Illustrate a Dystopian City Using Traditional Painting Techniques and Cinema 4D | Pete Maric | Skillshare

Illustrate a Dystopian City Using Traditional Painting Techniques and Cinema 4D

Pete Maric, Designer | Cinema 4D Expert | Founder, Triplet 3D

Illustrate a Dystopian City Using Traditional Painting Techniques and Cinema 4D

Pete Maric, Designer | Cinema 4D Expert | Founder, Triplet 3D

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15 Lessons (1h 33m)
    • 1. Introduction

      1:19
    • 2. Brushstrokes

      4:02
    • 3. Color and Materials

      5:04
    • 4. 3D Modeling

      8:12
    • 5. Background City

      11:43
    • 6. Pyramid

      4:37
    • 7. Composition

      9:20
    • 8. Details

      7:51
    • 9. Birds

      2:53
    • 10. Lighting

      5:50
    • 11. Rendering

      4:06
    • 12. Post Production 1

      11:15
    • 13. Post Production 2

      11:45
    • 14. Conclusion

      0:26
    • 15. Bonus Lecture

      4:18
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About This Class

Welcome to this course on Illustrating a Dystopian City Using Traditional Painting Techniques and Cinema 4D.

In this series of lessons we will cover a lot to give you a solid understanding of the creative and technical steps of combining traditional and 3D illustrative techniques. The topics that will be covered include:

01. An overview of the process used to create your own custom-crafted brushstrokes using traditional painting methods.

  • Discussion of painting materials and mediums.
  • Discussion of negative and positive space when creating the initial brushstrokes with variations.
  • Scanning in Adobe Photoshop.
  • Curves in Photoshop and applying the adjustments to all the brush scans.

02. Adding the painted brushstrokes to materials in Cinema 4D and applying them to 3D models.

  • Establishing a color scheme to use throughout the work.
  • Overview of Adobe Color.
  • Creating materials in Cinema 4D using the brushstrokes as the basis.
  • Creating bump and alpha channels and adjusting the alpha for a cleaner look.
  • Reusing the materials to create color variations.

03. 3D Modeling the elements that make up the dystopian city.

  • Creating parametric primitives and adjusting the material projection using the texture tool.
  • Creation of random spheres using the MoGraph Cloner, effectors and fields.
  • 3D modeling the buildings using simple parametric primitives, the make editable function, additional modeling tools and the use the MoGraph Cloner.
  • Creating the pyramid using a MoGraph Cloner, Cube and Volume Effector and adjusting the overall shape. 
  • Creating the details of wires, pipes and coils using Sweep NURBS and cloners.
  • Creating the birds using a cissoid spline, rectangle spline and Sweep NURBS. Scattering the birds with MoGraph and random effector.

04. Establishing a solid composition using the rule of thirds and leading the eye to the main focal of the image.

  • Render settings and output dimensions.
  • Camera settings and using the composition tab’s grid setting.
  • Discussion of the rule of thirds.
  • Placing the foreground, mid-ground and background elements within the scene for a balanced composition.
  • MoGraph selection and hide selection functions.

05. Lighting the Scene.

  • The use of the environment tool, creating fog, and adjusting the fog’s color and distance settings.
  • Using omni lights and adjusting the color, visible light and shadow settings. 

06. Rendering

  • Creating compositing tags and object buffers for all the main geometry of the scene.
  • Set-up multi-pass layers within the render settings.
  • Set-up the Cel Renderer effect and export outlines and edges as separate passes.
  • Set-up the Sketch and Toon effect and export as a separate pass.

07. Post-production workflows in Adobe Photoshop.

  • Organization of multi-pass layers and channels.
  • Compositing cel renders and sketch and toon into the multi-pass file and setting the proper blend modes.
  • Layer masks and non-destructive editing of details.
  • Painting light effects and using the channels for quick selections.
  • Painting radiating light and using the channels for quick selections.
  • Quick mask mode, painting details for emphasis and visual impact.
  • Repurposing the brush patterns for added detail, composition, grunge and dirt.
  • Adding people with a discussion of various free and paid resources for creating entourage.
  • Curves adjustments and refining the overall look/feel of the work.
  • Painting additional detail using the brush tool.
  • Adding glows and highlights to emphasize the main focal of the image.

08. Bonus Lecture

  • Tips and tricks for working efficiently.
  • Creating custom assets.
  • Using Cinema 4D’s content browser to save your creations for use in later projects.
  • Repurposing content for future work and variations on a theme.

Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

Pete Maric

Designer | Cinema 4D Expert | Founder, Triplet 3D

Teacher

Pete Maric founded Triplet 3D in Cleveland, Ohio in 2013, with the goal of creating a 3D studio that can bring together a wide range of skill sets and experience to deliver inventive, high quality work to clients.

He graduated from The Cleveland Institute of Art before working for three of the top 50 retail design firms in the US. In 2001, he began working independently in the architectural industry and worked with brands such as Adidas, Nintendo, and Everlast. His work has been featured in the Adobe Illustrator WOW! books, Photoshop User Magazine, Architecture in Perspective, Cleveland Magazine and House Trends.

Since 2008, he's been developing his CGI expertise, and teaches modeling and 3D animation at The Cleveland Institute of Art and Tri-C Community College.

