Intro to Watercolor Florals in Procreate | Teela Cunningham | Skillshare

Intro to Watercolor Florals in Procreate

Teela Cunningham, Hand Lettering + Graphic Design

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15 Lessons (1h 22m)
    • 1. Intro to Watercolor Florals in Procreate

      1:04
    • 2. Class Overview

      5:12
    • 3. Bonuses + Install Instructions

      3:17
    • 4. Tips for Choosing File Size, Resolution + Color

      6:49
    • 5. Digital Wet on Dry Technique

      2:11
    • 6. Common Leaf Shapes

      3:04
    • 7. Common Petal Shapes

      2:23
    • 8. Project 1: Specific Flower Doodles

      8:39
    • 9. Project 1: General Flower Doodles

      8:41
    • 10. Project 1: Foliage Doodles

      8:56
    • 11. Project 2: Balanced Bouquet Anatomy

      6:23
    • 12. Project 2: Creating a Composition Template

      3:37
    • 13. Project 2: Painting Loose Wildflowers

      8:36
    • 14. Project 2: Adding Foliage + Finishing Touches

      9:54
    • 15. Thank You + Next Steps

      3:38
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About This Class

If you’ve ever wondered if it was really, actually possible to replicate the look of traditional watercolor on an iPad in Procreate, you’ve come to the right place.

In intro to Watercolor Florals in Procreate, you’ll learn how to take the wet on dry traditional watercolor painting method and apply it to two full watercolor projects. 

In Project 1, you’ll create basic, beginner friendly floral doodles, perfect for social media icons and logos.

In Project 2, we create a loose style watercolor wildflower bouquet from scratch, walking through tricks to create a visually balanced - uncrowded, but full - bouquet every time.

This course includes 4 custom watercolor brushes and both project color palettes, all free with your enrollment.

In order to successfully complete this course, you’ll need any iPad that supports pressure sensitivity, the Procreate app with version 5 or newer installed and a stylus that’s compatible with your iPad. 

If you’re ready to save on art supplies and paint in a world with more vibrant colors, hit enroll and start creating your own beautiful watercolor florals in Procreate. 

