. And you just opened a subfolder resources. And when you open that UC, the lectures with resource, just click on one folder. And you can download the contents of that folder to have the resource file that goes with that lecture. At you see that this video listen also goes with one resource file. So let me open that resource file because it's the contents of the course. And you see that to give the course a little bit more structure, I divided the course in several parts. And as you can see, there are nine different parts, and each part has one or more video lectures. Now this is important when you're more advanced musician and you know already about courts and triads and seventh chords. And you know how they are formed, then you can just skip the first two parts about triads and seventh chords. Now just have a look at the lessons in those parts just to be sure that you know everything. That, for example, if you know how to form diets, but you don't know about, let me say inversion, sorry, slash courts that do just Dose two lectures of course. But on the other hand, when you're not so advanced and you don't know how to form courts, of course do the first two parts. So okay, I think that's about it. And I wish you lots of success with this course. 3. Introduction to triads and other chords: A court is a set of notes played simultaneously, or in some cases arpeggiated, which means that denotes our plate one after the other. Of course consists mostly of three notes are more. However, a set of two notes played together could also be considered as a court. A trial is simply occur to consisting of three notes. In this section, we will start by looking at triads, and in the next section we will see seventh courts. A seventh chord is built on a try it. In fact, it's a triad with an extra note, the seventh. So in this section, we will start with triads, a try it consists of the first, third, fifth note of a scale. In the next lesson, we will start with the major triad. If you already know how to farm major, minor, diminished and augmented triads. And if you know how to make inversions of triads and you know the slash notation. You can skip this section and go to the section about seventh chords. 4. Major triads: A major triad consists of the first, third, fifth note of a major scale. Let's start with the simplest major scale, that of C Major, which as you know, consists of the notes C, D, E, F, G, a, B, and C. The first third fifth notes are C, E, and G. Those three notes played together form the C major triad. Let me show you some other major triads. So for example, F-major. This is the F-major scale. F, G, a, B-Flat, C, D, E, and F. The first third fifth notes are F, a, and C. So this is d, F major triad. The G-Major triad is also a simple one, consisting only of white keys on the piano. The first, third, fifth notes are G, B, and D. This is the G-Major triad. Okay, let me do some trials with black keys. For example, the D major triad. The D major scale is D, E, F-sharp, G, a, B, C sharp, and D. The first third fifth notes are D, F-sharp, and a. And this is the D major triad. I tried with two black keys is for example, the major triad. The B major scale is C sharp, D sharp, E, F sharp, G sharp, a sharp and be. The first third fifth notes are B, D, and F sharp. And this is the B major triad. An example of a major triad that starts on the black key. So where the root of the triad is a black keynote is for example, an E-flat. Try it. The E flat major scale is E-Flat, F, G, a flat, B flat, C, D, and E flat. The first third fifth notes are E flat, G, B flat. And this is the E-flat major triad. One last example, the F-sharp major triad. The a sharp major scale is F-sharp, G-sharp, A-sharp, B, C sharp, D sharp, E sharp, and F-sharp. That first third fifth notes are F sharp, a sharp, and C Sharp. And this is the F-sharp major triads. The court symbol that is used to indicate a major triad is simply the letter of the root of the chord. So when you see, for example, in sheet music above the staff the letter F, then the f major triad is meant. Okay, we've seen now seven different major triads. In the resources. You will find a PDF file with all the 12 different major triads. 5. Minor triads: The same principle as with major triads, also applies to minor triads. So take the first, third, fifth notes of the scale, in this case, the natural minor scale. The simplest natural minor scale is that of a minor, since it consists of the same notes as a C Major scale, it only starts on a instead of on c. So in the a minor scale are only wife keynotes. So a, B, C, D, E, F, G, and a. The first third, fifth notes are C and E. And this is the a minor triad. Okay? A C minor triad. The C natural minor scale is C, D, E flat, F, G, a flat, B flat, and C. The first third fifth notes are C, E flat, and G. This is the C minor triad. Now, I don't know if you noticed. The only difference between a major triad and a minor triad is the second note of the triad, which is by the way, the third note of the scale. Look at the difference between the C minor triad and the C major triad. This is c minor, and this is C major. The C and the G are the same in both courts. C minor. And the major difference is here. C major has an E. C minor hasn't E-flat. We call the major third in the scale of C and E flat. The minor third. It's called a thirt because it's the third note in the scale of C. So when you know a major drive, you can simply lowered a major third by a semitone and you'll have a minor triad. The major third has then become a minor third. The root and the fifth, so to G are the same in both diets. So let's apply this trick to find some other minor triads. For example, D minor. First, the D major triad, which are the nodes D, F-sharp, and a. Then lower the major third, which is the F-sharp, by a semitone to obtain the minor third. So that's an F. And here you have the D minor triad, D, F and a. Ok, one more example, the E-flat minor triad. Take the, take the E-flat major triad, E-flat, G, and B flat. Lower the major third, that G by a semitone to fly. So G flat is a minor third. And here you have the E-flat minor triad, E flat, G flat, and B flat. There are several courts symbols for minor triads. For example, an E-flat minor triad triad can be written as E flat with a little m, or as E-flat with a minus sign, or also as E-flat with the letters m and i, or with the letters M and N. In the resources, you will find a PDF file with all the 12th minor triads. 6. Diminished triads: Before telling you how a diminished triad looks, I'd like you to have a look at the distance between the first and the second quarter tones in a major and in a minor triad. C minor triad. This is the distance between C and E flat. So that's 123 semitones. A distance between two notes of three semitones is called a minor third interval. In a C major triad, the distance between the first and the second quartile. So the distance between C and E, one semitone more, so four semitones, 1234. This interval is called a major third interval. Now, a minor triad consists of a minor third interval from the first node, the root to the second node of the trie it, and a major third interval from the second chord note to the third coordinate. You can see that it's a major third, since from E flat to G is 1234 semitones. So a minor triad consists of a minor third with on the top the major third interval. In a major triad. This is the opposite. The distance from C to E is a major third. From E to G is a minor third, since it's three semitones from E, one to three to G. So a major triad has first a major third interval, and on top a minor third interval. Now, instead of sticking a minor third on a major third, or a major third on a minor third, you can also stick to minor third intervals on top of each other. And that is exactly what happens in a diminished triad. A diminished triad consists of two minor third intervals stacked on top of each other. So let's see how a C diminished dry. It looks like C is the root. Then a minor third up, 1-2-3 among E-flat. Second quarter tone. From E-flat, again, a minor third up 123. And I know what an item on G flat, the third core tone of C diminished. So a C diminished triad consists of the notes C, E flat, and G flat. And in the table, you can compare a minor triad, major triad and diminished triad. A diminished triad has two stacked minor thirds intervals. As you know, in the scale of C, G is the fifth note. We call therefore G defeats in the scale of C, G flat is a semitone lower than G. We call G flat the diminished fifth in the scale of C. You see that you can simply find a diminished right? By taking a minor triads and lower the fifth by a semitone. Or you can take a major triad and lower both the major third and the fifth by a semitone. So for example, a G diminished triad. Take a G minor triad, G, B-flat, and D, and lower the face. A, d by a semitone. And this is a G diminished triad, G, B-flat, and D flat. Another example, an E-flat diminished triad. The E-flat minor triad is E-flat, G-flat, and B-flat. Now lower the fifth B flat by a semitone. B-flat then becomes an. Now, this is a bit special. We don't call this node a, but in this case we call it B double flat. Why is that? This is because it's the diminished fifth. The fifth in the scale of E flat is D flat, 12345. When you lower B flat by a semitone, we just add a flat sign. So it becomes B double flat. Another way of looking at it is look at the E flat major scale. E-flat, F, G, a flat, B flat, C, D, and E. Flood. The fourth note is a flat. A flat contains the letter a. So then enter a is for the fourth note in the scale of a leaflet. The fifth note has the letter B, even when it's B flat. But the letter b belongs to the fifth note in the scale of E-Flat, so we definitely need the letter B for a diminished fifth. That's why we use BWA, double flat rather than a. The courts symbol for diminished riots is the letter of the root with a little circle, or with the letters D. I am like for example, di diminished. As usual, we will find the other diminished riots in the resources. 7. Augmented triads: So we saw that the minor triad consists of a minor third and a major third on top. A major triad has fared a major third and a minor third on top. A diminished triad is just two stacked minor thirds. Now, what's an augmented triad? An augmented triad consists of two stacked major third intervals stacked on top of each other. So a C augmented triad starts with a C, then a major third up to 1234, V e. Again, a major third up to 1234. The G sharp. A C augmented triad has the following notes, C, E, and G sharp. G sharp. The augmented fifth in the scale of C. Here is our table completed, where you can see the intervals between the nodes of a minor, a major, a diminished, and an augmented triad. Another way to find an augmented triad is by taking a major triad and then raise the fifth by a semitone. Okay, one more example, the E augmented triad. First, take an E major triad. Those are denotes E, G-sharp, and now raise the fifth B by a semitone and you obtain B-sharp. Now, a B sharp is of course, the same note as a C, but I call it B-sharp, since b is the fifth note in the scale of e, And we need, we need the augmented fifth. The literacy is reserved for the sixth note in the scale of e, even when the fixed sixth in the scale of E is C-sharp and not see. The court's symbol for augmented triads is the letter of the root with a plus sign, or with the letters AUG, like for example, d augmented. Okay, again, as usual, you will find all the augmented triads and resources of this lecture. 8. Inversions: Let me go back to the C major triad, C, E, and G. You can play this trait in three different ways. First, just as C, E and G. We call this a C major triad in root position. Since C, the root is at the bottom of the triad. Then for a second way of playing a C major triad, take the lowest note, the root C, and put it at the top. And you get E, G, and C. This is still a C major triad, but now a C major triad in first inversion. Now take the bottom note, the E. Move it to the top. And you get a C major triad in second inversion, G, C. And when you would now move again, the bottom note to the top, you're back in root position. It can be played in three different positions. Root position, first inversion, second inversion. Now, you can, of course do this for all kinds of triads, not only with major triads. Let me give you some examples. A D minor triad and reposition is D, F and a. In first inversion, this becomes F, a, and D. And a D minor in second inversion is a, D and F. Another example, a G diminished triad in root position is G, B-flat, and D flat. In first inversion, this becomes B flat, D flat, and G. And in second inversion, D flat, E, G, and B-flat. 9. Slash notation: When you play a try it with your right hand, you could, with your left hand, play a bass note over it. In most cases you would play the root of the triad and the base, like for example, this C major triad with a C in the base plate with a left-hand. But let's assume that you don't pay, you see with your left hand, but an E, the second quarter of the C major triad. You now have a C major triad with an E as lowest note. And it sounds just like a C major triad in first inversion. And that's actually what it is. A C major triad in first inversion. Since the e is at the bottom. You can write this with the following notation. C slash ie. The first letter, the C means the trials to be played with the right-hand and the second letter V E means the bass note to be played with your left hand. This way of notation is called the slash notation. And C slash e is also called a slash chord. The slash CT, C slash g is a C major triad in second inversion, because the G is at the bottom. Now, the bass note does not necessarily have to be one of the notes of the triad. And to be honest, mostly it isn't. You can, for example, make the sludge chord C slash a, where a is the note and the base is not a courtesan. F slash g. G is not a note of the F triad. E flat, a flat, et cetera. The triad in slash chords. So the first letter is mostly, but not necessarily a major triad. It could eventually also be minor or diminished or augmented. Try it. 10. Major 7th: A seventh chord is a triad with an extra note. Let me illustrate this with a C Major seventh chord. I start with a C major triad consisting of the first, third, fifth note of the C major scale. And I simply add the seventh note of the D major scale, which is B. And this gives me the C Major seventh chord. A G Major seventh chord consists of a G-Major triad, so G, B, and D. And you only have to add the seventh note in the scale of G-Major, which is the F-sharp. And here's the G Major seventh chord. By the way, the seventh note in a major scale is officially called the major seventh. And there's also a note which is the minor seventh, which we will see soon. Okay, let me show you a major seventh chord with a black key note as a root. For example, a flood major