Ch... See full profile

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Transcripts

1. Introduction: Welcome to this course on creating a dystopian city using traditional painting techniques and cinema 4D. In the series of lessons, we will cover a lot to give you a solid understanding of the creative and technical steps of combining traditional and 3D illustrated techniques. The topics that will be covered include an overview of the process used to create your own custom crafted brushstrokes using traditional painting methods. Turning your paint brush strokes into materials and cinema 4D and applying them with 3D models. 3d modeling the elements that make up the Dystopian cities, such as parametric primitives, buildings, pyramids, wires, birds, and the use of MoGraph cloners. How to establish a solid composition using the rule of thirds and leading the eye to the main focal of the image. Lighting using visible omni lights and environment fog, multi-pass rendering using the standard render, cell render and Sketch and Toon, post-production workflows and Adobe Photoshop covering compositing, painting glows, lighting, and effects for enhanced visual impact. Ready learn the methods for creating a dystopian city using traditional painting techniques and cinema 4D enroll today on Skillshare. 2. Brushstrokes: Welcome to this course. The very first thing we're going to start doing is creating some brushstrokes. So for this, all I did was I used some very inexpensive printer paper. I use inexpensive paints that I had laying around my studio and a brush. So basically you could use whatever you want for this. You can use oils, you're going to use gouache, you can use watercolor, any other kind of ink. You know, it's, it's really up to you. So you don't really need anything expensive here. You don't have to go out to the art supply store and get anything special for this course. Basically anything that you have laying around is going to work for this portion of it. So again, I started with a blank sheet of paper. It's just plain printer, printer paper. And I went through and I created a whole bunch of variations of brushstroke. So what I'm thinking really is just a variety of different patterns. On some of these, I went edge to edge, I love. I let some of the brushstrokes kinda hanging out to add a little bit of negative space. On some of these, I left more negative space than others. And just kinda went through, you know, and just let the brush stroke look like it's gestural, has a little bit of movements, has negative and positive space. And each one of these, and just play around until I came up with, you know, four or five different variations that I was happy with. All right, so take some time, you know, bust out your traditional art supplies, make some random gestural brushstrokes and we'll go from there. So one of the things that I wanted to tell you about for this portion is if you don't have any art supplies, don't sweat it because I'm also going to be providing these brushstrokes for you so you can use mine. It's not that big of a deal for the sake of this tutorial. So look for those and the resources portion of this class. So once we have all of our brushstrokes created, the next step is going to be to scan everything in into Photoshop. If you have a scanner, what you need to do is go into Photoshop, go File Imports images from device, and then scan in all of your brushstrokes once they are dry. So from here, I'm just going to apply a really simple curves adjustment to each one of these. I have all of these scanned in. Here's my second 1, third 1. So I'm going to go back to my first one and I'll go down here and I'll add a curves adjustment. Okay, so here's my curves adjustment I'm going to do here is grab this little curve, push it down. I want to be able to see some of these little brushstrokes and the thickness of the paint. So I'm not going to push this way too far. If I push it too far, that's just going to go completely black. And then I'll take this whites and I'll push that over just a little bit, just to give this white a little bit more contrast with that black. And if we toggle that on and off, and I'll see we have quite a bit of contrast now, and that's what we're looking for. So the nice thing about using these adjustment layers is you can reuse them on all of your scans. So I need to do at this point is grab my Curves Adjustment and click and drag over to scan number to drop that in. Then I'll go to number 3. Take that curves adjustment, drop that into their drop it into number 4 and drop it in a number five. So if you see some of these needs that need a little bit of tweaking, all you need to do is go back into your curves. Maybe some of these need a little bit more black. To get some of these delicate brush strokes in here. I might just push this one a little bit further and you just have to kind of play with it. Look at it, see what it needs. I think I'm going to push this white a little bit further as well. And toggle that on and off. And there you go. So at this point what I would do is I would go through each one of these individually and go up to my layers palette and just say flattened image, that's going to flatten that out. Then you want to save each one of these. 3. Color and Materials: Now that we have our brush strokes together, Let's go ahead and create a color scheme. So for this piece, I used this particular color scheme and I have all my RGB values at the top. So if you want to use this one, you can. Otherwise you can create your own. So a good resource for creating your own color scheme is this Adobe Color app. So if you just start with the color, you can go here. You could pick monochromatic or triad complimentary, split colors and play around with this until you get the color scheme that you want down here. Once you get a color scheme that you're happy with, you can either save it to your Adobe profile or you can just take a screenshot of this. So if you go Command Shift 4 on a Mac and just take a screenshot, you'll see down here you have all your RGB values. So RGB, and these are the numbers that you could plug in when you're creating your colors in Cinema 4D. All right, so in cinema 4D, the first thing we're gonna do is create a plane. And I will hit T on the keyboard or the Scale tool and scale this up pretty big. Something like this. And then the next thing we're gonna do is create a material. So if we come down here in the bottom left and double-click, that'll create a new material. Double-click this, and then I'll just rename this brush 0, 1. So for this we're going to import and one of our brushes that we created. So let's go to color. And right here where it says texture, you have three little dots right here. Let's click those and locate our scan and click Open. And right here you can just hit no. So this preview, I'm going to right-click on this and just go to plane. And let's go into reflection. I'll remove this default specular. Then I'll add a new layer, reflection legacy. I'll take the roughness all the way down. I'll take the brightness down, just, I don't know, something like 20 percent or so. So now go back into my color. Right where it says texture, I'll right-click. I'll say Copy. And now I'll go to bump. I'll enable that channel. And then where it says texture, right-click and say paste. And I can take this bump up, I don't know, like 40, 50 percent or something. And now we want to create an alpha. So I just want the black parts of this to show and the white part to be transparent. So in the Alpha, let's go ahead and enable that. And again, under texture, I'll right-click and I'll say Paste. So right now this preview, Let's right-click that and we could say open window, this will allow us to see a bigger thumbnail this, so right now what we're seeing is the white is opaque in the black part is transparent. So let's go into here, invert this. And now we have black is pretty opaque and the white part is transparent. So really quickly let's just go through and add, I'll minimize this for a second. Let's add this brush stroke to this plane. And let's create a small lights just so we could see the edges real quick. I'll zoom in a little bit and take a render. So as you can see, we're getting a lot of these white edges around here. So what we're gonna do is tweak that texture. So if I go to alpha and I click this texture right here where it says black point and white point. I can take my black point up. And you'll notice this black part is getting a little bit more opaque. Okay? So let's take that up too, 75 and see what that looks like. It's probably a little bit too much. And you'll have to go in and kinda tweak some of these parameters and the white point we can start bringing down. And again, you'll have to tweak this just to see what works for your scene. And it will take another render. So let's compare the previous render to this one. So it's getting a little bit better here. We can continue going through here and continue tweaking some of this stuff. So if I bump this up a little bit, take that down. Let's see if that helps a little bit. Yeah, a little bit. So I think for this scene and this is going to work, You know, we're really not looking for photo-realistic. If I was doing art realistic render, I would probably tweak this till these edges were really crisp. But for this scene, what we're looking for is something that looks a little bit hand-drawn, a little bit 30. So I think this is going to work. So we can leave this like this and move on. 4. 