Intro to 3D Lettering in Procreate | Teela Cunningham | Skillshare

Playback Speed


  • 0.5x
  • 1x (Normal)
  • 1.25x
  • 1.5x
  • 2x

Intro to 3D Lettering in Procreate

teacher avatar Teela Cunningham, Hand Lettering + Graphic Design

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

18 Lessons (1h 25m)
    • 1. Intro to 3D Lettering in Procreate

      2:00
    • 2. Welcome: Class overview + bonus

      2:14
    • 3. [Beginner Basics] Project: Hello | File setup

      3:12
    • 4. Implementing manual shadows

      9:50
    • 5. Implementing manual extrusions

      3:19
    • 6. [Beginner Basics] Project: Basic | File Setup

      3:14
    • 7. Automated extrusion + long shadow

      6:32
    • 8. Extrusion shading + background glow

      7:35
    • 9. [Beginner Basics] Project: Float | File Setup

      8:24
    • 10. Floating hatch shadows + inline

      3:03
    • 11. Finalizing the layout

      2:48
    • 12. [Beginner Basics] Project: Push | File setup

      4:05
    • 13. Adding subtle highlights + soft inner shadows

      7:54
    • 14. Finalizing the layout

      3:12
    • 15. [Beginner Basics] Project: Stuck | File setup

      4:00
    • 16. Applying warped shadows

      3:39
    • 17. Shadow masking

      6:40
    • 18. Thank You + Next Steps

      2:58
  • --
  • Beginner level
  • Intermediate level
  • Advanced level
  • All levels
  • Beg/Int level
  • Int/Adv level

Community Generated

The level is determined by a majority opinion of students who have reviewed this class. The teacher's recommendation is shown until at least 5 student responses are collected.

2,535

Students

52

Projects

About This Class

If you’re familiar with lettering on an iPad using Procreate, you’ve likely seen the incredible potential now available to hand letterers. Not only can you practice your lettering without wasting paper, you can practice using multiple brushes, textures, blending tools, effects..the list goes on. One of the most eye catching effects is making your lettering appear as if it’s popping off the screen by creating 3D lettering in Procreate.

In this projects-based intro course, we’ll cover the beginner basics of 3D lettering. Even if you don’t have prior iPad lettering or 3D experience, these 5 beginner projects will get you fully prepared for creating advanced projects later on. You’ll learn manual and automated 3D extrusions, long shadows, extrusion shading, floating decorative shadows, debossed and illusion effects, and even a peeling sticker trick.

Not only will you learn how to complete each project step by step with everything explained along the way, you’ll learn how to use a non-destructive workflow and numerous shortcuts and tricks within Procreate you can apply to any iPad lettering you make in the future.

With your enrollment, you’ll also receive a free bonus! The custom monoweight procreate brush we use throughout every project is included so you can follow along exactly.

In order to successfully complete this course, you’ll need the latest version of Procreate installed on an iPad that is compatible with the Apple Pencil.

Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

Teela Cunningham

Hand Lettering + Graphic Design

Top Teacher

Hey! I'm Teela and I help designers + hand letterers build their skillsets to open new creative + financial opportunities. Freebies + tutorials here! > https://every-tuesday.com

See full profile

Related Skills

Graphic Design Creative

Class Ratings

Expectations Met?
  • Exceeded!
    0%
  • Yes
    0%
  • Somewhat
    0%
  • Not really
    0%
Reviews Archive

In October 2018, we updated our review system to improve the way we collect feedback. Below are the reviews written before that update.

Why Join Skillshare?

Take award-winning Skillshare Original Classes

Each class has short lessons, hands-on projects

Your membership supports Skillshare teachers

Learn From Anywhere

Take classes on the go with the Skillshare app. Stream or download to watch on the plane, the subway, or wherever you learn best.