seventh. The E flat major scale is a flat, B flat, C, D flat, E flat, F, G, and a flood. The first, third, fifth seventh notes are a flood, C, E flat, and G. So this is the a Flat Major seventh chord. Let me show you the notation for major seventh chords. There are several notations possible. The most common court symbol is the root. So for example, a flit followed by a triangle. Other possibilities, a flat with a capital letter M, or a, footnote metaliteracy m, a and j, eventually followed by the number seven. In the resources. As usual, the major seventh chords in all 12 keys. 11. Dominant 7th: A dominant seventh chord is a major triad with an extra note added, not the major seventh, but the minor seventh. Now, what is a minor seventh? Let me show you this in the key of C. As you know, the major 17 to C major scale is the be. The minor seventh is the note just a semitone lower than the major seventh. So in this case the B flat. So a C Dominant Seventh Chord consists of the notes C, E, G, and B-flat. You see that the minor seventh, B flat, is a note that is not present in the C major scale. Let's look at the G Dominant Seventh Chord. First, take the G Major triad, which is G, B, and D, and then add the minor seventh. The seventh in the scale of G major is the F sharp. Lowering the F sharp by a semitone, and you obtain the minor seventh V, f. So G Dominant seventh has the notes G, B, D, and F. All white keynotes. Let me take a dominant seventh chord starting on a black key. For example, B flat. B flat major scale is B-Flat, C, D, E flat, F, G, B flat. The first third fifth notes are B flat, D, and F. The seventh note is, we have to lower the seventh by a semitone to get the minor seventh. So this is the a flat and B flat dominant seven squared is B flat, D, F, and a flat. Now, there are two important remarks concerning dominant seventh chords. The first one is when referring to the single notes of a dominant seventh chord, we often call the minor seventh simply the seventh. This doesn't mean that we are talking about the seventh note from the major scale. Because then we would have a major seventh chord and not a dominant seventh chord. No, this is just done because it's simpler to say seventh then minor seventh. And when we're in the context of a dominant seventh chord, we know that it must be a minor seventh. The second remark is that instead of saying dominant seventh CT. We often simply say seventh chord. And that's also what you see in the court symbol. That's simply the root of the court with a little seven, like, for example, E flat seven. You can find all the 12th dominant seventh chords in the resources. 12. Minor 7th: A minor seventh chord is a minor triad with a minor seventh added. So in the key of C, This would result in the following notes. For a C minor seventh chord. C, E flat, G, B flat. B flat being the minor seventh in the key of C. As you know from the last lesson, let me show you some more examples. The E minor seventh chord, for example. You can start with an E minor triad, which has the notes are E, G, and B. As you know, you can find that in several ways. Either you take first an E major triad and your lowered a major third by a semitone. The E major scale is E, F sharp, G sharp, a, B, C sharp, D sharp, and E. The first third fifth notes are E, G-sharp, and be lower to G sharp to G. And you have the a minor triad. Or you take the E natural minor scale, which is E, F sharp, G, a, B, C, D, and E. And then take the first, third fifth notes from that man or minor scale. So E, G, and B. Or a third method from E, go a minor third or three semitones up. 123, your OMG, the second quartile. From g, go a major third up. So four semitones, 1234, you're on b. So you have three different ways to find the E minor triad. So finally, to find the E minor seventh chord, just add the minor seventh. Now, perhaps the easiest way to find the minor seventh is to go to semitones, which is a whole tone down from the root. In this case, the 0s. I will do this from the E one octave higher. So 12 and d is the minor seventh in the key of E. So finally, the E minor seventh chord is E, G, B, and D. One more example starting on a Blakey, F-sharp minor seventh. Let me start with an F sharp major triad, F sharp, a sharp, and C sharp. When I lower the a sharp by a semitone, I get a minor third. So the F-sharp minor triad is F sharp, a, and C Sharp. You can find the minor seventh by going to semitones down from F sharp to that sum e. So here is finally the F-sharp minor seventh chords. F-sharp, a, C sharp, and E. And of course, you will find all the other minor seventh chords in the resources about the notation. You can use the notation for the minor triad and just add a seven. So for example, E M7 or E minus seven, or E and I7 or e, m i n seven. Now, there is a special type of minor seventh chord that is a little bit different. Let me explain. And let me start with a C minor seventh chord, C, E-flat, G, and B. When I now lower the fifth, the G, by a semitone, I get the G flat, which is the diminished fifth. The court now looks as follows, C, E-flat, G-flat, and B-flat. This court is called C minor seventh flat five. But, and also very often used name for this court is C, half-diminished. And it's not difficult to see where the diminished comes from. Since you can see this C half-diminished chord also as it C diminished, right? So C, E flat and G flat, but with a minor seventh, the B-flat edit. So you could find a half-diminished courts by taking a minor seventh chord and lowering the fifth by a semitone, or by taking a diminished triad and adding a minor seventh. Okay, one more example, g half-diminished. So let's start with a G diminished triad, which is G, B-flat, and D flat. We simply add the minor seventh. Minor seventh in the key of g is f. So g half-diminished is G, B flat, D flat, and F. And again, in the resources you will find all the 12 half-diminished courts. There are two notation for minor seven flat five or half diminished chords. For example, GM seven, B5, where the little b stands for flat. So a flattened fifth. And the other court symbol is a g with this little sign. 13. Diminished: The easiest way to see a diminished chord is that it's going to be built by sticking four notes on top of each other that are each separated by a minor third interval. So starting on C up a minor third, 123 to E-flat. From E-flat up a minor third, 123 to G flat. And from G-flat, a minor third up 123 to now technically spoken, this a is rather at B double flat than an a. Why is that? Well, look at it this way. When we started on C And went up in minor thirds, we went from C to E flats. So we skipped the letter D. From E flat to G flat. We skipped the letter f. So from G flat, going up a minor third, we should skip the letter a. So it should be something with B. That's why it should be B double flat rather than a. So this C diminished chord is C, E flat, G flat, and to be double flit. Another example, E-flat diminished from E-flat going up a minor third takes us to G flat, as you know already. And from G flat, a minor third up takes us to B double flat. So the same note as we found for C diminished. And finally from B double flips, a minor third up takes us to 123. But I may not call it C because we have to skip the letter C coming from B flat, which is the letter B. So this has to be the double flat. So E-flat diminished as the notes. E-flat, G-flat, B double flat, and D double Flint. And what do you see? They are exactly the same notes as the notes for to see diminished chord. Only that denote C in the E-flat diminished chord is written as d double flat, but it's still the same note. And guess what? G flat diminished has also exactly the same notes. And a diminished. I call it now a instead of B double flit, since I consider it now my starting node to the root of the court. So a diminished consists also of exactly the same notes and is in fact the same court. So when I see in sheet music that courts symbol for E-flat diminished. I could also play C diminished, G-flat diminished, or a diminished, since they are all one and the same court. Now, this is true for all the diminished courts. When you have a diminished court, it will be the same for the diminished chord, a minor third up. So when you have, for example, a di diminished chord, then that's court. Where will be the same as the F diminished chords, the a flood diminished chord and the B Diminished chord, a C sharp diminished chord, will be the same as the diminished chords with the roots E, G, and B-flat. So there are actually only three different diminished courts. Let's put that in a table so that you can see the overview. You see that you have three columns with diminished courts. All the courts and the same column consists of exactly the same notes and are therefore the same courts. You will find on all of this also in resources. The court symbol is the core to root letter with a little circle followed in most cases, but not always by a seven. You'll see sometimes also to root letter followed by the letters i and m. 14. Augmented: An augmented seventh chord is made by taking an augmented triad and adding the minor seventh. So a C augmented seventh chord is made by the amended dry it, C, E and G sharp, and the minor seventh flat. So the whole sea of mended seven squared is C, E, G-sharp, and B flat. You see that the interval between the augmented fifth, the G-sharp, and the minor surface to be flat is that of a whole tone or two semitones. So way to quickly find a voicing for an augmented seventh chord would be to first take the major triad, then raised by a semitone, and then add the note, a whole tone above the augmented fifth. So for example, a G augmented seventh can be found as follows. Take the G Major triad. It, this is G, B, and D, raised to d by a semitone, then it becomes D-sharp. At denote a whole tone about the sharp, that's the f. And this is the G of mended seventh chord, G, B, D sharp. Or for example, B-flat augmented seventh. First, the B-flat major triads, B flat, D, and F. Raise the F to F sharp and add the note a whole tone above the F sharp, the A-flat. And here you have B flooded mended seventh, B flat, D, F sharp, and a flat. The course symbol is like that of the augmented triad, but with a seven added. So c plus seven, or C with the letters AUG and the seven. Or also see seven plus five, and in some cases C7 BY 13. Now, perhaps you don't understand where I got this BY 13 foam from, but you will learn that later. But for now, just know that the sharpened faiths and the flattened 13th or the same node. So a G sharp or a flat in the key of C. In the resources, you will find more. 15. Minor major 7th: In the lesson about minor seventh chords, you already saw that adding a minor seventh to a minor triad will give you a minor seventh chord. So a C minor triad, C, E-flat, G, with a minor seventh, the B-flat gives you the C minor seventh chord. But if instead of the minor seven for the B flat, you add the major seventh, the B, you get the C minor Major seventh chord, C, E-flat, G, and B. The miner in an a minor major seventh refers to the minor third. So the E-flat in the key of C and the major In the name refers to the major seventh. So in the key of C, this is B. A D minor Major seventh chord, for example, consists of the notes D, F, a, and C Sharp. Since D, F and a is a minor triad, and C sharp is the major seventh in the key of D. There are several court symbols for a minor major seventh chords, but the most often used ones are C minus triangle with or without a seven. And C M triangle with or without a seven. More in the resources. 16. Chord Inversions: As with the triads, also with seventh chords, you can make inversions. And since we have four nodes in a seventh chord where a dry it only has three notes. We can make one more inversion. So besides a root position, you can make three different inversions. Let me illustrate this with a C7 chord. C7 has the notes C, E, G, and B flat. So in reposition that looks like this, with c at the bottom. When E is at the bottom. So just take the C and put it at the top. You have C7 in first inversion, putting EA that up, and you get C7 in second inversion. And finally, when you put g epitope, so you'll have B flat at the bottom, and this is C7 in third inversion. And of course, you can do the same thing with all the other seventh chords, whether they're minor seventh, major seventh or other seven scores. Noticed that when you make an inversion of a diminished court, you get the diminished chord, a minor third up, which is still the same diminished chord. So when I take for example, C diminished, C, E-flat, G-flat, and B double flat. And I move C to the top. I just get the voicing for E-flat diminished. But since E-flat diminished is the same chord as C diminished, it can just be considered as another voicing for C diminished. 17. Slash notation - II: We already discussed slash courts before. But I'd like you to show some more about slash courts related to seventh chords. Take for example the slash CT, E minor slash c. So E minor triad with it see in debates. And E minor triad is E, G and B with C in the bass. This gives C, E, G, and B. So this is nothing else than a C Major seventh chord. Now, it's very well possible to have a seventh chord in the right-hand instead of a triad. Take this slash chord. For example, D minor seventh slash g. This is the so-called Je sus chord. You will learn more about SAS quarks later. And I can of course, play the D minor seventh chord in the right-hand in several inversions. 