Transcripts

1. Intro to Watercolor Florals in Procreate: If you've ever wondered if it was really actually possible to replicate the look of traditional watercolor on an iPad in Procreate, you've come to the right place. In intro to Watercolor Florals in Procreate, you'll learn how to take the wet and dry traditional watercolor painting method and apply it to two full watercolor projects. In project one, you'll create basic beginner friendly floral doodles perfect for social media icons and logos. In project two, we create a loose style watercolor wildflower bouquet from scratch, working through tricks to create a visually balanced uncrowded but full bouquet every time. This course includes four custom watercolor brushes and both project color palettes, all free with your enrollment. In order to successfully complete this course, you will need any iPad that supports pressure sensitivity, the Procreate app with version 5 or newer installed, and a stylus that's compatible with your iPad. If you're ready to save on art supplies and paint a world with more vibrant colors, hit enroll and start creating your own beautiful watercolor florals in Procreate. 2. Class Overview: Welcome to intro to watercolor florals in Procreate. I'm so glad you're here, and just to kick everything off I want to give you a quick class overview so you have an idea of what to expect out of the class, and what you'll learn in the class. First of all, prerequisites, these things you have to have in order to successfully complete this class. You will need the Procreate app version 5.0.1 or newer, that is the version that this course was recorded using. You'll need an iPad with pressure sensitivity just because it really helps get those beautiful watercolor looks to our leaves and our petals. These are recommendations, these are all compatible iPads. If you have any of these iPad versions and you also have a stylus like the Apple Pencil that works with it, then you'll be all set to go. Optional items on my iPad, personally, I use the paperlike screen protector, it actually is paperlike, and I can't recommend it enough, I can't even picture myself drawing on glass anymore. That would be my recommendation if you're in the market for a screen protector. I also use a grip, it's by Uppercase Designs, and it's called the NimbleGrip. There's a link right there if you want to check it out, you'll see me using that in a lot of the videos. When you draw for a really long time I've found the grip to be really helpful for myself, so I just want to throw that out there in case that something that you're interested in. Why digital watercolor florals when you could just paint these traditionally, with your own [inaudible] or tube watercolors on watercolor paper. I myself, love traditional watercolor, but it's not always possible when you are on the go or you're just relaxing for the night on the couch and you want to paint, but you don't want to pull out all those art supplies. These are some of the reasons why you would choose, to create your watercolor florals digitally rather than traditionally. It's super easy to reuse your artwork when it's created digitally first. Traditional watercolor artwork requires you to scan it in and then cut it out in Photoshop, if you want to place it on different items, or if you want to remove the watercolor paper texture background from your artwork so you just have those floating florals. These ones will already be able to float, you can disconnect them from the background really easily, you don't have to worry about having a scanner or spending hours inside of Photoshop. There is no costly paper, paint, or brush supplies. If you have all those prerequisites, that's all you need to create endless, like an infinite number of watercolor florals, that's all you need, so that's pretty cool. It's also easy to create anywhere, like on your couch if you're watching TV at night, you just need your iPad and your stylus, and you can utilize colored vibrancies that are beyond paint capabilities. Because we're painting on screen with a digital device, you're painting in the RGB spectrum, this is the light spectrum, and it's a far greater gamut than what can be achieved with just regular paints in your everyday tangible life. You can, obviously, practice over and over without any wasted art supplies, or a mess, you don't have to feel bad about wasting that really expensive paint, or that really expensive paper, because you just create a new canvas and you're ready to go, and then finally it's really easy to share your artwork quickly on social media, in e-mails, anywhere you want to share your artwork, it's already in your digital format, so it's ready to get distributed very quickly. What you'll learn. You'll learn the wet on dry painting technique in a digital format, so this is an example of that, you can see those really pretty overlaps. Whenever you're painting on top of a previously painted area, you can see the edges are a little harder, but we've got that beautiful texture, within all the paint strokes. This class comes with two projects. The very first project is watercolor floral and foliage doodles. All these floral and foliage doodles that you see right in front of you, we're going to paint every single one of these together. We're using that wet on dry technique, and this is perfect for beginners. If you see this and you're like, there's no way that I could paint this, I promise you, even if you're opening Procreate for the very first time, you will be able to follow along, and paint every single one of these. You're learning wet on dry simple illustration methods with limited shapes, brushes, and colors. All of these only use three brushes, so that's pretty cool too. Once you're finished, you can use these as social media icons, web and stationery graphics logos, you can really use them on anything that you would like, and then for project 2 we're creating a loose style wildflower bouquet. What you see in front of you, that is the exact project outcome, that is what we're going to paint together. Once again, we're using that wet on dry technique, and you're going to learn about bouquet anatomy and hierarchy, planning out your bouquet from scratch. Using existing bouquets to really learn how they're arranged, so you can plan out your own, so it always feels harmonious and balanced. You'll also learn how to paint without overcrowding elements by having too many overlaps, so it still feels full, it still readable, it still looks it's arranged correctly, but you don't have stems all over the place and overlapping everything, so it still feels really pretty without getting too busy. The class hashtag for this course is #ProcreateIt. That is the hashtag that I use for all of my Procreate courses, so I would love it if you share anything you create on social media. My Instagram handle is everytuesday, and if you could use that class #ProcreateIt, I try and go through and give a like to every single piece of artwork, so I'd love to see what you create in the class. Let's get started. 3. Bonuses + Install Instructions: In this video, we're going to talk about the bonuses that came with your enrollment in this class. Where to find them, and how to install them. First of all, the bonuses that came with your enrollment are four Procreate watercolor illustration brushes. They include: the medium paint round, which is the main brush that we use for these projects. The sketching pencil, the water bubble stamp, and the rounded splatter brush. You're also receiving both project color palette so you can follow along exactly. The bonuses are located on my website at this link. It's every-tuesday.com/florals-bonuses. You're going to have to input that exactly. When you arrive on that page, you will need to enter our password. The password is skillshare. It's all one word. All lowercase. I recommend using the Chrome browser. Safari has changed their installation process a bunch of times with different iOS updates, but Chrome has always been really reliable with their instruction. That's why I'm only providing instructions for Chrome. If you don't have Chrome yet, go download it for free in the App Store, and then use that to input the URL, and visit that page where all the bonuses are located. You can not get to these bonuses within the Skillshare app, so you have to go to this URL, and put the password in it. Once you arrive there, you'll be able to see all of the bonuses. These are the installing instructions for the brushes. When you first arrive, this is what it will look like. You'll see the four brushes listed as well as the two color palettes. For the brushes, you're just going to tap on whichever brush that you would like, and when you do that, it'll turn gray. You want to tap this icon, the Download icon to initiate the download. After you hit that icon, you'll see at the very bottom of your screen, it'll show the name of the brush, and there'll be a little download link. You want to tap on that download link. After you do that, it'll change to say, "Open in." Then tap on, "Open in, " then this little panel will show up. If you have a bunch of apps like I do, you may have to toggle them to the left to find Procreate, but Procreate will be listed there. When you see, Copy to Procreate, tap on that icon, and then head into Procreate, tap the little "Brush" icon to open up your Brush Library up at the top, navigate to the Imported brush category on the left side. The very first brush in that category will be the brush that you just downloaded. You'll just want to do that for each brush that came with the class, and then they'll all be right there. As far as installing the color palettes that came with this course, you want to go to the exact same URL, tap on the "Color palette" just like you did with the brushes, and then tap on that Download icon to initiate the download. After you do that, it'll look very similar to what we did with the brushes. You'll tap on "Download" at the very bottom of your screen. After you do that, it'll change to say, "Open in." Tap on, "Open in." Find the Copy to Procreate. Hit that little icon, and then head back into Procreate. You want to hit the "Color dot" in the upper right corner of your Procreate interface. Then at the very bottom of your color options, you want to choose the Palettes category all the way to the bottom right. Then you want to scroll all the way to the very bottom of all of your color palettes, and the most recent downloaded palette will appear at the very bottom of all of your palettes, so you have to scroll all the way down, and then you'll see it. Then you can just select that. Set it as your default, and begin using it. That is where to find the bonuses, what the bonuses include, and how to install both the brushes and swatches, so you'll be all set to go. 4. Tips for Choosing File Size, Resolution + Color: In this video, I'm going to give you some file size and color mode tips. First, we need to talk about size versus resolution. Throughout the course, I'm going to tell you what size I'm using for my Canvas, but it's really up to you to create any size Canvas that