Transcripts

1. Intro to 3D Lettering in Procreate: If you're familiar with lettering on an iPad using Procreate, you've likely seen the incredible potential now available to hand letters. Not only can you practice your lettering without wasting paper, you can practice using multiple brushes, textures, blending tools, effects, the list goes on. One of the most eye-catching effects is making your lettering appear as if it's popping off the screen by creating 3D lettering in Procreate. My name is Kayla and I've been creating iPad lettering ever since the very first iPad Pro became available. Since Procreate and Photoshop are so similar and my background is in graphic design, the tools within procreate clicked immediately for me. I've created dozens of iPad lettering and procreate tutorials and am now I'm taking things even further, showing everything I know about creating 3D effects in procreate. In this project's based intro course will cover the beginner basics of 3D lettering. Even if you don't have prior iPad lettering or 3D experience, these five beginner projects will get you fully prepared for creating advanced projects later on. You'll learn manual and automated 3D extrusions, long shadows, extrusion shading, floating decorative shadows, the Boston illusion effects, and even appealing sticker trick. Not only will you learn how to complete each project step by step with everything explained along the way. You'll learn how to use a non-destructive workflow and numerous shortcuts and tricks within procreate you can apply to any iPad lettering you make in the future. With your enrollment, you'll also receive a free bonus. The custom manulate procreate brush we use throughout every project is included so you can follow along exactly. In order to successfully complete this course, you will need the latest version of procreate installed on an iPad that is compatible with the Apple pencil. So grab your iPad, Apple pencil and a comfy chair, and let's create some 3D lettering in procreate. 2. Welcome: Class overview + bonus: Hello and welcome to the intro to 3D lettering course in Procreate. In this video, I just want to give you a quick class overview what to expect and how to download and install your free bonus. First, what you need for this course, you will need an Apple pencil and you'll need an iPad that's compatible with the Apple pencil. We're not utilizing any pressure sensitivity in this course, so if you don't have an iPad Pro, that's totally fine, but you will need an iPad that's compatible with an Apple pencil. Obviously you'll need the latest version of Procreate installed on your iPad because that's where we're going be working this entire course. The class bonus is this free mono weight brush. It's the same brush that I'm using that you'll see me using an all of the videos. I'm giving it away for free so you can follow along exactly. You can find it. You have to go on your iPad to this URL that you see on screen, every hyphen tuesday dot com slash 3d hyphen skillshare, and then you can pick it up. Once you arrive on that URL, this is what you'll see. First you want to hit the download button right there where it's labeled number one, I'm in the Chrome browser right here on my iPad, and once you hit the download, you'll see at the very bottom and little prompt will pop-up and you just want to tap download when you see that prompt. From there it'll change to open in. I want you to tap that. When you do that, you'll get an option to copy it to Procreate. When you see the little app icon for Procreate, tap on that. This is where you'll find it when you're in Procreate, you want to navigate to your brush library and you may have to go all the way down in your brush categories, there should be a category called imported and you'll see it pop-up right there. That is where to find it once you're in Procreate. Finally, we do have a class hashtag for this course, and it is #3DHUSTLER. If you're posting your work on Instagram, I'd love it if you use this hashtag, and I'd also love it if you tag me, my handle on Instagram is @everytuesday, I'd love to see what you're creating and how you're interpreting all the different lessons within this course. Please use #3DHUSTLER and tag me @everytuesday. That's it for getting started. Let's jump into project number one. 3. [Beginner Basics] Project: Hello | File setup: Welcome to project number 1 in the beginner basic series. In this video, we're going to create our lettering and then implement manual extrusions and manual long shadows. For every project in this course, I am using a screen size document. When you're in your gallery and you create a new art board, just choose screen size or any other size that you'd like. Screen size is the size that I'll be using for all of these videos. I'm going to go create a brand new screen size document right now, this is the final outcome. I'm going to create that new document and then I'll be right back. I've got my screen size document, and I'm going to give you the colors for this video. If you're new on creating color palettes, the way that you do that, is you just come over here to where pallets are, and then just hit plus right here and this will be a brand new palette and you can rename it if you'd like. This is the palette that I've pre-made for this video. I'm going to come over here and give you the individual values. This is the value that we're working off of right here, this hexadecimal. For every project, I'll give you the colors, and I'll give you the hexadecimal for each color that we're using in every individual project. For this one, this is the background color. This is going to be our lettering color, this is our extrusion color, and this is our long shadow color. We're going to start with the background color right here. I'm going to return back to my desk mode, right here. I'm just going to tap on the circle up here, and bring it down and this will fill my background with this color. I'm going to come into my layers right here, and rename this layer background, just so we stay super organized as we work in the class. Tap on the thumbnail, choose rename, and type in background. Now we're going to create our base lettering that we're going to use for our manual extrusions and our long shadow. Create a brand new layer on top of your background layer, tap on the thumbnail, choose Rename, and this one's just going to be called Hello. Now we're going to grab the color for our lettering, so tap on the circle, choose this bright blue color, and then come into your brush library, and locate your monoweight brush. If you haven't downloaded this free monoweight brush that comes with your enrollment to the class, just revisit the video right before this one and I'll show you how to, download it, and access it, and install it, so you can start using it. I'm using the ET monoweight brush for this, and for all videos in the course. I'm just going to increase the size over here up to, about 15 percent, so you can see it really well. I'm just going to write my lettering right on top of here. If you need to reposition your lettering like I do right here, just tap on the cursor icon and then you can move it into place. If you use this green little line that's right here, you can rotate it too, if it's a little bit over or under rotated. So I'm going to keep it a little straighter by doing that. Now I've got my lettering all set. In the next video, we're going to implement manual extrusions. 4. Implementing manual shadows: In this video, we are going to apply a manual extrusion and the next project in this course, I'm going to show you how to automate this process. But I thought it was really important that you understand from a manual perspective how to create and implement these and how these actually work manually and then that way you understand when we go to automate them, what exactly is happening behind the scenes. We're going to do everything manually, for this one, you can choose to use either technique as you work throughout the course, the automation one is obviously much faster, but the manual way is much cleaner. I'm going to show you how to do that right now. For a manual extrusion, we want this to look like it's 3D, so we need to chunk a file and just add some extra weight to it so it's not just flat lettering. In order to do that, we need to make a copy of this lettering, but it needs to be in a different color. I do want to mention right at the beginning of this that I'm not going to be using Alpha lock throughout any video in this course. My background is in graphic design and throughout my formal education, it's always been best to supply as many layers as possible to a client or just for yourself for referencing. The more layers you have, the more opportunity you have to go back and edit or change or just things later on without having to redo things and Alpha lock forces you to put everything on one layer. I don't like the nature of having to flatten and put everything together on one layer. My workflow is very much from a graphic design background, where we may have multiple layers, but we have different items on those layers so you can always edit and adjust and tweak things later on if you ever need to. That is my reason for not using alpha lock if you ever wonder about that throughout the course. All that said, what we need to do now is create a copy of this lettering in a different color, I'm going to show you how I do that. What I do is come into my layers, I'm going to tap on my layer thumbnail and choose "Select." Now the only thing that's selected is my lettering because I selected it right on this layer. Now I'm going to create a new layer right above it, I'm going to hit plus, I'm going to rename this one "extrusion." Tap on it and choose rename. Okay. My lettering is still selected even though I'm on a brand new layer right here. Now we need to grab a different color. I'm going to hit my little color dot up here and I'm going to choose this darker color for my extrusion. I'm going to return back to my layers and on this layer, my extrusion layer, I'm going to tap on the thumbnail once and choose "Fill layer." Now I'm going to fill my selection, which is my "hello" lettering, with this brand new color. I'm going to hit fill layer and you can see now I have a copy of my lettering, but it's in a new color. I know that my extrusion needs to go beneath my lettering. I'm just going to tap and hold and then drag it beneath my original lettering. If I turn off my original lettering, the visibility of it, you can see it's still there, it's just behind it. Now we need to move the extrusion further away from our base lettering. I'm going to tap on my cursor icon right here and just move it down a little bit. This is going to create that 3D look of my lettering right now it's just looks like a drop shadow. But