18. II-V-I progression: Have a look at the D minor seventh chord. It consists of the notes D, F, a, and C. All notes that can be found in the C major scale. When you take another court with DSA route. For example, D7, which consists of the notes D, F sharp, a, and C. It contains the F-sharp and note, which is not in the C-major scale. Same thing for D major seventh. It contains an F-Sharp and a C-Sharp. Both notes that don't occur in C-Major. The same thing can be said for the other courts, with D as a root node. D diminished, the half-diminished, D minor, Major seventh. They all contain at least one note that doesn't occur in C major. So, in a way, you could say that D minor seven fits the C-major scale, since it contains only Notes from the C-major scale. For every node from the C-major scale, there is a court that only consists of only Notes from the C major scale. For the court, Based on the third note of the C major scale, the E. That's the E minor seventh chord, which consists of the notes G, B, and D. All notes from the C-major scale. For the court, Based on the fourth note of C-Major, The F. It's not a minor chord, but F major seven. With the notes are F, a, C, and E. The court with only knows from C-Major based on the fifth note, the GI dominant seventh. Since it consists of the notes G, B, D, and F. For the sixth note, the a, it's again a minor seventh chord. A minor seventh, which has denotes a, C, E, and G. All notes from C major. The seventh note B has also a quarter with only Notes from C major, and that's B half diminished. If you don't see that directly, let me show you what the notes of B half diminished Are. You could start with a B major triad. Those are denotes B, D sharp, F sharp. To make it minor, lower the D-sharp by a semitone to do, to make it a diminished right? Lower the fifth, the F sharp, by a semitone to F. So B, D, and F is the B Diminished triad. Now only at the minor seventh, which is a whole tone below the root. So and you have to be half-diminished chord, B, D, F, and a. All notes from C major. Okay, there is only one root note from C major scale that we haven't looked at yet. And that's the note C itself. The only court with C as the root. And that contains only Notes from the C major scale is C Major seventh, consisting of the notes C, E, G, and B. C Dominant seventh, for example, as a B-flat. And note, which is not in the C major scale, C minor seventh, as an E flat and a B-flat. Both notes that don't occur in C major. So C Major seventh is the only C chord that has only Notes from the C major scale. In the following table, you see an overview of all the courses that go with a C major scale. We call C Major seventh the one court. Since it's built on the first node of the C major scale. D minor seventh is a two chord in the scale of C Major, since its root is the second note of C Major scale. In the same way, E minor seventh is the three chord in the key of C. F major's haven't visited for a court in the key of C, G7 is the five chord, a minor seventh chord and B half diminished seventh chord. You could make such a table, of course, for all the 12 keys. But let's for now concentrate on the course that go with the C Major Scale. Now, in jazz, the most common chord progression is the so-called 251 progression, which means the two court, the five chord and the one court from one major scale are played as a chord progression. So in the scale of C major, this means that the following chord progression, D minor seventh, G7, C Major seventh. Now, when played on the piano, that sounds as follows. Okay, this is not really the best way to play the 2-5-1 progression in C on the piano. Since you have to jump with your right hand, first to the right, and then back to the left. When you use inversions, you can play the 2-5-1 progression without having to move your right hand so much. Look at this one. You see that I hardly have to move my right hand. So what did I do? I played first D minor seventh in second inversion, then G7 in root position. And finally, C major seven chord in second inversion. Another way of playing the 2-5-1 in C without moving too much right-hand is this one. So that's D minor seventh in root position. G7 in second inversion. And C Major seventh in root position. Now, later we will add more interesting notes to courts to let themselves more jazzy. But for now, I will instead take notes out of the court that we don't really need. The first note we will take out is the root in the right-hand. What's the point of playing the root in your right hand? If you're already playing it with your left hand. And if you're playing with a bass player, then the bass player will play the root. So then you don't have to play the root at all, not even with your left hand. The next note I will leave out is their faith. Why deface? Well, look at the notes into major seventh, minor seventh, and dominant seventh chords. Those are the most plate courts. And what do you see? The minor seventh chord has a minor third, where the major seventh and dominant seventh courts have a Major third. The major seventh chord has a major seventh, where the minor seventh and dominant seventh chords have a minor seventh. The only note they all have, the fifth. What this means is that only the third and the seventh defined a court quality. So the effect, if a court is major seventh, minor seventh are dominant seventh. The fifth doesn't do anything to define the quality of the court. Of course, if you don't look at diminished or half-diminished courts that have a diminished fifth. But as I said, the most used courts are major seventh, minor seventh, and dominant seventh chords. So when we play the root with a left-hand or eventually not at all, depending whether you play a bass player or not. And leave out the root and the fifth in the right-hand. You can make the most basic form of a 2-5-1 progression, for example, as follows. So in D minor seventh, I play the root, the D in the left-hand, and the right-hand, C is the seventh, F is the third. In G7. You can leave the F where it is, because it was the third in a D minor seventh chord, but it's the seventh Pharisee, G7 court. So the only note you have to change apart from the base note when you play it, is the C, the seventh of the D minor seventh chord that becomes a b in G seventh chord. And which is the third. When moving to the C Major seventh chord, the only note apart from the base note that I have to change is the f, the seventh of the G7 chord, into an E, the third of the C Major seventh chord. That B, the third of the G7 scored, can stay where it is, since it's the seventh of the C Major seventh court. By the way, notice that I talk the whole time about the third and the seventh without specifying if it's a major or minor third are the major or minor seventh. I do this because it's quicker and every musician does it in this way. And by now, you should know whether it's a major or a minor third or seventh. Now, we started in D minor seventh chord with seventh, the c at the bottom. You can also start with the third at the bottom. The same 2-5-1 progression then looks like this. When going from D minor seventh to G7, you only have to lower. Your seventh is a semitone. When going from G to C major seventh, you have to lower again only the seventh. The f, in this case, a semitone. So those are the two positions in which you can play a 2-5-1 progression in C. Now, we've seen only the 2-5-1 progression in C. Let me now show you the 2-5-1 progression in the key of G. So with courts that have only Notes from the G major scale in it. Well, as a C Major scale, the one chord is a major seventh chord. The two chord, a minor seventh chord, as well as the Three Chord. For record, a major seventh chord, five chord, dominant seventh chord, et cetera. So the table, of course, in the G major scale is the following. So 251 progression in the key of G is a minor seventh. The seventh, G Major seventh. Now, how to find the a and B positions of the 2-5-1 progression in G. The position was the position where we played the two chord with the seventh at the bottom. The two chord is a minor seventh, and the seventh of a minor seventh is the G. So the key at the bottom and the third, which is the minor third. So to see, on top, you can play the bass notes, so a, with your left hand. Then the next court, the five quirk is D7. Remember that we only have to lower the seventh by a semitone. The seventh of the a minor seventh chord was the g. So lower the G by a semitone. Play at the same time, a, D with your left hand. And here's your D7 scored. For the next court, the one chord, which is G major seventh, just lower the seventh of the D7 chord. So to C, a semitone gene database, and that's the G Major seventh chord. And once again, the whole 2-5-1 progression in G. So in the right-hand, when going from one core to the other, the only thing you have to do is lower the seventh by a semitone. Okay, the B position. Now start to pay the two chord, a minor seventh with the third at the bottom. The third sort of minor third in this case is the note C. So C at the bottom and the seventh, the g at the top. Play with your left hand in the base. That's our two chord. Then, as always in the right hand, you only have to lower the seventh by a semitone. The seventh is the g, so lower it to F-sharp. Played D with your left hand. And that's defined chord D7. To go to the one chord, only load is seven space semitone in your right-hand. So c gets a B. And of course, play the root note G with your left hand. And there's our one chord, G major seventh. So the whole 2-5-1 progression in G looks as It's good to practice the 2-5-1 progressions in all the 12 keys in both positions. If it's difficult for you to find out what they are in each key. You can look to how I play them in the next lecture. And in the resources that go with this lecture, you will also find the 2-5-1 progressions in all 12 keys in both the a as the B position. Later, we will add more notes to the chords in a 2-5-1 progression. 19. Playing the II-V-I progression in all 12 keys: In this lesson, I will play the 2-5-1 progressions in all 12 keys in both positions. I will start in the key of C and will then go up in the circle of fifths, so to G, D, a, E, et cetera. If you don't know the circle of fifths, don't worry, you will not need it in this course. The fact that I used the circle of fifths is that every time we go one step up, the scale gets one extra sharp note when going from C, the other side. So C, f, B-flat, E-flat, et cetera. The scale gets in every step and extra flat note. Okay, I will do the progression in the order C, G, D, a, E, and B for the skills with sharps. And then F, B flat, E flat, a flat, D flat, and G flat. For the skills with floods. I will play the progression with the right-hand and the left-hand. I will play the root notes of the courts. Be sure to also practice the progressions in your left hand. They're not necessary. 20. Sus chords: The simplest way to play a sa squared is to play the root of the Sa squared into base with a left-hand and a major triad, a whole tone below the root in the right hand. So you could, for example, play a G Sus chord as follows. You see a gene debase, since it's a G Sa squared. And the major triad, a whole tone below the g is the f. So f major triad in the right hand. You can use the Court symbol Jesus or G7 SAS. But you can also use the slash notation f slash g in this case, since you are playing an F major triad, G in the bass, Notice that I play the f major triad in the right-hand in second inversion. I could also play the f major triad in root position or in first inversion. But a try it often sounds strongest when played in second inversion. So that's why I played it in second inversion. But you can, of course, choose each of the three positions if you want. The SAS refers to the suspended fourth. Suspended fourth is the fourth note in the scale, the scale of G, in this case. The fourth note in the scale of G is 1234, C. This C is the suspended fourth. Since traditionally this note would resolve to the major third. So in the scale of G, the SAS court becoming a dominant seventh chord. But it's not necessary for a Sasquatch to resolve. Okay? F slash g is not the only way to place Jesus CT. Another way is to play D minor seventh slash G. So a D minor seventh chord with a G in the bass. So like this. When you compare f slash g with D minor seventh slash G, you see that the only difference is the note D, the fifth in the scale of G. Now, very often people think that in Sus chords, the fourth comes in the place of the third. But it's very well possible to have a cis court with a fourth, third, like this, Jesus voicing. So the root g in the left-hand and the right-hand side, which is the fourth. F. This is the minor seventh, which is the major third. Important when playing the third in SaaS courts, is that the third should be placed above in the third, fourth. Otherwise it sounds bad. So when I place the B an octave down and the C an octave up, listen to how this sounds. Not so very nice, isn't it? But when pacing the third above the fourth, then yes, that sounds much better. Okay, let me give two more examples of such squirts. Css can be paid as the slash chord, B flat slash C. Since B flat is a whole tone below c. So c in the left hand and a B flat major triad in your right hand. And as I said in second inversion, it normally sounds better. So let me play the B flat major triad in second inversion. Second example, A-flat sus can be played as the slash chord, G flat, a flat. So a flat in the left hand and G flat major triad in the right-hand. And again, I will play the G flat triad in second inversion. And that's my a flat sus chord. Okay, no, I don't think that you always have to play the major triad in second inversion. In some cases, you might want another inversion or the root position. It depends on you, how you want the court to sound. 21. Adding notes to chords Introduction: In this section, we will discover what notes can be added to major seventh, minor seventh, and dominant seventh chords to let them sound more colorful, more jazzy. But before adding notes, we will first take away notes to make more space for the notes that we're going to add. Actually, if you follow the last lesson in this section about seventh chords, you already know which two notes I'm going to take out. But okay. For those who skipped that section, I'll explain it again. The first note I will take out is the root of the chord. The root is mostly plate by the bass player, so you don't have to play it also prompts, you may play it if you want. And when you don't play with a bass player and you play the courts and your right-hand, you could play the bass and your left-hand, leaving space in your right hand for other notes. And when you're playing the courts with your left hand, for example, when you play a solo with your right hand, you can generally play rootless chord voicings, even if you're playing without a bass player, because your brain will here to harmony and will automatically know what the root note of the chord is. For the second note that we will mostly leave out. Have a look at this table. You see that the minor seventh chord has a minor third, where the major seventh and dominant seventh chords have a Major third. The major seventh chord has a major seventh, where the minor seventh and dominant seventh courts have a minor seventh. The only note they all have besides the root is the fifth. What this means is that only the third and the seventh defined a court quality. So defect if a court is Major seventh, minor seventh, or dominant seventh, the fifth doesn't do anything to define the quality of the chord. So the second note we will leave out in most cases is the fifth. Now, to be honest, in the next lessons, I will play the root in the left-hand, but into right-hand. I will only play the third and the seventh. And of course, the note or notes that we will add to the court. Now, before we go on with the next lessons, where we will finally add notes to major seventh, dominant seventh, minor seventh chords. I wanted to tell you how we number the different notes in a scale, since this is very important for the rest of this course. As you know, a chord is built with the root or first note. The third, which can be minor, a major, the fifth, and the seventh, which can also be minor or major. So actually you have the series 1357. So this corresponds with