you would like. If you want your artwork larger than the size that I'm creating mine at, you can definitely do that. You have full reign over the size of the documents that you would like to create for your art work. A couple of things to keep in mind as you're sizing your own artwork now and in the future. First of all, the size of your Canvas refers to the dimensions, the physical dimensions of your Canvas. So it's the length and the height. So a couple of examples would be 1500 pixels by 1000 pixels, or two inches by three inches. Resolution refers to how many pixels or ink dots. Pixels being anything that's used on the web or ink dots, meaning when your printer outputs ink, how many of those dots of ink are crammed per inch of your canvas? PPI stands for pixels per inch and DPI stands for dots per inch. The greater the resolution, the clearer and crisper your artwork will appear, because it's got all of that extra information crammed inside of each one of these inches. But at the same time because you're cramming all of this information in each one of these inches, your file size will naturally be much larger. So 72dpi is the web standard, and 300dpi is the print standard. If you want to keep that in mind as you're deciding which resolution to choose for your artwork. I have some recommendations that you can use that will hopefully help you to decide what size and resolution is best for you depending on what your usage of your artwork will be. Things to consider. What will your art be used for? If you are creating artwork that is meant to be seen on the web or on a social media account, as far as size goes, you always want to size your artwork for the largest it will ever appear at. Because you can always scale your artwork down, but you should not scale it up because when you scale it up, you're stretching those pixels and Procreate is a pixel based program. When you stretch those pixels, you can't invent information that wasn't there to begin with. If you're condensing them, that's fine. That information already exists. It's just getting crammed into a smaller space. But as soon as you stretch it, you're now making something larger than the program originally was aware of. As far as the size of your graphics, you just want to refer to the current sizes that each social platform recommends or if you are creating graphics to be used on the web, just be aware of what size is recommended for those graphics and then size your artwork accordingly. As far as resolution for web and social media graphics, although 72 DPI is the web standard, I recommend going higher. I actually use 300 DPI just so I have the highest crispness, most beautiful resolution than I can possibly create with my artwork. This will also look much better on higher res or retina screens. Then finally, for your color mode, anything that you're viewing on screen, utilizes colors of light. That's the RGB spectrum, that's the red, green, and blue spectrum. Whereas with ink, that's the CMYK, which stands for cyan, magenta, yellow, and black. When you are mixing colors of light, you can obtain much higher vibrancy of those colors, colors that are not able to be achieved with pigments. Although RGB is the most well-known color mode, as far as vibrancies are concerned, Procreate now defaults to a mode called P3. P3 provides an even larger color gamut than RGB, which means greater color possibilities and vibrancies. So that is the mode I recommend. You can always go down with the number of colors that you can utilize in your artwork depending on where it's being seen, but you can't go up like with size, you can always go down but you can't go back up. If you are planning to print your artwork, the size should still always be the largest that it will need to be used, that way, you're only ever going to scale it down. You're never going to stretch those pixels which will result in blurry or pixellated edges. Resolution, the print standard is 300 DPI, so that's the resolution I recommend if you're printing your artwork. Color, if you are professionally printing your artwork, my recommendation is to ask your printer, what color mode they prefer the artwork to be delivered in. It may seem like a no-brainer that you should just create it in CMYK. But as printing technology has advanced, there are now many printers that are able to print some colors that are in the RGB spectrum. Depending on the types of printers that your printer has access to, that could also affect how many colors they're able to achieve and the vibrancies and what substrate they're printing on. My recommendation is to always ask, some printers will actually prefer that you provide them an RGB mode. That way they can actually output a higher quality result than if you had provided them a CMYK file. Finally, if you're artwork may or may not be printed, you're in the fence. Maybe you'll print it at home. You're not really sure. My recommendation is to stick with P3, because of the reason that you can obtain the greatest amount of color with P3 and you can always go down later. You can go from P3 to CMYK if you need to. Your color will become duller when you do so because there are fewer colors available in the CMYK spectrum. But you can't go from CMYK to P3 and expect to just magically get this larger color gamut. The greatest level of colors is always based on the mode that you start with. Hopefully, that all makes sense. So there's one other thing that I want you to keep in mind and that's Procreate currently limits the number of layers that you can use in your file based on size and resolution. If you need to create a large piece at a high resolution, I recommend checking the number of layers beforehand that you're allowed to use in that document. That way you can adjust your workflow accordingly. I'm going to show you where you can find that information. I've got an example for you, and the example I'm going to show you is 1500 pixels by 1500 pixels at 300dpi. What you want to do is go to the wrench in Procreate, then you're going to tap on Canvas under the categories and then hit Canvas information. After you do that, you want to navigate to Layers on the left-hand screen and then you will see the number of layers available on the right side. If you only have access to 20 layers, you may want to rethink whether or not Procreate is the right program to be creating your artwork in. Maybe you're just creating a regular social media graphic where you don't need it super-large and you have access to 500 layers, then you already know that you're not going to have an issue whatsoever. You can create whatever you want and you're not going to run out of layers. It's just something to be aware of, especially if you are working at a very large size, at a very high resolution. That is a quick overview and my best tips about choosing the size, resolution, and color mode for any document that you would like to create using Procreate. 5. Digital Wet on Dry Technique: In this video, we're going to talk about the wet and dry techniques. In traditional watercolors, like you see right here, the wet and dry technique is used when you want some really beautiful overlaps. What you do is you paint your shapes. In this case, it's a petal shape and then you wait for it to fully dry and then you paint with wet paint on top of it. A new paddle that overlaps it. You wait for that one to dry and then you paint another one. Whatever you are painting on top of is already dry, unlike the wet-on-wet technique, where your paint while your surfaces are already wet. In this case it's already dry. You get these really beautiful translucent overlaps and you can use these on leaves, especially on branches and with petals that can be really pretty. Luckily on procreate it makes it way faster because you don't have to wait for anything to dry, you can just paint it right away. The way that you do this, let me grab a pink so you can see is you either want to grab your light paint round, your medium paint round, or your heavy paint round. Each one of these brushes simulates a different thickness of paint. If you want really light paint, choose the light paint round. If you want really heavy, thick paint, choose the heavy paint round. I'm going to stick right in the middle with the medium paint and I'm just going to paint one petal this is that upside-down teardrop shape and then you can just draw another one right next to it. As soon as you do that, you can see that pretty overlap happening. The key to using this brush is you want to keep your stylus on the surface for the entire time that you're painting in a petal. If you just do the outline and then you paint it in, you're going to get that overlap on the outline and that is not the look that we're going for. Just make sure whenever you're painting it in, keep your stylus on top of the iPad. As far as leaves go, you can paint in a branch and this is pretty nice because when you paint in your leaves, you can cover portions of the branch, so the branch goes right into the leaves and that gives you another level of that translucency. If you want to overlap some leaves up here, you can do that as well. That is the wet on dry technique in a digital format. 6. Common Leaf Shapes: In this video, we're going to practice common leaf shapes to give us some really good practice heading into Project 1. So everything we do here will be used in Project 1 and throughout the rest of the course. It's a really good idea to just warm up your hand, get those motions down, and then you will be perfectly prepared for the rest of the course from here. So for common leaf shapes, I have my Project 1 color palette loaded up right here. I'm just going to grab the darkest green color for all these examples. So the focus can be entirely on the leaf shape and I'm using my medium paint round brush. So the first leaf shape is the most common leaf shape and it's just a pointed oval. So you've got a point on both ends, and you're going to keep your stylus on the screen the entire time. So as you're painting, you're just going to fill it in all in one go. If you paint it like this, and then try and fill it in, you're going to have those overlaps, that wet and dry techniques. So you don't want to do that. Just make sure when you're drawing all these shapes that you're always keeping your stylus on the screen. So for the second leaf shape, we're going to take advantage of our pressure settings. So you're going to start with a little pressure, lots of pressure and then little pressure and it's going to be this long, tall, skinny leaf. So little pressure, lots of pressure and little pressure. You can do little pressure, lots of pressure than little pressure. If you want to play around with the different shapes you can get out of this, if you want to make some smaller ones. So that's leaf-shaped number two. The next leaf shape is like a teardrop, but it's a long one. So you're going to start pointed and then come up and it's going to be round at the top and then come back down and then we'll fill it in. Then you can do an alternate version of this that's a little bit smaller and then finally the smallest one will be more round. Then riffing off of this one, we can come up and have more of a point at the bottom. So it's like a circle right there and then ends in a point. So let me fill this one and I want you to see the outline of that one. Then because it's pointed right here, this is kind of where it will hook into the branch or have a little bit of a stem. So that's what that shape looks like. Then finally, we're going to take this first leaf shape and just make it compact so it's a little fatter. So it's going to come up and then around. So that is this leaf shape. If you want to get a little bit fancier with your leaf shapes, you can add some notches on them so you could come up and notch into it and then the stem would come through like this on this one. If you want softer edges on any of your leaves, you could do a leaf like this as well and then your stem will come all the way through. So those are basically shapes that we're going to be using throughout the rest of the class and the rest of the projects. So just create these a few different times. Warm up your hand, get that muscle memory going, and then you'll be all set for the rest of the projects. In the next video, we're going to talk about common petal shapes, so we're going to do the exact same exercise only for petals. 