Intro to Gouache Botanicals in Procreate | Teela Cunningham | Skillshare

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Intro to Gouache Botanicals in Procreate

teacher avatar Teela Cunningham, Hand Lettering + Graphic Design

Watch this class and thousands more

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

17 Lessons (1h 51m)
    • 1. Intro to Gouache Botanicals in Procreate [class trailer]

      1:49
    • 2. Course Overview

      5:53
    • 3. Downloading + Installing Bonuses

      2:15
    • 4. Helpful Links

      5:10
    • 5. Using Source Photos Correctly

      3:56
    • 6. File Size + Color Profile Tips

      6:13
    • 7. Warm Up: Rose Branch

      15:40
    • 8. Warm Up: Eucalyptus Part 1

      9:52
    • 9. Warm Up: Eucalyptus Part 2

      11:13
    • 10. Warm Up: Primroses

      6:46
    • 11. Warm Up: Purple Aster

      7:23
    • 12. Project 1: Flat Style Blueberries Part 1

      7:17
    • 13. Project 1: Flat Style Blueberries Part 2

      7:01
    • 14. Project 2: Flat Style Lemons Part 1

      5:43
    • 15. Project 2: Flat Style Lemons Part 2

      5:25
    • 16. Project 2: Flat Style Lemons Part 3

      5:07
    • 17. Thank You + Next Steps

      4:37
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About This Class

Learn how to create flat style digital gouache paintings directly in Procreate! Throughout 4 warm up mini projects and 2 main course projects, you'll learn the basics of the flat digital gouache painting style, how to use a source photo for reference and how to add simple, bold details to your artwork.

2 free Procreate gouache paint brushes are included with your enrollment, so you can follow along with every video. Start painting your own custom, beautifully textured gouache style paintings today!

Meet Your Teacher

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Teela Cunningham

Hand Lettering + Graphic Design

Top Teacher

Hey! I'm Teela and I help designers + hand letterers build their skillsets to open new creative + financial opportunities. Freebies + tutorials here! > https://every-tuesday.com