you can already picture if we were to connect the two together, that would create that 3D look. Whenever you're creating a manual extrusion, you actually have to work from the end up to the beginning. We have to start with our long shadow before we can implement our extrusion because as you'll see, as we start painting in our extrusion, it'll become more difficult to create a long shadow later. We want to do are long shadow first and then come back to the extrusion. One thing you need to know is that your long shadow is always based off of the position of your extrusion. We need our long shadow based off of this darker layer, not our top brighter layer so we don't get confused. I'm going to turn off our top layer temporarily, I'm just going to uncheck this to remove the visibility. I realized that this is a lot of information at once, but I promised just follow along, watch the videos, watch the first couple of projects that he was in and all start clicking. What we need to do is create a copy of our extrusion now of the position of our extrusion and this one needs to be in a different color. We're going to repeat the same steps only. This is going to be for a long shadow. I'm going to tap on the extrusion layer to select and whatever is on this layer has been selected, which is just this dark colored lettering. We're going to create a new layer right above it. Tap on the thumbnail to rename it and we're going to call this long shadow. Now we need to grab a color for that, tap on your color circle. We're going to choose the darkest color right here, come back to your layers, tap on the thumbnail and choose "Fill Layer." Now we have our lettering as a darker color. Now our long shadow is always going to appear beneath our extrusion so we need a drag that layer beneath our extrusion. Tap and hold and then drag it beneath your extrusion. Now we need to reposition the long shadow. You can place your long shadow in the same direction as your extrusion but I've always found there to be more visual variety. If you go in the opposite direction of your extrusion, it just changes things up a little bit and makes that 3D pop up the screen effect even more realistic. We're going to select our long shadows, tap on your cursor. Now I'm just going to tabulate over here just a bit. All right. Now we've got our long shadow positioning, we've got our extrusion positioning and we have our original lettering up here. You can see when they're all together, it looks a little confusing, but we're going to make sense of everything in a minute. We're first going to start with painting in our long shadow manually. This part can seem a little complicated, it'll make a lot more sense once we automate this process, but just hang with me right now. Our long shadow is going to be connected to our extrusion layer. But it's hard to see because our extrusion is sitting right on top of it, so if we reduce the opacity of our extrusion, we can see things in what we're doing a little bit better. In order to reduce the opacity of your extrusion layer, just tap on the "N" and now you can reduce the opacity. I'm just going to reduce it down enough where I can see my long shadow beneath it. That looks good, I'm at about 50 percent. Make sure you're still on your long shadow and that you have your dark colors selected and that you're using your monolight brush and I'm going to reduce the size of it just a little bit. Now we want to start connecting the different pieces. This part would connect directly here and if you hold a line, it'll automatically straighten. It takes a couple of seconds, but it all automatically straighten for you and we can fill areas like I know this whole part needs to be filled with my long shadow. If I draw this and connect it, now I can drag my circle over and fill it in right there, so that can speed things up too. I need this bottom point, connect to the same bottom point here. This part needs to be filled in as well as here and here. You can see that I'm getting a little bump the area right here where my extrusion runs into my long shadow and if you want it to be a little bit smoother, just carry this part up. It's nice smooth transition and the same thing here. We can see bumps right there, you can draw all that line to smooth it out. I'm going to speed up the video and go through the rest of this word. Just keep in mind that this is just so you understand how these things work, once we automate this process goes really, really fast. We've got a long shadow all set now and we can increase the opacity back on our extrusion layer. Just slide this all the way back up and you can see it's already making a 3D look right here before we even turn on our top layer. In the next video we're going to draw in our extrusion and we'll finish everything up. I did want to mention if you're brand new to procreate, just a heads up, that's really helpful, if you draw a line that you don't want to be there, a two finger tap on does the previous action, so two finger tap, undo and it's a three finger tap to go back in the future. 5. Implementing manual extrusions: So we're all ready to go with our manual extrusion. So we don't get confused, I'm going to turn off the visibility of our long shadow, and we'll return to that later. So we're going to come back to our extrusion, but we know that the top lettering right here, this nice and bright lettering, it'll be a lot easier to draw in these manual extrusions, if our top layer is a little lighter. So I'm going to hit the "N" over here, reduce the opacity down to about 50 percent, so I can still see through it, and then return to the extrusion layer. We need the extrusion color, so tap on your color circle and choose this color right here. Grab your brush one more time and make sure that we are painting on the extrusion layer. So now, just like we did in the last video, we're going to start connecting the different areas, to make it nice in 3D, and this is one of those areas where it's bumpy right here, so we're just going to follow this along and make it a smoother transition. Once we have our manual extrusion, we can up the opacity of our base lettering so return to your layers palette, tap on the "N" of your base lettering, increase your opacity all the way up, and now we can see that nice extrusion. Now, we can also turn on our long shadow. So if you're long shadow feels a little too dark, which mine definitely does, you can reduce the opacity of that as well. So just tap on the "N" of your long shadow, and just reduce it down to a percentage that feels comfortable to you. I always like going down enough where I'm still creating enough contrast between my other colors, so I'm going to go down to 20 percent right here. So I still have enough contrast, where you can see that it's a shadow, but it's a little more subtle right there. So whenever I'm choosing colors, I typically choose my base lettering color first, and then the extrusion is always a darker shade of my top lettering, and then I choose whatever color I want from my background. Then I base my long shadow off of my background, so I'll make my long shadow a darker color than my background. So you don't always have to go off of one color for the whole thing like this one is, it's all blue, but if you decide to change up colors, that's usually what I keep in mind when I'm choosing my colors. Is I can have a different background color and a different base lettering color. My extrusion works off of my base lettering and my long shadow works off of my background color. So that is how to do manual extrusions and shadows, and if that seemed too long or complicated, hang with me for the next video, and you'll see how fast this process can become. We can really start automating things and making your lettering pop off the screen really quickly. 6. [Beginner Basics] Project: Basic | File Setup: I promised that I would share a much quicker and much easier way to create your extrusions and your shadows in Procreate. In this video, I'm going to show you how fast it can be and how you can really speed up that process. I just felt that it was really important that you understood the main structure of how everything works before we start automating it and introducing all these fancy tricks. In this video, this is the exact outcome that we're going to be creating together. I'm going to show you that trick. We're also going to integrate shading within our extrusions and we're going to add in some back lighting which you can see this nice little glow on the background right here. I'm going to create a screen size document. I'm going to give you the colors and then we'll get started. I've got my screen says document, let me grab those colors. This is our background color, that orange, this is going to be our lettering color, this is our extrusion color, and this is going to be our shadow color. I'm going come back, I'm going to grab that background color and I'm going to drag it on to our board and fill it up. We can label this background, and now we're going to create our lettering layer. I'm going to rename this and just call it "Basic," but obviously, write whatever phrase that you would like to use for your project right here. We're going to grab our lightest color right here. This time I'm going to write on caps just to change it up from script that we did in the last project but whenever I do, all caps I really like turning on the guides in Procreate that way I keep everything straight and the same height. In order to do that, you're just going to click on your wrench, go into Canvas and where it says drawing guide, just toggle that on and then hit edit drawing guide. I like darkening up my guide so you can drag it to whatever color you'd like over here. I usually go dark and you can reduce the grid size right here. I like giving myself a smaller size grid. You can change the opacity too if it's a little too dark for you. Then hit "Done. " Now I'm just going to write out "BASIC, " in all caps. I'm going to make sure I've got my monoweight brush selected right here. I'm going to reduce the size just a little bit. I'm around 20 percent right here for the size. When you're happy, you can turn off your guides. Just hit the wrench and then toggle off Drawing Guide. I actually want to move mine over just a little bit so you can see it a little bit better, and I'm going to drag my I and my C a little closer. That looks good. If you ever want to move any elements separately, all you have to do is hit this little selection icon up here, and then you can just draw the selection, the elements that you want to move. Then you can just grab your cursor right there and then just toggle them or reposition them however you like. We've got everything set up exactly as we need it. Then the next video I'm going to walk you through how to create that extrusion as an automation instead of drawing everything manually. 