7. Common Petal Shapes: In this video, we're going to create some common petal shapes, just like we did in the previous video with our leaves. I have my dark pink color selected this is the project one color palette once again. For our first petal, it's actually the exact same shape as our first leaf, so it's just that pointed oval shape. This works really well when you're layering. This would be used in a situation where you stack them on top of each other for that, what Andre technique and it's really easy to make a quick flower like this. This is just your pointed oval. The next petal shape is more of a teardrop shape so instead of being pointed at both ends, it's going to be curved at one end and pointed at the other. These ones can come from the bottom and look like this. It's like a balloon shape. Then they can also go the opposite direction. If you had a daisy, for example, you would have a shape like this, and then you would layer it. That's the upside down one. It's this version only it's like this. The next shape is a more exaggerated form of the teardrops. It's going to come up from the side and be very extreme so that's what that one looks like. This shape are going to be creating chrysanthemums with this is a really handy one to know so it's just very extreme right here on the curve. The next shape is just a circle that's pretty easy. We're also going to be using ovals. Then just like our leaf shape, another common petal shape is going to come up from the bottom and then be like a circle and have a point at the bottom, but it's going to be more exaggerated. Another one is less exaggerated than that. It's like our teardrop, but it's fatter. It's going to come around like this instead of tall and skinny. You can see the difference right here between these two. Finally, if we want to add a little bit of detail to the edges, we've got a petal that hooks in up at the top and you can make this tall and skinny. You can also make this short and fat. This is more of like a heart shape and then another common petal is coming up in the notching end. Once again, you can make this tall and skinny or short and fat. Those are the common petal shapes that we'll be using throughout the rest of the class. Give yourself some warm-up practices a few times and then you'll be all set to go. 8. Project 1: Specific Flower Doodles: Welcome to Project number 1. In this project, we're going to be creating a bunch of floral and foliage simple doodles. These actually work really well as social media icons, they can be used as logos, there's all kinds of really fun little uses you can make with these. They only use two of our brushes. They're super simple to make. If you've never even used Procreate before, you'll be able to follow along and create these exactly. In this video we're going to replicate real flowers and then in the second video, we're going to do some general flowers. Then we'll finish everything off with our foliage doodles. I'm going to create a brand new document that is screen sized. Make sure you've loaded in your color palette for Project 1. If you haven't done that yet, just refer to the Bonuses and Install Instructions video, and then you'll be all set to go. I've got my screen size document all ready to go. The first one we're going to create is called a snowdrop. The snowdrop looks like a depressed flower. All the petals are facing downward and then it's got this hook shaped stem on it. The colors we're going to be using for this one are the dark blue for our petals, the dark green for our stem and our leaves, and then the dark orange for the transition area; from our petals to our stem. The one brush that we're using for this flower is our medium paint round. Make sure you've got that selected and you'll be all set to go. I'm going to grab my blue first and we're going to paint the petals. The size of my brush is seven percent for this. I'm going to create the center petal first and then we'll put the other petals on it using the wet and dry technique. For my center petal, it's going to be tear dropped in shape. But instead of it being a hard point at the end, I'm going to make the point a little softer. It's a little bit more of a curve at the very tip than a point. Like that. Then for the next petal, you're just going to do the same thing but overlap. It's going to come like this. Then for the final petal, we're just going to do the exact same thing on the other side. Those are our petals for our snowdrop. Now we're going to create that transition areas. Create a brand new layer, grab your dark orange, and then just put a little dot at the very center right here. If it's not as dark as you would like it, just go over it one more time and that'll darken it up. Now for our stem, we're going to create a brand new layer. We're going to grab our green and this is going to hook up and then down. Then we're going to add on two leaves. I'm going to use the pressure technique for my leaves. I'm going to go little pressure, lots of pressure, little pressure, and then put another one over here. Little pressure, lots of pressure, little pressure. I actually think I want to move this stem just a little bit closer, so I'm just going to tap it over and down. Now that we have our snowdrop, we can group all of our layers together, so just slide them to the right, hit "Group", toggle up, rename, snowdrop. On to our next flower. Our next flower is going to be the chrysanthemum. I'm going to create a brand new layer. We're going to do the petals first, once again. I'm going to grab my dark orange color. I'm still using my medium paint round brush, and I'm still using a seven percent size brush. I start with the center petal first and this is going to be an upside-down teardrop. It's going to look like this, color it in. Then on either side of it, we're going to use that extreme teardrop shape. It's going to be really curvy and then come back down. You're going to do the exact same thing on the other side. Then we're going to repeat the exact same process one more time. But now the petals are going to get skinnier and a little bit flatter. Then same thing on the other side. Once you have all of your petals, I like adding an extra layer of color just to add a little bit more depth. I'll come up the center petal halfway and this will darken it up and just look like there's another petal right there coming up. Same thing over here. Now we can create a brand new layer. We're going to draw our stem next, so grab your dark green color again. This is just going to come downward. Now we're going to create the transition area between the petals and the stem. This is going to be really simple. It's the pointed oval shape for this. Then we're going to add on our leaves. I'm going to do the exact same thing that I use for the snowdrop with the pressure style leaf. Light pressure, heavy pressure, light and then over here, the same thing. That is our chrysanthemum. I'm going to group these together and label it chrysanthemum. For our third flower, we're going to create some sweet peas. I'm going to create a brand new layer. I'm going to grab my dark pink color right here and we're going to do very similar to what we did with the snowdrop. But instead of having our petals go from point to curve, it's going to go from curve to point. I'll show you what that looks like. Our top-most flower is going to be above those. It's going to be a little bit more closed up and smaller. I'm going to create these little heart-shaped petals, and I'm just going to do two of them right here that are going to be up at the top. Then I'm going to do groupings of three petals each right beneath it. Right underneath this I'm going to do three petals. This one's all opened up. Then I'll do it again right here, and we're going to have these ones overlap a little bit more. Then for our sweet pea, there's also flowers that come off the side. I'm going to draw some petals over here as well. Now we can put our stem on. I'm going to grab my dark green color again. I'm going to create a brand new layer, and I'm going to switch to my sketching pencil brush for this. I'm going to draw a stem all the way down and make sure that it meets each one of these groupings as it goes down. This is going to come down here, through the middle there and then down here. Then for these ones, they're going to branch off. Then wherever the petals meet the stem, I'm just going to draw a nice little transition. It's like a triangle shape of just these two meeting together. That is our sweet peas. We can group these two layers together, rename the sweet pea. I'm just going to select it and move it over a little bit. I've got a little bit more room here. Our last flower is our daisy. We're going to create a brand new layer up at the top. We're going to be using light pink for the petals on this. Grab your light pink, which is the first one on the second row. We're going to return to our medium paint round brush. The size, I believe is still at seven percent. We're going to keep our seven percent size. We're going to have one daisy facing sideways and then one facing straight on. For the one that's facing sideways, we're going to create a petal that is this tear drop shape and they're going to overlap. I'm going to put, I think four of them right here. We've got our petals right there and then we're going to do petals all the way around. This is the forward facing one. I like leaving some white space right in the middle for the center. Now we can put in the centers of our daisy. Create a brand new layer, grab your brown. For this one it's going to be an oval up at the top and then it's going to flatten out where it meets the petals. Then we're just going to put a dot in the center of the other one. Now we can draw in our stem. Create a brand new layer. Grab your green. I'm going to return to my sketching pencil for this, for the stems. I'm going to draw this one down and then this one's going to meet it. Then we can add in our leaves using our medium paint round. I'm going to put a bunch of leaves on these ones. Looks like I drew that a little bit crooked, but we can fix that easily. Just toggle your layers over, Group, rename this daisy, and we can grab it, bring it over and rotate it a little bit. That looks better. These are our four flower doodles based on realistic flowers. In the next video, we're going to create some more general looking flowers that you can integrate anywhere, where you need a little bit of extra space or filler in all of the projects to come. They are really good, hard-working elements that will really push your design further. 