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Transcripts

1. Intro to Gouache Botanicals in Procreate [class trailer]: Although gouache isn't as well known as watercolor or acrylic, it is just as powerful at delivering beautiful results. The magic in gouache is that it can behave like watercolor, but with an opaque, matte finish and also like acrylic, but it can be reactivated with water. Its inherent natural ability to adapt to several styles makes it one of the most versatile mediums available to artists. Now that Procreate can join the gouache-loving party, it's time to bring that magic to the iPad. My name is Teila, and for the past seven years, I've been creating weekly tutorials and courses on design, lettering, and illustration. While traditional art will always have a big place in my heart, creating digital art in Procreate has transformed my art-making process in all the best ways. In this intro course to gouache botanicals in Procreate, you'll digitally paint in the flat gouache-inspired painting style using two free brushes which are included with your enrollment. The flat style is the most familiar gouache style made up of simple one-color shapes with bold details to imply texture and depth. We'll begin with two foliage and two flora warm-up exercises before moving on to our two main projects: flat-style blueberries and a branch of fresh lemons. Throughout this style, you'll learn simple layering methods, how to simplify complex images by finding their mid-tones, and where to add those bold details. To complete this class, you'll need an iPad that supports pressure sensitivity, a compatible stylus, and the Procreate app installed on your iPad. This course was created with beginners in mind. So even if you've never used Procreate before, you'll be able to follow along and learn a lot about the program at the same time. Find find a cozy spot to paint, and let's create some flat-style gouache botanicals in Procreate. 2. Course Overview: Welcome to intro to Gouache Botanicals in Procreate. I'm so excited you're here and in this video, I'm just going to quickly walk you through expectations and an overview of what you can expect to learn throughout this course. First, you're going to learn one gouache-inspired digital painting style and we're going to reinforce that style across four warm up exercises and two full projects. The flat style warm ups include two foliage and two floral exercises. It's basically like four mini-projects and this is what they look like. The first warm up is a flat rose branch, the second one is a flat eucalyptus, there's tons of layering here so if you're new to Procreate and getting familiar with layers, you will have it down after that project. Then in warm up number 3, we switched to florals, we go from foliage to florals and we're going to paint two flat style primroses and then in the final warm up, we're going to paint a flat purple aster. Then we move on to the main projects which are a little bit longer and we'll just hit everything home that we discussed throughout the warm ups. The first project is flat style blueberries. What you see on screen that is the final outcome of the first projects so we're integrating layering, we've got different colors, we're definitely using that flat style to our full advantage in integrating a few really bold details as well. Then in the second and final flat style project, we're going to be painting some lemons. This is the final outcome of that and we take what we did in the first project with the blueberries and we make it more complex. We have additional layering, additional elements, and we're integrating additional details throughout our entire piece. Along with all of our projects, I'm also including tips on file size knowing how to size your artwork depending on its final usage, the color profile to use, your Canvas size, your resolution, and I'm also going to walk you through how to use source photos correctly since we will be basing all of our illustrations on source photos, I want to quickly talk about when it's appropriate to use any photos you find online and when you'll have to purchase photos or find certain licensing rights within those photos if you ever plan to sell the artwork that you create. Then I've also included two Procreate gouache brushes for free with the course. They are the thick, round, opaque brush and the blender brush, which you will see throughout the videos and in the video titled downloading and installing class freebies, I share exactly where you can find those, pick those up, and how to install them. Then I just want to share my iPad specs in case you're curious about the hardware that I'm using, I am on a 3rd gen iPad Pro, it's a 12.9 inch screen which I love, and it's 256 GBs, which if you are in the market and that's an iPad that you're looking at, I've been very happy with it. I've had it since late 2018. It's still super reliable, I've never run out of space I still have plenty of space left, and I prefer the larger screen size because it feels more like a standard sheet of paper for me. With that iPad Pro, the compatible Apple pencil is the 2nd gen Apple pencil, and then this course is taught using Procreate version 5.1.5. So you'll want to be on at least that version or new or to follow along. If you're brand new to creating artwork on an iPad and you're in the market for an iPad, my recommendation is any iPad listed at this link, it's every-tuesday.com/iPads. That will bring you to a screen on Apple's website, and it shows you all the iPads that have pressure sensitivity, which is so important whenever you're drawing. Any pressure you put on your styles you can affect the weight or the size of that brush as you're using it. It becomes extremely powerful whenever you're illustrating on the iPad so you'll definitely want an iPad with pressure sensitivity. That link shows you all of the iPads that have that sensitivity, as well as which Apple pencil is compatible with each one, and my recommendation is to not invest in a third party stylus that's going to work for a little bit or maybe not work at all, and then stop working for you randomly. The Apple pencil is always going to be your best bet. Yes, it's a bit more of an investment, but you won't have any of the headaches that come along with 3rd party stylus, so that's what I tell all my students. Apple pencil is always my recommendation. This course, if you are brand new to procreate, it's extremely beginner-friendly I kept that in mind throughout all of the videos. It's a great starter course for new Procreate users because that increases in complexity as the course progresses. We start out really, really simple, and then we build on to those skills as we move throughout the different projects. If you're new to procreate, I recently released a brand new course called Procreate 5x for beginners. If you click on my profile image or visit my profile on Skillshare, you'll see it listed there it's called Procreate 5x for beginners. It's an updated version of my previous course called Procreate for beginners. Just make sure you're clicking on the Procreate 5x for beginners, and that takes you through four different projects and it's a very, very intro-version that covers a lot of different tools within Procreate that you will use most often whenever you're creating artwork. Finally, I want to share a perk for you since you are checking this out and taking it from me here on Skillshare, if you would like to upgrade to the full gouache lovers brush site, which those two free brushes are a part of. You can get 10 percent off of it by using the discount code Skillshare 10, and I've left links to both the standard license and the extended license of that set right on screen. If you are posting your artwork on Instagram from this class, I would appreciate it so much if you could tag me, my handle is everytuesday and then also use the class #procreateit. That way we can support each other and see all the different really cool artwork that comes from everyone that's participating in this class. That's a quick overview of what's coming up. Let's dive in. 3. Downloading + Installing Bonuses: In this video, I'm going to walk you through how to download and install the freebies that came along with your enrollment in this class. Your enrollment includes two free Procreate brushes, which you can see on screen. We're going to be using these for nearly every single project that we create together. The first one is the thick round opaque. This is the primary brush that we'll be using. Then we also use our blender brush as a smudge brush to adjust certain areas of our artwork as we're working. Both of those are crucial to the flat style. Those are the direct download links to these brushes. I want to show you how to use those links to access the brushes and then get them installed into your version of Procreate. The first thing you want to do is open up the Chrome browser on your iPad. It's the most reliable browser, so it's always the one that I recommend for downloading freebies and installing them into Procreate. You can see the example right here. I have typed in one of the links from this previous page. You can see it, it's right in the URL bar, that's the download link. Then when you hit "Enter" down at the very bottom of the screen, you'll see a little Download bar and you want to tap on "Download." After you do that, it will download it, and then that text will change to say, Open In. You want to tap on that, and then you'll get this little window that pops up. If you haven't opened Procreate before you do this, you may not see Procreate as a suggested app right away. Even if you toggle through them and you don't see Procreate, then you just want to open Procreate on your iPad and then go through these steps again and it will show up there. You should see Procreate right there. So tap on Procreate and then that will open it in Procreate. When you go into the Procreate app and you tap on the little brush icon in the upper right of your screen, you will see all the brush libraries listed on the left. There will be a category called Imported. When you tap on that category, you'll see all the brushes that are part of that. If you've downloaded individual brushes in the past, those will all show up here and the newest ones will appear at the very top of the categories so you can see where that one is listed. Once you do that, you'll just go back through and do the exact same thing for the other brush, and then you'll have both of them and you'll be ready to go. 4. Helpful Links: In this video, I want to provide some really helpful links as you navigate through the course and some links that will be helpful to you in the future for your own unique artwork to come. The first thing I want to mention are my accessories, I get asked this a lot. I do use a screen protector and the screen protector that I've used for almost two years now and that I love, it's the official Paperlike screen protector. There are a lot of rip-offs of this brand, so beware of that because a lot of people have issue with the rip-offs by wearing down the tip of their Apple Pencil. I have never had this issue with the official Paperlike screen protector. After two years of continuous daily use, it has never worn the tip of my Apple Pencil down. That's probably one of the most frequent questions that I get asked by people looking for a screen protector, so I want to make sure that I mention that. I love this screen protector, yes, it does feel like paper and it has totally transformed the feeling that I get when I'm sitting down and creating on an iPad because I don't feel like I'm drawing on glass. The feeling that I get when I'm drawing on the screen feels like I could be doodling in any sketchbook, so highly recommended that screen protector. I also use the NimbleGrip as my Apple Pencil grip, which you'll see in all the videos. I never used to use one, but the company was kind enough to let me try one of their grips out and I started using it and I couldn't take it off after that. I got really spoiled by it because I didn't realize the way that I hold the Apple Pencil, it rubs on the inside of my middle finger and it starts to hurt after a while. It's a silicone grips, so it just slides on and slides off and even though I use it with a second gen Apple Pencil, I have to slide it off in order to charge my pencil but it's such a small inconvenience for me because of the huge benefit that I get. I can draw for hours not without my finger getting hurt or tired because I've got that grip now. Then another accessory that I use that I don't mention very often because it's never onscreen with me is the Apple Pencil stand. When I'm working at home, I usually have my iPad next to me at my desktop, and the stand, you can actually put the Apple Pencil in it even if the grip is on it, so that's pretty cool because I usually have a ton of different pens or writing utensils on my desk with me. If I always pop my Apple Pencil there, then when I grab my iPad if I need to work or check something really quick when I'm at my desktop, I know my Apple Pencil is right there, it's really easy for me to just grab right away or you could use the stand for any other pencil or pen as well. That's another accessory that I use and I really love. Now hopping to our Pinterest board. I have made a custom Pinterest board of a bunch of source images that you can use for your own projects. All of the source photos that we use in this class are listed on that board but then I also pack the board full of other source images that lend themselves really well to all the different styles that we'll be painting in so you have plenty of options to practice. Once you go through the projects in the course, you can just revisit that board and practice with some other photos due to challenge yourself a little bit more or get some more practicing. Let's talk about stock photos. For all of the projects in the class, we base our paintings on source photography that where we have something to reference as we're painting. Not only can you grab photos off of Pinterest like we'll be doing throughout the class, if you plan to ever create artwork that you intend to sell, you want to make sure that you're using Royalty Free stock photography. These are free websites. Any photos that you find on these websites that are listed on screen, you can download them and use them as your source photo and then you can turn around and sell the artwork that you made based on those photos. You can't