7. Automated extrusion + long shadow: in this video, I'm going to show you how to do the Automated extrusion and the shadow. The first thing we need to do is make a copy of 'Basic' but in a different color. We're going to come over here, we're going to select our basics, so tap on the Thumbnail to ''Select'', and now just the 'Basic' lettering is selected. You're going to create a brand new layer and you're going to color it, this extrusion color right here. Select that color, return to your Layers Palette, tap on your Layer Thumbnail and choose ''Fill layer.'' Now you can see we've got 'Basic' exactly the same only a different color now. We actually want this underneath our original because it's going to act as an extrusion, so it needs to be behind our original. I'm just going to hold it and drag it behind our original and I'm going to label this 'Extrusion.' In order to do this automation, we need to apply a motion blur onto our extrusion layer. You're going to come over here to our magic wand and you're going to choose ''Motion Blur'' and you're going to drag it diagonally. I'm going to drag it in this direction. I'm going to drag it a fair amount hopefully you can see it on screen here. I'm dragging it about 30 percent for my motion blur and now if I zoom in, hopefully you can see that we need to darken it up obviously because as you motion blur it, you're blurring everything. Everything becomes a lot lighter, so we need to darken those areas up. In order to do that, you're going to come over here to your layer you can see it's all blurry right now and there's two ways you can do this. You can select your layers, so tap on it to ''Select,'' and then tap on it again and choose ''Fill layer'' and you can keep filling it with this color. You can do this a few times. Tap on it, ''Select,'' tap on it again and choose ''Fill layer.'' The other option that you have is selecting it. ''Select'' it and then grab your brush and I've got my ma-noway right here and I'm going to increase the size of my brush all the way up to max and then you can paint over those areas. You want to make sure you get all the areas right here and this will also darken it up. We get the 'B.' All right, I'm going to zoom out a little bit, make sure we got all of the edges. When you're all set, just tap on your "Selection" icon up here, you can see it's got a nice hard line now. Now we want to move this, so this top edge right here lines up with the top edge of our base lettering. You're going to come back to your Layers Palette, make sure you're still on your Extrusion Layer and you're going hit the "Cursor" icon up here and then you're going to move this until it lines up right there. You can zoom in here and make sure everything looks good. I think that's looking pretty good. Yeah. I think we're pretty good here. Now that we have our extrusion, just in the same way as we talked about in the last video, your long shadow is based off of your extrusion versus your base lettering. We're going to use this extrusion layer to create our long shadow now. We need to make a copy of our extrusion, but we need it to be a different color. You're going come back to your Layers Palette, you're going to select your Extrusion Layer, so tap on the Thumbnail, choose, ''Select,'' create a new layer right above it. We're going to color this one the darkest colors, so come to your colors and choose the darkest color right here. Return to your Layers Palette, tap on the Thumbnail and choose ''Fill Layer.'' Now we have that extrusion layer it's a different color now, and we're going to rename this one 'Shadow.' Obviously the shadow needs to go beneath the extrusion layer so you're going to tap on this layer ''Hold'' and then ''Drag'' it right below the extrusion layer, so it's behind there. But now we need to stretch this one out, and we're going to stretch it the opposite direction as what we stretched the extrusion. For the extrusion we stretch it this way 30 percent now we can stretch the shadow this way. Make sure your shadow layer is selected come up here to the Magic Wand, choose ''Motion Blur'' and begin dragging until you can start seeing a noticeably larger. I'm going to go up to 30 percent again right here for my motion blur, release. Now you can introduce the exact same method that we did before. You can either tap on this and choose, ''Select,'' tap on it again, ''Fill Layer'' and you can do this a number of times or you can ''Select'' and then grab your brush and brush in those edges so you can see they're becoming nice and hard. Once you have everything all set, now we need to move this one so this top edge of the shadow aligns with the top edge of our extrusion. We want to move this line to match this pink line right here. I'm going to make sure you sun your Shadow Layer, you're going to hit the Cursor Icon up here and you're going to drag this down until they match up perfectly or as close to perfect as you can get. That looks pretty good. We can zoom in and see. That's looking great and it feels really chunky right now, which makes it a little less believable. You can make your shadow as darker or as light as you would like. I think this is a little too dark, so I'm going to reduce the opacity on it. I'm going to come into my layers, I'm going to hit where the 'N' is and reduce the opacity. I'm going to reduce it down enough where it looks like a shadow, but it's still creating contrast between the other colors that are on my layout. That feels pretty good I'm going go to 20 percent here. The last things that we're going to do is adding in those shadow details to the extrusion components of our piece, which I'm going to talk to you about how I choose those and then how I integrate them in any type of lettering style, and then we'll add in that background glow in the next video. 8. Extrusion shading + background glow: In this video, we're going to apply the shadows to our extrusion layer and then add in that background glow. The first thing we're going to do is add in those shadows to our extrusion layer. Whatever I'm adding in shadows to an extrusion, the main rule of thumb that I keep in mind is I want to go on the underside of my characters. The underside would be the underside of the C right here, or the bottoms, I guess you could say. So the bottom of the C right here, or undersides, same with the I. The S would be down here and up here. Whatever letters you are looking at determine where the underside parts of that letter are and those are the parts that you want to put shadows on. It makes sense if you had light casting down, you wouldn't have the underside be darker than where the light is hitting it, which would be the upper part. If you're having sunlight come from the corner, these top areas are always going to get sunlight and these bottom areas are going to be in shadow. If you always do it on the underside, it's a pretty nice guarantee that things will always look believable. If you want to take things even further later on, to find a light source and then you can determine where the shadows would appear based on where your light source is located. I hope that makes sense. I'm going to show you exactly how I'm going to do this right here. What you want to do is grab your same color as your extrusion right here. Only thing is, we are going to change it to multiply. This is going to be on top of our extrusion layer. So select your extrusion layer, create a new layer above it, and this is going to be extrusion shadows. I'm going to rename this, and then, just tap on the end right here and change the blend mode to multiply. The multiply blend mode blends whatever color you're using into the color that's beneath it. So on top of the extrusion, it makes it darker, multiply always makes things darker. What I want to do is only draw the shadows where the extrusion layer is, I don't want to draw it outside of the extrusion layer. Our little handy trick of tapping on our thumbnail and choosing select because we're only selecting the extrusion here. Now that everything on our extrusion layer is selected, when we go to another layer, anything we draw on this layer will be limited to just the area that's currently selected. If I tap on this, you can see, if I start brushing, I can't brush outside of the extrusion because the extrusion is selected, even though I'm on a new layer, because I selected the extrusion layer first. Hopefully, that makes sense. Let me backtrack a little bit. We're on our extrusion shadows. I'm going to grab my Monoweight brush. I'm going to reduce the size of it because that's way too big, and down to like five percent. We're going to come to the underside of our C right here. Wherever the C transitions from an underside to a side, I always draw an angle and whatever angle you make this, just make sure it's similar to the other angles you draw where those transitions occur. We know that this part of my C is also going to be a shadow. Then I can also just color drop in here if I close the shape up, and drag my coloring. You can see that's the underside of my C. Now, I can do the same thing over here. This is where it's starting to transition, from the bottom part to a side. Now, I can just draw this in as a shape and fill it in. For our I, obviously the underside is just down here. Nice and easy. For S, this would be our underside. I can also get this little shading right here because this would be considered an underside, and then, same thing for here. For this top part of the A, you want to match the same angle you've been using and just draw the angle just like that, and that's how you would do that, kind of weird shape part of the A. Then we'd also do the underside here of the A. Our B is the very last one. This whole part right here would be considered an underside. Once you have all of your shading down on your extrusion layer, you can deselect. Now obviously, this is way too dark, so we can reduce the opacity on it. Just hit the M and reduce your opacity until you're happy. Once again, I just look for something that gives me enough contrast, depends on how bold or how subtle you want your final effect to be. This feels pretty good to me. I'm at 27 percent for my opacity here. As I zoom out, that feels good. Zoom in, see how that feels. Our extrusion shading is all done. Now I just want to show you my trick for adding a background glow to your work, which can really enhance that 3D effect to make it feel even more real. I'm just adding a little bit of back lighting behind your lettering. In order to do that, what I do is, I come to my layers and I go right above my background layer. Select your background layer, hit "Plus" for a brand new layer, and then grab your lightest color. This would be my lettering color right here, or you can use white if you'd like. Then come to your brushes and choose Airbrushing, and choose your soft brush, and you want your soft brush to be really small. So I go down to like three percent. Then you just want to tap on with your finger instead of your Apple Pencil, because if you do your Apple Pencil, sometimes it won't be a perfect circle, and it really helps if it's a perfect circle to begin with. So just tap once and you can see it's really subtle right there. Then grab your cursor icon and stretch it out. I like doing this instead of starting with a big brush because I've noticed that I can get a much more softer glow by doing it this way, by enlarging it versus just painting it nice and big. I like how subtle of an effect I can get and it's really soft the way it blends with the background. I can just position it like that and you can see if I turn it on and off here, just watch behind the lettering. You can see the nice effect that gives. If you want to reduce it even more, you can do that with the opacity, but I like how it looks right here at full opacity. Let me label this glow. So that is our Beginner Basics Project Number 2 on how to automate your extrusion, your shading and adding shadows to your extrusion plus a back light glow behind your final lettering piece. 