9. Project 1: General Flower Doodles: We're picking up with our general flowers now. These ones, you can pick and pull whatever you would like and combine them to create your own florals that are a general look of many florals out there. We've got petaled flowers, we've got a thistle like flower which is the second one and then we've got some round flowers as well as another petal shape that's just a little bit different. You can pull from the different leaves and petal shapes and invent your own flowers here. These are all the ones that we're going to be creating in this video. I'm going to create a brand new screen size document and then we can start. We will kick things off with flower number one and flower number one is a petaled flower. We're going to grab this gray color right here. We are still using the medium paint round. I've got the seven percent size selected. We're going to draw those petals and we're going to have a grouping of three petals. These ones are fatter looking petals than before, but they're still going to overlap and then we'll have another grouping going the opposite way and maybe just a little bit smaller. Now we're going to create a stem, so create a brand new layer. I'm going to grab my Sketching Pencil brush for this and grab your brown and this stem is going to come down like this. This one's going to meet it and then this transition area is just going to be a really loose, just lines that connect the two. Now we're going to add on some branches to add in our leaves. We're going to have a branch that comes up and we'll add on a few extra branches right here and this is where we'll put our leaves. Create a brand new layer, grab your light green color and we're going to return to a Medium Paint Round. For these leaves we're going to do a curvier one and it's going to be long and skinny, and by overlapping on the branch, it's nice having that little transparency where it peaks through. That's looking good. It feels like I could use one more leaf right here, so I'm going to add that. I'm going to come back to my second layer, grab my brown and my Sketching Pencil and just give myself another line to work with and then I can return to my leaf layer, grab my light green and my Medium Paint Round and then just add that in. There you go, that feels much more balanced. I'm going to group these together, rename this one one and let me rotate it just a little bit so it's a little straighter. Moving on to number two, we're going to create a brand new layer. We're going to start with the buds on our thistle like doodle. I'm going to grab my lightest orange and I've got my medium paint round still selected and I'm just going to paint out three oval shapes and I've changed up the size of them just slightly. I'm going to create a brand new layer, grab my dark orange color. I'm going to grab my Sketching Pencil brush and then draw a line that's curved down and then another one, and then I will draw the exact same curved line on either side. We're going to draw in our stems next, so create a brand new layer, grab your brown. Make sure you're sketching pencil is still selected and we're going to draw these stems down. I'm going to draw the first one down from the top one and then these ones are going to connect to it. On the transition area, I'm just going to do the exact same thing we did before, just really simple lines that connect the two and then I'm going to add, it's going to look a little bit like hair on the top, but natural thistles do have this, so I'm just going to put some lines up at the top too. Now all we have to do is add in some leaves, so I'm going to create a brand new layer. I'm going to grab my Medium Paint Round brush, and add in those leaves. Those are our thistles. Let's group these together. Label this one two. Onto number three, so let's create a brand new layer. We're going to grab our light pink color for this. I've got my Medium Paint Round selected again and we're going to do some pointier shaped petals for this one. This is just a general petaled flower option and then we'll create one that's just opening up over here. I'm going to move this one a little closer to the other one. Maybe reduce the scale just a little bit, create a brand new layer. We're going to grab our third teal color on the second row. Grab your Sketching Pencil, draw stem down from the top petals. Return to your brushes, grab your Medium Paint Round and for this one, the transition area is going to be the same shape as the petals, only it's going to be the leaf color and then we can draw in our leaves, our leaves are going to be a little bit curvier on this one just to change everything up a little bit and we'll draw these ones directly onto the stem instead of branching off of the stem. That is number three. Group these together label this three. We're going to use a different type of brush for this next one, I'm going to grab my dark pink color. Let's create a brand new layer. I'm going to grab this water bubble stamp brush right here and this one's pressure sensitive, so however hard you tap on the screen will determine how large your circles are. I'm going to do a variety of different sized ones that are just clustered together like that and then we'll draw stems in, so create a brand new layer. Let's grab our second color, this teal color right here. Grab your Sketching Pencil again, and this time we're going to draw a stem down and then these ones are going to connect in a cluster right here. Now we can add in our leaves, so create a brand new layer, grab your Medium Paint Round, and then just add in your pressure leaves. Group these together, labeled this four. On to number five, we're going to create a brand new layer. We're going to grab our darkest blue color. We're going to also grab our Medium Paint Round brush. For this one we're going to do a cluster of dots that are all really tight together, that form a cone shape, just like that and then we'll put a little one down here. Then we will draw in a stem, so create a brand new layer, grab your brown color. I'm going to grab my Sketching Pencil again and then draw a stem that comes here and one that attaches to this one and then up here, we're just going to connect to loosely some of these in here. This one's a really simple one and that's all there is to that one. Let's group them together, label this one five, and then the very last one, so create a brand new layer. We're going to grab a gray color right here, and grab your water bubble stamp again and this one's just going to be a cluster up at the top. It's going to look like an oval in shape. These ones are going to be a little bit tinier in size, and they're all going to look together in a shape. Create a brand new layer for our stem, we're going to use this light green color right here, so tap on that. We're going to grab our Sketching Pencil, but reduce the size just a little bit. I'm coming down to like four percent for this, draw a line straight down, and then these ones are going to branch off in a curve. They're all connected like this. Instead of being super compact and upright, they're more spread out. Now we can drop in our leaves, so grab your medium paint round and then just creates more pressure sensitive leaves. Group your layers together. Label this one six and there we go. We've got six different general flower style doodles. You can just mix and match with the petal and leaf exercise that we did earlier with the common shapes, mix-and-match, change up the colors and you can really invent your own really cool floral doodles that way. In the next video, we're going to create some general foliage doodles and then we'll be all set to move on to project number two. 10. Project 1: Foliage Doodles: We are already to finish up project number 1 with some foliage doodles. What you see on screen is exactly what we're going to be creating together. We've got six different style branches and leaves that will be great elements to work with as we move throughout the rest of the course. We're going to create another screen size document, and then we can begin. We're all good to go. Unlike with our flower doodles, where we began with our petals and then add it on the stems with our foliage doodles, we're going to start with our stems and then add on our leaves. For this first one, I'm going to grab our brown and I'm going to grab our sketching pencil, and we're just going to do a really basic branch. Whenever I'm creating a branch, I'll always start with one that's a little, let me make this a little bigger, and come up to 78 percent for this. I will start off with one line that's just a little bit curved and then I will branch off of this line with another curved line and all of my lines stay a little bit curved after that and you can just add extras or as many as you'd like. I like trying to fill in the gaps so any white spaces that I feel exists, that's where I'll put another branch. I don't want it to be symmetrical though. I'm always really aware, I have two on this side and I'm just going to leave this one plane that way it changes it up a little bit. Because once it gets too symmetrical then it doesn't feel like it could actually exist in nature. This is just a general branch and then I'm going to create a brand new layer. I'm going to grab my grayish color down here and put on some leaves. I'm going to grab my medium paint round brush and these leaves are going to be a little bit fatter but still that teardrop shape. You saw in the last video how we had skinnier versions of these, so these ones are short and stubby kind. I'm still having the branch go through the leaves because I really love that transparency effect that you naturally get with a wet and dry technique in watercolor. This is our first branch of leaves. I'm going to drag these to the right, group them together, and we'll just label this one 1. Create a brand new layer, for this next one, we're going to grab our brown again, grab your sketching pencil again, and we're just going to draw a curved branch and then this one's going to look like a fern locks. I'm just going to give myself a little branches and this one actually is pretty symmetrical because ferns are really symmetrical. Create a brand new layer, grab my dark green color, grab my medium paint round again. These leaves are going to be long and skinny pointed, oval