always do that with a Pinterest photos unless the photo explicitly states that you can do that. We're using the Pinterest images as practice. The intention here is not to sell the artwork that we're creating in this class, the purpose is to practice and to learn all the techniques so then you can go and create any type of artwork that you would like and sell the custom artwork that is unique to you. These three sites, I've used a bunch in the past and they have all Royalty Free imagery so you can go and download and use them. Those are the ones that I recommend. Why would you pay for stock photography if you can just get free Royalty Free photos from those sites that I just mentioned. The reason is maybe you can't find the type of photo that you would like. Paid stock photography tends to be of higher quality overall and because it's paid, fewer people will be using those photographs. If you want something that's really custom or unique or not many people would ever create anything based on the stock photo that you find because you're paying for it, there will be fewer people that use that photograph as inspiration for their artwork, so can just make your work look more unique and stand out a bit more because of that. I have purchased photography from every single site on this list so I can speak from personal experience. All of these are super dependable websites that I would definitely recommend. They all have different offerings, so just check them all out see what you can find, see what fits your style or what you're looking for best. 5. Using Source Photos Correctly: In this video, I just want to inform you a little bit about how to use source photos. We touched on this briefly in the Helpful Links video, but I wanted to put this all in one place, so if you need to reference it in the future, you can find it really quickly. Using source photos. There are two different scenarios for using source photos. The first scenario is when you're creating artwork that's based on a photograph, and then the end goal is that you'll sell the work that you produce that's based on this source photo. If you are using a free photo, you want to make sure that the rights are listed clearly for it and you want to look for certain words when you're reading through those rights. First you want to look for permission to modify, reproduce, or copy the image. Those are the three main keywords for what we're doing with the photography throughout the course. Perpetual, you don't want any expiration or end date to the rights that are listed. If the rights aren't listed, the best course of action is to always contact the owner of the photo or the website where the photo is available and get written permission, which is perfect with an email. You'll have your written permission and then you'll be all set. I shared several free photo sites that I use and I love in the Helpful Links video, so make sure to reference that for those sites. If you are using a paid photo, if you went out to a stock photo site and you bought a photo, so you can use that as your inspiration or if you're planning to purchase a photo, you always want to keep in mind that when you believe that you're purchasing a photo, you're actually buying the license or the rights to use that file in specific ways. You want to make sure that the rights that are included in your purchase cover those three keywords; modifying, reproducing or copying the image, and you want to look for any limitations. These can be the number of items you can produce, what you can produce, how you can produce them, and any expiration for the license. When you're purchasing a photo, the rights can be extremely specific, so you just want to read through them and make sure that they're going to cover whatever final usage you intend with your artwork. There's usually different licenses based on how you plan to use your image. An example of this would be if you're using it on a website, in a blog, or in a magazine, that can be a different license then say getting it printed on a mug and then selling that mug. Just read through the different sites and the different licenses that they offer, and make sure that you're purchasing the license that is specific to the usage that you intend for your final artwork. Once again, if anything is ever unclear, always contact the photo's owner or the website where the photo's rights are sold. Explain to them how you would like to use it and let them tell you in writing what license you need to buy. That way you'll always have a record of that directly from the source. Once again, you can refer to the Helpful Links video for several paid stock photo sites that I recommend. Scenario number 2 is when you would be creating artwork based on a photo and you only ever plan to use it for personal use. By personal projects, I mean anything you create for family that you never plan to sell. Maybe you want to practice with it, maybe you want to just create some artwork for your home. All of those would be considered personal use because you have no intention of ever selling it. If you are using a photograph that doesn't explicitly state its rights like on Pinterest, just realize that if you change your mind and you want to sell the artwork, you may not be able to, or it may be difficult to track down the original owner. Photos on Pinterest are a great example of this. Yes, we're using photos from Pinterest for this class, but all of this is for practice purposes only. There's no intention of selling the artwork that we're creating in this class. It's just for practice, it's only for your personal use, so then you have the skills that you need to create your own unique art later on. Then finally, I just wanted to throw this in. If you are planning to create artwork for a non-profit, a rule of thumb is to just treat it like a commercial use, that way you will always be covered since a non-profit is more of a business usage than a personal use. 6. File Size + Color Profile Tips: In this video, I'm going to give you some tips about file size and setting up your file to accommodate whatever usage you have planned for it. When you're in Procreate you're going to hit this little "Plus icon" and you can get a lot of the standard sizes that comes along with Procreate or you can make your own custom canvas with your own custom settings. In order to do that you'll hit this little icon underneath the plus. This is where you can apply all those settings. Throughout this class, we're going to be using a screen size canvas at 300 DPI. The reason that I chose this is because whenever you're deciding on what size canvas you would like you want to make your size as large as the artwork would ever need to be used at. If you need to print your artwork later on at a very large size then you want to make it at that size, because you can always scale down but when you scale up you're stretching pixels and that's when you get those fuzzy edges and that reduced resolution, so there's degrading of the image that happens when you scale it up. When you scale it down you're not degrading anything you're just compacting those pixels. Keep that in mind. You always want to make your artwork at as large of a size that you will ever need it at. Standard print resolution is 300 DPI. The screen resolution is 72 DPI. If you ever want to print your artwork, if you've created it at 72 DPI, you can't just automatically add in additional pixels that were never part of the original artwork. If you need the resolution to be larger, if you created it at smaller than 300, you have to remake your artwork or you just have to use it with the degraded quality. That's why I always use 300 as the DPI because it's the standard print resolution, so you always have the option to print whatever artwork you make. You may not ever need to print the artwork that you make but at least you know that you can and it's going to hold up and be beautiful at whatever size you created it at. You'll see that with the screen size, which is 2732 by 2048 pixels. If you're in the US that's the equivalent to about nine inches by almost seven inches, 6.8 inches, so that's a pretty large size for printing, so that accommodates a lot of standard print size needs. That's why I'm using the screen size at 300 DPI. However large you go with your width and height and your DPI combined, you're going to be limited by the number of layers, and this number of layers is based on how powerful your iPad is, how much space it has on it. If you have an older iPad that has less space you're going to have a different number here than I have. Just a heads up about that. However much they limit you, 91 will always be enough for this class by the way. This is an okay number for everything that we're creating but if you get down to 10 layers here it may be a little tricky. You may have to start merging layers together when maybe you would prefer that you kept them separate. Just keep that in mind when you're creating your custom canvases and make sure that you're sizing it to as large as you'll ever need it. You can label your custom canvas up here. We could just call this one our Standard Canvas, and now it will always show up as part of our default. Over here you can also change the color profile. We're not going to mess with the Time-lapse settings or the Canvas properties because we can use the defaults and they're perfectly fine. But as far as Color profile goes, I want to mention a few things right here. I always work in the Display P3 color profile, which is under the RGB tab. There's a few reasons why I do that. The Display P3 color profile is the latest and greatest color profile. The reason why it's so great is because it has a wider color gamut. It's able to achieve a wider range of colors for your artwork than any of the other color profiles. If you are on an older iPad, you will not have this option, you'll just have the standard RGB which is totally fine. Just use whatever the default SRGB color profile is for all of your artwork and you'll still be good to go. The Display P3 is based on the type of screen you have. If you have an older iPad that's why it won't show up because the screen technology has come a long ways which can accommodate that new P3 color profile. Because it can achieve a wider gamut, you can always switch over to CMYK later on if you want. The RGB color spectrum is based on light, which is why it's associated with screens, whereas CMYK is based on pigment. You can always achieve brighter and more vibrant colors in the light spectrum than you can in the traditional paint spectrum. I always recommend working in RGB because a lot of newer printers can print a wider gamut than they used to be able to. Many printers now recommend providing them with RGB files instead of CMYK like it used to be in the past. With CMYK you can always go from RGB down to CMYK and you'll just lose a little bit of color. If you've ever done that before, you've noticed that the color becomes a little more dull when you switch to CMYK, because it has to throw out all the colors that it can't achieve. You can always go from RGB down to CMYK. But if you start with CMYK you're already starting with a smaller range of colors, so even if you switch to RGB you're not going to miraculously get more vibrant colors. You have to make it with those vibrant colors in order to have them at your disposal, so don't start with CMYK and then plan to change to RGB. As long as you always start with the most options at your disposal, you can always remove them later, but adding them on you can't do that. That's my spiel about color profiles. For the purposes of this class, we're sticking with Display P3. If you don't have that one stick with the default SRGB and make sure you're working in the RGB color spectrum and you'll be all set. Those are my quick tips on size and color profiles. If I hit "Create" it's going to create a brand new canvas for me. If I ever want to duplicate this canvas and use it again, which we do throughout the class, when you're in the gallery view and you need to create a brand new one just hit the "Plus" and all the way at the bottom you can see our standard canvas is now right here. All you have to do is tap on that and you've got that brand new canvas. You don't have to create all those custom settings every single time you want a new canvas that has them. 7. Warm Up: Rose Branch: We're going to kick off our flat style projects with some warm-up exercises. These warm-up exercises will be foliage and florals. They're mini-projects. They're fun, they're quick, and they will give you a handsome muscle memory right away and get a feel for how to create the flat gouache painting styles. For this warm up exercise, we're going to be painting this rose branch. This branch is going to be based off of a source photo, which we're going to go and pick up in Pinterest. I'm first going to create a brand new Canvas that has screen size 300 DPI and the Display P3 color profile. I am in Pinterest on the gouache source photos board, and you will have to scroll down a little ways, but once you're there, this is it right here. We're going to download it to our camera. Hit the three dots up at the top, hit "Download Image," and that will save it to your camera. Now we can hop back and to procreate, and bring it into our brand new Canvas. You're going to hit the wrench up here and under the add category, hit "Insert a photo, " and go grab it. It will come in pretty small, so we need to scale it up and reorient it on our Canvas. I'm going to turn it around and my bounding box is going to be a little bit at an angle too. I like the scale on here, I'm going to leave it right about there. Whenever you're scaling up, you want down here to be uniform with snapping turned on, and that will help you to scale proportionally so everything will continue looking as realistic as possible. Once you have it positioned, just de-select. Now, we're going to begin planning out how we're going to paint this. Whenever you're painting in this style, the first thing you want to do is paint the furthest most back element. In this case, it's going to be this branch. That's heading through all of these leaves, and then we will layer in the furthest most back leaves and then the top leaves, and then we'll add details on top of everything. This one's a really good one to get started with because you're going to go over a lot of the basics before we build in complexity with the next warm-up exercises. We're going to start with a branch. With the flat style, it's