9. [Beginner Basics] Project: Float | File Setup: In this project, I'll now walk you through my process for creating floating shadows. Floating shadows are shadows that have a separation between your main base lettering and where the shadows are. I'm going to show you how to do a solid one and then we'll add in a little more detail by creating a hatched, floating drop shadow. This is the outcome for beginner basics project number three. I'm going to go ahead and create a brand new document. I'll give you the colors once again and I'm also going to share my tip or my trick for using existing typefaces. If you're not comfortable using your lettering or drawing your own block letters on your own, I'll show you my trick for that too. I've got my screen size document and now I want to give you those colors. This is the background color, the hex for that. This is the lettering color, so another dark gray color. This is what we're going to use for our hatched detail over floating shadow. I also integrated an inline, which we will also go over so this is the color for that. Then I just finish it off by putting on underneath floats so it says float on, and that is the kind of neon green color that I use for that. First, I'm going to walk you through the steps that I take to bring in that existing typeface and we're going to take care of the type first, and then we'll put on that darker background later on, and you'll see how it all comes together. What I want you to do is come out of procreate and go into your favorite browser, and then you're going to go to myfonts.com. Here I am at myfonts.com. This is my favorite website for this kind of trick that I like to take advantage of. I will mention that when I'm using existing typefaces, I always make sure that I've purchased them first. All the typefaces that I use throughout this course, I already own them because I just don't think that it's right to be using them in Procreate if you don't already own them as your own purchase first. I don't want to take away anybody's artwork that I haven't given some credit to. That being said, one of the fonts that I own is called lulo, L-U-L-O, which is what I am using for this project. This is it right here and it's by the yellow design studio. Once again, I own this one so that's why I'm taking the liberty of using it in my project. What you want to do is just type in whatever you want your word to be. I'm using float right here. This is an all caps font. You can see I'm getting all the different variations of it right here. What I do is I zoom in to the one that I want, I want this really thick one right here, and then I'm just going to take a screenshot of it. I've got my screenshot and now I can go back into procreate. All right, so now once I'm in procreate, I'm going to go to Add and I'm going to hit "Insert a photo" and I'm going to grab that screenshot that I just took. This is the screenshot and if you want to make it bigger, you can make it bigger. I like this size right here. We're just going to set that on its own layer right here and then I'm going to create a layer right above it, and this is where we're going to trace over it and use that existing typeface. I'm going to grab this lighter gray color, I'm going to make sure I've got my monoweight selected and that I'm on that new layer, and then I'm just going to trace over it. Let me see, if it's hard to see, you can always reduce the opacity of your screenshot. I'm going to do that so I can see things a little bit better. Then I'm just going to come in here, let me reduce the size of my brush a little bit, and I'm going to trace each letter. Once again, especially for these letters, these block letters, if you just hold your line for a second it'll straighten up and then you can get a perfectly straight line. Unless you want the more hand-drawn look, then you can just free hand the whole thing. Okay, so for Os, you can draw a circle and close it. Obviously that's not perfect, that's okay, but if you hold it, procreate will automatically snap and now I got an oval. But if I tap with one finger, it'll make it perfectly circular and then I can bring it in where I need it to go. Then I can move it a little bit too just by selecting it and moving it down so it's more aligned. Then I can do the exact same thing with the center part of my circle. I'll have to do is draw a circle that's as close as I can get and then just hold it and then it'll snap. That actually looks pretty good, just like that. I'm just going to leave that one like that. Once you have all of your letters traced, then you can just grab your color circle and just drop it into each letter to fill out the color. All right, so once you have your letters all set now you can just delete your screenshot. Just slide it over and choose Delete. Let's label this one Float. Now we're going to talk about floating shadows, the actual shadow that's going to float away from it. I'm going to show you how to do a solid one first and then we're going to use that solid one as a guide for when we create a hatched one. In order to make a floating one first, what you want to do is make a copy of your original lettering. I'm just going to slide this over and choose duplicate. I'm going to grab the bottom one and I'm going to drag it over pretty far so we can get it some nice floating right here, but I'm still overlapping with the original base lettering right here. I'm going to reduce the opacity just so you can see the two a little bit better. The new one, the one that's going to float is the lighter color right there. What we're going to do is define a space in between our base lettering and our floating shadow right here. We need one more layer in between for that. I'm going to select my base lettering, so select it. Then we're going to create a new layer right underneath it. Let's color this a different color just so we can see it. This is temporary, we're going to delete this one. We're just going to use it temporarily. Come back here, it doesn't matter what color you choose for that. We're going to fill the layer and I'm also going to drag this one and I'm going to place this one right in between the two. All right, so that looks pretty good. You want to be exact, you can count the number of taps that you do, and you'll just do half the amount of taps for this new layer as you did for the longer one. Now we've got our three layers right here. What we want to do is wherever this teal colored layer is, we want to delete that from our later floating shadow right here. What we can do, let me zoom out of this, we want to come to our teal layer. We're going to select it, so tap on the thumbnail, choose, Select. Now we can turn this layer off because we have that selection created and we're going to come down here to our shadow layer, this bottom one, and we're going to grab our Eraser tool. I'm going to choose a big hard airbrush for this just so it's really easy to erase everything. Now we just want to erase it away, and there we go. Now I can just deselect everything and we have our floating shadow. So that's how easy it is to make that. Distancing, wherever you place that teal layer that we had right here, that's how much of a space you're going to have between your shadow and your main lettering. I'm just going to label this one solid shadow from here you can either keep that as a solid shadow but in the next video, I'm going to show you how to use it as a guide for your hatched shadow, and then we'll also introduce that inline within all of our letters. 10. Floating hatch shadows + inline: So in this video we're going to use our solid floating shadow as a base for our hatched shadow. If you want to introduce a floating shadow that has a little bit more detail, I love using a hatched shadow for this. So what I'm going to do is first delete this till layer here because we definitely don't need that one anymore. That was just temporary anyway. But we want to put our head shadow above the solid shadow because we're just using that as a template or a guide for where to actually place those hatch details. So I'm just going to create a new layer right above it and we're going to call this one hatched shadow. So we've got our teal color right here and I'm going to go back and grab my monoweight brush right here and I'm just going to zoom in and let's see what sizes this is. That's a pretty good size actually, I'm going to keep that size. That size is about four percent. So when you're drawing a hatch shadow manually, you just want to try and make them as close to the same angle as possible. Obviously, that's impossible to do that consistently throughout, but just do the best you can. It's part of the handmade feel of everything that you're doing, which is really charming and really wonderful. It's one of my favorite parts of iPad lettering. So I'm just going to come through and the best you can keep a similar distance and a similar angle and you're just going to use that initial solid floating shadow as your guide and just move around all of your letters. So I'm going to speed up the video and I'll be back after I finish this. So once you have all your hedge details now you can turn off your solid shadow layer right here, and you're left with your floating hatch shadow, which looks pretty nice. Then the next thing we want to do is add in those inline details, which just punches up our layout a little bit. If you want to add a little extra detail in addition to your hatched floating shadow. So I'm going to create a new layer right above my float layer. I'm going to label this one inline and I'm going to grab my