shaped, just like you would see with a regular fern. These top ones are going to be smaller, and they're gradually going to get larger as you go down the branch. My next set of leaves are going to be larger and longer than these ones. You can see that gradual transition from small leaves to large leaves as you go down the branch. That is branch 2. I'm going to toggle this over group and just label this 2. For our third one, this one's going to look like a poplar tree, round and tight together leaves. I got my brand new layer. I'm going to grab this gray color right here and I've got my medium paint round brush again and for this one I'm just going to sporadically put a bunch of little dots, and remember that this is a pressure sensitive brush, so however hard you press down on the screen will determine the size of your little leaves. That looks pretty good. I'm going to fill in a couple of these gaps. For the stem on this one, I'm going to create a brand new layer. I'm going to grab my brown, again, grab my sketching pencil, but reduced the size of this one down to four percent. This one is going to start here. It's going to have a little bit of a curve to it. But then these ones are going to start connecting to it as it goes throughout all the leaves. It's that simple. I'm going to group these together, label this one 3. To number 4, we're going to draw our branch again first this time. This one's the exception since it's very similar to how we draw our flowers, and we're going to create a more basic branch than this one. This one's got a bunch of different branches branching off, this one is going to be much more simplified. We're going to keep my brown selected. I'm going to keep my sketching pencil selected, create a brand new layer and for this one, let me increase the size of this up to six percent. For this one, we're just going to draw a line down. We're going to have another branch right here, one here, one over here, and then two right here, so far fewer leaves than before and a much simpler branch. I'm going to create a brand new layer, I'm going to grab my lightest green color, grab the medium paint round brush and this time these ones are the pointed oval shaped leaves, but they're going to be a little bit fatter because I really want that overlap to show when I've got two next to each other to show off that wet and dry technique. You can see how pretty that looks right there, and we're still overlapping the branch, so we've got that transparency happening as well. That is number 4. Slide this over, group them together label this 4, and now we can move right along to number 5. Number 5 is like our fern, only it goes every other leaf this time instead of mirroring what's on one side or the other. Let's create a brand new layer, grab our brown, grab our sketching pencil again. This one is going to be a curved branch, but we're going to have it go every other this time. Create a brand new layer. I am going to grab this darker teal color for this one, grab your medium paint round again in this is that similar shaped, pointed oval. Sometimes I'll make leaves that are little sketchier, so leave white space in between them. That's another way to change up the style of what you're doing. If you feel like you're using the same shapes over and over again, that makes them look different automatically. It's just a quick sketch color and that leaves that negative space and that looks really pretty. I'm going to redo these ones in the same style because I really like that. On to our very last one, I'm going to toggle these together, group them, rename this one number 5, create a brand new layer, and I'm going to create a branch again. Grab your brown, grab your sketching pencil and this one's going to be a complex branch again, just like with our first one. These ones are going to point upward more often though. Now we're going to put on some really simple leaves. Create a brand new layer, for this one, I'm going to be using the second teal color. Grab your medium paint round brush, and these ones are going to be more oval. They're tinier and there's just a little bit of a point at the end. That looks pretty boring the way it is, but now we're going to add in some extra depth by adding additional leaves without a branch connecting them. These ones are attached directly to these branches. I like doing the tips of all of them first and then coming in and adding them wherever I feel like it could use a little more depth. Whenever these ones overlap, I'll do one right here, you can see how pretty it looks when you zoom out. It starts looking a lot more realistic that way, and you can do as few or as many as you would like. That is our last branch. Let's group these together, label this one 6. That completes project number 1. Hopefully you got a really good idea of all the different possibilities that you can create for your own logos or icons or doodles or just simple graphics that you could put on dictionary or gift tags. There's a lot of really cool possibilities with just really simple elements like these. Now let's head into project number 2. 11. Project 2: Balanced Bouquet Anatomy: Welcome to project number two. Project number two is a loose style watercolor wildflower bouquet. So what you see on screen is exactly what we're going to be creating together. I'm going to share my trick for creating a balanced bouquet with the right scale of all of your floral elements, how to plot it out and plan it out. Then I'm also going to be sharing my tips for layering, where you won't have things overlapping too much, where it gets too busy, or you can't see some of the more beautiful elements as well because things are beginning to overlap when things get busy. So I'm going to share all those tips. So right now I'm going to create a screen size document, and then we can get started. Okay, I've got my screen size document and before we get started, I want to walk you through how I create a balanced bouquets, and I've already pulled a few reference images that I want to talk about first. So these are the two reference images, and you can see this one's got a wildflower field to it, and this one is definitely less wildflower like, but it's a really good example just to go over what I want to talk about in terms of creating a balanced bouquet. So the first thing you want to do is reduce the opacity of both of these down to 50 percent, bring this one down to 50 percent. So we can still see what's going on, but we're going to draw on top of it. So I'm going to grab black first and my sketching pencil. We'll start with this one. So for this exercise, we're going to determine where our hierarchy is in terms of florals because you're always going to have large, medium, and small size florals and then you're going to have your foliage supporting elements. So this exercise is meant to allow us to learn how a regular bouquet that we find appealing is composed. So I'm going to create a brand new layer and circle the larger elements. So this rose and this rose are my largest elements here. Now I am going to look at the medium size elements, which would be this flower, looks like I've got some flowers over here that are larger in size, and this one, even though it's composed of a bunch of smaller flowers, they're all the same. So these ones will also count, and I've got another one of these larger ones over here and even these ones are on the larger side. This one is also large. Okay. Now we're going to look at our smaller flowers, so I've got smaller ones that are tucked into these little areas. That looks good and now I also have these elements, which I would say could border on like a foliage or a floral element. These look similar to lavender here, so I'm going to put these in, but these are a different shape. They're not like a bunch of flowers that are all clustered together, but they are supporting elements of the bouquet. Now I've got my foliage elements. So my foliage elements, I'm going to sketch on top of so I can get an idea of where my florals are and where my foliage is. Now we've plotted out our entire composition of the [inaudible]. So if I turn off this layer just to see what I'm left with, this gives me an idea of how the [inaudible] is put together, so I can use this if I wanted to create my own bouquet with my own floral elements. This is how it would be balanced if I wanted something similar. So I would have my largest elements right here, here, up here, and then I would have some medium elements around it and a few smaller ones sporadically placed in. Then I would come up with some elements that were poking out of the bouquets around it, just to add a little bit of extra color outside of the foliage just fills everything else out. You can learn quite a bit by doing this exercise because the wildflower bouquet that we're going to be creating together, we're going to create from scratch. So you can have an idea of all the decisions that you get to make for your own bouquet based on things that you find attractive already. So we're going to do the exact same exercise one more time with this bouquet, so I'm going to create a brand new layer and let's just hit home everything that we talked about with this one. So this one is composed a little bit differently. We don't have as many medium size elements, actually I'm not sure we have any here, but we have a large, and we have a bunch of small ones. So this is a large one, large one. Just to give you an idea of a different scenario, because this one for sure is more wildflower like, and I'm going to circle the blue ones because these ones are one different element compared to everything else that's in here. All right, so I've got my little daisys everywhere else, so I can circle these ones. These ones really fill it out like foliage does, but it's giving us a pop of color, which makes the bouquet really pretty. Now we can sketch in all the foliage elements for this. Okay, we've got this one all done now so let's turn off that source image, and we can compare these two. So with this one we have a lot of medium elements but the bouquet itself is much smaller, and we've got a ton of foliage elements here but not so many here, but it still fills in all the gaps for us. So it's really hardworking because that pushes those floral elements forward. In both situations, we have elements that extend outside of the bouquet, the main cluster of the bouquet itself. So we've got that with foliage elements here and this floral foliage like elements with this first bouquet. So all really important mental notes to take as you're planning out your own bouquet. So now that we have all this in mind, we can plot out our own bouquet and create it from scratch knowing ahead of time everything's going to be a harmonious, everything can be really well planned out. That way, we can have something that looks nice and full but doesn't feel overcrowded. So in the next video, we're going to sketch out our bouquet and get started painting it. 12. Project 2: Creating a Composition Template: In the last video, we talked about composition with our bouquets, so now we're going to sketch out