3D Modeling: Now we can start adding additional geometry to our scene. So if I go up here to my parametric primitives, let's just start with a cylinder. And we can go to the Scale Tool, kinda push this up a little bit. We can also tweak this by adjusting these little handles here as far as the scale. And I'm just gonna take this brush stroke and I'm going to add it right to this cylinder. All right, we can take a quick render z. What that's looking like. I think of what I want to have happen is I want to have the bottom a little bit opaque and the top just kinda fading out. Okay, so let's tweak this. So I'm just going to go here. I'll click on my material and a where it says projection. Do a cubic projection. Then I can click this material, click the cylinder, and go to my texture tool. And I can just start moving this texture. And then I can scale it. And so the bottom is a more opaque layer and just move this up then the top. So now I can take another render and that's kinda what I was looking for. You could keep tweaking this if you want. We can rotate this, do whatever taken other render. There we go. So something like that. And then what we can do additionally is create a few extra pieces of geometry. So if I create a tube, let's just push this over. Make this a little bit bigger, a little bit thinner. So we're just trying to get some abstract geometry in here, just kinda indicate maybe there's some buildings in here, whatever. And then I can just duplicate this material by holding down Command, clicking and dragging onto this tube. And again, we can go through, take this, we could tweak this. However we want. Move it up and down, that kinda thing. So the only trick with this, with this texture tool is you have to have the material selected and the piece of geometry. Then you click this texture and you can use the scale or the Move tool and the scale too on the rotation tool. So if you wanted to rotate this, you can rotate that however you want. So now I'm just going to create a few extra pieces of geometry. So I'll create a sphere. Let's go through and move this. And it will change the placement of all of these things later on in the video once we set up the composition. But again, I'll command click this, put that into here. Take a quick render. That's cool. And maybe I will just duplicate this by holding down Command, clicking and dragging in the scene. So now we have some additional elements in here. Let's go ahead and create some random spheres. So I'll take these and I'll group them together. We can go up to Object, group objects. And I'll just call this parametric parametric primitives. And then I'm going to create some random spheres as well. So I'll go here to my parametric primitives, create a sphere. And now I'm just going to bring this down. And I'll go to my MoGraph Cloner. And I'll take my sphere and drop it right into this cloner that's going to start cloning these and creating duplicates. All right, so we can go on this MoGraph cloner settings. And now where it says object, There's this grid. We can bump this up to like three. Maybe even more. There we go, something like that. We could tweak some of these parameters. But what am I? What I'm gonna do here is I'm going to have mostly these black spheres, but I want to have a few in here that are, that are also the blue from the color scheme that we established earlier on. So I'll take this sphere and I'll just hold down Command and just duplicate this a few times. So I'll take this material, drag and drop it, drag and drop it. And now most of these are black. So what I'm gonna do is I'm going to create a blue sphere in here as well. So I'll take this material down here that we created. I'll hit Command C, Command V on the keyboard. That creates a new material. And I'll just call this brush blue. And if you remember from this color scheme, we have RGB values, 132, 138255. So those are the numbers that we're going to plug in for some of these colors. So the way that we're gonna do that is where it says texture. We'll click this and we'll say layer. Now we can click this icon. And right here where it says shader, I'll add a color. And now in this color, I want to be in my RGB values. And I'll type in those RGB values, 130, 230 eighths, and 255. So our alpha channel is still going to be there, or bump is still going to be there. Now it's just going to colorize this material. So I can just take this, put it on this blue sphere. And now I have some random black and blue spheres in here. And what I'm gonna do here with this cloner selected, I'll go to MoGraph Effector. And now what I wanna do is I want to affect the size and the position and the scale of some of these clones. So MoGraph Cloner and I'll add a plain effector. Okay, so you definitely want to make sure that this cloner selected before you do this. So select the cloner, MoGraph, Cloner Monograph, my new effector plane. And you'll see right away we got a little bit of movement in these spheres. So if I go to my plain effector, I can go to my parameter. I could start tweaking some of this stuff. We can go to scale. We could scale some of these down to like minus one, minus one, minus one and l, all of them are going to disappear. So what we'll have to do is go into this falloff tab. And let's just go ahead and add a spherical fall off. So what this does is it's going to make the spheres in the center almost disappear. In the spheres on the outside. It's going to make them full size. So if I go into spherical field where it says remapping, let's click Invert. So now the ones in the center are going to be bigger than the ones on the outside are just going to kind of fade out. So now I can take all these plain, plain effector and cloner and hit Command or altered G to group those together. And I'll just call this spheres. And then we can take that and move it up. I would probably take this cloner and just make everything a little bit bigger. Or hit T on the keyboard and scale them up. And then move these up a little bit. For right now, I wouldn't worry about the placement of this. Again, we're going to get into the placement later on when we establish the composition. 5. Background City: The next thing we're gonna do is create the background city for our project. So we're gonna go ahead and reference these colors. So what I'm gonna do is I'm going to create new materials for this midtone, for this orangey color and for this brown color. All right, and the way that we're gonna do that is I'll just take this blue. I'll hit Command C, Command V on the keyboard. And I'll just rename this tan. Now go to my color channel. I'll click this and now this color, I'll just change these RGB values. And there's my second color. All right, so now I can go ahead and duplicate this again, Command C, command V. And I can call this orange. And then I'll click this again. And then I'll change these RGB values. And then again, I'll duplicate this Command C command V. And I'll just call this brown. Click this, and I'll change these RGB values on this. And there we go. Alright, so now let's go ahead and turn off. Our spheres are parametric primitives and we can start modelling some very basic background buildings. So I just wanted to tell you for this tutorial, I just use stuff that I have in my content browser that I've created. So I have my own presets over here, and I'm constantly adding to this as well. So here's my 3D models. I have a whole bunch of background, buildings and shapes and this kinda stuff. So I went through and I used just some basic parts of buildings that I have in my content browser. And I'll show you how to add stuff to your content browser later on in this, in this course. But for the time being, let's just focus on creating