made up of color-blocked shapes. Whenever you're looking at one of these shapes that you're about to paint, you want to evaluate what is the color that makes up the majority of the shape. With the flat style, we're not painting shadows, highlights, and midtones altogether for every element, we're just basically painting the midtone of each one, Then we're adding in some energy with the details that we'll put in later. For this branch, even though we've got the green up at the top of it, and then we've got much lighter brown down here, the main color of the branch is this midtone right here, this middle brown. We need to color drop that and we need to create a brand new layer for it. Come to your layers palette. This is our source photo. Create a brand new layer and label this one branch. We need to grab that color of the middle part of the branch. Hold your finger on this little icon between the size slider and the opacity sliders. Just hold your finger there and then bring your stylus over and touch the screen where the brown is that you want to grab. You'll see this magnifying glass I show up where my stylus is and the top color is the color that you're changing, and the bottom color is the color that you currently have selected. If you're changing the color just a little bit, you can do a nice comparison by using this tool. We're looking for a middle brown right here, and I like this one. Once you have it, you just release. Now, you can see we've got the brown up here. We're going to be painting using this thick round opaque brush in the gouache lovers set. This is a pressure sensitive brush, so as you're painting, if you want a larger line, just put down more pressure and you will get that larger line really quickly. Just keep that in mind as you're painting with it. I've got a size right here of about 12 percent. When you have a long continuous stroke, I want to show you with this brush because there's a small shifting color and then there's this overlap where you've got the shadow on it. Just keep that in mind if you lift up your stylus I need to put it back down again as you're drawing this branch. If you're not able to draw it in one stroke, you will get a little bit of shadow happening because it has these built-in qualities of real paint where when you're painting on top of an existing stroke, you're going to get a little bit of shadow because the thickness is there. These brushes were meant to mimic real paint as much as possible. As I'm drawing this branch, I already know that I'm not going to be able to draw this all the way down and keep it consistent the way I want to. When I look at this branch, I look at opportunities or places where I can lift my stylus up and then put it back down again, and no one will know that that's what I did. Anywhere you have leaves that overlap your branch, that's the perfect place. I could draw this down and then stop it right here because I know that this leaf is going to cover it, and then continue downward from here. That way I can reposition my Canvas, get my hand in the position that I want it to be to make this really pretty seamless looking stroke. Now that I've got my branch, I'm going to add in these little stems on it to make sure I'm getting all these areas. Once again, I'm keeping the exact same color. I'm not changing the color for these stems, they're all the same. Once you have your branch complete, now we're going to create a brand new layer right above it, and we're going to turn off the visibility of the branch. As I work with the flat style, I found that if I turn off the work that I did previous to what I'm about to do, it makes everything a lot easier and less confusing. I can just focus on exactly what I'm mimicking in the photograph versus being distracted by elements that are maybe overlapping things that won't overlap things in the future. I'm going to turn off the visibility of the branch layer. The next thing we want to paint in is the next furthest backed element. Those elements will be leaves that are currently being overlapped by other leaves. You can see down here I've got this leaf that's being overlapped, and I've got this leaf that's being overlapped just a little bit right here. With our layer or whatever is on the topmost layer will be appearing on top of whatever is beneath it. I know that I need this leaf and this leaf to be on top of this leaf and this leaf. Those need to be on a separate layer above these leaves. We're going to paint in these back leaves first and then we'll paint in the rest of the leaves and then we'll add in our details. We're going to focus on these two leaves first, and we're going to color drop and we're going to look at the main color that makes up this leaf. I'm going to hold my finger again on here. I'm going to find the main color, which I think is probably around here. It's up to you if you want to paint in where you think the leaf is going back here, or you can just paint to this edge just enough so you know it's going to be covered by the top leaf. It's completely up to you. Because we had to scale this photo up quite a bit, the resolution became really pixelated. It's easier for me to draw details with Zooming out a little bit, I can see things a little bit clear. I'm just going to draw a straight line around here. Then these zigzags right here, I'm not being perfect with them. You can be more precise if you want to. I'm just going to come around and paint right around where they're at. You want to keep your stylus down again for when you're painting here because then you're going to get those shadow overlaps. Just paint in one continuous stroke. If you can't get into all the nooks and crannies, don't worry about it. I'm going to show you how to fix that. I've got the majority of this leaf painted, and if I turn off my source photo, I can see all the areas that I've missed. In order to fix these, you want to grab your smudge brush. Tap on the smudge tool and select the blender brush in the gouache level side. You can change the size of this. I usually come down to like three or four percent for the really small areas. That way I can be very precise, you're just going to push color into the white areas. Start where the color is and then push it. I try to get as much pigment as I can into the shapes that I draw because this brush has built-in texture, it's settle, but it's there, and if you leave a bunch of gaps, you're pushing the texture as well, so the texture ends up smoothing out. I really like keeping as much inherent texture as I can in the shapes. We can move on to the next leaf. Turn on your source photo again, go back to your regular brush. We're going to grab the mid tone of this leaf so hold your finger on this little icon. I'm going to grab a color around here. You just want to make sure that you're painting where this overlaps going to happen because we're going to paint that right on top of it later. Then put these zigzags in and continue painting in one continuous stroke for the shape. Takes a little bit of practice, but once you get it down, you'll be able to start moving really fast. We're going to turn off the source photo again and grab my blender and push this color. If at any point in time you've painted outside the lines, like if your brush slipped and it ruins some of your zigzags, you can always push from the outside in. Put your stylus down where the white is and you can push in and correct and actually recreate these zigzags if you need to. You can do it both ways, whether you need to push from the inside out or the outside in. Once you have your two leaves, let's turn the source photo back on and we can turn those off. Let me label this one, leaves 1 and we'll create a brand new layer right above it and call this one leaves 2. Now we're going to paint all the rest of our leaves, but we're going to turn off our leaves once so we can just focus on the photo and grab your brush again. We're going to repeat the exact same thing that we've been doing. So for this top one, I'm going to grab a color around here. Even when I'm painting a lot of leaves at once, I'll go back through every single leaf as I'm painting it and correct it before I move on to the next leaf. That way I know when I'm done, I'm really done. I don't have to go back and try and find all these. This top part, I don't like this little stroke sticking out so I can bring it back in by pushing from the outside in. Turn the source photo back on, grab your paintbrush. Now we know that we need to paint this leaf, this leaf, this leaf, and this leaf. We've got four leaves left. I'm going to speed up the video doing the exact same thing that I've been doing and then I will be back. I've got all of my leaves painted in now. If we take a look at everything as a whole, I just want to make sure that all of my stems are touching leaves, so I don't have any leaves that are floating and I can already see that this one's barely hanging on. I can use my blender smudge brush for this too. I'm going to come back to my branch, grab my smudge, and just push this up so it looks a little more stable. Is just a little short so I'm just going to push that color right to that leaf and then we're all set there. The last thing is adding in some details. With the flat style, all of the details we put in will be very simple and very bold. We don't want to over-complicate anything. Whenever you think about the extra details you could add in, usually in your head when you're thinking, should I add this extra piece to push it a little bit more? The answer is usually no for this for the flat style. In this, let me turn these off so we can look at them. We're going to paint in the veining now, and we're just going to use lines for this. I'm going to tap on my leaves 2 layer, create a brand new layer, and label this on details. In here we're going to find the lightest color that way we can contrast enough so it'll to be standing out against whatever color we painted this. I'm going to hold my little button down and find a lighter shade right here. Then when I paint this in, it's really up to you how much detail you want to show in the veining. But I would just recommend not putting too much on, especially if you're inventing veining. With this one, it's very simple, especially this top leaf. I'm not going to change the color now. Whatever color you decided for the main vein, we're going to use the exact same thing for the veins and the rest of the leaf. I'm just following the lines as I see them and sometimes I need to zoom out so my eyes can adjust, especially for a photo whose resolution has broken down when scaling it up. It's okay to invent some veining here, because even though I can't see much up here, it would look weird, and all the veining right here. I'm just adding some extra in here. This one's got an extra piece coming off of it and that's fine too. We're going to do the exact same thing for each leaf, but for each leaf change the color because all the leaves are different colors. I'm going to grab the light color from this leaf and then paint it up. Remember that these are organic forms. You wouldn't necessarily have everything be perfectly symmetrical everywhere. Keep that in mind that it's absolutely okay to have little changes to your lines as you move along because that's how it occurs in nature. I made it to the last leaf down here. This part you could put in the details in here. Just keep in mind that you don't want to overlap this leaf at all because all these details are going to be on top of everything and this leaf is supposed to be behind this one. Up here, this one didn't have any veining that I needed to worry about, but this one does. You could add your veining right above this leaf. That way you know for a fact you can extend these lines as far as you want and they're always going to appear behind these leaves. In order to do that, you would just create another layer above leaves 1. That's what I'm going to do. If you decide to draw it along with the other details up here, just make sure that you're stopping before you get to this leaf and it can feel a little unnatural when you do that, which is why I prefer to add in that additional layer for this detail, just even though it's only for one leaf. Now I can go all the way back with these veins and I can be really messy with them and not worry too much. When we turn everything on, you'll see how seamless it looks. We're going to turn off our source photo and turn everything else on. You can see these lines. I don't have to worry about them stopping short right here because we added that layer. So there's our rose branch. That completes our first warm-up exercise for our flat style. In the next video we're going to make things a lot more complex with a silver dollar eucalyptus branch. 