C, E, G, and B. If we take only Notes from the C major scale for now, if you were to continue this series after to seven, you would get 91113, which would then correspond with the notes D, F, and a. Okay. You see that we don't have to go on to 15 since that would be again the C. Now, this is exactly what we do. We call the D, the ninth in the scale of C. You would normally expect to D to B the second, since it's the second note in the scale of C Major, but we call the D the ninth. The 11th is the F. Now, to be honest, the f is only called the 11th in minor seventh and dominant seventh chords. In major seventh courts, we call it the fourth, since it's the fourth note in the C major scale. And the last one, the 13th, is the a in the scale of C. Now, this is only the case for dominant seventh chords. For minor seventh and major seventh chords, we call it simply the sixth. Since a is the sixth note in the scale of C, perhaps this is all a bit confusing at the moment, but the more we will use this numbering, the more you will get used to it. 22. Adding notes to major 7th chords: Let's just try to add notes to a major seventh chord and listen if they sound well. For simplicity, I will the whole time use the C Major seventh chord, but we can use the results, of course, for all the other keys. I will play the root C as a bass note in the left-hand. Also in your left hand, I will pay the third and the seventh. So those will be the major third and a major seventh. So in the key of C, the nodes e and b, and I will play in the right-hand, the note to add. So how many notes could potentially be added to a major seventh chord? Well, there are 12 different notes, but there are three notes that we don't have to add since they're already in the court. Those are of course, the root and major third and the major seventh. There are even more notes that we don't have to try. And those are the minor seventh, the minor third, and the flattened ninth. Since they all tend to destroy the tonal feeling of a major seventh chord. We also don't have to check the fifth. Since we already know that you can add it to the court, since it's part of the court, even if we took it out for now. So we have 12 minus seven equals five different notes left to check whether they sang well on a major seventh chord. So let's go. Since we skip, skip the root C and D flattened ninth to D flat, we can start with the first next note, which is the D to ninth in the scale of C. So let me play a C Major seventh chord with a D. Okay, that sounds nice. So the ninth is a note that we can add two major seventh chords. We can now skip the E-flat and the e, since they are the minor and the major third. So let's move on to the F. Well, I think that you also heard that the f doesn't really fit in a C Major seventh chord. So that is definitely, definitely not a note that we will add the F-sharp then. Okay, let's try. Yeah, the F-sharp fits with the C Major seventh chord. F sharp is the sharpened fourth in the key of C. So generally we can say a major seventh chord. You can add the sharpened fourth. You could use the Court symbol C Major seventh sharp forth. But even when you see the normal CT symbol for C Major seventh without a sharpened fourth, you can usually add the sharpen fourth anyway. Okay, let's move them. We would skip the G, So let's try G-sharp. So why would say G-sharp can be added to C major seventh? So, major seventh chords, you can add the sharpen fifth. And you could use a court symbol, C Major seventh, sharp five. The last note we have to check on C Major seventh is the a. And that one also sounds good on C major seventh. So major seventh chords, you can also add to this sixth. Let me finally show you the results of which notes can be added to major seventh chords. 23. Adding notes to minor 7th chords: Okay. I will again take the minor sevenths court based on C. So with C and a route, how many nodes do we have to check? Well, we don't need to check the root and minor thirds and the minor seventh since they're already in the court. Other notes that we don't have to check are the major third were an a minor chord, so you would not play a major third and a minor court, the fifth, since that's already in the court. And the major seventh. No. You can add a major seventh on the minor court, but then you have a minor, major seventh chord and not a minor seventh chord. So anyway, we will not look at that option. So we're left with 12 minus six equals six notes to check whether they sound well or not over a minor seventh chord. So after the root C, we can start to check if D-flat sounds OK. So I play C minor sevenths with an added D-flat. Well, you here, it doesn't sound that well, so we will rather forget debt combination. Let's try the ninth, the d.school. Yes, that one sounds right? So on a minor seventh chord, we can add the ninth. You could ride v-squared as C minor nine, but even under C, C minor sevenths, you can simply add the ninth if you want. So, as we've already said, we can skip E-flat and E. So let's move on to the F, the 11th in the key of C, C minor seven. And an F sounds also ok. So on a minor seventh chord, we can add the 11th. And for the court, you could write c, m, 11. The next one. We will not call it F sharp, but G flat, the diminished fifth. And actually, you already know what a minor seventh chord with a diminished fifth is. That's a half-diminished chord. Of course, when you play this diminished fifth, so half-diminished court, you don't play the fifth since the fifth and the diminished fifth played together will not sound very good. Okay, we skip the fifth and move on with a flat, the flattened six. Let me play it for you. See minor with an a flat. Okay? It's possible to play that one. To be honest, the flattened six is not very often played on minor seventh chords, but okay, it's a possibility. So that would be a C minor flood and sixth. The last nodes to try on a minor seventh chord is the sixth, an a in the key of C. So I play C minor and an a. And yes, sounds OK. We can add it to our list. Or yeah, the court symbol would be just see M6. So c here to complete at list of notes that can be added to minor seventh chords. 24. Adding notes to dominant 7th chords: So on a dominant seventh chord, we don't have to check the following notes. The root, the major third, fifth, and a minor seventh, since they are already in the court. Another note we don't have to check is the major seventh. We already have a minor seventh chord. Now, you would say, of course, the minor third is also a note. We don't have to check. Since this court has a major third and you cannot have a minor third and the major third in the same court. Well, that's true. You cannot have a minor third and a major third in the same court. But there is something special with that note. We will see that in a while. So I will start with a C Dominant seventh chords. And I will start to add my first note, the flattened ninth, or the D flats in the key of C sounds. Okay? We can add that one to our list. So on a dominant seventh chord, you can pay the flattened ninth. The court symbol is C7 flat nine. What about a ninth, D In the key of C? So C seventh with a D. Yep, totally acceptable. On a dominant seventh chord. You can play the ninth, and you could write C ninth. By the way, when you see the chord symbols C9. That means that the seventh, soda minor seventh is also present in the court. Even if it's not mentioned in the court symbol. But on a normal C7 court, you can also simply pay the ninth. You don't have to wait before you seeded ninth in the court symbol. Now, when we go again, a semitone up, we arrive at this note. This is a D sharp or an E-flat. E-flat is the minor third in the key of C. And I already told you there's something special with that note. Let me first play it. C dominant seven. And I add this note. Hey, did you hear how nice that actually sounds? Does that mean that you can actually add the minor thirds to a dominant seventh chord? Well, know, since, as has been said before, You cannot have a minor third and a major third at a same time. That's why we will call this note D-Sharp and not E-flat. Since E-flat would be the minor third, and D sharp is the sharpened knife. So the court doesn't have a major third and a minor third, but a major third and a sharpened ninth. And there's nothing against that. So on dominant seventh chords, you can add their sharpen ninth. The courts symbol is C7 sharp nine. We skip the major thirds and we will try this one, df, the 11th in the key of C. Not so very nice. We will not add these notes to our list. But when we go another semitone tone up to the sharpened 11th, so the F sharp in our C7 chord. Yeah, that sounds okay. So on dominant seventh chords, you can pay the sharpened 11th. You can use this chord symbol C7, sharp 11. We skip the fifth and we go to the A-flat, the flattened 13th. Let me play it. Also a nice sound. So on a dominant seventh chord, you can add the flattened 13th. And this is the chord symbol C7 BY 131 more left, the a. So y will play a C seventh within a. And that sounds just fine. So on a dominant seventh chord, you can add the 13th. And for the court, you could ride C, 17th. And here's our completed list of notes that can be edits to dominant seventh chords. Now, when you have a quick look at all those notes that you can add to a dominant seventh chord. You might notice that two of the notes are just notes that occur in a major scale. Those notes are the ninth and the 13th. So in the scale of C major dose R denotes d. And the other notes you can add our notes that don't belong to the major scale. The flattened ninth, D flats in the key of C, sharpen ninth, D sharp in the key of C. The sharpened 11th, F sharp in the key of C, and the flattened 13th, a flat in the key of C. Our notes that don't belong to D major scale, we call these last notes alterations. So when a note that you can add to your course doesn't belong to the major scale. You call it an alteration. 25. Add more than 1 note Altered: Is it possible to add more than just one note to accord? Yes. Why not? Let's have a look at some examples. First, major seventh chords. A very often used piano chord voicing for a major seventh chord is the 69 chord. So a major seventh chord with its sixth ninth at it. What's so special about this chord voicing is there is that it is often voiced without major seventh. That seems very strange. A major seventh chord without a major seventh. But let me first play it for you. So I will play C6 nine chord voicing. And for a fuller sound, you can play also with the fifth. The sixth and the ninth actually replaced the major seventh. And this chord voicing can normally be used even when the court symbol says C Major seventh. But sometimes in sheet music, you will see it written as C 69. Now, an example of a minor seventh chord with to edit notes. I will start with a C minor seventh without any edit notes. And I will now add a ninth 11th. So f, C, How does that sounds? I could eventually move the f, the 11th an octave down. That's a very nice and warm sounding chord voicing, isn't it? And if your left hand is big enough, you could also play it as follows. Okay, let me move to dominant seventh chords. Dominant seventh chords are the most interesting courts to add notes to, especially altered notes. So notes that are not in the scale. But let me start with adding a combination of two notes that are in this scale. A C dominant seventh chord. You could add the ninth and the 13th. So the D and the a, so a C7 chord and I add a d and an a, C. How nice that sounds. To have a more closed position. You could take the a, an octave down, like or instead of taking the a down, let me bring it back up first. I could take an octave up like this. Now, these last two chord voicings, so this one and this one are very often used chord voicings for a C7 chord. So when you see a C7 chord in sheet music, you can simply add the ninth into 13th. So use one of the chord voicings that I showed you. So you don't have to wait until you see a ninth or 13th in the chord symbol. Since they are not freely alterations, you can simply add them to a normal C7 chord. Another example, when you see in sheet music the chord symbol C7 flat nine. Then you can add besides the flattened ninth, 13th. So the flattened ninth in the key of C is D flat, and the 13th is the a. So let me first play C7. Then at the flattened ninth, the B-flat, and then the 13th, the a. And you could eventually move the E an octave up. This is a very often used chord voicing for C7 flat nine quarts. Ok, I'd like to talk now about a very special dominant seventh chord. What I want is to add all the alterations possible on a dominant seventh chord. So that means the flooded ninth, the sharpest knife, the sharpened 11th, and the flattened 13th. So in the key of C, That would be the deflects, the D sharp, F sharp, and the A-flat. Now, there is a scale in jazz music that has all those alterations. And that scale is called the altered scale. Since it has all the alterations possible in a major scale, it's beyond the scope of this course. But if you wanted to know more about that, you can check out my Jesse theory course, which is titled The Complete jazz theory course, Jess coarse scales and more. So what court belongs to the altered scale? Well, that's the altered chord. And that's the court with all the before mentioned alterations. Now, let me play a C Dominant Seventh Chord with all the alterations. So I start with C dominant seven, C, E, and B flat. And I add the flattened ninth, the sharpest ninth, the sharpened 11s, and the flattened 13th. Wow, that sounds, of course, way to fool. So what we do is taking away some alterations to let it sounds more open. What is mostly done is to take away the flattened ninth. So the D flat, and the sharpened 11th, so the F-sharp. Okay, this sounds much better. And you could use this chord voicing for the C7 altered chord. And often used voicing is where the third, the E, is played an octave higher. You can also play it in another position. In that case, take the e and the a flat, an octave down, and you have this voicing. And this position is also often used for the C7 altered chord. And you can use both positions also as rootless voicings. You can notate the altered court as follows. C7 altered or simply see altered. The altered chord voicings that we have seen are the most often used voicings for altered courts. But you can of course also make other combinations of edit altered notes. Like for example, the, the combination of the flattened ninth and flattened 13th in C dominant seventh chord that looks like this. First C dominant seven. So C, E and B flat, and then D flat, E flat, and a flat. The flattened 13. This is a less used chord voicing, but also a potential voicing for a C7 altered chord. 