what our bouquet will look like. I'm going to turn off the these sketch layers and create a brand new layer. The first thing I like to do is draw a general shape of what my bouquet will look like. For this one, I want it to be nice and skinny because I'm going to tie it with string, or ribbon at the bottom. I'm going to have my bouquet come up like this, and around, and then it's going to be tied here and then extend down here with the stem, so that's the shape that I want my bouquet to be, going to rotate it just a little bit. Now that I know that this is the shape that I want, now I can start putting in my large flowers, and you can put these anywhere that you would like. You can refer to a reference image, you can create your entire bouquet off of a trace of another bouquet if you'd like, but I want to share my thought process when I'm creating one from scratch. I never put anything right directly in the center to start with. I'll start right here as one of my larger ones, I'll put another big one over here, and to balance it a little bit, I'll put another big one up here. Now we can start thinking about my medium elements. I know I want to put a medium element next to some of my large elements, just to support them a little bit more and show that the scale is different between the two of them so I'll put another medium over here. You can draw these in different colors too, that will help you differentiate between them. Something needs to go up here, and maybe another one here. I want a good balance between my medium and my large, put one maybe poking out up here, and maybe another one right here. Now I can draw in my smaller elements. I'm going to put in maybe some small flowers right around here to support these, these could be little daisies, which are really hard working elements when you're making a bouquet. I'll put in some smaller ones over here, maybe up here, poking out of the bouquet a little bit, I think that will look nice. Let do one over here, we're going to put another small flower over here. Now I can draw in my foliage. I feel like I should have a couple of small flowers over here. That's feeling pretty good. Now I know that I want my foliage to fill in the gaps of these, but I also want to plan out where it's going to poke out from the general shape of my bouquet as well. I'm going to have some poke out over here, maybe up like this. This is my sketch layer, I'm going to scale it down just a little bit so I'm not so tight to my edges, and I'll place that right there. Now we have the base of what our bouquet will look like. I'm going to reduce the opacity down to, let's see, I'm going to go down to 30 percent, so you can still see it on screen. This is my template. Now, the fun part begins where we can start painting in all of our elements and balancing everything out. In the next video, we're going to start painting in our largest flowers first. 13. Project 2: Painting Loose Wildflowers: Okay, let's start painting. The first florals that were going to paint are big daisies. I'm going to grab my dark orange color down here. Hopefully you've already got your Project 2 colors loaded in. If you don't make sure to watch the video on bonuses and install instructions and then you'll be all set to go. I'm going to grab my darkest orange color, which is the third one on the bottom and I'm going to go grab my medium paint, round brush. I'm going to come in here. Let's create a brand new layer for these. I'm going to label these ones large flowers. For these ones, these ones are going to be long skinny petals that are separated a little bit, so there's some space between them. I'm going outside of the lines, but you still want to be using those lines as your guide. It's okay to draw outside of them, but still pay attention to them. There's one, let's do, here's another one. These ones are forward facing daisies. You can see I'm drawing these pretty fast so it's a sketchy style. This is a loose style version of this bouquet so just keep that in mind. There's no pressure at all to make anything perfect. Those are my main, large ones, I think those are the only large ones I had and now I can pop in the center, so I'm going to grab my darkest color right here. It's the second one up at the top, and I'm just going to dot in the centers like this. Now we can work on our medium flowers. You can create a new layer for these. I'm still keeping my dark orange color. For the medium ones, I'm going to have the majority of the daisies facing sideways. I will put one up here that's still facing forward just to make sure we get a smaller one that's facing forward and here too. These ones are going to look a lot like the Doodles that we did so they overlap a little bit. Put another one that's facing downward. It's nice to have some of these flowers face different directions because that's what would happen anyway. All right, let's drop in some centers for these ones. The forward facing one will be the same dotted center and then the side ones are going to be a half oval. If you want it darker, just paint over it one more time. We can see how everything's looking by turning our sketch layer on and off. That's looking good so far. Now we're going to paint in some chrysanthemums. I'm going to create a brand new layer. I'm going to grab my dark pink color. These are just like we did with the Doodle, you're going to draw a petal up, that is upside down tear shape and then we've got these extreme curves right here. We're going to paint another one here. It's okay to overlap a little bit on some of these petals. If you're going to have a petal that goes way into the other petal then I'll usually stop it short so it doesn't overlap too much. I still want everything to read really well. Typically I would draw a stem all the way down, but we've got a lot of other elements to go in here. It's like making a mental note that you have to put the stems in later once you're filling everything out. But I do want to connect all of these petals together with one stem. I'm going to grab my dark blue color again. I'm going to grab my sketching pencil, I'm going to bring the size down to like eight percent, and I'm just going to connect all of these together. Now when I need to fill in my stem later on, all I'll have to do is draw a line down. This part will already be done for me. That is all of those. We're moving right along. I'm going to create a brand new layer and we're going to add in some of our smaller elements now. I'm going to draw clusters of really tiny daisies. I'm going to grab my lighter pink color. For these ones it's actually really easy with the medium paint round brush. Let me make this five percent. You're just going to draw a dot and do it five times and leave the center open. These are really fun, really easy supporting elements to make and you can put as many as you want in a little cluster. If you want to change up the color too, you can switch back and forth between a dark pink and a light pink and that will give it an extra bit of depth as well. If it's becoming hard to see what's going on because of your sketch layer. It is for me in some of the smaller areas, you can turn the sketch layer off and on like I know I'm going to fill in some gaps over here and then I can turn my sketch layer back on and then return to it later. I'm going to add in the centers for all these. This is really easy, you just grab your dark blue and just put a dot inside of each of these. I'm going to turn off my sketch layer for this because it'll be much easier to do this part. I've got those small supporting elements there and I'm going to create a brand new layer. Let me turn a sketch layer back on. We're going to add in just a couple more additional pops of color and then we'll fill everything else with different foliage. So for these last few pops of color, I want to use, let me grab my light orange color. A few more of the Doodle styles that we practiced in Project 1. The first one is going to be some dots just like this and then we'll connect them all and we're going to put another one right up here. This is another one of those elements where you need to make a mental note that the stems are going to connect down later. But let's grab the dark blue. Let's grab our sketching pencil and at least get it started. I'm going to draw a line down here and then start connecting these. At least those are in there now, let's turn off the sketch layer and see how those look. That's looking good. The last elements I want to add and I'm going to create brand new layer. Let me turn my sketch layer back on. In these areas that are poking up right here, that are meant to be flowers where I got the circles dictated and I think I'm going to pop a few in here to just break up a little bit of these dense foliage areas. I'm going to grab my light pink color, grab your medium paint round again and I'm just going to drop a few dots here and there and then we'll just connect them. At least then I'll have a little bit more color amongst all the foliage that's going on. These are just random dots and then when we connect them, they'll look more like flowers. I'll turn off my sketch layer and then let's just connect these so I create a brand new layer. Let's grab our dark blue. Let's grab our sketching pencil. Once again, I'm not going to draw the stem all the way down, but I am going to do just the basic connection amongst these ones. I will have a line. This one's running into the flowers so that's not the best example. Let's do one of these. Bring this down. I'm not bringing it down all the way, but I have an idea of where it would connect. I think that's all of them now so let's turn off the sketch layer. That's looking really good. I'm going to group all of my florals elements together because we're about to put in a ton of foliage elements so I want to keep them separate that way I can find things a little easier as I work with my foliage. Those are grouped, rename this one florals. In the next video, we will fill this out with our foliage. 