8. Warm Up: Eucalyptus Part 1: Welcome to our second warm-up exercise with foliage in the flat style. In this video, what you see on screen is exactly what we're going to be creating together, this is a silver dollar eucalyptus branch. Once again we're going to hop over to Pinterest and grab our source photo. I'm on the gouache source photos board, I'm going to scroll down here and grab this silver dollar eucalyptus. Once again, three dots up here, download image. In Procreate, I'm going to create the same size document that we've been working with so far, it's a screen size 300 DPI Display P3 color profile. Once again, if you're on an older iPad and don't have Display P3, then select the default sRGB color profile. I've got that brand new canvas and I'm going to bring in the image by hitting the wrench, Add category, Insert a photo. I'm going to scale this up to the size that I want it within this canvas, and just make sure you've got uniform down here with snapping turned on, and I like this nice big size. Once you have it all set, now we're going to start planning this out. In the same way that we worked with our rose branch, you can tell we've got way more elements here because we just have so many leaves, but we're still going to use the exact same process. This will get you comfortable with that process of painting your furthest back elements and then working forwards and also incorporating details where they need to go based on the position of your leaves. As I look at this, I'm noticing a few things. I'm noticing all the leaves and how layered they are. I've got some that are really far back and dark colored, so I know that these ones are going to be on a bottom layer. Then our branch, we painted our branch first with the rose branch, but here you can see this dark colored branch heads through the entire full branch of the silver dollar eucalyptus, so it's overlapping many, many of these leaves. I'm noticing that that branch is probably going to be on one of my top layers because of that, and I'm just going to have a bunch of different layers for the leaves. We're going to start with the furthest back ones and then slowly work our way forward and then incorporate the branch as we need to. You'll also notice that there's quite a lot of detail in these larger leaves that are at the forefront, so it's up to you whether or not you want to paint in all the veining here. I've decided that I'm just going to paint in the one vein down the middle. But if you'd prefer to have the additional veining in here, feel free to add that in. Let's get started with painting. I'm going to focus on the furthest most back elements. I'm going to basically work from left to right and then work my way down. I'm scanning the image as I move, that way I can try and get as many furthest back elements as possible. I'm going to start up in this upper corner first, let's create a brand new layer and label this one, leaves 1. Right up here in this corner, I already know that this leaf is the furthest back one, so let's paint that one in. Once again I'm using the thick round opaque brush, and I'm going to color drop it by holding this little button over here, and then grabbing the color, and then painting it in one stroke without lifting up my stylus. It's up to you how much information you want to paint in behind the leaf that's on top of it. We can do a quick check to make sure that we haven't missed any areas that we need to smudge and then we can move on. Now, I'm noticing that this leaf right here is behind these two so these ones need to be painted in, so I'm going to color drop right up here and paint in. Once again, I'm just grabbing an average color for this leaf. Now I can come down here, and I'm noticing even though that this one is behind this one, this one is behind this one. It's like constant layering right here. I know that this one is the furthest back, so I'm going to paint this one in next. Let's do a quick check to make sure we don't need to smudge any color before moving forward, everything still looks good. Now I'm going to come over here and check these ones because these meet together right here, so I'm going to paint whatever I need to up here. I know that this one is just being covered by this one, so I can paint this one. Then this one is being covered by both of these, so I can paint this one. I'll do a quick check to see if I need to smudge, I do need to smudge. Let's see what else we've got. This one is behind quite a few, so this will be the next one. Let me do a smudge check, still good. It looks like I smudged an extra piece of paint, so let me erase that, and back to painting, let's see. As I come over here, I'm noticing that this one, you can see that we've painted this one, so I already know that this one must be behind this one, so I'm going to skip this one for now. This leaf is behind this one, so this will be the next one that we paint. As we move over, I can see I can paint this one, I can also paint this one, this one. Now I've got like a whole collection of overlapping right here. This one's overlapping this one, which is overlapping this one, which is overlapping this one. I'm looking only at the furthest back one, so this is the one that I'm going to want to paint right here. If we turn off our source image, we've painted quite a few leaves already, and this part there's really no avoiding. It can get confusing, but I'm going to show you what I do as I work to make sure that I'm not doing work that I've already done. I'm going to create a brand new layer and label this one leaves 2. I mentioned before that I always work with turning off the work that I've already done as I'm creating new work, so I'm going to do that. Turn on your source photo, and the next thing we're going to paint in is anything that isn't the furthest most back but the next most back. Right here, this leaf was being covered by this leaf, which is been covered by this leaf, so this middle leaf is the one that I want to paint here. Check over here, this was the furthest back one, so I know that I can paint this one. Then over here, I can paint this one. I can also just take care of this one as well because it's just on its own up at the top, it's not interacting with any other leaves, so it's totally fine for me to paint it on the same layer, so I'm going to take care of this one as long as I'm here. This one was the furthest most back that was being overlapped by this one, which is being overlapped by this one, so since this is the middle one, that's the next one we're going to paint. Then I can paint this floating leaf right here. This one was our furthest back one, so I can paint the one on top of it, and then let's check over here again, this part gets really confusing because there's so many over here. If you ever can't remember if you painted one or not, like I can tell that all of these ones, this one was overlapping this one, so I believe that this is the one that I painted. If I want to double-check, I can just toggle the visibility of my leaves 1 on and off and I can see that I did paint that one so I don't have to worry about that one. But now, let's see, I can paint this one right here. Then this is strange because we've got one that is at an angle, and then this is the middle one, so this is the one that I want to paint right here. I can paint this one because it's just floating on its own over here. I can paint this one, I can paint this one. It starts becoming easier and easier the more that you've taken care of other back items so once you get to the top, you just automatically know that anything that's sitting on the top you can paint. We had this one painted from this layer, so I know that I can paint this middle one now. This one's just floating on its own, so I can paint this one in. See if I have any up here at the top. I can take care of this one because this one's on its own too. Remember, you only want to paint the ones that are completely on their own, they're not touching or interacting with anything else if you put them on this layer. I think I've got most of what I need now. Let's turn both of these on and turn the source photo off. You can see we've already painted a lot pretty quickly, and we've already got those really pretty overlaps with the different shades of this blue-green and it's looking really pretty. Next, we're going to move on to the next layer. 9. Warm Up: Eucalyptus Part 2: This middle part is the fuzzy part, where I usually have to turn things on and off quite a bit just to make sure that I'm painting new things, especially in areas that are really dense, with a lot going on. Let's turn on our source photo. We're going to turn off leaves one and leaves two, create a brand new layer. This will be leaves three, and let's evaluate. I believe, that part has been done and this part has been done. Now I can do this middle one right here. It's totally fine to just keep checking. I do this all the time, and it actually makes it go faster. It seems like it would go slower because you're constantly checking, but it saves you extra work in the long run. I thought I missed a part. I'II take care of that. Now, as I come down here where things get pretty confusing, it's a lot easier for me to wrap my head around, if I just toggle my leaves one and two on and off, and that way I can see what's missing. If I turn these ones on, I can see that this leaf is missing, and this one looks like it's covering this one, so this is probably the one that I need to also paint. I'm going to paint this one, and then I'm going to paint this background one. Moving over here, we're going to do the exact same thing. I'm just going to turn both of these on. I can see that I can paint this one next. Coming back over here, turn these ones on. I can see that this one is missing, so let's paint that one in. Actually this one goes on top of the branch, so I'm going to save that one for its own layer because it was one of the only leaves that covered the branch. Let's turn these back on. This one looks like it can be next. Just doing a quick check up here. Now that we have all of our layers on, let's turn off our source image. I can see that I've got some smudging to do on this one. We're looking pretty good, we've only got a few leaves left. If I turn on the source image, I can see I've got this one, this one, and this one left. I'm going to paint those ones in and then we can start working on the details and the branch, and then we'll be all set. I'm going to create a brand new layer, label this one, leaves four. I'm going to go take care of those leaves. Let's just do a double-check and make sure that all the leaves have been taken care of. I'm going to turn this on and off. Usually, that helps me see right away too. I think I've got everything. There appears to be an area on this one that needs to get smudged. Remember that you can always turn your layers on and off to find out which layer something is on, like this one right here. I can see that that's the layer that I need to be on in order to smudge that. We've got this whole cluster of leaves, and now they need some details. I'm going to turn off all of my layers except for leaves one. Turn on the source image, create a brand new layer above leaves one, and just label this one, Details one. Now, we're going to only add details onto this one and then we'll do the same thing for leaves 2, 3, and 4. This part, I'll go pretty quick. It helps to toggle this on and off, that's how I tell instead of having to go back and figure out what's overlapping, what, I just toggle this leaves one on and off. This one doesn't really have any detail, so let's go to the next one. This one, there's one little hair line there, so I'm going to take care of that. Straw it down, and then turn my leaves one back on, find the next leaf. That's how I work when I'm adding these details. Leaves one toggled on and off, so now I can see that this is the line that I want. The biggest part of this process is going to be making sure you're painting on details one and not leaves one, because once you start going pretty quick, it can be easy to paint on one instead of the other. Just make sure you're painting always on details one instead of leaves one, leaves one is the one that you just keep toggling on and off. You can toggle it on and off without selecting it, that does make it a little bit easier. You can see that this branch is overlapping this leaf, so I don't mind that my detail overlaps the branch because the branch, once we paint that in, is going to overlap these details. You can be a little messier during this part. I'm just checking to make sure that all of my leaves that had details have them drawn in, and now we can go into leaves two. I'm going to toggle these ones off, come to leaves two create a brand new layer, label this one, Details two. Once again, same exact process. This one has quite a few more leaves. I'm going to speed up the video, but it's the exact same process that we've been doing. Let's take a preview of how everything is looking so far, with our details in here. It's really starting to come together. Now, let's take care of that smudge that I put on there by accident. Let's erase that away. On to the next one, we can turn on leaves three, turn off everything else, create a brand new layer above leaves three, label this one, Details three, and turn our source photo back on, and we can do the same thing we've been doing. On to leaves four, turn on leaves four, turn everything else off except for your source photo, create a brand new layer above leaves four, label this one, Details four. There's only three leaves here, so this one's pretty quick. I made a mental note as I was working because when I painted this one in, I knew that the branch needed to go behind where this one was going to go, and since that one is on leaves four, I'm going to paint the branch underneath the leaves four layer. Tap on Details three, create a brand new layer, and this one's going to be called branch. It's on top of everything else, but it's behind this leaf. We can start painting that in. This one, is pretty dark throughout most of it. I'm going to grab one of these browns over here. This is the color I'm going to maintain for all the branches. These ones can fill very section, so if you need to lift up your stylus, it's totally fine because this is a branch and it will just add to the feel of connections here. But we do want to make sure we're getting them all, and also be aware that for the most part, this is going to be up on the top, so you want to be really careful where it's running into things. Like right here I ran into this leaf, let's find where that leaf is, you can see, it's going to overlap there and that's not going to look so good, so I'm going to erase that back a little bit. Just keep that in mind as you're working, you have to be pretty careful with the branch layer. You can reduce the opacity, if it's becoming hard to tell where you've painted and where you need to paint next. Now that we have our color and we know we're not changing it, you can reduce the opacity of the source photo. We always keep the opacity all the way up because when we're selecting color from the photo, you don't want a diluted color, you want the full saturated color, and you won't get that unless the opacity is at 100. Now, we can reduce it because we've already got our color selected and we're not re-selecting color right now. Make sure you're on the branch layer, and then you can continue painting, and now you should be able to see things pretty well. I think I've got all my branches now. You can see I stopped at short down here, I could extend it actually. Now that I look at it, I want to make it a little bit longer, and leave it right there. Now it's time for the grand reveal. We're going to turn off our source photo and begin turning on all of our other elements. That's all of them. Now, what I like to do, is I zoom in here and I'm still on my branch layer, and I'm seeing if I need to smudge anywhere. I could bring down this one just a little bit. This one was just an empty twig right there. I can make this one move in a little bit more. This is like final details. It's up to you how much you want to fuss with things here. Just be aware that if you're smudging, it can start looking pretty pixelated the more you smudge because it's so soft, when you're smudging. You could just grab your brush and paint it in if you wanted to erase that part, you could do that too. I just come through and look at all these connections, make sure that my branch is actually connecting to all of these leaves. Here's one right here that needs to get fixed. I'm actually just going to paint this one in, so I just bring it up. Take a final look at it zoomed out, make sure everything still feels the way you want it to. That completes our second foliage warm up for the flat gouache painting style. In the next video we're going to get warmed up with some florals before moving on to our larger projects. 