26. II-V-I progressions-II (A and B positions): As you know, the 2-5-1 progression is the most common chord progression in jazz. In the previous section, you've already practiced a 2-5-1 progression in all the 12 keys. But you use an each courts to only the root, the third and the seventh. You will now play the 2-5-1 progression in all 12 keys with edit notes. We will not add alterations, only notes that are in scale. Here is a 2-5-1 in C. So we start with D minor seventh. And I will add the ninth and also play the fifth. So that was two D minor sevenths, that two chord. Now, the five chord, G7. Now, when you are on the D minor seventh, you only have to lower the seventh to C, a semitone to be. And you have a voicing for the G7 chord. This G7 chord voicing has besides the third and the seventh bf. So in ninth, the a and the 13th, the E. So again, from D minor seventh to G7, only move one note. Then the C Major seventh chord, I will play a C 69 court, and I will also play the fifth. So that results in this voicing. The third, E, g, the sixth, and the ninth D. So the whole 2-5-1 then looks as follows. You can play this also without a bass note, so as a rootless chord voicing. But it's actually good for now to play the root, since you will in this stage better C and here the court, so for learning purposes, it's for now, probably better to play a route with your left hand. Ok? This has to be practiced in all 12 Quirky's Of course, in the next lecture, I will show you this. So I will play all the 25 ones in all the 12 keys for you. After your master it in your right hand, you should play all the 2-5-1 progressions in all 12 keys with your left hand. In that case, of course, as rootless chord voicings, It is very important to also know how to play chords with your left hand. Since when you play a solo, you will do that normally with your right hand. The left hand will then pay the court's okay. But 2-5-1 that I showed you. So D minor G7, C Major seventh, is what is often called a 2-5-1 progression in a position. There is also a 2-5-1 progression in B position. Let me show you. We play the D minor seventh with a seventh, see as lowest note. Then the ninth, ie, the third, F, and the fifth a. Also here, when going from D minor seventh to G7, you only have to lower the seventh, the sea, a semitone to B. And this is G7. We will pay the C Major seventh with the seventh B as the lowest note, then c root the third, and finally the fifth. And once again, the 2-5-1 progression in B position. Play it in all 12 keys, and you can play the roots in your left hand. Then played a 2-5-1 progression in B position in all 12 keys with your left hand. Again, in the next lecture, you can see how I do it. And in the resources, you will find a PDF file with all the 2-5-1 progressions in a and b position. 27. Playing the II-V-I's in all 12 keys (A and B positions): In this lesson, I will play the 2-5-1 progressions with added notes in all 12 keys in both positions. I will do this in the same order as the lesson where I showed the 2-5-1 progressions in all 12 keys, but without edit notes. So following the circle of fifths. So that will be in this order, C, G, D, a, E, and B, four scales with sharps, and then F, B flat, E flat, a flat, D flat, and G flat. For the skills with floods, I will play the progression with the right-hand and the left-hand. I will play the root notes of the courts. Be sure to practice to progressions in positioning your left hand. Voicings. 28. Major 7th chord voicings: In the previous section, I already showed you some courts voicings for a major seventh chord. I showed you this 69 forcing that appears at the end of the 2-5-1 progression in a position. And I showed you this voicing that appeared at the end of the 2-5-1 in B position. When you practice well, all the 12 2-5-1 progressions in both the a and b position that I proposed in the previous section. Then, you know, well how to play those matrix seven 4-6 in every key. And it's good to know them since they are very often used. So what more voices can you make for a major seventh chord? Well, a lot. I cannot show you all the voicings that exist, but let me show you a few so that you can get an idea of what is possible. First of all, in this 69 voicing, you could move the E and the G an octave up like this. Now, which of those voicings is better? This one or this one? Well, that depends. It depends on the situation. Perhaps that in this situation where you play the E and G an octave higher, that you're in the way if you have right-hand, because you would like to play notes here with your right-hand. In that case. Go for the other voicing. It depends also on what some dewormed. Perhaps you want a higher sound. Then play this one or a one, draw the or lower darker sound, then they this one. And if you want a voicing that is less dense, then you could leave out the fifth. Okay, what else could you play? You could just add the ninth, like in this voicing, the root C in my left hand, then in the right-hand, E, G, B, D major seventh, and the ninth. And of course, you can pay it also as a rootless chord. So in that case, leave the left-hand out or play the same voicing with your left hand. Or you could add the sharpen fourth, so the F sharp in the key of C. This is a chord voicing for C Major seventh with the sharpen forth. Now, most of the voicings I showed you are enclosed position. That means, that denotes into court voicing are all close to each other. Like in this voicing. This voicing, or this voicing. You can also spread out the court notes and use both hands. Like for example, this voicing. In the left-hand, I play the root and the fifth G. And in your right hand I played the third and the seventh. So this is actually a very simple chord voicing with only the basic notes in it. But by spreading the notes over both hands, I get a very nice open sound. Or take this C 69 voicing that you already know. I could play in the left-hand and the a, and in the right-hand, D and G. And I have the same notes as in my 69 voicing in closed position. But now more spread out. The more open sound. Look at the individual nodes starting from the lowest note, the E. The interval from a to a is exactly force. Now if you don't see this directly, look at the major scale, E, F sharp, G sharp, a, B, C sharp, D sharp, E. So a is the first note in the major scale, 1234. And the interval from a to a is a fourth. From eight to my next chord. Note that D is also exactly a fourth. Dy is the first note in the a major scale, 1234. And finally from D to G is also exactly afford. Again, g is the fourth note in the scale of D major, 1234. So this Major seventh chord is made of three stacked fourth intervals. It's easy to find. Other majors have, of course, with a similar voicing. First start on a major third and then go up in fourth. So for example, E-flat Major seventh chord can be made as follows. First start on the major third, that's a G in the key of E-flat. Then going back and forth. So from G to C, from C to F, And from F to B flat. And here is a chord voicing for an E-flat Major seventh chord. There will be some more major seventh chord voicings In this section about, so what courts and fourth courts. 29. Minor 7th chord voicings: A simple but effective chord voicing for a minor seventh chord with only a ninth edits to the normal quarter notes is this one. I play C in the bass with my left hand and right hand. I played a minor third, the E-flat, G, the minor seventh flat, and the ninth. You can of course, also play it as a rootless chord voicing, for example, with your left hand. Now, you probably already recognize this chord voicing as the chord voicing we used in the 2-5-1 progression for even minor seventh chord, the two chord in a position. So if you practice the 2-5-1 progressions, you know how to play it in all 12 keys. Of course, you can play this voicing in several inversions, like this one, this one, and this one. You can also spread the notes of these four things a bit more out. So I could play C and G in the bass with my left hand and my right hand. The ninth D minor third, E-flat, and the minor seventh, B-flat, or this one. We solve this one already in the last section. So what did I do? In my left hand? I paid the C and E flat is the root and the minor third. And in my right hand, f, B-flat, and D, the 11th, the minor seventh, and the ninth. Now, if your left-hand cannot reach this large interval from C to E flat. You can also play it in a closer position like this. Now, to easily find such a chord voicing in other keys, look at it in this way. In the left-hand, take the root and the minor third. And in the right hand, look at this F, b flat, and d. That's a B flat triad and inversion. So play the root and the minor third in a left-hand. And a major triad built on below the root in the right hand. Let me give an example of this method in the key of F. So on an F minor seventh chord with added ninth, 11th in the left hand, the root, and minor third, so that's F and a flat. And in the right-hand, a major triad, a whole tone below, below the root F. So an E-flat major triad. So when I play the E-flat major triad, for example, in second inversion. I get this chord voicing for an F minor seventh chord. Another very nice spread out chord voicing for C minor seventh chord is this one. Very nice, isn't it? So what did I do? In my left hand? I played C, G, and D. So the root, fifth, ninth. In my right hand, I played E flat, B flat, and F. The minor third, minor seventh, 11th. To easily find this chord voicing, look at it this way. Start on the root c in our case. Then go up to times in fifth. So from C to G and from G to D. So I have then C, G, and D in my left hand. For the right-hand, start a semitone above the highest note in your left hand. So in our case, I start on the E-flat. From then make the exact same pattern with your right hand, with your left hand. So go up to times in fifth. So from E flat to B flat and from B flat to F. And that's the whole quarter voicing. So let me apply that to, for example, g minus f. Start on G, goes to T2 times a fifth up. So from G to D, and from D to a left-hand. Then in the right-hand, start a semitone above the a on the B flat. And then go to time's up. So from B flat to F and from F to C. And here is our very nice sounding G minor seventh chord. As you know, the Sixth can also some nice on a minor seventh chord. You can play this sixth on a minor seventh chord when the minor seventh chord is not the two chord in a 2-5-1 progression. So in that case, when it's not a two chord in the 2-5-1 progression. You could, for example, play the C minor seventh chord as C in the bass than in the right-hand. B-flat minor seventh, E-flat minor third, and the sixth. Sometimes the sixth replaces the seventh. So another chord voicing for C minor sixth chord could be seen Bass, and in the right-hand, simply, sixth and E-flat minor third. 30. Dominant 7th chord voicings: In the last section, you Seoul ready to voicings for a C7 for voicing without altered notes. Or I should actually say, two positions for the same voicing. We added in the last section, the ninth and the 13th. So the D and the a in the key of C. And that resulted in these two positions for a C7 chord. This one and this one. These two positions are very often used voicing for a dominant seventh chords. Now, if you want a little bit more open sound, you could leave out the 13th, leaving only the ninth as edit notes. So like this. Since these voicing, so with the ninth 13th edits are so often used. Let's look at similar voicings in other keys. For example, E-flat. Let me first play the root E flat and a left-hand, and then in the right-hand, the major third, G, and D minor seventh, D flat. So let's now add the ninth, the F, and the 13th, the seed. And here's our E-flat seven voicing with added ninth, 13th. For any other position, move the G and C an octave up. And here, the same voicing for E-flat seven, Indiana position. Okay, one more example, F-sharp. I will play the root F sharp in your left hand. Right hand, I start with a major third and a minor seventh, E. I add a ninth, G-sharp, and the 13th, D-Sharp. And here's the voicing for F sharp seventh. And for the other position, just moved the E and D E sharp an octave up. And of one arc second position for the F sharp seventh chord. Okay, since these two positions for a dominant seventh chord are very often played and very useful. I would advise that you play and memorize them in all 12 keys. But if you practice well, the 2-5-1 progressions in a previous section, you'll already practice both positions because they appear as the five quarts into 2-5-1 progressions in the a and b position. Okay, let me return to the sea seventh chords with the edit ninth, 13th. You can spread out this court voicing to have a more open sound. You can play this spread out chord voicing as follows. First of all, you will need both hands to spread out all the notes in your left hand. Start with a minor seventh flat, then the major third, E, and the 13th, the continuing or in your right-hand within ninth D, then the fifth, and finally the root C. So this is actually the same voicing. So with ninth, 13th edit, but note not enclose position, but with the notes spread out. Now to be able to quickly play such a voicing. Notice that most of the intervals between the consecutive notes into core to our fourth, with the exception of the lowest interval. The lowest interval from B flat to E is 123456 semitones, or three whole tones. Since there are two semitones and the whole tone, this interval is called a tritone interval. It's divides an octave in exactly two equal parts, since an octave consists of 12 semitones and a tritone consists of six semitones. Okay? So the first interval, the interval between B flat and E, is a tritone interval. Now, all the other intervals are forth from E to a, from a to D, from D to G, and from G to C. Okay, let me give you one more example of such, of such a voicing this time for G7. And let me use this interval formula that I just showed you. So we start on the minor seventh, which is an F in the key of G. Then for the first interval, we go a tritone up. Now, when you don't see directly how far it tried to notice, you can go up a fourth and then a semi-tone. Or you can go a fifth up, and then gotta go down two semitones. So from f, a fifth up to C, and then a semi-tone down to B. So that's our first interval, a tritone from F to B. Then from B go up in forth till you arrive at the root of the chord. So g, In our case, Derby go from b to e, from e to a, from a to D, and finally from D to G. And here is our nice open zoning G7 chord voicing with added ninth, 13th. Now, all the voicing for a dominant seventh chords we've seen in this lesson so far are all seventh chords without any alterations. Only to ninth into 13th had been edits till now. When can you use alterations like the flattened ninth, sharpened knife, sharpened 11th and floods and 13th? Well, first of all, when they are in the courts seem old elite sheet of course. Like here, for example. Sometimes you can add them yourself, even if it's not the inequality symbol loans lead sheet. Now, there are no strict rules of when