some really simple buildings. So if I take a cube and let's go into our top view, all I'm doing here is just reshaping this. And then pushing this up a little bit. I'm going to make this editable. And now I'm going to add a few more lines segments to this. So go up here. And I'll say Loop Path Cut, add a path cut there, and a path cut here. And now I go to the backside. I could turn off this light as well. There we go. Now I'll go to the back side and with only visible elements selected on my live Select tool. Let's go ahead and select this. Select that. And I can right-click. Extrude, click and drag and an empty area and just kinda extrude these walls back. Alright, I can push this back a little bit. At this point, I'm going to cut in some additional geometry so I can go into my line mode. And this time I'm going to say only select the visible elements on my live Select tool unchecked. And I'll select these middles line segments. And I'll hit Connect points and edges. And then I'll do that one more time. And now I can go into here Loop Path Cut again. And I'll just make an area for a window. And again, these are going to be background buildings, so they don't have to be super, super detailed. And I can go into my polygon mode. And then I'll select all the way through this and hit Delete on the keyboard. So that's going to create some openings for the windows, like I. And usually I'll go back in here and I'll bridge these gaps because you can see there's a huge gap in this now. So if you want it to bridge these together, all you need to do is go into your line mode, right-click bridge. And then what you could do is you can take one line and bridge it to the next and go through and do the same for all these openings. Or you can just leave it because again, these are background buildings and we just want some additional detail in here. Alright, so once you have that together, I'll just create a really simple roof on this. So I'll start with another cube. I'll make it roughly about the same size as this little overhang. And then I'll just push this up. And I will make this editable, go into my poly mode, select the top of this. So as you can see, when I went to live selection, I selected this top polygon. It also selected this bottom polygon. And the reason for that is live select I only had, I have only selected visible elements unchecked. So if I go through and check it, now, when I select that top polygon, it only selects that one. All right, so what I'm gonna do here is extrude enter. And then I'll just grab this and push it up so that I create a really basic roof. If I take a quick render, good see I'm not getting a lot of definition and that roof. The reason is this default tag called the Phong Tag. So if I take this Phong Angle and I push it up, actually if I push it all the way down to 0. Now you can see we have a little bit more definition and that rough. Okay? So let's take both of these shifts, select them, right-click and say connect objects and delete. That's going to make one piece of geometry. So I'll just call this building one. And then what I can do here is dropped this into a MoGraph Cloner. And now it's going to start duplicating these. I'll go into my Object Mode Grid, start offsetting these a little bit. Maybe we can make some here. Offset this. Okay? So let's just go ahead and push this up. These are probably a little bit too big. So I'm just going to take my cloner hit T on the keyboard, bring that down. Actually for this, I'm just going to make one. And now I could take this texture that I created, this tan. Put it on here. I'll choose a cubic method. And I'm just gonna go to my texture. Scale that up. And I'm just going to push that down a little bit. So the bottom is like opaque. I can even rotate this a 180 degrees. And now when I take a quick render this, the tops of our buildings are kind of like fading out. Okay, so I'll call this back buildings one. And I'm going to add a few more. There we go. Something like that. And now with this selected, I'm going to go ahead and create a random effector. So random effector go to my parameter. Now I'm just going to start offsetting these buildings up and down, left to right. And just creating some off some variation in this, maybe too much in a y. So I think that's pretty good right there. Play around some of these parameters. Really don't want all of these going through one another. You'll have to play around with this until you get it looking like you want it. And then we can take both of these. We can just bring it down to the ground, push it back and space. And now this ground plane, I think it's way too small, so I'll just hit T on the keyboard. Bring that up. Okay, if we wanted more of these, we can just increase this number. And now what I'm gonna do is I'm going to take both this building one command C Command V. Now push this back in space. And now for this one, I'm just going to take the second color, put it here. And then maybe for this MoGraph Cloner, what I wanna do is add another height to this and maybe I could take this bill that and just kinda tweak the shape of it a little bit. Maybe this one's a little bit longer and we have these floating buildings in the background. Okay? And maybe also for this one, I can delete this effector and then create a new one. So Effector Random. Start playing around with this stuff. And then I can also add a little bit of scale. I can also add some rotation and push this over so you could see not that way. It's a little bit of rotation like this. That works. And then again, I can take this, rename it Buildings O2, Command C, Command V. I'll take this effector, delete it. Take these buildings, push them further in the background. And after this color, I'm just going to use this third color. We created bone. And we could tweak this as well if we wanted to, we can go into the texture tool, scale this up and down how everyone wanted to make it look a little bit different from the other ones. Okay? And then we can take this, create a new MoGraph random effector. And again, we can start tweaking some of these parameters. Maybe we want some additional background buildings. There we go. Now we can take both of these, kind of push these up. Like they're floating in outer space. Now when we take a render, here's what we have so far. It's looking pretty good. So we have a bunch of buildings in the background. I would probably go through and Dom add some variation to the building. Like if you wanted to cut another hole for a window or change the shape, you can come up with two or three different variations so it doesn't look so uniform. But at this point it's looking pretty good. If you are enjoying this course so far, please consider leaving a review. Thank you. 6. Pyramid: So now let's create the pyramid. So what we're gonna do is we'll turn off our city. And we'll start with a cube. We can even turn off our plane. So let's start with this cube. And we can scale this down a little bit if we wanted. And then we're going to create a cloner. We're going to take this cube, drag and drop up until it's a child of this cloner. And then it's going to default to grid array. Just leave it like it is. We can increase the amount of cubes that are being cloned right here. And then what we're gonna do is we're going to create a pyramid. And now with that pyramid selected, Let's just go ahead to end at a scale that up something like this. We can move it up as well. So now we want to click this cloner and with that selected, we go up to MoGraph, effector and volume of factor. All right, so now in this volume effect or we're going to uncheck scale, we're going to check visibility. And then where it says effector, we're going to drop this parameter under there. And now these cubes should start cloning to this pyramid. All right, so just so we can see the cubes, Let's go into our pyramid. Render Tags display. And we could just choose a lines. And as you can see, this is working. All right, so now we can start tweaking some of this stuff. So if we increase the count, so this cloner is starting to clone along this pyramid. So what you're gonna wanna do is just go through and start tweaking this until you're happy with it. You're bringing these together, bringing farther apart whatever you want to do. And the other thing we could do is we could reshape this pyramid until we get it looking exactly like we want it. I think this cloner, what I could do is I could bring down these clones so they're a little bit closer together. I can move it up, move it down. There we go. I can make it a little bit bigger if I wanted. So this is going to be all up to