10. Warm Up: Primroses: In this video, we're going to warm up with some gouache flat style florals. We're going to start with these two primroses. Once again, we're going to create a brand new canvas that is screen size 300 DPI, display P3 if you have it, if not, use the default sRGB color profile. I'm going to hop into Pinterest and go grab the source photo for this. I'm on my gouache source photos board and if you scroll down quite a ways, there are the primroses right here. Tap there, tap on the three little dots, hit "Download Image" and now they're on our camera roll now we can hop back into Procreate, hit the "Wrench", hit the "Add" category, and then hit "Insert a photo". I'm going to scale these up and position them where I want them. Once you have your photo in here, I don't like how green and muted this is, I'd like these to be just a little bit brighter so we're going to make a photo adjustment first. Before we begin color dropping, I just want to work with more saturated, brighter colors for this. In order to do that, I'm going to hit the "Magic wand" up here and then choose "Curves" and hit "Layer". Down here we're just going to use a standard curve. You're going to push up just a little bit, a standard S curve, so this is going to brighten it and then this is going to make all of our darks have more contrast in them. If I bring this down, you can see that things are looking a little greenish, which we don't like. We're going to fix that too. There we go. We brightened it up quite a bit and now we're just going to adjust the green that's in this photo so hit "Color balance", 'Layer". Then where the green is, we're just going to add some magenta to counter it and make it feel a little more white. I think that looks a lot better. We've got some brighter colors now to work with and it makes it a little easier to see the details. We're going to do something just a little bit different with this one because this is a smaller flower, but we still need to paint things in the right order. Instead of separating everything out on layers, we're going to put all of our petals on the same layer. Because this brush has that built-in shadow whenever you're painting an additional layer on top of one, we can take advantage of that with something cute and simple like this. I want to show you how that works just to give you an additional option when you're painting in this flat style. The first thing you want to do is establish which petals are behind which petals. By looking at this, I know that these two are the front most petals, these two are the back most petals and then this one is in the middle because it overlaps this one, but it's underneath this one. That's the order that I want to paint these in, even though they're all going to be on the exact same layer. Then all the shadows that are made will make sense. I'm going to create a brand new layer and just label this one petals. I'm going to grab just one color for this and I'm going to grab one of these brighter shades of white right here because I just think that's cleaner and prettier. First I'm going to paint these back ones. Then I'm going to paint this one. This one can be a little complex because the more you paint in, the less information you have about where certain items are, because this petal needs to cover these two. I need to make those decisions myself, where it's going to overlap since I can't see it now. You can see we've got some really pretty shadows and overlaps. This brush does have some color dynamics applied, so there's a slight shift in color when you're painting. You can do things like this with the different petals without having to change a color just slightly. If we turn off our source image, let's see if we have any smudging to do, there's this little area right here, but I think everything else is all right. Now we can paint in our center and we're going to keep this super simple. I'm going to create a brand new layer, label this one center. Turn on the source photo, turn off the petals layer. We're on the center layer and we're just going to paint in this yellow area. Grab a mid-tone, it's going to be more yellow than orange. These ones, I'm just going to paint in little dots. These are all going to be on the same layer as well. Then this little green dot in the very center, we're going to grab that one and paint on top of all the yellow, so there's that automatic depth there. Now let's turn on our petals, turn off our source image, and you can see we've got a really cute primrose pretty quickly and we've only used up two layers, so it was nice and quick, but you can still tell exactly what it is. We're going to do the exact same thing for the one that was in the front. But we're going to group these together that way we can keep everything organized. Tab it over to the right to select the other layer, hit "Group" and we'll label this one back. We can turn this one off temporarily and work on the front most one. Create a brand new layer. This one is going to be called petals. Grab a shade that you like. I'm going to grab one over here because I like how bright it is. By looking at this flower let's see, we've got these two that are the front most flowers. This one is a back most, this one is the back most and then this one is the middle one. It's like this one only it's rotated a little bit. We're going to paint the back most ones first, just like before. Then we'll paint this one. Then this one was our in-between petal. Now you'll have to start making decisions about how far your petal overlaps the other ones since you can't see it as well. Let's see if we have to do any smudging. Turn off the source photo, zoom in here, everything still looks okay. Turn off the petals layer, create a brand new layer, label this one center, and turn our source photo back on and we can paint in our yellow areas. Then the green center. Let's turn that on, turn off our source photo. We can group these two together and just call this one front and turn on our back one. Now we've got two cute primroses right next to each other in the flat gouache painting style. 11. Warm Up: Purple Aster: In this video, we're going to finish up our warm-up exercises for the flat Gouache painting style and we're going to finish it off with this Purple Aster flower. What you see on screen is what we're going to be creating together we're going to follow a very similar process to what we did with the primroses, only we're going to add a little bit of extra complexity by adding a few more layers to it. I'm going to create a brand new Canvas that is screen size 300 DPI and the display P3 color profile, then I'm going to hop over into Pinterest and grab our source photo. I'm in Pinterest on the same board that we've been using, this one is also, little way down, it's right next to the primroses. It's this one right here. Once again, hit the three dots, download image, hit the little wrench, add category, insert a photo. This one's got a few different options you can pick from. We're only going to be painting one for this, unless you'd like a challenge and you can paint some extra ones or overlapping ones. I'm going to focus on this one right here. We can increase the saturation or make any adjustments to the photo colors right now if we want. I think it's just a little too green, I'm going to adjust that. Hit the magic wand, this is the time to do it if you're going to do it. I'm going to hit "Layer". I'm going to add maybe a little bit of red, a little bit of magenta in here to brighten up my purple, then I'm also going to increase my saturation. Increase the saturation to make it a little bit brighter, I'm going to also add that curves. This part is totally optional. I'm going to brighten it up a little bit, give myself some extra contrast here. That is what my curve looks like and I'm just sticking with the gamma. I'm not splitting these ones up. Those are the adjustments and now we can start planning all of this out. Just like we did with the primrose, we're going to paint in all of these petals on the same layer and they're going to be the exact same color, but there's a bunch of them here. We're adding a little bit more complexity. We're going to be paying attention to the furthest back ones and then we can add in all the rest on top. I'm going to create a brand new layer and label this one petals. I'm going to grab a purple that I like. It's going to be a softer, like that one. Now, I can start painting in any of these petals that are further back. I usually don't paint the whole petal, I just paint up until I hit the next one, that way when I'm painting these ones that are on the very top, it's a little easier for me to tell the contour, the edge that I need to draw along. I'm just coming around and painting any petals that I see are being overlapped by another petal. I'm definitely going to skip some then come back to them when I paint on top, I'm going to get that nice shadow edge. Now that I have these drawn, you can see that I've got this whole cluster right here, this was the furthest back one. Then that's overlap by this one which is overlapped by this one which is overlapping this one which is then overlapped by this one and this one. A really easy way to do this as you just start from the back and work your way towards the front. I'm just going to take care of all these ones right now then just ever so slightly overlapping these first ones, but enough where you're going to see that shadow edge. Even though I've got an extra flower over here that's running into my photo, I'm only focusing on this flower right here. Don't let it distract you and don't paint in things that don't belong with this flower that we're on. I can overlap this one that I drew earlier. [MUSIC] Let's see how this looks without the source photo. See if we've got to smudge anything. You'll see that I didn't paint all of the petals to go all the way to the center because I've got so much information in the center that's going to take care of that. I can turn off the petals now, label this one Center one. Let's talk about what's going on here, then we can paint it. We've got one base color which is what we're going to paint in first then we're going to add in the details. This orangish, yellowish, greenish color, that is our base and then we've got some really dark areas and some really light areas. You can see we've got lines and we've got some texture in the center. We're going to just focus on the simplest boldest areas that we can add detail. We don't want to go overboard with them, but we still want to give information to the viewer that there's some stuff going on here. When I look at this, I see this center part with the little dots, that part is important because it's different than the rest of it, then I see these lines poking out. I want to include those too, but I think that's all I need to include. I'm going to create a layer that only has the color, then I'm going to put some of these details on one layer and then the center, most details on the last layer. Let's start by just painting a general color for the shape, that will help the viewers' eye to make sense of what's going on even though it's extremely simplified in the center. I'm going to grab a color for the center. I think this color is probably a good one. I'm going to come around the edge. I can be really loose with this, I like making it a little squiggly because it is squiggly and that will just let the viewers eye know that it's extending pretty far into the petals. We can turn that off, create a brand new layer. Turn on our source photo, label this one Center two, and let's paint these little lines in here. I'm going to grab this color, which I'm not crazy about. It's fluorescent. Let's grab a more muted color. I'm just going to put these lines, they're thick around here. I'm going to turn those ones off, create a brand new layer and label this one Center three. For this one, I'm just going to paint in little dots of the center color. Let's turn on all of our layers now and turn off our source image. If we zoom out, you can see we've got a lot of detail and a small amount of space but it's all very simple and variable, sticking true to this flat Gouache painting styles. That is our Purple Aster. It's the last warm-up project. Now, we're going to get into the larger projects for this flat style, we're going to start in the next video with our blueberry project. 