to add this alteration or the other, but there are some guidelines. First of all, the most used dominant seventh chords with altered notes are. The seventh flat nine court the seven sharp 11 chord and the altered chord. When you see an elite sheet, a dominant seventh chord with no altered notes, you could use one of those courts with altered notes by first looking at which courts comes next. So after the dominant seventh chord, then you can use the guidelines in the following table to choose which altered note or notes you want to add to your quart. So for example, the next court after my different dominant seventh chord is a fifth down. Like the progression a seventh D majors have, then you can substitute for the a seventh chord and a C7 flat nine, or an ASM with altered court. Or for example, into chord progression, G7, D major seventh. Which alteration can you make? Well, from G to D is a fourth down. Look into table for a fourth them, you can use the alteration seven sharp 11. So for the G7 chord, you could add the sharpened 11th, et cetera. Now again, this table is not a set of strict rules, only some guidelines of where you could eventually add alterations to your dominant seventh chords. There are many other possibilities and they depend on the situation. Most important is let your ears be the guides of what sounds well and whatnot. And the more you do it, the more you try, the more experience you get in adding altered notes to courts. Let me show you some dominant seventh courts with alterations. Some of them I already showed in the previous section, so they can already look familiar to you. I will start with the C7 flat nine quart. And I will now take the g for the root, since we already saw a C7 flat nine voicing in the previous section, I play a G in the bass with my left hand and my right hand. And f, the seventh and the third. I know at the fled and ninth, eighth let this voicing is already a G7 flat nine voicing, but very often the 13th. So E in the scale of G is also added. And this is a very often used voicing for a G7 flat nine CT. And for a rootless voicing, you can leave out the G and debase. Now, there is something special about C7 flat nine courts, and that's because they are related to diminish courts. I will tell more about it in the lesson about diminished chords and this section. And perhaps you remember, I explained that for diminished courts, everything repeats at the interval of a minor third. Well, the same can be said for C7 flat nine Courts, since they are related to two diminished courts. That means that the G7 flat nine voicing can also be used for C7 flat nine chord, a minor third up. So for a B flat seven flat nine voicing, or as a D flat seven flat nine voicing, or an E7 flipped nine voicing. Or if you have a voicing for a B-flat seven Flat nine CT. You can use it for all the four courts that I mentioned. So you can use a voicing for one court in this family of courts, for every other court in the family. And as with diminished courts, there are only three families. So only three definite difference, C7 flat nine courts and not 12th, as with most of the other courts. Let me move to some other dominant seventh chords with an alteration. This seven sharp nine Court. The best way to voice F7 sharp nine chord is to take the major third minor sevenths and to sharpen ninth. So in the case of C7 sharp nine court just play ie, the third, B flat, the seventh, and D-sharp, D sharpen length. And here we have a rootless chord voicing for C7 sharp nine. And if you want, you can, of course played bass notes, see, with your left hand. Okay, this sudden sharp 11 chord. You can just play the root in your left hand. And then the minor seventh, major third, and sharpen the lattice. You can also play the seventh an octave up. Another voicing for a C7 sharp 11 is this one. Can you see what is strange about this chord voicing? Well, perhaps you noticed that the court doesn't have a third. It has a minor seventh. Ninth, sharpen the 11th, 13th, but no third. Can you make a dominant seventh chord without a thirt? Well, a printer, yes. Otherwise I wouldn't show you this chord voicing. Of course. This chord voicing comes from melody, minor harmony. And this particular voicing can be used for a lot, of course, for a G minor major seventh and Acis flat nine, a B-flat Major seventh sharp five as C7 sharp 11. So that's what I just showed you. An E half-diminished and for an F-sharp altered chord. For some of these courts, the voicing lexer third. For others, it doesn't have a seventh. And in melodic minor harmony, it can happen that a court doesn't have a thirt or a seventh at all. When you play a court's derived from melodic minor harmony, you're actually more paying the whole family of courts that go together that like the six core. I just mentioned, that one single CTE. And then it's not important if a third or a seventh he's missing. In my just theory course titled to complete just theory course, Jess course skills and more. I explain exactly how this all works. 31. Altered chord voicings: Technically spoken, the ultimate court belongs to the dominant seventh chords, so it belongs to the previous lecture, the lecture about dominant seventh squirts. But since the altered CT is a bit, especially in the way that it goes with the scale, the altered scale that has all the alterations possible. I thought that's the altered quarter, deserved a lesson on its own. Actually, I already showed you the most used piano chord voicings for an altered chord in the lesson about altered courts in section four. I will show it once more to you. So the altered court with C as the root, has the major third, E flat and 13th a flats and the minor seventh B flats. And they're sharpened ninth, D-Sharp. And you can get another position for this C7 altered court by moving the EE a flats and an octave up. Now, I don't know if you realize, but you saw both positions for this C7 altered court already before in the previous lecture about dominant seventh chord voicings. But then for another court, can you remember which one? It was? 40 F sharp seventh chord. Now, at first sight, that might seem very strange. An F sharp seventh chord has exactly the same voicing as it C7 altered court. But have a look at an F sharp seventh chord. The seventh is the E, and the E is the third of the C7 altered court. That third for the F sharp seventh, D sharp is the same as the seventh. 40 C7 altered court. We only call it a B-Flat in the case of a C7 altered chord, but it's the same note. So C and F sharp are somehow related to each other, since the third of one chord is a seventh of the other and vice versa. Now, this always happens to do dominant seventh chords where two roots are exactly a tritone away from each other and see an F-sharp are exactly a tritone away. Remember that a tritone interval consists of three whole tones, are six semitones. And you can see that from C 123456 semitones to F-sharp, and from F sharp, 123456 semitones two c. So from C to F sharp is a tritone interval. And also from F sharp to C isn't tritone interval. So a third of one chord is a seventh of the other, and this seventh becomes the third. But what about the other nodes into courts? We have the D-Sharp and the a flats. The Sherpa at ninth and floods and 13th into C7 filtered court. What are those two notes in the F sharp seventh chord? Well, the D sharp is the sixth note in the scale of F sharp. But in a dominant seventh chord, we call its rather this 13th. So D-sharp, the sharpened ninth vertices, heavens audit ct is the thirteenths, 40 F sharp seventh chords. The a flats, the floods, and 13th in the C7 altered chord is the ninth in DFS sharps. F is scored only that in the key of F sharp. You would rather call this an G-sharp than an a flat. So finally, the chord voicing for this C7 altered court is exactly the same voicing as the voicing for an F sharp seventh court with at its ninth 13th. And since the ninth 13th are notes in the major scale, they're not altered notes. This is a normal, not alter to F sharp seventh chord. Of course, I talked the whole time about rootless chord voicings. When in discord voicing, I play a C in the base. Then this is automatically a C7 altered court. Milton, F sharp seventh chord anymore? When I play an F-sharp into base, it's an F sharp seventh chord, not anymore as C7 is altered chord. Now, when C7 altered and F-sharp seven shared the same chord voicing. This means that C-sections and F sharp seventh altered also share the same voicing. So you can very quickly find an F sharp seventh altered voicing. Just take a normal unaltered C7 chord voicing with added ninth, 13th, and change the root note from C to F sharp. And if you've played rootless than it's exactly the same voicing. So a voicing that you saw for a C7 squared with added ninth 13th is this one. I will pay with a c into base to make clear that this is a C7 chord. No, I changed the bass notes to F sharp, and I have an F-Sharp seven altered chord. So here's another reason why it's so good to practice positions for to dominant seventh chords that ochre into 2-5-1 progressions that we saw before. Because then you don't have only dominant seventh chord voicings. But you also have the two positions for all the altered course. That's our a tritone away. At the end of this course, I will tell you a little bit about just theory and explain a bit more about this phenomenon. That's the dominant seventh chord, a tritone away from each other are strongly related. 32. Diminished chord voicings: In section three, basic seventh chords, you learned that a diminished chord can be made by stacking minor thirds. So an F diminished chord would be Starting on F minor third up to a flat. From a flat minor third up to C flat, which is of course the same note as B. And from C flat, or be a minor third up to E double flat. But I will call it simply D. So here's an F diminished chord. F, a flat, C flat are B and D. To make this a little bit more interesting, the d is mostly replaced by V. So then you get this chord voicing. F, a flat, B. Actually it's a sea floods, but let me simply call it b and e. Now, I hope you remember. You have seen this chord voicing before in the lecture about dominant seventh chords. In this section, we used this exact chord voicing for a G7 flat nine court. Perhaps you remember also that I said that C7 flat nine courts are related to diminished chords. So you see that an F diminished chord is actually the same court as a G7 flat nine CT. Or more generally, I can say a diminished chord. If the same court as a C7 flat nine court, a whole tone up. When you study just theory. You will also learn that the same diminished scale is used to improvise over G7 flat nine, and F diminished. As you know, for diminished courts, everything repeats at the interval of a minor third. So this chord voicing can also be used for a flood diminished, BY diminished and di diminished. And also for all the seven flat nine courts that are a minor third separated from each other. So that makes a total of eight different courts for diminished chords and four C7 flat nine courts. In the following table, you can see that three families of courts that all share the same voicings. So that means that if you have a chord voicing for one court in the family, you can use that exact same chord voicing for all the other seven courts that are in the same family. So let me give you one more example. I first want to find a chord voicing for C diminished court. In section three, basic seventh chords, you already learned this voicing. C, E flat, G flat, and B double floods, but let me call the devil, fled simply a. So C, E-flat, G-flat. And we will do the same thing as we did with the half-diminished chord. We will raise the a by a whole tone to let the court sound a little bit more interesting. So this gives us the following voicing for C diminished chords, C, E-flat, G-flat, B. Now look again at a table. I can use this C diminished chord voicing for all the eight cores that are in the same family, you can just change the root in your left hand. And when you play rootless chord voicings, then there is no difference at all. 33. Augmented chord voicings: We already met the augmented seventh chord. The augmented seventh chord is actually a Dominant Seventh Chord since it has a major third and a minor seventh, but it has an alteration. The augmented fifth. A nice chord voicing for C augmented seventh chord is by adding also the ninth. Let me play first C7 squared with, apart from the root, only the minor seventh and the major third. Now I will add this sharpened fifths. So this is basic C augmented seventh chord. And I add the ninth a D. Also sounds nice. You can also play it rootless. On an augmented seventh chords. You could also add the sharpened 11th. Now, when I added here is perhaps a bit too many notes near to each other. I should spread the notes a little bit more out. But look at this voicing. You see I have here a voicing with three edit notes, ninth, sharpened 11, and they sharpen fifths. Ok? But if you just want a simple open sounding chord voicing, you could play only the minor seventh, the major third, and the augmented fifth. So for a C plus seven chord, you can play the C in the bass with your left hand and right hand, the seventh, B flat, the third, E, and D augmented fifth, the G-sharp. And of course, if you wanted rootless, just leave out the C in your left hand. 34. So What chords: So what courts are named after Miles Davis composition? So what from the 19 fifties? So what from Miles Davis is a tune that consists of the following courts. D minor seven, urine 16 measures, E-flat minor seven during eight measures. And again, D minor seven urine aid measures. So what is an example of a Modal jazz tune where you stay during several measures on one and the same court like is clearly a case in this tune. Imagine that going from the first time of playing this court scheme to the second time, you have to play 16 plus eight equals 24 measures of only D minor seventh. Well, that's a lot of measures of only one court. You understand that if you would play during all this time, only one and the same chord voicing, that it would become quite boring. So you'll have to add some variation, even if you play the whole time. D minor seventh. So that's where to, so what courts come into play? The basic, so what chord voicing for a D minor seventh chord into tune? So what would be the following? In the left hand, you play the D and the G, which is the 11th in a D minor seventh chord. In the right-hand, you played a minor seventh, C, D minor third, and the fifth da. An easy way to quickly find a. So what chord voicing is to realize that it is made of three-step forced intervals. And a major third interval from D to G is a fourth. From G to C is a fourth. From C to F is a fourth. And finally, from F to a is a major third. Notice that this exact, so what D minor seventh chord voicing could also be used for other courts. It could be a rootless chord voicing