you. So at this point what you can do is just play with the cloner counts and the spacing size and the pyramid shape until you get the desired shape of the pyramid that you want. And once you're done with that, we can take all this group it altogether, Option G on a Mac, and we'll call this pyramid. So we group it all together. And this pyramid, I can just turn off by double-clicking these two little dots. Then I'm going to create a new material based on this color schemes. So I'm going to choose this light cream color. So I'll duplicate this tan Command C command V, and I'll rename this light. And in this color channel, modulus changes color to 255, C33 into one-to-one. All right, and I'll drop this right on our cube. What I'll do here is I'll just take this, put it on a cubic, and let's take a quick render. And there we go. So we could tweak this texture if we wanted. I would probably go through and rotate it so the bottoms more opaque than the top. Something like this. We can elongate this texture if we wanted. Just play around with it until you're happy with the result. Once we're done making this pyramid, then we can go in and duplicate this cube Command C command V. And we can just bring this up to add like a little floating cube up above this at T on the keyboard for scale. And then what I could do is duplicate that one more time Command C, command V. Bring that up and just scale that down a little bit more. And then we can drop these inside of this pyramid group. Alright, so let's take a really quick render of the scene. So here's our scene so far. It's kinda look at a little chaotic, but no worries. Well, you're going to tweak all of this. 7. Composition: So now let's set up our composition. Let's go up to render settings. And for output. I'm gonna go ahead and uncheck lock aspect ratio is at 16 by nine film aspect. So I wanted to work with 2400 pixels by 3000 pixels. And then I will read lock this aspect ratio. Okay, so for the time being, let's just take this number down to about 500 and just in case we need to take any test renders. And then what I'm gonna do is I'm gonna go to option configure. And then in this tab where it says safe frames, I'm just going to bring this opacity up. And what that does is it darkens these edges so I can see what my composition looks like. And then I'm going to create a camera. I'll look through this camera in this composition tab, I will enable the grid option. So now I want to set these pyramids to kinda line up with the rule of thirds here. I think that works right there. And then what I'll do after this is all lock this camera. So I'll go up to well, what am I looking for here? Rigging tags and hit protection. Okay, so now we can go through and we can get start composing our scene. Alright, so if we uncheck these parametric primitives, we can go in here individually and just start offsetting these things and composing our scene. So that looks pretty good right here. And you can just resize this, tweak this, whatever. You're just kind of looking at. What's going to make this composition interesting. So here I can just push this over to the side. And I can use my top view as well, maybe to bring that a little bit closer. And then we can have this thing floating a little bit in the space. And let's take this sphere. We could push that back. Well, let's just lift that up a little bit. There we go. Okay, so now I'll do my back city. So here let's just turn everything off the back ones and we'll take this foreground. And let's just go ahead and push this a little bit further back from the camera. Something like this. And what we could do is we can even rotate it a little bit. Not that way. Rotate it like this. That's cool. You'd bring it closer. There we go. And now we can turn off, turn on our second set. Buildings. Bring that back in space. Bring that up a little bit. That's looking kinda cool. Now let's turn on our last ones. And again, we could probably rotate this and a little bit. So it's kind of facing the camera a little bit more. There we go. What about if we bring this up? We could probably even increase the count of these. So if I go back to my cloner, There we go. I can move these over a little bit. And I think that's pretty cool. So right now, let's think about how are we going to compose the scene additionally in the foreground. So what if I took some of these back buildings? Like let's just take this first one command C, Command V. And then what I'll do with this is I'll just bring this forward somewhere in the foreground. And I can just scale this by hitting T on the keyboard. Scale that up a little bit. And now I can rotate this in the place. Maybe it's something like this where only we're only seeing the side of the building. Bring that back a little bit and maybe bring it closer to the camera. Actually, we could prize scale this down a little bit. I'm going to scale it from the bottom of here. So I'll go to my axis tool, push that back. And then I want this building to kind of sit on this ground. And I'm looking at this little red line here as reference. So here I'll just hit T on the keyboard, scale this down, and just bring that into the foreground to kind of frame that. We can take a quick render, see what this is looking like, and it's looking pretty good. So for this, I'm going to change this color to the dark color. I kinda want this color of the pyramids to sort of stick out and be emphasized, would just go through and keep tweaking this. One other thing I'm gonna do is I'm going to duplicate this pyramid Command C Command V. I'll take these top cubes. I'll change this color again to this. And now with this pyramid, what I can do is just rotate this, maybe a 180 degrees. And then I can bring that also closer to the foreground. And add, add that as a compositional element as well. Just sort of framing the scene. So you want to play around with this stuff until you're happy. That's looking pretty good. This reflection on this ground could probably be tweaked a little bit. So I can go back into this brush first and foremost and delete unused materials. Let's see which one is right here. Let's reflectance. I'm just gonna take them as brightness by half so that about 10 percent. I think that's better. Okay, so then you want to keep tweaking this composition until you're happy with it, okay, And maybe you want to take this pyramid. You can also duplicate this. I can reset it as another foreground element, right? So again, you're framing that composition with all dark things on the, on the foreground. And that's going to emphasize this pyramid in the center. So if I take a quick render, I think that's looking pretty good. Maybe I could push these, this pyramid over here and see what that looks like. Let's look in. All right, maybe I could duplicate that one. Put it down here, framing and composition even further. So I'll just continue going through and tweaking it until you're happy with this composition. Okay, so now let's turn on the spheres. And some of these might be blocking some of our pyramids or background buildings or whatever. So we might have to delete some of these spheres. So the way that we're gonna do that is we're going to go into this MoGraph Cloner. And what we can do is go MoGraph, MoGraph selection. And that's gonna give us little dots. So if we select some of these dots, I can hit Shift. Get rid of some of these spheres over here. And just kinda clean it up a little bit. Now after we selected the spheres that we want to get rid of, we just go to MoGraph and then Hide Selection. And it's going to hide those fears if we hold down shift and we can continue to add to this selection and it'll get rid of some of these spheres. So you just want to go through, take a look at this, which spheres are getting to be too much in the scene. And then you just go through and delete some of those. So if you wanted to have a sphere reappear, all you have to do is hold down command on a Mac and click that little dot and it'll reappear. So here's where we're at currently with this composition. I think that's looking pretty decent. We can continue going through and tweaking some of this stuff until we're happy with it. 8. Details: Now let's create some additional details for our scene. Second, go through and turn off this background city. And the first thing I'm gonna do is I'm going to create some wires coming in from the sides. So if I go into, that could turn off these spheres as well. So I could see this a little bit better and probably the foreground. So right now, I can go ahead. I'm going to go up to here and select my spline. And I'll click and drag to create