Implementing eDiscovery in SharePoint: The Complete Course

Syed Raza, Web Developer | Entrepreneur-CEO www.claydesk.com

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26 Lessons (3h 28m)
    • 1. Meet your instructor & Course agenda

      5:43
    • 2. What's in it for me?

      6:07
    • 3. Important e-Discovery terminology

      5:47
    • 4. Office 365 Dashboard

      9:51
    • 5. Office 365 Overview

      5:41
    • 6. Login into Office 365

      3:04
    • 7. Adding users

      10:27
    • 8. Introduction to Exchange

      5:43
    • 9. Exchange admin center - Overview

      10:42
    • 10. Compliance center

      17:09
    • 11. Creating e-Discovery case

      12:27
    • 12. Compliance permissions

      5:51
    • 13. Compliance search

      6:48
    • 14. Exchange auditing functionality

      6:05
    • 15. Placing legal hold

      7:02
    • 16. All about data loss prevention (DLP)

      10:48
    • 17. Journaling

      4:50
    • 18. Retention policies

      8:35
    • 19. Introduction to SharePoint

      7:23
    • 20. SharePoint admin center

      9:22
    • 21. Site collections and e-Discovery center

      10:09
    • 22. Admin user profiles

      6:31
    • 23. Records management

      8:32
    • 24. Apps and term store

      6:13
    • 25. Creating new cases using SharePoint

      5:01
    • 26. Creating queries

      12:05

Project Description

Create a new SharePoint Site

When you create a SharePoint site, it helps to understand where your site is in the hierarchy. The following three SharePoint concepts are important ones to know:

  • Top-level Web site    The default, top-level site provided by a Web server. To open the top-level Web site, you supply the URL of the server — for example, http://My_server — without specifying a page name or subsite. Administrators go to this site to change settings for the entire site collection.

  • Subsite    A complete Web site stored in a named subdirectory of the top-level Web site. Each subsite can have administration, authoring, and browsing permissions that are independent from the top-level Web site and other subsites. A subsite can also have subsites of its own. Because every site below the top-level site is actually a subsite, each subsite is generally called simply a site. To open a subsite, you supply the URL of the server and any subsites — for example, http://My_server/My_site — without specifying a page name.

  • Site collection    A set of Web sites on a Web server, all of which have the same owner and share administration settings. Each site collection contains exactly one top-level Web site, and can also contain one or more subsites. There can be multiple site collections on each Web server.

Main Task:

Create a new SharePoint site.

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