12. Project 1: Flat Style Blueberries Part 1: Welcome to our first flat style project. What you see on screen is exactly what we're going to be creating together. You can see we have incorporated all of those warm-up exercises with a full project. We've got varying blueberries in color and scale, and then we also have that depth going on with the different leaves along the branch that's holding on to all of these blueberries. We're going to be using a lot of the methods that we've already used, and we're going to put everything together to get this really beautiful painterly flat style gouache painting. You can see we've got some different brush strokes in here that are subtle, and we've got that beautiful layering with the different shadows, and it feels very illustrative. Even though we're color blocking the majority of this, you can see when we zoom out, the full picture is really easy to understand. I'm going to create that standard canvas size that we've been using, that we will continue to use throughout the rest of the course. When in doubt, make your canvas screen size 300 DPI, Display P3. If you don't have access to Display P3, then select the default sRGB. I'm going to create that brand-new canvas, and then I'm going to hop over to Pinterest to grab our source photo, and then we'll get started. I am in Pinterest on that gouache source photos board and this photo is all the way at the very bottom. When you come down here, this is our blueberry photos, so tap on it. Three little dots, download image, and now we're going to hop back into Procreate. Hit the wrench, go to the add category, insert a photo, and grab the photo. Here's my photo. I'm going to enlarge it and position it where I want it to go. I like that it's going to take up most of the canvas here, and that looks pretty good. Now we can get started with planning out how we're going to paint everything. It's really up to you if you'd like to start with the blueberries or the leaves first. I am first going to paint in our branch, our main main that's going to connect everything since it's basically the furthest back element. Let's paint that in, and then we can go from there. I'm going to create a brand-new layer, and I've got my thick round opaque brush selected. I'm going to grab this midtone of my branch. I'm going to grab this one. Even though these ones are different colors over here, I'm going to keep that same brown throughout. Paint this branch down, and that's all I'm going to put in here. Even though we've got a few branch elements right in here, this could be a little confusing to the viewer, so I'm actually just going to omit this part and make this blueberry a little bit larger to fill in that gap. Now that I have this branch, I'm going to label it, and let's move on to our blueberries next. I'm going to create a brand-new layer, label this one; blueberries 1. I'm going to turn off the visibility of the branch layer, and let's look at our blueberries. I know that this one is the furthest back one right here. I can see there's a sliver of one right here, and then this one right here. Those are the ones that I'm going to paint in first. Actually, we could also paint in this one because these two don't interact where we can see it because this one is right in the way of it, so I can paint this one in as well. I am going to grab that color. Hold the little button over here on the left, grab the midtone of it, and paint it in. You can see that I'm not worried about this detail right here. I'm just painting in that circular shape of the blueberry. We're going to come back to this afterwards. We're going to grab the midtone of this blueberry. Now we can paint in our next layer of blueberries. I'm going to create a brand-new layer, label this one; Blueberries 2. I'm going to turn off the visibility of blueberries 1, and once again, remember which ones you've already painted. I'm looking at this and I'm realizing that this one's on top of this one, this one's on top of this one, and then this one is ever so slightly on top of this one. This is the only one I'm going to paint on this layer, and then this one's going to be on the next layer, the next layer, then the next layer. We're actually going to use four layers right here, that way we can have the correct layering for each one of these blueberries, which makes a huge difference, especially when we're painting in the flat style to make sure that we're overlapping the correct elements. I'm going to paint this one right now. Once again, I mentioned before how is going to make this one just a little bit larger to cover up that branch detail that was there, so that's why I made that a little bit bigger, but it will not overlap this one. This one will still overlap that one. Let's also do a smudge check really quick. I'm going to turn the source photo off, and that looks okay, so I can continue moving forward. We're going to turn off blueberries 1 and Blueberries 2, create a brand-new layer, Blueberries 3, and we're just going to paint this one right here. Turn it off, blueberries 4, blueberries 5, and this is our last one. We've got all of our blueberries in here, let's do another smudge check. You can see it's already beginning to come together, and I think I'm going to paint in one little branch detail right here, that way it doesn't get too weird or out of control of the size of these blueberries. I'm just going to grab my branch layer, I'm going to grab the same color and just paint a branch in here, and that will give that extra information that the eye needs to understand what's happening there. I could even add another one if I wanted to in here. Now, let's add in the details for our blueberries. I'm going to turn all of these off. Turn the branch off, turn our source photo back on. Up at the very top, create a brand-new layer, label this one; blueberry details. Now we're going to paint in these details. I just follow along the contours, and you're going to draw basically the same exact shape. Let's turn on all of our layers, turn off our source photo and see. I'm seeing one area that I need to smudge right here. I'm going to reduce my smudge brush just a little bit. There's another little area. That's looking good, and if we zoom out, all looks like a bunch of blueberries. Now in the next video, we're going to move on to our leaves. 13. Project 1: Flat Style Blueberries Part 2: Picking up right where we left off, now we're going to begin painting in our leaves. Let's group everything that we've done together so far. I am going to slide all of these layers over to the right, including the branch layer, hit "Group" and label this one Blueberries. Let's turn our source photo back on and turn off all the work that we've done so far. In our source photo, you'll notice that they're all on top of the branch, so we can paint all of them including all their details at the very top. They'll go on top of everything that we've done so far. I'm going to create a brand new layer and this one's going to be called Leaves 1, and we're going to continue following the exact same process that we've been keeping with this flat style. I'm going to look at the furthest back leaves and then work my way forward, and then we'll add in the details for each respective layer of leaves. If we look at this, we can tell that this one is definitely the furthest back. This one, because it doesn't interact with this one, we can also paint this one in. We can paint this one in and this one, and there's also one right here that I think we can paint in as well. We can paint in quite a few on this layer more than we've seen before. I'm going to grab a mid-tone of this one. This one has that shiny area, but for the most part, it's a darker color. I'm going to grab one of the darker colors here. I turn off this layer, create a brand new layer, Leaves 2. I think that we can paint all the remaining leaves in now. Looks like this one, this one, and this one. I think there is only three left. Yeah. This will be pretty quick and easy. We can preview what everything looks like without our source photo and we can see that we've got some interactions here that aren't the most appealing, so we can definitely fix that. Let's see on the source photo, what's there? It looks like we've got more of a branch there, these are coming together. We can also just make it a little denser. I'm going to add in more of our branch element right there just as a space filler. So I'm just going to add in a line right here. Let's look at these again. You can see that I toggled down the group to get to that and then I found my branch layer and I painted it on the branch layer. That part's important. Let's turn off our source photo. You can see a Slavic gap right here. I'll also make some connections with these other ones. Wherever I see little areas that could grab someone's attention for the wrong reasons, I like filling that in with something that will no longer grab any attention. With leaves, adding a branch element is a really easy way to do that, especially if you have a convergence of different elements and there's no really clear defining way to color block that in. I think I will also smudge this one up a little bit to cover this because I don't like that weird hairline right there. I'm going to grab this layer and just smudge this area up a little bit. It meets the other color. Now it seems much more natural and I actually don't even need the branch there anymore. You can just fill that in the leaf color. Now we can start adding in the details to these leaves, and then we'll actually be done with this first project. I am going to turn off these leaves and just like we did before, we're going to add the details on top of each layer of leaves. Let me turn the source photo back on. For Leaves 1, create a brand new layer. This one will be called Details 1. If you remember before with what we did with the eucalyptus foliage, we would turn this on and off to see where our leaves are and that makes it a lot easier to know where you have to start putting in your details. If I toggle this on and off, this is going to be my first leaf right here. I'm going to toggle leaves off. Make sure you're on the Details 1 before you begin to paint, grab the color that you need. These ones are pretty simple. There's a lot of lines and a few of these leaves have veining as well. These top ones really only have that center-line and I'm going to make sure that I add in the veining on the ones that are very obvious. We'll take care of that right now. Let's preview what that looks like without our source photo on here. That all looks pretty good. You could see I also added just one line of shadow right here. It look like the center part of our veining, but it also doubles as a shadow as well. That can be really effective as far as layering goes. I pop that one in there. Now we're going to do the exact same thing with Leaves 2. Create a brand new layer right above Leaves 2. This one will be Details 2. We're going to turn off our blueberries layer, turn the source photo back on and repeat the same process of toggling these on and off to find out where you need to paint. I think I've got everything here now. I'm going to turn off the source photo, but have all the other layers turned on. Now we're just going to take a look at everything and make sure we're happy with it, see if there's any other smudge areas that might have gotten missed. If you'd like to add in a background color, I actually like soft blue color that's in the background of this one. It's almost a gray, but there's a little bit of blue in it. I'm going to add that in and you can either apply it to the background color or create your own layer of color. I'm going to first eyedropper the color that I want, this area that's just got a little bit of a more blue tone to it. I'm going to grab that color. Now you can see it saved in my history. When I hit my background color layer, I can just tap on that one. That's the first one in my history. Then, I can turn off my source photo and we can also group all of our leaves together and just label this one leaves. That completes our first project in the flat digital gouache painting style. 14. Project 2: Flat Style Lemons Part 1: Welcome to our second flat style project and the last project in this class. What you see on screen is exactly what we're going to be creating together. We're going to once again use a source image, but we are also introducing some more complex forms. I'm going to once again create our standard canvas and then head into Pinterest to grab our source photo. I'm on our Pinterest board and this one really is all the way at the bottom, so just scroll all the way down and here is our lemon photo. I'm going to hit the three dots, download image, hop back into Procreate, hit the little wrench, add category, insert a photo. Let's scale this up to get it the size we want on our canvas. I'm making sure I don't crop off any of the leaves, and that looks pretty good. Now, we're going to proceed exactly as we have been, and then we'll start introducing those more complex details later on. For this one, we're actually going to start with our lemons because if you look at our branch, there are areas where branch is in front of some of the leaves, so our branch is not going to be our furthest back element in this project. This lemon is definitely one of the furthest back elements, same with this lemon. We're going to paint in our lemons first and we can actually keep all of our lemons on the exact same layer because none of them are overlapping each other. They are touching right here, but they're not overlapping, so we can paint them all together. I'm going to create a brand new layer, label this one lemons. I still have my thick round opaque brush selected, and I'm going to grab the mid-tones again for each one of these lemons. This one is a much lighter colored lemon. You can see with this little magnifier, the top color is the color that I'm about to select and the bottom color, was this color, the color that we just painted. We can see how different this color is going to be compared to the one we just painted, so that can be really helpful when you're deciding on which color to choose. Unto this lemon that's poking out back here. Then this one right over here. We've got all of our lemons in here and now we can paint in our lemon details. I'm going to create a brand new layer, turn off your lemon layer and label this one lemon details. Once again, the flat style, we're always using very simple and very bold details to illustrate areas of extreme contrast or texture. Right here we do have some texture on our lemons, but we also have some really strong highlights, so we have that giant contrast and color, and we also have texture. One way to show that off without getting too the weeds with tonal changes, is just adding in some dots. Dots and lines are super powerful when it comes to the flat style. Right here, we're going to utilize some dots to dictate a highlight on our lemon and also that it's textured. I'm going to come in here and grab this light yellow color and I know that I'm going to hang right around this little area because it's just a little bit of highlight here, whereas this one has a bunch of highlight. I'm just going to draw in some lines here. If it's hard to see what you're doing, feel free to reduce the opacity of your source image and you can drop those in. You don't have to make these all the same thickness or the same size. You just want to make sure that the viewer can understand that there's a highlight right here. I'm going to increase my source photo all the way up again. If we want to preview how this is looking, we can turn on our lemons layer and zoom out. You can even turn off your source photo and I love that I've got this cute, little highlight here, and it's also informing the viewer that the entire lemon is textured even though one little area is the only part that we're calling out, so it can be really effective. Now, we're going to turn off our lemons, turn your source photo back on and this is the next area, this giant highlight right here. I'm going to grab this light color and just paint in this area. I like previewing this after each one to see if I need to add anymore to make it seem more realistic. I think I can add just a little bit more, going up a little higher because this one is definitely the brightest one. Yeah, I like that. Right now, we've been focusing on highlights. We can also focus on shadows. If you have an extreme contrast and color where there's a shadow, you can do the exact same thing and notate it the same way only with the shadow a darker color rather than a lighter color. That's what we're going to do with this lemon, this area that's being covered by the leaf right here, we're going to add in details to that area. I'm going to grab that dark orange color and just put in a few lines right here. You don't have to put a tone, just enough to inform everyone. This leaf is obviously going to cover the rest of this. I'm final just having that. Now, let's take care of this little highlight right over here on the edge and on the very tip of it. Let's preview that, I'm going to add just a few more in here. We've got all of our details with our lemons completely and in the next video, we're going to start focusing on our leaves. 