a second. And then hit Enter. And then in the perspective view, what I could do is create a circle. And I can take this circle down to, let's say, I don't know, 20 inches or so. And with the circle and the spline, now we can take now we can create a sweep nerves and drop the circle and the spline into that sweep. So what that's gonna do is it's going to create this little wire. Alright? And at this point, I can just go through, I can take the circle and maybe make that a little bit smaller. And then I'm just going to move this up and space and make sure we're looking through the camera view. And there we go, That's looking pretty good. So I can go back and tweak some of these parameters. So let's take this end spline, kinda bring that up. There we go. And on this spline, I'm just going to add this brush just like that. And then I'm gonna take this and holding down Option, I create a cloner that's going to start making duplicates and add the sweep to the Cloner right away. So this time instead of a grid array, I'm going to do a linear array and I just want to go side-by-side. So I'll 0 the y value and I will just add some more size to this. There we go. And I could take this cloner, push that over, and just kinda compose this. Oops. So there's sort of hitting that. Okay, so I'll just call this wire cloner. And then I'm gonna take that and I'll duplicate it Command C, command V. And what I'll do here is I'll just rotate it a 180 degrees. And here I can just push this back in space. I can bring these closer together. Or maybe I needed to bring them farther apart. And actually that looks pretty good. Lift that up right here. You push this over. Maybe this sphere needs that come up. There we go. 0, this 0 that out. I'm going to bring them closer together. There we go. And maybe we need a little bit more curve on this one. So I'll take this last point. And I just started bringing that down. It gets there, bringing it over. There we go. That's looking pretty good. So the next thing that I'm gonna do is I'm going to create some pipes going through this scene. And that's pretty straightforward to create. I'll make a cylinder. And instead of having to go up and down, I'm going to have the orientation of the cylinder plus x. And then I'll just bring this down, make it a small little pipe, and just make it a little bit longer. So it's going through my entire scene. Maybe that could be a little bit smaller than that. About 2.5 thing, that's pretty good. And with this one, again, we're going to add a MoGraph Cloner. And we don't want a grid array, we just want a linear array, 0 out the y. And we will add some additional segments and the z. And again, I'll take this brush, this dark one, and place it on that cylinder. And then I could just start bringing this up. Maybe it's coming through here. I'll make a duplicate of this Command C command V. Rotate this in place this way. And maybe this one just needs that come up a little bit. Maybe something like that. And I could just bring this back in space. I can go back to the cylinder, make it a little bit longer. That works. And now we're going to add some other elements coming in from the foreground, like some snaky looking shapes. So let's turn on our camera view so we can see where that's coming from. I'll turn on my foreground. And so I want something that kinda of snakes this way. So what I'm gonna do is grab my pen tool again. Click and drag, click and drag. Click and drag again. Just so I'm getting this nice little curvy shape and the perspective view create a circle spline. Bring that down. I don't know, five inches or something. And I'll use an additional sweep nurbs, circle and Spline become children of that. And I can take this circle, maybe make it a little bit smaller, and drop this brush right under there. And again, I'm going to use a MoGraph Cloner com. This is that a grid array. I'll do object again, not objects. Sorry, I'll do linear. And then 0 out. This is why. And I could do a, an x. And I can even probably rotate this a little bit. And I can take this cloner, move that over. So now that these elements are kind of drawing the eye in towards this pyramid, right? So I could take this created another one. I'll just call this snake or something. So I know what it is. Command C, command V. And now what I could do is I can just rotate this. So there's another one light coming from the back or something. And it's best to do is in this perspective view. So I could see compositionally what's happening. And then I'll just bring this up a little bit. And we bring it back. So it's sort of hitting that pyramid. So those are the additional elements that are added to the scene. Here's what it's looking like so far. And then I could take all of these and I can just group those together. That's Option G on a Mac. And I'll call this details. 9. Birds: Let's create some simple birds now. So I'm just going to turn everything off here. Get out of my camera view. And we'll start this off by going up to our splines, starting with a sinusoid shape. And then what I could do is go up to my slides again, create a rectangle. And this rectangle, you can just scale down. We can also go into this rectangle and use these parameters to scale it. So I'm just looking for something like that. And then I can go in, create a sweep. Nerves dropped both of these in the sweep. And now if you wanted your bird to be a little bit longer, and we need to do is go into this rectangle and just increase this number right here. Alright, so I'll rename this bird. And then I'm going to put this inside a cloner object. So I'll take this bird, put it inside a cloner. And we could do a grid array, maybe have a few more those, separate these out a little bit. There we go. I'm going to put this brush on these birds as well. So now I don't want them to be too uniform. So what I'm gonna do is I'm going to go into my MoGraph of factors and I will choose a random effector. Where is my random effector? There it is. And now where it says parameter, I could start pushing this stuff over a little bit, just so they look like they're a little bit random. And I can go to my rotation, kinda rotate this a little bit. And there we have some birds. So now I'm just going to group these together. If I call this bird's. Now I'll go back into my camera view. I'll turn everything else back on. Take these birds. Actually, we could turn off these spheres so we can see everything a little bit better. Let's take the birds and you just kinda push him back here. Maybe rotate them a little bit. And then push them up this way. Push them back in space. Maybe I can rotate them a little bit more. There we go. And since they're so far back in space, the simple shape won't really matter that much. So now we have some birds in our scene. 10. Lighting: Okay, Now that are seen as coming together, Let's go ahead and start adding some lighting to this. So let's go ahead and organize this scene. I'll just take all of my geometry, group it together by hitting Option G on a Mac. And I'll call this model. And then we're going to start the lighting process. So first and foremost, I'm going to come up here and creates an environment. Okay, with this environment created, I'm going to go ahead and enable fog. Okay, So right off the bat, here's what we get with that. This fog is a pretty cool little technique. So what I'm gonna do is I'm just going to change the color of this. So remember that color scheme that we use them beginning, I'm going to use something similar to this orange color. So I'll type in those values, 3129. And then what I'll do is I'll probably just make this a little bit darker than that. So something like this. And then we could bring that fog a little bit closer to the camera view. So right now it's at 36 a 100 inches. What if I do 2 thousand? That's going to start covering up our background building too much. What about 3 thousand? We might have to push it further back in space. Okay. So now that sort of gets rid of our birds over here. So what I'm gonna do is just continue playing with this until I get those birds back. Or I could take those birds, push them further, push them closer to the camera so we can see them. So I can just scale these down a little bit, push them closer to the camera scale. So definitely want those in the scene. Just adds a little bit of detail to that sky. So you can continue playing with yours until you get that back in there. There we go. We might actually need to push it back and space now. So just play with that until you get it looking correct, you know, and how you like it. That's pretty cool. So the next thing we're gonna do