tan color right here, make sure I still have my monoweight brush. Then for each one of these, you just want to draw a line in the middle of the letter and just go through each of your letters, drawing your lines in. So now we have our inline details, and in the next video, we're going to finish this off by putting in our background. We're going to draw in some doodles and add in the little text right below this. 11. Finalizing the layout: So we're going to finish this up in this video. So the first thing we want to do is bring in that background color. So we're going to come all the way to the bottom, create a brand new layer, and make sure it's just sitting above your background right there. We're going to select our darkest color, and then just color-drop using your little circle right here, and drag it onto the background, and now you can see everything is starting to pop and really come forward because of all the contrast between these colors. So the next thing I like to do is add in some doodles. This is totally optional. I just like making the layout feel a little bit more energized, and less static especially when you're using an existing typeface that's a little blockier. It's nice to add in a little personality for extra contrast. So I'm going to grab my tan color, one scan. Actually let me label this as my background. In these doodles are going to be just above the background. So I'm going to create a brand new layer right there. I'm going call this one doodles, and make sure I've got my motto way, and going to reduce the size of this slightly because I don't want it to compete with my text, and then I just like drawing in some freehand doodles. These ones anybody can do. I just draw a really simple foliage. So those are my doodles, and I want the exact same doodles that I have on this side, on the other side. So in order to do that, you're going to come over to your layers. You're going to duplicate your layer, and then select that duplicated layer. Then you want to flip it horizontally. So down here, just choose, "Flip horizontal", Then if you choose magnetics right here, and slide it, it'll keep it nice and straight. It'll give you a line to keep it straight. So I'm going to about here with this, and that looks pretty good. Then I'm just going to take it off the magnetics. So the next time I use this, it's not automatically magnetizing to everything, and then we're all set with that. Then the last thing we're going to do is just add in our text at the bottom. So I'm going to come over here, create a brand new layer, and call this one on, and grab that bright lime color right here. I'm going to increase the size of my brush just slightly, and then just draw that on. So that is our project for beginner basics, project number three, I'm creating floating hatched drop shadows. 12. [Beginner Basics] Project: Push | File setup: This is our next beginner basics project. This is what you would refer to as a d-past type of effect where it looks like you're pushing in into the paper because the highlight in that soft shadow really tricks your eye into believing that something's being pushed in versus extruding out. This is the final outcome of our projects. I'm going to once again create a brand new screen size document. I'm going to give you the colors and then we're going to get started. There are actually only three colors that we're going to be using for this project and if I go to value, this is going to be the background color, it's also actually going to be the color of our text. This is going to be our highlight, and this is going to be our shadow color and once again, I'm going to be grabbing an existing typeface for this one. Existing typefaces or if you want to create your own block here text work really well for this type of effect. That's why I'm going to grab those. I'm going to go back to my fonts and grab some text. For this one, I'm going to use actually a free font called novecento. There it is. We're going to take them and push right here, and this is the font that we want this novecento sans. Just make sure if you're using the free version, that you find the free version right here, unless you own it, in which case, use whatever you want. You can see right here, this novecento sans wide bold is the one that I want to use. Right now I've got an uppercase and then small caps. It's actually a golden rule with graphic design not to pair uppercase and small caps. I want to make sure I fix that up here and make these all uppercase or all lowercase. Let's come back down here and see what that looks like. This is the one that we want right here. I'm just going to take a screenshot of that and then go back into procreate and grab it. We're back in procreate, hit the wrench, go to insert photo and grab that image. I'm going to scale this up a little bit. If you want to make sure that you're straight and not add an angle, a nice little trick is bringing in your guides once again. If you come to the wrench and go to Canvas and choose drawn guide and then edit drawing guide so you can see things a little bit better. I'm going to darken up my grid and reduce the size of it. This is really nice to give you an idea of how angled your letters are. I like turning it on when I need to make sure something is straight. When you enlarge like this, it's really easy to tweak it at an angle. That looks better. If you grab the green node up here or you can also rotate it slightly too if you need to make any further adjustments. That looks good. Now I can turn off that guide I don't need it anymore. I'm going to reduce the opacity and this one just slightly and once again, we're just going to trace over it. We're going to use this first color right here for our lettering. I've got my monitor way brush or reduce the size of it way down and outline these letters and put them on a new layer. Remember do that. So rename push. I'm going to outline these and fill them and then I'll be back. I got my letters all outlined. I'm going to delete my screenshot now and just fill in my letters. We've got our letters all set. We've got our file setup. In the next video, we're going to bring in those highlights and the soft shadows and then we'll finish everything off in the last video. 13. Adding subtle highlights + soft inner shadows: In this video, we're going to bring in those highlights and those shadows that really bring this effect to life. The first thing you want to do is select your text. Tap on the Thumbnail, Select and we're going to create a new layer right above our text and this is going to be our highlight layer. I'm actually going to rename this right now and we're going to color it a nice and bright purple pinkish color right here. Grab that color comeback and then just tap on that thumbnail and choose Fill layer. This is great. We've got our bright color here but we only want a slim edge of it to show that it's a highlight. In order to do that, we're going to do something really similar to what we did with our floating shadows in the previous video. What you want to do is create a temporary other layer right above it. I'm actually going to replicate my bottom layer. Just push the original lettering layer so I'm just going to slide it over and choose Duplicate and I'm going to drag it right above my highlight layer. Just hold it and then drag it above. Now this one's on top of it and then I'm just going to nudge it to the left slightly to reveal that highlight. In order to do that, you're just going to grab your cursor, make sure this top Push is selected. Now I'm going to do is tap a few times because we want this to be a very, very subtle shift because we want a really fine line right there. I'm just going to tap it over a few times until I start seeing that highlight being revealed and I'm actually going to bring it down a little bit too, so I get a nice little highlight up at the top. In the same way that we removed the extra layer from our floating shadow in the last video, we're going to do the exact same thing here. We're going to select this top Push. Tap on it, choose Select, so that is selected. Now we can hide it. We're going to return to our highlight layer and we're just going to erase that away. Grab your eraser and just erase away and that will reveal that highlight. We're all set right there. Right now you can see we've got our lettering and we've got our highlight but there are a few areas that got clips because of our little nudging. I typically just go back in. Make sure you're on your highlight layer. We can delete this layer now that we don't need it. I'm on my highlight layer and I've got my bright color selected and I'm going to choose my mono way and just bring it way, way down and just fill in some of these areas. If you don't mind them having little gaps here and there, then just move on ahead with your layout, but I'm a stickler for these little details, so I'm just going to fill these in really quick. All right, so we're all set with our highlight and now it is time to drop in our shadow. For the shadow, it's going to be very similar to what we just did. We're going to select our original layer here, this push layer. Tap on it to select, create a brand new layer above it and this time it's going to be this really dark purple. Select the purple, come back to your layers. This one we're going to label shadow. Tap on it and choose Fill layer. For this one we just need a little bit showing on the left and on the bottom. We're going to do the exact same thing that we just did before. We're going to replicate this bottom one right here. Just drag it over, choose Duplicate, and then drag that copy right above the shadow layer and now we're going to nudge it the opposite direction that we did the highlight. A little bit this way, and a little bit up. I'm actually going to change the blend mode on this to multiply for the shadows, so come to your shadow layer, hit where the N is and change it to Multiply and this will darken it up. If we zoom in really close right here, you can see where that shadow is beginning to appear, and that's looking good. I'm going to leave that just like that, and now we can delete the part that we don't need. You're going to come over to your top push, you're going to select it. Tap on the thumbnail, choose Select, uncheck it so we're going to hide it. Return to your shadow layer and now we're going to delete that selection away. Now we just need to soften up this shadow. Right now it's a pretty hard shadow and you can see we've got some gaps again, so we can fill those in as long as we're here. I've got my brush selected and I'm just going to fill in these areas on the H and the P. Now what we want to do is just soften the shadow a bit because your shadow is going to be a lot softer than you're highlight on this. What I'm going to do is actually add a motion blur on it. Just