15. Project 2: Flat Style Lemons Part 2: Picking up where we left off, now we're going to move into our leaves. I'm going to turn off details in our lemons, but let's first group them. Slide the lemons over to the right, hit ''Group'' and label this one lemons. We can just turn off the visibility of this group. Now let's create a brand new layer and we'll label this one leaves 1. This part will seem very familiar. Now we're going to look at any leaves that are in the background, this leaf definitely, this one and this one right here. Let's grab our color, our mid tone, and paint this in. With this one, you'll notice that I've got this detail, this edge that's flipped over or flipped up, and I've got this edge too. We're going to come back to those parts, so just paint the main leaf area. That is not a change of color. Let's create a brand new layer, label this one leaves 2, you can turn off our leaves 1 layer and we'll paint those remaining leaves in. It'll be this one and this one. Let's do a smudge check for both of those layers. Turn off the source photo, turn on our leaves, and it looks like I've got a spot right here. Now we have all of our leaves and we can start adding in those details. Turn on your source photo, turn off leaves 2, tap on leaves 1 and create a brand new layer right above it. This will be called details 1. Once again, we can toggle on and off our layers to see where we're painting and paint those details in just as we have been all along. We're on this semi complicated leaf right here. First we're going to paint in these details, I've already painted in the veining, so I'm going to take care of this right now. I'm taking advantage of the pressure sensitivity of this brush. I started out with little pressure and then I increase the pressure. Then along this edge, we also have this really strong detail of the underside of the leaf that is much lighter than the top part. You can bring that back. Then I also have this really big chunk of dark right here. You can either exclude it, or you can paint in that detail if you'd like. It's totally up to you. I'm going to not grab the very center part. I'm going to make this a little more subtle because I feel like black is just way too strong here. I'm going to grab one of my darker hues so it's a more seamless, transition, and showing that shadow. You can paint right over the details that you've already got. Once again, this is totally optional. I just want to show you what I do for this. We can preview how everything looks by turning on our other layers and turning off our source image. There you go. We've got that little extra color black detail there. I try not to add too many of those when I do add them in because then I can start getting carried away, and then I add too many. Then it feels less like a flat style gouache painting because I've added just too much detail to it. The joy and the beauty of the flat style is really the simplicity. Just keep that in mind when you decide to add in additional details. Let's move on to our leaves 2 now. I'm going to turn off our lemons, our leaves 1, details 1, and turn our source photo back on. Come up to leaves 2, create a brand new layer, label this one details 2 and once again, we can turn these on and off to see where we're working. I grab the lightest color to work with here down with this vein. Let's preview these details and we can preview everything right now actually and turn off our source photo. Zoom out, zoom back in. I really love this little detail right here, how it adds that extra depth and it's still a flat color. I'm going to move forward with this. I can group all of these together and this will be our leaves. Group, label this one leaves. Now we're all ready to finish this up with our branch. 16. Project 2: Flat Style Lemons Part 3: Picking up right where we left off. Now we're going to start talking about what we need to do with our branch because this branch is the most complex one that we've seen so far. There are portions of it that are behind elements and in front of elements. Let's look at the source photo and talk it through. What we see right here, is that most of the branches go in front of the leaves or connect to the leaves. But we have this area right over here where we have this leaf overlapping the branch and overlapping these areas. This is something we need to consider. There's a couple of things that we can do, we can either erase super tight right here, or we can paint this last segment on a layer that is behind this leaf, which is what I'm going to do. We're going to take care of these other components first and then we will worry about this one last. First, we need to decide on a color for our branch. In these little areas that connect the lemon itself, these lighter green areas, I've chosen to paint these in and color-block them as their own shape that is separate from the branch, because they're very distinctive and because they're connecting straight into the lemons. I'm going to paint all of these dark areas. I'm even going to paint where it connects into the leaves the same color, but when it comes to these connections, these ones will be a different color. That is my plan right now. I'm going to create a brand new layer up at the very top and call this one branch. Even for this one, I can come as far down as like this joint, and I also want to make sure that I paint this end. It starts getting funky around here. I'm going to paint straight down to this joint and then these areas, I'm going to paint an extra. So let's get started. I'm going to grab a green, then I'm going to use for all these branches, I think there's a good green right around here. It's definitely a darker green. So just begin painting, and I like painting these ones in segments because it makes it really easy for me to then pick up my stylers when I need to transition to a new direction. I've come to this segment that I need to take care of. I'm going to create a brand new layer between the lemons and the leaves. Tap on the lemons group, create a brand new layer and this one will be called back branch. I still have the same color selected, so I'm going to paint this part in, and even though this is one of those connections that's connecting directly to the lemon, it's more the color of this branch than it is this very different lime color. That's why I'm keeping it the same color as the branch. I've added those and so that can be my extra depth. Now let's preview what this looks like. I'm just making sure I don't have any floating leaves here. I think that looks good. Now we can move on to those extra segments. I'm just going to create a brand new layer above the branch layer and label this one segments. I can toggle off the other layers, turn my source photo back on and on the segments layer, grab that lime green that we were talking about and paint those in. There's quite a few of them, and this one has yellow on the end of it, so we'll paint that in separately. Like I mentioned, I'm going to paint that yellow and separately. I'm just going to label this one yellow. Since it's the only piece that's like that. Let's take a look and see how we feel about everything. I am really happy with how that's looking. This last part is totally optional. I'm going to add in a background color or you can leave it white, I think white looks really beautiful here. I've chosen to go with a minty green color, which is different than the background color of the photo. You could definitely use this one too, but I've chosen to borrow a color that's already in my artwork. I'm going to grab this green and then just make it a little lighter. I've got that green selected. I'm going to come up here and reduce it way down so it's almost white, but it still has a little minty in it. I'm going to tap it down here too. I've got it saved. The value of this if you want to use the same one, is this hexadecimal right here. It's dfeacd. I'm going to come back to my background color layer, tap on that, and then choose that color, then I can turn off my source photo and, there we go, we've got our lemons all set. That completes our second project in the flat digital gouache painting style and the last project of this class. In the next video, we're going to talk about where you can take your digital gouache painting skills next. 17. Thank You + Next Steps: We made it to the end. Thank you so much for following along, for checking out the class, and checking out however many projects you followed along with, or posted, or shared. Thank you so much for being here. Before you go, I want to remind you of a couple of things and give you some next steps. First, don't forget to grab your bonuses, refer to the downloading and installing bonuses video within the class to pick up your two free brushes, the thick round opaque brush and the blender brush. Because you are watching this on Skillshare, you can take 10 percent off the standard or the extended license of the full gouche lovers set. If you enjoyed using those two brushes, they're part of a larger set of 12 custom gouche inspired brushes. Use the discount code, SKILLSHARE10 at checkout, and you can get that 10 percent off of either of those licenses. Another perk that I would like to offer you is, this class is an introversion of my full Gouache Botanicals in Procreate class. The full course has an additional 10 more projects and three other gouache inspired painting styles. There's a link on screen. Because you checked out the introversion, I would like to offer you $20 off the full course. Just make sure you're using the discount code, SKILLSHAREGOUACHE, all one word, make sure the spelling is correct because gouache is a funky word to spell, and that will automatically apply that discount. Here are those other projects that we go over. We pick up right where this class left off. There's one more flat style project, which is the most advanced flat style project. It's some cup oranges. Then we move on to the chunky style, which is a more acrylic style of painting utilizing those natural capabilities of gouche. We paint the lemons again, but in the chunky style so you can see the differences. Then we create almost an abstract bouquet of flowers. In project number 6, we create an English rose on a black background that really pops forward off of the screen because of the chunky style and all of those different tones were able to achieve. The bonus project for our smooth style, you can see it's the most realistic style out of all of them. We paint the lemons once again, so you can see the differences as we go through the course. Then in bonus project number 2, we take the same rose that we created in the chunky style, the English rose on a black background and we smooth everything out, following a couple different techniques. That just adds to the realism of that rose. In the last style, it's the large stroke style. We paint the lemons one last time. You can see all four styles with the same subjects. Whenever you're painting artwork in the future, you can just look at those different pieces and then decide which one works best for whatever subject you're painting. This is the large stroke style. It's the happy medium between the flat style and the chunky style. It's a more limited palette but we have those really large brush strokes throughout, which lend themselves really well to large petal flowers like the Magnolia in project number 8, or the peony in project number 9. Then we finish everything off with project number 10, we mix all the styles together for our final bouquet. That looks painterly and realistic at the same time. Once again, the link's on screen to that full course. Please enjoy $20 off by using the discount code, SKILLSHAREGOUACHE, all one word. Finally, if you'd like to dive into some of my other Procreate courses here on Skillshare, I have an Intro to Watercolor Florals course, I have a Procreate 5X for Beginners course, which is perfect if you're just getting started with Procreate. I have a Intro to Watercolor Lettering in Procreate class and a 3D Lettering in Procreate class. In order to get to them, just visit my profile or go to skillshare.com/everytuesday and you can see all of them listed there. Finally, don't forget to use our class hashtag when you're posting your artwork on Instagram. It is #procreateit. I would be so appreciative if you could tag me. My handle is everytuesday, so I can send it some love. If you are looking for some free tutorials, every single week, I post a brand new Procreate tutorial over on my YouTube channel. They range from beginner friendly all the way to advanced. I release a brand new one every single Tuesday all year long. You can find my YouTube channel at youtube.com/everytues. If you'd like to pick up some free Procreate brushes and color swatches, I add several of them to my resource library every single month, and you can find that at tuesdaytribe.com. Thanks again for being a part of this class. I'm so grateful that you chose to learn from me and spend some time throughout this class making these really fun projects. I really hope you post on Instagram because I can't wait to see what you make.