is add a main light. So we're gonna come up here and add a light to the scene. And for this one, what I'm gonna do is I'm just going to push it in front of this pyramid. Maybe something like this. So for this main light, I'm going to use very similar light that I use for that fog. So I'll type in those values here. So I'll just go to my RGB type into 4131 in 29. And then what I'm going to do in these light settings is where it says visible light. I will say visible. And turn this, move this over a little bit, something like this. And we could take another render, see what that looks like. So now we're getting this sort of glow right by our pyramid. We might want to make that just a little bit lighter. So we can see that. And we can tweak these parameters right here. You see that these handles for this light, you can just bring that out if you wanted to see more of the visible light. And there we go. And now what I can do is I can enable shadows on this. So what I'm gonna do is down here in the shadow tab, I'm going to enable area shadows. And then I'll go to my shadows tab. And typically I push my shadows more towards the blue tint. And I can bring that density down, maybe 8587. So now we're getting some shadows in our scene. This latest casting shadows, we can see that light that's looking better. And then what we could do here is create one more light. So let's go ahead and creates an additional lights. And I will bring this up. It's getting a little hard to see all this stuff in here. I'll bring this up till it's kind of in line with this top little cube. So we'll just push that up here. And again, I'm going to use my color scheme and this time I use this lighter color. So I'll go into here 245, 233, and 212. All right, and I'm going to enable again the visible light settings. So visible light. And let's take another render. So now we have that light casting some shadow from our top. And that's maybe a little bit too intense. So I could bring that back down a little bit. So I can take this intensity, bring that down to maybe 50, take another test render. So at this point it's just a matter of going through and tweaking some of your light settings. Okay, so maybe this main lights and I'll just rename this main. Now, call this fill or glow, whatever you wanna call it. Maybe this one needs to be brought out over here so we could see the front face of those cubes. And there we go, looking a little bit better. Alright, So at this point, what you should do is just go through and refine your light settings until you're happy with the overall look and feel of everything. Alright, and then the next video, we'll go ahead and render everything out. 11. Rendering: Now that we have are seen in place and the lighting is correct, Let's go ahead and set up our rendering. So the very first thing we're gonna do is add object buffers to all of our models. So I can right-click and add this compositing tag. And then I will enable Object Buffer one. And I can Command click and drag on all of my geometry to add additional object buffers. And then what I'll have to do is go back into each one and assign a different number to it. Okay? 5678. Okay, so now we go into the render settings and we'll go to output. I use 2400 and by 3000 for my rendering. And then we'll go to multipaths, enable that. And then with the multi-pass selected, let's go to this multi-pass tab and say Add Image layers. And we also have eight object buffers. So we need to go back to this multi-pass tab and add an object buffer for each one. So here's 1, 2, 3, 45678. Now the object buffer ids need to correspond with these object buffer IDs. So we have one, we'll change this one to two. Okay? So this is going to give us alpha channels where it will allow us to easily select our geometry in Photoshop later on after we render this. So we can close this tab and then go to anti-aliasing, will set this from geometry to best. And now we'll want to save the specify safe path. So for this, since we're on multi-pass, we're going to want to enable this multi-pass image. And then we'll hit these three little dots and we'll specify a location for our render. All right, let's just call this city multi-pass. Hit Save. And now what you wanna do is just come up to this render to the picture viewer. Hit Render. And then Cinema 4D, we'll go through, do its thing, render out the image. So once you're a multi-pass render is done, what we can do is we can go in and turn off multi-pass. Come down here to the Effects. We can add a cell renderer and just check this outline, then go to Save. And we could specify 01 cell render. And then we can, we can even turn off our lighting for this. So it goes a little bit faster. Once the cell rendering is done, the outline, we're going to go back to sell render, uncheck outline, check edges. Then we'll go to Save. And now we'll save this as edges hit render again. So once that's done, let's uncheck cell render and we'll go to Effect and will select Sketch and Toon. What that's gonna do is it's gonna give us a new material. We're just going to drop that right in onto our model, go back into our render settings. And where it says shading, what we're gonna do is we're gonna say custom color and we'll just leave this white. And then for this Save, again, we'll just name this ST for Sketch and Toon. And then we'll render that out as well. 12. Post Production 1: Okay, so now that we have everything rendered out, Let's go ahead and do some post-production. So I have my multi-pass layers. Here are my multi-pass image here. I have my cell rendering. You can see all those lines that are rendered out. It's really nice. I also have these edges that I rendered out my Sketch and Toon. So we're going to composite all of these together. So the first thing, let's go into our multi-pass file, and let's go ahead and turn everything off so we can figure out which layer is doing what. So here's the specular layer. I can leave that shadow layer. Ambient cost X is not doing anything since we don't have it turned on as an effect inside of Cinema 4D. So we'll go ahead and delete that. Global illumination ambient occlusion. We didn't add that either. So I'll go ahead and delete that reflection. I'll leave that refraction, atmosphere, atmosphere to magic bullet. There's nothing in there. I'll double-click this diffuse. Just go ahead and rename it to fuse. Again. That's just going to make it a, a layer that's not locked. So I can take all of these and drop them inside of a group. Carl, this group MP for multi-pass. So the next thing that I'm going to do is go into the channels. So in these channels you'll see that there's all these different object buffers. So this is going to allow us to easily select our geometry. All right, so let's go through this and just rename these so we know what they are. So the first one is our ground. The second one is, let's just call this mid shapes. Classes are spheres. We have Background City. Here's our pyramid. And this is our foreground. These are all the pipes and wires. We'll just call that Pipes. And here's our birds. Okay, so once we have that together, we can click this RGB. That'll take us back to the view of seeing everything together. And now we can start compositing these multi-pass file. So what I'm gonna do in the cell is hit Command a to select all. And then I'm going to drag over top my multipaths file. Click Shift on the keyboard and then let go. That's going to snap it to the exact same position as it should be. And then I'll go ahead and rename this cell. All this is going to do is accentuate the edges of our geometry. So I'm going to take this cell and I'll change this normal blend mode to a multi-planet Multiply blend mode. So you'll see if I toggle this eyeball on and off. It's just given us more like a hand-drawn look and feel to this. And I'm going to accentuate that a little bit more. So I'll just take this, duplicate it. Not I'll make those lines a little bit thicker. All right. So go ahead and turn that on and off. And there might be areas that you want to, that you might want to mask out. Like maybe these birds don't need to be as accentuated. So I'll take this top one, add a layer mask. And then when I'm on the layer mask, I get paint with black to get rid of some of this on these birds. All right, I think that looks pretty good. And the next thing I'm gonna do is I'll go ahead and I'll close this cell. And I'll come up to these edges and I'll do the same thing. I'll hit Command a on the keyboard to select all click and drag holding down Shift. And then let go on top of this. Now I'm going to name this edges. And again, I'm going to