make sure that your shadow layer is selected. We don't need this top push layer anymore, I'm just going to delete that to clean up our file. I've got my Shadow layer selected. I'm going to come over to my magic wand and choose Motion blur and I'm just going to stretch it just a little bit to create that nice shadow right there. That looks good. Let me see for how far that went. That was about a nine percent to 10 percentage motion blur. Now if we zoom out, let's see. All right, that's looking good. Everything looks really good inside of our letters, but you can see we've got some stragglers that are hanging outside of our letters that we don't need. This is where a clipping mask would come in and a clipping mask takes whatever's on your top layer, the shadow in this case, and it masks it or locks it inside of another layer. All these edges will be excluded because it's going to be locked inside of our base letter right here. I'll show you what that looks like. You can watch the S as it happens. When it come to our layers and where the shadow is, you're just going to tap on it and choose Clipping mask. You want make sure that whatever shape you're locking inside of another shape, that the shape that you want to lock inside of it is right below it. If this push were like a few layers down, it's not going to work because your clipping mask is always directly tied to what's exactly underneath it. I wanted my shadow to be locked into my base lettering, which is my push lettering right here. Layer order is really important when you're using clipping mask, but now you can see if I release this clipping mask, it comes right back out. But if I apply the clipping mask, it locks it right inside of this shape or this layer right here. All of this is looking good, but now we need to bring it to life. I'm going to add in the background color. The reason why we kept everything on white right now is because our main lettering is the same color as our background to create this effect. If we had the background color, it would be really hard, if not impossible, to see our base lettering since they're the same color. That's the reason why it stayed white this whole time. I'm going to create a new layer up here and then I'm going to drag it all the way to the bottom, and then label this one background. Now we can just grab the same color as our lettering and drag it to our background and now you can see that effect. But it plays with your eyes quite a bit whether or not it's pushing in and pushing up. But we're going to add in some extra details around this in the next video to finish it all off. 14. Finalizing the layout: All right, so we're right where we left off from the last video, and we're just going to add in some final details just to make it a little more believable, that we're pushing in instead of pushing up. One nice way to do that is to introduce that background lighting or the background glow that we used in our basics video. I'm going to come over here where a background layer is, create a new layer right above it and I'm going to grab our brightest color and we're going to use that trick again. In order to do it, you just want to come over to your brushes. You want to come to airbrushing and then choose soft brush, and you want to make sure it's kind of small. This is a good size right here at around 3 percent, and you're just going to tap with your finger once, so it's nice and tiny, and now we can make this nice and big right behind the push. We're going to give us that nice highlight right here, and it's a little bright so we're going to reduce the opacity on it just so it's nice and subtle, and I'm going to label this glow. All right, so that's looking good, and actually, you know, what I noticed is I think I want my shadow to be even blurrier right here, just make it a little more believable as a shadow. I'm going to come back to my shadow layer, and since it's already mast into our pushed lettering as a clipping mask, we can do whatever we want to and it's going to stay exactly where it's at within these letters unless we move it around so I can increase my shadow really easily with a gaussian blur. I'm just going to do that and I'm going to drag it a little bit and get a nicer, subtler shadow. That's feeling good, and I'm actually going to reduce the opacity a little bit on this as well. That feels really good, and now we're going to add in our final lettering. I'm going to come all the way to the top, I'm going to add another layer. I'm going to label this, just lettering, and then I'm going to use my brightest color so we can see it really well. Grab my [inaudible] brush and then just add some lettering around it, and this just anchors everything together. I'm actually going to move like always and reduce the opacity just a little bit. That concludes our project of creating some deburst lettering using a clipping mask where we brought out some tricks with a fine line highlight on the edge, and then that blurred shadow as well, and also utilizing the same color lettering as our background, which really enhances that effect of being pushed right into the surface. 15. [Beginner Basics] Project: Stuck | File setup: In this project, we're going to be creating some sticker lettering. It looks like our lettering is stuck to a page, but it's lifting up just like a sticker wood. We make this really believable with some handy tricks with our shadow. You can see that the shadows distorted right here and it makes it believable that your lettering is lifting up and you can see that it disappears completely at the base of this lettering. We've also integrated a tricolor Ambre or gradient effect. You can see we've got a nice highlight up at the top, a middle-ground color, and then we've got some dark color at the bottom where it's a fixed to the surface before it's starting to lift up where the color is much lighter. Once again, I'm going to create a screen size document and then I'm going to give you all the colors and we'll get started. Jumping over to these colors, we're only using three colors for this one, which makes it super easy. This is our background color, the hex for our background. This is our main lettering color, and this is a highlight color that we're going to be using. Alright, so we're just going to drag in our background color to start things off. We'll label this one background. Now we're going to create our lettering layer. I'm going to label this one stuck. Am going to grab middle color, this teal color right here, I'm also going to grab the mono-weight brush, and I'm going to make the size large so you can see it really well on screen. I'm just going to letter out stuck. I've got my lettering. I'm going to make it a little more centered here so we can see it really well. The first thing we're going to do, is apply that Ambre or that try gradient effect. In order to do that, my method is selecting your lettering. Just tap on your layer thumbnail to select. Gesture lettering is selected and then create a new layer right above it, and now we're going to grab our light color right here. We're going to set this blend mode to overlay, so blends really nicely into what's underneath it, but acts as a highlight. We're going to choose ''Overlay'' right there and we're going to grab a soft brush for this because we want that to be really, really subtle, that gradient as it goes from one color to the next. We're going to hit ''Airbrushing,'' and grab our soft brush, and we're going to make it pretty big. You can see when we start painting up here, we're getting a soft highlight up at the top. I actually think I can go even larger here. Let's go a little larger. You can see how nice and bright it is up at the top. If you ever wonder what your layers looking like, just come over here and you can see you where I've painted the white right up here. Now we just need to add a little darkness to the bottom of our lettering. I'll label this one highlight. Now we're going to do the dark part of our gradient. Our base lettering is still selected right here, so we can utilize that while we're here. We want to create a brand new layer. Tap on your original lettering layer, create a new layer right above it, we're going to label this one dark gradient. We're going to change the blend mode on this one and multiply. Whatever is underneath it, it's going to blend in a dark way. Whereas overlay blends in a light way, multiply blends in a dark way. I'm going to tap on the N and hit multiply. We're going to choose the exact same color as our lettering. But since we have a multiply blend mode apply to it, it's going to appear darker. Once again, I'm using the soft brush in a mine, my brand new dark gradient layer. I'm just going to paint down here and you can see how it's getting darker at the bottom. But I still want to make sure that I'm getting some middle ground color right here, which it looks like I am. That is our tricolor gradients. We're all set so we can de-select now. Everything's looking really good. In the next video, we're going to create that distorted shadow. 16. Applying warped shadows: In this video we're going to create those work shadows. Since the shadow is coming off of our lettering, we need to create some dark lettering that is exactly the same as this. We're going back to tricks we've already utilized in past videos. We're going to select our lettering. Select it, and then we're going to make a copy of it underneath it that's a different color. We're going to tap on our background, create a new layer right above our background. We're going to label this shadow. We're going to select our darkest color, which is this background color, but it's not going to show up on the same colored backgrounds, so we need to change the blend mode of this layer. So tap on the, 'N,' change it to, 'Multiply,' so it'll appear darker, and now we're going to fill this. Tap on your thumbnail, and choose, 'Fill Layer.' Now, if I turn off my original lettering, you can see it's dark right underneath it, so we're all good to go there. Now we need to distort our shadow. In order to do that, make sure it's selected, and then select it up here. Now, down here, you wanted to choose warp. When you do this, you can drag these individual components of this grid to warp your shadow into the shape that you'd like it to be. If I grab this corner node right here and I drag it slightly, you can start seeing that shadow appear pulled in this direction. I want to keep pulling all these top sections in the same direction, in the same amount as this one. I'm looking at the curve of this line, and I'm dragging this one in a very similar curve, so everything is consistent. All right that's all you want to do here. If you touch anything down here, it's going to start dragging it off of the bottom and we want our shadow to match up with our bottoms, because