for a B-flat Major seventh chord. The d at the bottom is then the major third in the key of B flat. A G is the sixth seeded ninth. F. A would be the major seventh. So this chord voicing for a B-flat major seventh chords as an added sixth ninth. We saw already chord voicing for major seventh chords. We're the sixth and the ninth replaced the major seventh. In this case, the major seventh. The a is normally present. And as extra edit notes, you have this sixth and the ninth. Now this, so what's chord voicing could even act as an E-flat major seventh sharp for a court. The bottom note, the D, would be the major seventh in the scale of E-flat. G is the major third to the sixth, F, and a is the sharpened fourth. Since a flit is the fourth note in the scale of E-Flat. Okay, back to our D minor sevenths. So what's chord voicing? When you want to use it on several measures of D minor sevenths, like instituions. So what? You need a bit more variation, as I said before. Now look at the following. I will move all the nodes of this voicing up. And I get this voicing, E, a, D, G, and B. I can do that again. I move every node up and then I have f, b, e, a, and C. I can do it again and again and again and again. And when I do it one more time and back on the original D minor seventh chord voicing. But now an octave higher. Notice that I move the notes every time up in such a way that I stayed in C-Major. In other words, all the notes in every way voicing than when moving up our notes in the C major scale. Moving up in this way so that you stay in the same scale is called moving up diatomic Lee. So I move the notes of the, so what Corte di, anatomically up the C-major scale. Now, you might ask why the C major scale, since we're in D, well remembered that D minor seventh is the to court in the key of C. The D minor seventh chord consists of only Notes from C major. When a musician improvises over a D minor sevenths court, he will in most cases, also use only Notes from the C-major scale. Since D minor seventh is actually derived from the C major scale. By the way, this scale that he uses is called the Dorian scale and consists of only Notes from C major, so only white keys, but runs from D to D instead of from C to C. If you want to know more about Dorian and other skills, you should do some study of jazz theory. Ok, let me come back. What airlift? When I moved the D minor sevenths. So what's chord voicing up diatonic Lee, the C major scale. I can create new voicings. I will list them again here and look at each of the voicings individually. So the first one can be used for three different courts. We saw a while ago. And that word, of course, D minor seventh, B flat major seven, and E flat major seventh sharp for this second voicing, it can also be used for three different courts. The first one is an E minor seventh chord. E is the root, a to fourth. Or in a minor chord, we call the drop at the 11th. D, D minor seventh, G, D minor third, and the fifth. The second possibility is C Major seventh chord. E is the major third to sixth, D19, G to fifth and beat the major seventh. And the third possibility is an F major seventh sharp. For record, e is the major seventh eight, a major third to D26, Gita ninth and beat the sharpen forth. Okay, the third chord voicing sounds quite dissonant. And that's because of the interval from b to c. This is called a minor ninth interval. Because of this dissonance, we will not attributed a CT. So let me move to the fourth voicing this voice and can be used as Jesus court. G is the root, sees the fourth, F is the minor seventh, B is the major thirds, and D is the fifth. The fifth voicing can again be used for three different courts. The first chord is a minor seventh chord. A is the root, D is a fourth or Rutter, 11th, G is the minor sevenths, C, D minor third, and the fifth. The second chord is F major seventh. A is the major third, D to sixth, G to ninth, C, D, and E, The major seventh. And the third possibility is B flat major seven sharp four. A is the major sevenths, D to major third. G, The sixth seeded ninth, and E sharpen forth. The sixth voicing is again a voicing that sounds dissonant because of a minor third ninth interval between E and F. So no court here. And the last voicing can again be used for a Jesus chord. C is the fourth, F, the minor seventh, B, D major third, E to thirteenths and their route. Now, when you have the D minor seventh chord for several measures in a row, like in the June. So what? You could actually use all those seven chord voicings to have more variation. So you could even use the more dissonant ones because they can create some tension and therefore interest. So even if all those chord voicings are not all D minor seventh chords. In fact, only the first one would be a D minor seventh chord. You can play all these chord voicing for long stretches of only the D minor seventh chord because you are actually outlining the C Major Scale. Or let me rather say the d Dorian scale, which is used to improvise over D minor seventh chord. To finish. So what? I will show you how you could use those different. So what voicings over a D minor seventh chords that stretches over several measures. 35. Fourth chords: Fourth courts are simply courts that are built of notes with intervals of fourth between them. Take for example, this voicing. This is a C6 nine voicing. E is the major third, a to six, D19. And cd root. We can now do the same thing as we did with the so what courts moving the notes or the fourth quarter diachronically up the C-major scale. So in this way, I start with the first note and go up one step further next voicing, another step to get another voicing. Again, a step, etcetera, like this. So let me list all the possibilities we get for moving up diatonic l0. By the way, notice that not all the intervals are fourth anymore once they have been moved up diatonic Lee. Okay, so the first one is a C6 nine quart as we saw already. The second one can be two different courts, D6 19 or a G7. For the D6 nine quart, we have F, D minor third, b, e, d, a, and d, the root for the G7 chord, F minor seventh, B to major third, eat the 13th, 89, and D, the fifth. The third voicing is a. Jesus court. G is the root, C, The fourth, F, the minor seventh, Bie De major third, and eat the 13th. The fourth voicing is an F. 69 court. A is the major third to the sixth. G dynein see two-fifths and f, the root. The fifth voicing is a G7. The b is the major third, E, the 13th, a D9, D to fifth, and G, the root. Now, I don't know if you noticed, but we miss a minor seventh, so let's add it at the bottom here. And discord voicing, we have seen it before. It was the spread out dominant seventh chord voicing that I showed you in section five in a lecture about dominant seventh chords. This is an often used voicing for dominant seventh chords, and it would be good to know it in all 12 keys. The sixth voicing is again a g squared, c is the fourth, F the minor seventh, Be the major third, E to 13th, 8 ninth. You can eventually play the G in the base as a root. The seventh voicing can be a voicing for two different courts. That first court is again a Jesus squared, D, G, the roots, C to fourth, F the minor sevenths and be the major third. The second course is an F major seven scores, but in that case, we have to add an a in the base. Otherwise the court will not have a major third. Okay. So the a is the major third, D to sixth, G to C, the fifth, F, the root and be the sharpened Forth. By the way, the a that I added into base works also when the voicing is used as Jesus court, since it's the ninth in the key of G. As you can see, all the voicings that I made out of the first voicing for C 69 have notes from the C Major Scale, which is normal since I went diatonic up the C-major scale. So that means that I can also use those voicings and my long session of D minor seventh chords, so in a tune. So what, so finally, with this, so what courts and the fourth courts and the voices we saw before for minor chords, we have enough variation to keep it interesting. Even if the D minor seventh chord lasts for 24 measures. 36. So What and Fourth-chords in other keys: In the previous two lessons we saw the, so what's the first chord voicings based on the C-major scale? What if you want to try to define those voicings in another key? Let me illustrate this with this. So what chord voicing for C minor seventh chord? We have, first of all, to ask ourselves in which key we are. Remember that for the D minor sevenths, so what's end? Fourth courts, in the previous lectures, we were in the key of C, So a whole tone down from D. So for, so what's first chord voicing for C minor seventh? We are in the key of B flat. One whole tone below. See? Perhaps it's good to remember what to B-flat major scales. This is B-Flat, C, D, E flat, F, G, a, B-Flat. So there are two flat nodes, E flat and B flat. And that's totally normal since a C minor seventh chord has exactly dose to flat notes. E flat is a minor third, and B flat is a minor seventh. So, okay, the basic, so what's chord voicing for C minor seventh would be start on a root C. Go three times up in fourths. So from C to F, F to B flat, and from B flat to E flat. The last interval was a major third, E flat to G. And here is our C minor sevenths. So what chord voicing? When we want to find all the other chord voicings derive from the basic. So what chord voicing? We have to go up diachronically, but now in the key of B flat. So there we go. Here's again our C minor sevenths. So what? And now one step up. Okay, that's easy. No more black keys in this step. Notice that we're now on the D minor sevenths. So what quarter voicing from the previous lesson on? So what chords? One more step up. Watch out. In a left-hand that d becomes E flat, and in the right-hand, the a becomes B flat. Okay? In this way, you keep going on in the scale of B-flat. And this is the last one. In the following table, you see the course that you can create in this scale. For comparison. I also put the court's direct from the D minor sevenths. So what's courts next to it? When you want to find any other, so what courts and all the derives courts within the same key always proceed in the same way. Look in which KUR. So one whole Tom Dunn from the minor seventh. So what's CT? And go diatonic Lee up in that key. 37. Upper structures: An upper structure chord voicing is made of a major third and minor seventh in the left hand and try it in the right hand. Let me show you the major third and a minor seventh in the key of C are the E and B flat, as you know. So I play that in the left hand. In the right-hand, I will play it, try it, and let me start by playing a D major triad. So let me analyze this upper structure court. Since we played E and B flat in the left hand, this is a C Dominant Seventh Chord. Let's look at the edit notes in it. Try it in the right hand. D F-sharp, and a. D is the ninth. F sharp is the sharpened 11th, and a is the 13th. D and a are both notes from the C Major Scale. But F sharp is a real alteration since it's not a note from C major. So this upper structured urge as a C7 sharp 11 chord. We call this court an upper structure to court, since the try it in the right hand is a Detroit. D being the second note in the scale of C. Of course, I can play inversions of the triad, and I can also invert the E and B flat in my left hand. So I could play the upper structured court as this. Whereas this or this, or this, et cetera. Let me show you another upper structure court. I pray again the E and B flat with a left-hand and right-hand, I play the E-flat major triad in second inversion. So what nodes do we have besides the major third and a minor seventh is in the left hand. You can read the leaflets as a D-Sharp, making it a sharpened ninth. A flat is the floods and 13th, and C is just the root. So this is the dominant seventh chord with the alterations sharp nine and flat 13, or a C7 altered chord. This is an upper structure, B6 squared, with a trial based on the flattened sixth note in the scale. And also here, I can play inversions. The upper structure six squared. So based on the a triad in the key of C sounds as follows. So again, ie. In the left-hand and the right-hand and a major triad in first inversion. The E and a and the a major triads are just the major third 13th. But to C sharp is an alteration. When you read that note is D flat, it's the flattened ninth. So this upper structure court, is it C7 flat nine chord? Now, the 0s in the left hand is normally not played, since you already have an e in the right-hand. So the upper structure six chord in the key of C can simply be played as follows. Now, those three upper structured, upper structure to restructure, B6 and upper structure, six, R3, most played upper structures. Since the C7 flat 9707 sharp 11 courts are the most US alterations on dominant seven scores. But they are not the only upper structures. Take for example, the upper structure B3 card. So based on the minor third. So E and B flat in the left-hand and the right-hand and E-flat major triads. The G and B flat in the right-hand are just a fifth and a minor seventh. But the E-flat, which you can read as D sharp, is a sharpened knife. So this is a C7 sharp nine CT. Another way to make a C7 sharp nine quart is when you play a C minor triad in right-hand. So let me show. So again, E and B flat in a left-hand and right-hand, a C minor triad. G and C in C minor triads are just the fifth and the roots. The E flat or D sharp is the sharpened knife. This is an upper structure, one minor chord. One because the root is C and minor, because it's a C minor chord that I play in the right-hand. Three more upper structure courts that can be played. Our upper structure, B2 minor, upper structure, B3 minor and upper structure B5. Let me start with the first one. Upper structure B2 minor. So based on the D flat minor triad, E and P flooding left-hand and right-hand the D flat minor triads. And we'll pay it in first inversion for now, but you can, of course choose another inversion. You see that the alterations already a flat, flatten 13th and the D flat flatted ninth. So this is a C7 flat nine flat 13 court. The second one, the upper structure, B3 minor, based on the E-flat minor triads, E and B flat in left-hand and an E-flat minor triad in the right-hand. E flat is the sharpened ninth. G flat is the sharpened 11th. You can see it as an F-sharp, and B flat is just their minor seventh. So this is a C7 sharp nine sharp 11 chord. And the third one, the upper structure B5, is based on the G flat major triad, E and B for the left-hand. G flat major triad in the right hand. The D flat is the flooded nine, G flat, the sharpened 11th, and be floods D minor seventh. So this is a C7 flat nine sharp 11. Now, again, only the first three upper structures are used often. So the upper structure to, for seven sharp 11 Kurds. V, upper structure, beef six for altered courts. And deeper structure, six for seven flat nine guards. 