14. Project 2: Adding Foliage + Finishing Touches: Now, it's time to put all that foliage practice to good use, because we're going to include a bunch of different elements in this, and then we're going to connect everything together, fill it out, and then it'll be done. I'm going to create a brand new layer. I'm going to work very similarly to traditional watercolors, where you would lay down your lightest colors first and start building on your dark colors on top of them. I'm just going to put in some supporting elements that I don't mind if I end up drawing on top of, they are going to be a little bit larger and much softer in color, and then we can build on top of them. That will give our bouquet a little bit stronger sense of depth to it. I'm going to grab my light green color right here. I'm going to drag this top layer underneath my florals, that way all of the foliage elements will naturally be behind my floral elements. For this larger one, I'm going to start by, I got my medium paint round selected. This one's just going to be a large version of these pointed oval leaves. I'm just going to draw a few on each side. You can add stems inside of them if you would like, but I'm going to just keep it nice and simple like this. Then I'm going to put another one of these right here. Let me turn off my sketch layer for this one. Something very conscious of where my flowers are. I don't want to paint entirely underneath them, especially for some of these pink ones. The green and the pink don't mix super well. I'm just giving the impression that it goes behind them. Looks like I miss some stems right here, so I'm going to fix that really quick. Okay, back at it. This one is just going to come up here really simply. Then I think I want to have one more over here, and that will be that. I'm going to create a brand new layer. I usually like getting my elements that are poking outside of my bouquet done first and then I can fill everything in the center, that's just how I like to work, because then I have the frame and I can fill everything. So that's where I'm going to focus my time next. I'm going to grab my lighter blue color right here. I'm keeping my medium paint round for almost all of my foliage elements. Wherever this is poking out in these places, I'm going to draw in a bit of foliage that's similar to what we practiced earlier. So it's going to have a stem, but some really simple branches off of it, and then do these pointed oval leaves again. Nice and loose, that sketchy feel to them, and just make your way around the bouquet with these. But we can turn off our sketch layer again if you need to see a little bit better. I feel like I framed it pretty well with these elements, so I don't want this to be the only framing foliage element that I use, so I'm going to switch to another foliage style. Let's turn our sketch layer back on. I'm going to grab this darker teal color right here. I'm going to switch to my sketch pencil temporarily and just give myself some longer stems for these elements. These ones are just going to be poking out around just so these looking so similar are not my only ones that are poking around. Okay. I'm going to switch back to my medium paint round, I am going to turn off my sketch layer so I can see what I'm doing a little bit better. For these ones, that's going to be like an oval, and then it's going to replicate on each side evenly. This one looked a little bit similar to eucalyptus. Those elements are looking really good. I like how everything is feeling so far. Let's turn on our sketch layer again, and we can move on with some other foliage elements. Now that I've got my frame all done, I'm going to start filling the interior of my bouquet up. I know I want to put at least one of these elements on the inside just to unify everything, that way, it doesn't seem like this style of element is only around the outside, same thing with this other element that I drew. I'm going to put a couple of those, just turn inside to reference the exterior elements, and then we can fill in all the other little gaps, and then it'll be done. I'm going to return to my sketching pencil and just put this element on the inside. I think I'm going to just put it right here, make it nice and easy. Let's add one of those other elements as well. This was in the same layer. I'm going to grab that light blue color, and I'll put one right here, and maybe one over here as well. Let's turn off the sketch layer for a sec. I'm going to add in another type of foliage elements. I'm going to turn my sketch layer back on, create a brand new layer. I'm going to grab my dark blue and for this one. Anywhere that I've got gaps, it might actually help if I turn off my sketch layer. Some of these gaps, I'm going to put in the style of foliage that's just a few dots here and there. It mimics this flower element that this is a foliage element, so it also helps to unify everything. These ones are dark but they're tiny. We're going to connect these ones. It's okay if you overlap some of your foliage elements, it's not okay to overlap your floral elements with your foliage elements because that's when things start becoming visually confusing. I'm going to grab at my sketching pencil to connect these, and since these are smaller, I'm going to make my sketching pencil smaller. I'm bringing it down to four percent, so these ones will all connect down. It's finally starting to look a little more like a real bouquet. You can see we still have some gaps around some of these flowers. Now is the time to draw in the stems of these ones that we were waiting for before, because now we've got everything that starting to fill out and that will let us know any remaining gaps that we need to fill in. I'm going to return to those flowers in my flower group. Let's see where they're at, and I'm going to draw some stems down. Let's make this a little bit thicker, and go up to seven percent with this brush. Same thing with these ones, and now I can also add in stems for these ones that are the floral dots. So let's find that layer and extend these ones down. Now, it's really obvious where I've got some remaining gaps right here. A supporting element that I always say for last whenever I'm making a bouquet is, let me close this up, I'm going to create a new layer up at the top, is just a plain old floating leaf. It will look like this. These are just leaves that are poking out here and there that fill in any remaining gaps that you have. But you want to make sure that everything is feeling pretty full before you introduce these because they can get out of control pretty quickly if you start putting in a tone of these. These ones are darker, so I've got my dark blue colors still selected, and they're sitting on top of everything. So that's why they're darker, they're in the front of everything. Just like that, we have a nice full bouquet. Let's draw in our extra stems. Let's turn on our sketch layer, and I'm going to first create the ribbon that's going to go on top of them, and then I can draw all the stems after that. Create a brand new layer. I'm going to make my ribbon, my pink color right here, and I've got my medium paint round selected. For the ribbon, I'm just going to do a bunch of lines, so it's more like colored string really. Then you can draw a couple of lines down where it was tied off, and now I can create a brand new layer underneath it. I'm just going to keep drawing all these four different colors. I'm just going to keep drawing stems that are pulling out from underneath it. I'm going to start up at the top because it's covering it, and then switch colors. I'm going to turn off my sketch layer now so I can see things better. That is the loose style watercolor wildflower bouquet. If you want to add some finishing touches, you can add in some paint splatter on top of everything, so let's group all of our foliage elements together first. Tap on the floral group up at the top, create a brand new layer. I'm going to grab my orange and grab the round splatter brush, and we can just add a little bit of splatter in the different colors. Those finishing touches are in there, and this project is done. 15. Thank You + Next Steps: Thank you so much for checking out this class. I just wanted to give a recap of things to keep in mind and next steps that you can take now that you know how to paint Watercolor florals in Procreate. First of all, don't forget to go and grab your bonuses if you have not done that yet. All of the bonuses can be found at this link. Make sure to input the password, skillshare, it's all one word and it's all lowercase. If you're not sure how to download and install those items, refer to the video titled bonuses and install instructions at the very beginning of the course. Finally, I want to offer you some perks for watching this course on Skillshare. If you'd like to upgrade to the full Watercolor Illustration Brush set which includes 17 brushes, you got to test out four of them. You can use the discount code Skillshare10, that's all one word, and you'll get 10 percent off either the standard or the extended license. You can see the links to both of those right there on screen. If you'd like to upgrade to the full version of the course, this was an intro version of the course, you got to see the first two projects. There are eight additional projects and you can check out the full course at the link on screen, and you can take $20 off the full course since you checked out the intro version here on Skillshare. Just make sure you use the discount code, SKILLSHAREFLORAL, that's all in one word at checkout. As I mentioned, the full course includes eight additional projects. In Project 3, we created a watercolor floral illustration based off of a photograph. Project 4 through seven is what I'm calling the Container series.These are simple bouquets in a vase, a pot, a bucket, and a pitcher. In Project 8, we create a custom leaf design that can be reusable. In Project 9, we create a border element that's perfect for our stationary. In Project 10, we go over how to create a seamless watercolor floral pattern directly in Procreate and then how to reuse that as a pattern in Procreate, Adobe Illustrator, and Adobe Photoshop. You'll also get access to several bonus videos including how to reuse Procreate artwork, how to save it out, and then had a reuse it in future Procreate documents as well as any program where inserting images is permitted. You'll also learn how to vectorize your watercolor artwork in Adobe Illustrator, and you'll see the wet on wet, the combination of wet on wet and wet and dry, as well as edge softening techniques that you can use for all of your Procreate watercolor artwork in the future. Once again, the link is on screen and you can get $20 off of that full course when you use the discount code, SKILLSHAREFLORAL. Finally, if you'd like to check out some of my other Procreate courses on Skillshare, these are some of my latest ones that you may enjoy. I have a Procreate for Beginners course, if you're brand new to Procreate that's a perfect place to get started and to learn all the basics of the program. I offer an Intro to Watercolor Lettering course. You'll get some free brushes and you'll learn how to create a watercolor effect within hand lettering that mimics traditional watercolor lettering. Then finally, my Intro to 3D Lettering in Procreate class. You'll learn how to apply several extrusion and shadow effects to lettering to make them pop off your screen. In order to check out any of those, just visit my profile here on Skillshare or go to skillshare.com/everytuesday. One last reminder, use the hashtag, procreateit, that's all one word. When sharing your artwork on Instagram, I check out that hashtag almost daily and I would love to check out your work and send it some love. I would also love it if you tag me. My handle on Instagram is @everytuesday. My name, everytuesday, references the fact that I post a brand new free tutorial on YouTube every single Tuesday, every single year and you can check out all of my tutorials for free over on YouTube. You can check out my channel at youtube.com/everytues. Thanks so much for checking out this course and I can't wait to see what you make.