it's starting to lift up and will lose that effect if we drag these other parts of our grid. We only want to touch this top section of our grid. I actually think I'm going to make my curve a little less severe here. Once you're happy with your warp, on your shadow, you're going to deselect it. Now it's come in nice and close, and now we want to blur our shadow to make it even more believable that the shadow has a decent distance from where our lettering is lifting up. Once again, we're still on our shadow layer right here. Then you're going come to your magic wand, you're going to choose, 'Gaussian Blur,' and you're just going to increase this until it feels nice and believable as a shadow. I'm at about 12 percent right there, and that feels pretty good. If I zoom out, that's all looking great. The only problem with this is, is down here, you can see that some of this shadow is peeking through. We don't want any shadow peeking through down here, because this is the part of our lettering that is still stuck to the surface. This is the part that's pulling up, so it makes sense that we have a shadow that's lifting off of our lettering but down here where it's still stuck to the surface, there shouldn't be any shadow because it's still stuck. In order to remove those in a believable way, we're going to apply a layer mask. In the next video, I'm going to walk you through the basics of layer masking in Procreate, and then you can see it in action. It's a really handy tool that you'll be able to utilize in all of your work moving forward in Procreate. It's something I use all the time. I want to make sure I take the time in an additional video to explain it and then show how it works. 17. Shadow masking: We're going to finish this off in this video. At the end of the last video I talked about Layer Masking. I want to talk about that first and then we will mask or shadow and then we'll finish off our layout right here. First of all, I have a full video on masking in Procreate. I will leave a link right below this video to that video, if you want some more information. But I'm going to summarize what I talk about in that longer form video right here. When it comes to masking, it's a non-destructive form of editing. What that basically means is wherever you would normally erase something away, you can mask it away, which is basically hiding it temporarily. When you erase something, it's destructive editing because once it's erased, you can't get it back unless you redraw it and then you're trying to match up lines, especially with lettering that can be really difficult. When you mask something instead of erasing it, you're hiding it, so you're putting a mask on it. You can always bring it back later, you don't have to redraw it. The way that works is by using black and white and what you always want to remember when you're masking is, "Black conceals and white reveals." When you apply a mask to a layer, whenever you paint in black on that mask, you're hiding elements of that layer. Whenever you paint in white, you're revealing those previously masked areas. I'm going to show you exactly what that looks like, because I know that can be really confusing, but this is such a powerful tool. I promise it's worth experimenting really understanding how it works, because it'll save you so much time in the long run and your files will be far more workable and easier to edit later on. I use it all the time when I'm adding flourishes or foliage details to my lettering, that I want to overlap or under lap certain elements, super, super powerful. Just take my word for it, please don't give up on it, even if it sounds a little confusing right now. What I want to do is, I want to apply a layer mask to the shadow. Because I want this bottom part of the shadow to disappear. But I don't want to erase it, because if I accidentally raise up into here, then I need to start all over again. In order to do that, we're going to come to our Shadow layer right here. You're going to tap on it and choose Mask. You can see right now it's all white, which means everything is revealed because white reveals. Anywhere that I paint in black on this mask, black conceals, so it will hide portions of the shadow. Whenever you apply a Layer Mask to a layer, it's tied directly to that layer. These two are linked. Whatever I do on this layer mask, is directly affecting whatever layer it's linked with. When you're using a layer mask, your painting in either black or white and you're using a brush. I've got my brush right here, and I want a soft brush because I want to very softly hide this bottom part of my shadow. So I need to paint in black instead of white. If I come over here to my white, let me get back to my disc, I can get true black by just double tapping down here and it'll grab true black, which is exactly what I need. I've got my brush. I'm making sure that my Layer Mask is selected. If my Shadow were selected it would look like this. This is my Layer Mask selected. Now if I paint very lightly on the bottom parts of these letters, you can see that my shadow has disappeared. That dark shadow is gone, but it still remains up here. You can see that it's actually disappearing a little bit up here because my brush was so big. If I want to bring that back, because now I've got too much that's disappearing right here, I can just paint in white instead. I can double tap where the white is and you can see on my layer and this is what my mask looks like. This is where I painted in black. If I'm painting in white now I've got my brush, I got white and I'm making sure my Layer Mask is still selected, if I paint here, you can see that it brings it back. I can paint over here and make sure all of my shadows that I want to appear are appearing. My brush was definitely too large when I began masking, so I'm going to reduce the size of it and just remove these bottom areas that I don't need anymore. I'm going to come back over here, double-tap on the black. I've got true black selected. I'm still on my Layer Mask and I just want to make sure that these areas don't have any shadow on them. You can see how powerful this is. I'm not redrawing any shadows, I'm just hiding it and revealing it using black and white. You can see how nicely that works out. I can always come back and forth. If I got rid of a little too much, I can always paint in white later on to bring it back. That's looking really good. We've got our shadow gone from the bottom part, but we still have it nice and distorted up here to give this effect that it's peeling off. Just to finish everything off, we're going to add some extra back lighting just to bring everything forward. Down here, I'm going to select my Background layer, create a new layer above it. I'm going to grab my lightest color right here. I've got my soft brush selected. I'm just going to tap once on here. Actually, I'm going to reduce the size of that first and then I'm going to tap once, and then I'm going to select it. I still have Warp selected down here, so make sure you change this back to Freeform and then you can stretch it out just the way you're used to. I'm going to make this nice and soft and big. Obviously this is way too bright right now, so I'm going to reduce the Opacity, just so it's not so strong. I just want this nice and subtle and that's looking really good. I'm going to label this glow. That finishes up our beginner basic series and you can see we've got all of our shadow gone right here and we can also see where everything is a little easier now that we've got that glow back there. I might remove a little bit of my shadow right here, so I can always come back to my Layer Mask. It's already on black and I can just take a little bit more of that away if I want. That is how to create a sticker peeling effect with your lettering. 18. Thank You + Next Steps: That's our course intro to 3D lettering in procreate. In this video I just wanted to share next steps and where you can take your 3D lettering following this course. First I want to invite you to take your 3D. I have had lettering even further within the full course. This was just the intro course, so it just covered the beginner basics lessons. The full course has six advanced lessons that allow you to combine the effects that you've already learned and also add in brand new ones. You can see the URL to the full course if you'd like to check out the full details of that course right on screen Every -Tuesday.com/3D- procreate. What you get with the full course are six advanced projects, this is what those projects look like, so you can see there's a bunch of different effects and styles to really punch up your lettering and take it even further and also begin including some textures as well. You will also receive the 11 original procreate project files, all the beginner basic projects that we just walked through, you will get their original procreate files from the video tutorials that you watch in addition to the six advanced projects, you'll also receive a free procreate gold foil texture. For those texture projects, you'll have that free foil texture that you can use and include in those projects.You will also have a lifetime access to the course it's a onetime purchase and you can watch the course as many times as you'd like whenever you'd like, you will always have access to the full version of the course. You will also receive unlimited updates unlike the Skillshare version as procreate evolves over time if I add in any new projects, you'll get them all for free within the full course. Finally, because you took this version of the course on Skillshare, I want to offer you a $20 discount. Once again, you can visit the full course that URL is onscreen and just make sure you use the code 3DSkillshare. It's all one word at checkout and you can receive that $20 off the full course and really dive in to those advanced projects, dissect the procreate project files, pick up that free gold foil texture, and always have access to the course. Finally, remember to go grab your bonus. Visit the very first video in this course on where and how to download your free monoweight procreate brush. If you haven't started following along with the projects yet, make sure you grab that free brush before you begin creating the projects, it'll be super helpful. We have a class hashtag. Remember if you are posting on social media, I'd love it if you use the hashtag 3Dhustler and please tag me, my handle is @EveryTuesday on Instagram, I would love to see what you make and how you interpret these projects. I also have a bunch of iPad lettering and free procreate tutorials over on my website. You can view those over at Every-Tuesday.com. Once again, thank you so much for being a part of this intro course. I hope you've enjoyed it and learned something new. I can't wait to see what you make.