38. Build your own chord voicings: Till now, I've shown you quite a lot of chord voicings for all types of courts that are used in jazz. You know, know, many different chord voicings for major seventh, minor seventh, dominant seventh, diminished, augmented, altered and a minor major seventh chords. But don't think that you have seen now all the possible chord voicings that exist. That would be impossible because the number of possible chord voicings is almost infinite. That's why in this lesson, I will give you some guidelines on how to build your own chord voicings. I will again show you this for courts with C as a root node. But the principles apply to all other keys so that you can use it to make every quarter voicing for every core type in every key possible. I will start with a C Major seventh chord with edit notes. I will actually first built a C Major seventh courts that consists of stapled thirds. Sometimes those thirds will be major thirds, sometimes minor thirds. Ok, there we go. I start on C and first go up in thirds on notes from the C major scale. So C, E, G, B, D. Now, the next note would be f. But as you know, the F doesn't sound well, a major seventh chords. So I take the F-sharp instead. The next third brings us to a, again, a note from the C major scale. And that is the last third, since otherwise we would again be on the road. See, let me hear you again how this chord sounds. What kind of coordinates is? Well, a C Major seventh chord, since it has an e and b. The major third and major seventh. What are the added nodes? Those are D, F-sharp, and a Jan ninth, sharpen fourth at 13th or six. So this is a C Major seventh, 13 sharp four. Okay, so we found one voicing for a C Major, 13 sharp for can we invent other voicings? Let's try. But before we do so, notice that this court voicing doesn't sound very tense. How does that come? This is because the intervals between the constituted court, court notes are all thirds and a third interval is a very consonant interval. So of course, voicing that consists of only consonant intervals will sound very consonant. If you want more tension, you will need more dissonant intervals and your chord voicing. In the following table, you'll see a list of consonants and dissonant intervals. You see that the third is a consonant interval. When you want more attention, be sure to include in your chord voicing also one or more intervals that are dissonant. What I will do is that I will use all the seven notes that we used in our first chord voicing for C Major, 713 sharp for all the next voicings that I will create. From the most consonant voicing with no tension. So the voicing with only thirds, I will first go to the voicing with the most tension that you can create with this same seven notes. And that's a voicing that consists of only whole tones and semitones. Here is again, the voicing that we had before. When I now move the notes that I played with my right hand one octave down. I get this voicing. You see, that's just the notes C, D, E, F sharp, G, a. And the intervals are almost all whole tones and one semitones. So that we're two extremes. First the voicing with no tension and then the voicing with a maximum tension. Mostly you will want to find a voice in somewhere between those two extremes. So voicing that has a mix of consonant and dissonant intervals. One way to build that is to go up in first, starting on B. So that's B, E, a, D, G, and C. So that's all fourth. So consonant intervals. And the last interval will be a dissonant interval. The interval from C to F sharp, which is a tritone interval. Okay? So you see that it's almost impossible to play this court, since my left hand is not big enough to play it comfortably. But let me turn. Okay, so that's one dissonant interval between for arrest all consonant intervals. Now, when we want to try to find another voicing with a mix of consonant and dissonant intervals. I will give you some guidelines on how to do that. Don't use small intervals at the bottom. Otherwise it will sound very muddy. Place dissonant intervals higher up at the bottom. But preferably in the middle region. Make intervals with a maximum size of a fifth, except for it to bottom nodes. With those guidelines, you can come up with a lot of possibilities to combine those seven notes. But look, for example, at this possibility. And look at the intervals between the consecutive notes of this voicing from D to G, the fourth, G to B, B to C, a semitone. So a dissonant interval from C to F sharp, a tritone. So again, a dissonant interval from F sharp to a, a third, minor third this time. And from a to E. So we have two dissonant intervals in this voicing. So that's a nice combination of consonant and dissonant intervals and gives us just some tension. Okay, I will give some more examples. First, two possible voicings for a C minor 11th court. Look at this very simple one, E flat, B flat, C, and F. So that's a fifth, a whole town. So dissonant interval. And here's another voicing for C minor, 11. G, D, E flat, and B flat. Here are two dissonant intervals. Nicely in the middle. From D to E flat is a semitone, and from E flat to F is a hotel. And you see a fifth and a button. So not too close to each other. So everything according to our guidelines. Okay, I want to finish with a dominant seventh chord and a C7 sharp 11. What chord voicing could we invent for a C7 sharp 11? Well, we could start with a fifth interval at the bottom. From C to G. G to B flat is a minor third. Now let's build some tension and go up a tritone to the major third in accord from E. Let's make even some more attention with the whole tone interval to the sharpened 11th, D, F sharp. And we could finish with a consonant interval and minor third from F sharp to a. And here is our C7 sharp 11 chord voicing. 39. Information about Comping: Comping comes from accompanying and means that you as a piano player, pay into bent to courts, mostly in arithmetic way to accompany a soloist or to Melody. Every pianist has its own style of comping. So I cannot give the rules on how to come, only some guidelines. Very important is not to come to busily, so that it is in the way of the solo player. Listen well and to try to fill the gaps that a soloist leaves. Which on the other hand, doesn't mean that you may know play a goal when disown was displaying. But be aware to leave the soloist the place that he or she deserves. Okay, that being said, let's first have a look on what's to play on the course that you'll see in a lead sheet. Well, actually, you can use a mix of different chord types that we've seen during this course. So you can use the standard dominant seventh, minor sevenths and major seventh chords that we used during a 2-5-1 progression exercises. And you can add alterations when the lead sheets tells you. And even in other cases. I have been talking which alterations to adds to seventh courts in a section about chord voicings. And you can of course mix in, so what court's fourth courts and upper structures. So make a mix of every type of courts. You will get a feeling for what works in which situation by just doing it, just trying. And of course, by listening a lot to others, listened to records, go to concerts, and tried to see what others do. Then tried to add some rhythm. You would normally not start every court on the first beat of measure. Hold the court for the whole measure, and then start a new court again on beat one of the next measure. You can of course start your guard on beat one. I didn't mean to say that you cannot start on beat one. But I'd only like to say, don't do it all the time, make some variation. Instead of paying the court on the ulna beat. You could also play it's between two beats. So for example, between one beat 12. You could also anticipate the court by half a beat. So starting between beat four of the last measure and beat one of the new measure. To have an idea of how to use rhythm while comping. You could again listen to what I played at the end of the lesson about, so what's courts? Now the following. When you want to use a rootless chord voicing, one that could be paid with only one hand. What's to do with the other hand? Well, first of all, you don't have to always play with two hands. But if you want, you could, for example, play the rootless chord voicing with your left hand and to play with your right-hand, for example, root, fifth, root. Let me show you. In the left-hand, I play the D minor seventh chord voicing F, a, C, and E. And in the right-hand, I can play the root D, a. And again the root D, with the same D minor seventh chord voicing and left-hand play, see Fc into right-hand. So minor seventh, minor third, minor seventh. But you can also add other notes like the 11th. So for example, and I'm still using the same left-hand voicing for D minor seventh. I can play G, c, G, with the right-hand, G being the 11th. And I don't have to double notes in my right hand. I could also simply play G, c, or c, g. Now, you could apply this same principle also on dominant seventh, major seventh, or other courts. Try it out and be creative. Of course, use notes that fit the courts and listen well how it sounds. And above all, don't be afraid to make mistakes when you hear that what you played didn't sound so well. Just don't pay them anymore. It's okay to make mistakes from time to time. And if you would never make any mistake, you probably wouldn't advance. 40. Tritone substitution: In section five, chord voicings in the lecture about altered courts, you saw that a voicing for a C7 altered court with exactly the same voicing as a voicing for an unaltered F sharp seventh chord. Let's study this more in detail. First, have a look at the characteristics of the three most important core types. Major seventh, minor seventh, and dominant seventh chords. Look at the interval between the third and the seventh for each core type. For simplicity reasons, let's do it in the key of C. First into C Major seventh chord. The interval between the major third E and the major seventh B is exactly a fifth. Since b is the fifth note in the skeleton. In the minor seventh chord, the interval between the minor third, E-flat. Minor seventh, is also exactly if it's in a dominant seventh chord. This is different. The interval between the major third, minor seventh, B-flat, is a tritone interval. Again, a tritone interval is an interval of three photons or six semitones that divides an octave exactly into equal parts. So the integral from B flat to E is also a tritone interval. Since the dominant seventh chord is the only court that has a tritone interval in it. That tritone interval defines the presence of a dominant seventh chord. Or in other words, is there a tritone interval in your court? Then debts Court must be a Dominant Seventh Chord. Now the question is, which dominant seventh chord? When we have the E and B flat? Then this dominant seventh chord must be a C7, isn't it? Well, not necessarily. Because there's another dominant seventh chord that has the exact same tritone interval between its third seventh and that other dominant seventh chord is F sharp seventh. Since the major third of C seventh, which is E minor sevenths of E, of F sharp seventh, and the minor seventh of C7 flat. B flat is the major third of F sharp seventh. Only debt you'll draw a sharp and then be flat, but it's the same note. And guess what? C and F sharp, or also a tritone away from each other. So that means that two dominant seventh courts whose roots are separated by a tritone, shared the same third seventh. Only the third of one-quarter is a seventh of the other and vice versa. Now, this means that when you see an elite sheet, a dominant seventh chord, you could eventually substitute that court, but a dominant seventh chord at tritone away. Just musicians very often liked to substitutes courts by other courts to make a tune some differently or more interesting. Look what happens if you apply this to the h5 court into 2-5-1 progression. The 2-5-1 progression in the key of C is D minor seventh, G7, C Major seventh. I will play it without any alterations or other edit notes. Just simply the roots in the left hand and a thirds and sevenths in the right-hand. The dominant seventh chord is the five chord, G7. Now, a tritone away from G is the note D flat. You can see that easily by going six semitones up from g. One, 23456. And we're in D flat. Or you can also go up a fifth and Dennis semitone down. So from G and fifth up to D and a semitone down to deflect. Or you can go from g of first up and then a semi-tone up. So from G to C is a fourth up. And then a semi-tone uptakes us also to deflect. So you could substitute D flat seventh for the G7 squirt into 2-5-1 progression in C. So the progression then becomes D minor seventh. D flat seven. C Major seventh. You see that in the right hand, I still play the same note. Since the third and the seventh of G7 are the Seventh and third of D flat seventh. So into right-hand, nothing changes. The change is in the left hand where I play the roots of the chords. Instead of g, I played deflect. Let me say again first, the original 2-5-1 progression with the G7. And now with the D flat seventh. You see how that changes the sound of the 2-5-1 progression? And look at the motion of the roots from D to D flat to see. That's a chromatically descending baseline. That's a very nice effect. Okay, this whole process of substituting a dominant seventh chord with another dominant seventh chord, a tritone away is called tritone substitution. You can apply tritone substitution ingest units when you see a dominant seventh chords, but don't overdo it, use it sparingly. Now, if you want to know more about jazz theory, if you want to have an overview and see the relationship between chords and scales, if you really want to understand what's happening in the music, then consider having a look at my graph theory course. Might just hear records complements very well this jazz piano courts course. It also teaches you which came to play over each court. And thus this for courts derived from major scale harmony, melodic minor scale harmony, diminished scale harmony and whole tone scale harmony. It also shows you how to use the pentatonic scale, the blues scale, and the bebop skill. And it tells you about re harmonization techniques, among which more about a tritone substitution. Now, especially for you as a student of this course, you can get my Jess theory course and also my other courses with a maximum discount. And that means for the lowest price possible on Udemy. If you're interested, check out the PDF file and the resources that go with this lecture with all the links to my courses with a maximum discount. Finally, I'd like to thank you again for taking this course. And I would like to wish you lots of success in your journey to becoming a great jazz piano player. And if you haven't done so yet, please leave a rating for this course and if possible, also a review. This really helps other students and also me. Thank you very much.