put this on a multiply blend mode. So now you can see we're getting all kinds of detail on the background of our city, which is really cool. You know, maybe it's a little bit too much detail. We're getting all these lines in some of these shapes over here. We're getting all this stuff in here. So it's given us quite a bit of detail in a pretty cool overall look and feel. So what I'm gonna do here is just take these edges and that might just bring this opacity down a little bit. So maybe something like 75 percent. All right, so that's looking pretty good. And then lastly, what I'll do is I'll take a close these edges. I go back to my Sketch and Toon. And this is pretty cool because it gave us like these almost hand-drawn lines, right? So some of these lines are thicker where they start and they kind of fade out. Thicker, thinner. So it's got a really nice feel to it. So again, I'm going to hit Command a, and I'll click and drag hover over this tab where my multi passes and then let go. And I'll rename this Sketch and Toon or just the st. And again, I'll put this on a multiply blend mode. So now you can see we're getting all kinds of detail. You know, almost looks like a hand-drawn thing now, which is really cool. So again, I think these birds are probably a bit much. So I'm gonna take that, create a layer mask. On the layer mask I will paint with black. So I'll go ahead and zoom into here, get rid of some of this. And what else do I want to do? And to, toggle this on and off. Maybe we could just reduce the opacity just a little bit on this layer. Maybe something like 90 percent. And I think that's looking pretty cool. So if we toggle this on and off and then toggle it back on. I think it's just given a lot of detail to some of this stuff. So now I'm going to take all these multi-pass cell layers and just drop them into a group, and I'll just call this lines. So now let's continue going through and start adding some adjustments. So the first thing I'm gonna do is create a new layer and I'm going to call this pyramid glow. I really want to accentuate this pyramid right here. So what I'm gonna do is I'm going to go into my channels and where we have our pyramid selection. I'm going to hit, I'm going to hold down Command on the keyboard and then I'm on a Mac. Click that and then I'll apply a selection just around our pyramid. So I want to use a really light color from our color scheme. I'll supply this for you guys. So I'll just hit I on the keyboard and select this color. And now in here I could just paints with that color. And I can change the blend mode to something like an overlay or soft light. You'll have to play around with these until you are happy with the way that they look. What about, I think there's Vivid Light. Vivid light looks pretty cool. So I'll just take this opacity and just kinda bring it down just a little bit. All right? So that's our glow on our pyramid. So if this is really brighten the center when it gets started doing is adding some radiating light around here. So that includes these pipes, these wires, maybe this foreground element like some, like some color are spilling out from here and some light spilling out in there. So I'll create one more layer and I'll call this radiating glow red glow. And then what I could do is I can come in here, command clip, command, click the pipes. I can Shift Command click the foreground. All right, So now again, I can come into my color scheme. And maybe now I'll use something like this, this color right here. So I click the I for the Eye dropper, select this color. And I'll go back to here. And then I'm just going to paint some color, like it's radiating out of that center, something like this. And then again, I can go through and I can start playing with some of these blend modes. I think this hard lights like a pretty cool vivid light, looks good. Thinking between the hard light, linear light. How about we do vivid light? That looks pretty good. And then why don't we duplicate this? And then I'll put it on a linear light to kinda get some of this over here in the foreground. And then I'll just reduce the opacity on the duplicated one. So that's looking pretty nice so far. Another thing that I wanna do is I want to accentuate some of these blue spheres. So I'll create another layer, I'll call this blue spheres. So now we can go into this color again. I could select this blue color and channels. Let's go to my spheres. And now if you hit Q on the keyboard, it's going to give you a preview of your selection. And what you could do with this. This is like a Quick Mask view. What you could do with this is you can go through and you can paint away the stuff that you don't want in the selection. So if I'm painting with black, it's going to add to that selection. So I'm just gonna go through and just get rid of some of these spheres that are black in here. Because I don't want those. I don't want this blue to be added to that black section. So take some time, go through this, get rid of these black spheres. And once you're done now, masking that out, what you could do is you want to get out of this Quick Mask Mode. So hit Q on the keyboard again. And now in my blue layer. And I can just go ahead and paint in some of this blue color for some of these. And now that's going to accentuate these blue spheres. And I could just start going through some of these blend modes and find one that I really like. I think there's overlay gives a nice look. It's not too in your face. And it's pretty nice. So I'll just stick with the overlay for right now. 13. Post Production 2: So the next thing I'm gonna do is open up my brush texture that we created. So I'll just take this command a to select the entire thing. And I'll just drop it right inside of this scene. And I can rename this texture. Can put it on a multiply blend mode. And I'm just going to play with this until it kinda looks cool. So what I wanted to do is just sort of frame this just like the other stuff is framing it. So I'll put one down here, maybe something like this. And I could just take the opacity down just a little bit. That's looking pretty cool. Maybe I can rotate it a little bit more like that right there. And then I'm going to duplicate that one more time. And I'll rotate this one. So it's kinda coming from the top. Something like this. There we go. We could keep playing with this until we're happy. I'm just looking for a little bit of brushstrokes there and there we have it. So now I want to go ahead and add some people to the scene. So a few places that you can find people. I'm going to give you a few options. So number one, you can add people on you're seeing through cinema 4D. So before you render everything out, if you wanted to add people that are 3D, you would just go into Window content browser and then just search for humans. And there's all kinds of people in here that you can use. Like these people in here and you can populate your scene with them. These are low poly ones. There's also some medium resolution ones. And poseable figures that are silhouettes, cutouts, that kinda thing. So there's, there's an option for that. And you can also go to this website called immediate entourage. And if you just click people, you have to register for this site. You can download a whole bunch of cutouts of people that you can go ahead and place it in your Photoshop file. So that's another option. You can also go to Brush easy, and there's a bunch of people, silhouettes that you can download. And you can install that inside of Photoshop. And then you'll have people that you can put directly into your Photoshop file. Or if you wanted to buy people cutouts that are realistic. There's a website called DOS design that has all a whole bunch of different people. Here's some business people Volume 1. And just look through that. They also have 3D models of people. So there's a whole bunch of options for, for adding people into your scene. So if we go back to our Photoshop file, I'm going to create a new layer. And I'll call this people back, people. And then what I'll do is I'll hit B on the keyboard, and I already have some of these brushes loaded. And let's just choose this person, these two people walking. So my eye level for this, Let's just bring this down is approximately right here. You can see how these lines from this pyramid are converging down and converging up. So wherever those meat is, where your horizon line is. So I'm going to pick a dark color, something like this. And I'll just go ahead and dad and a few people just kinda walking by, put their eyes at the horizon line. And I'll just put these people on a multiply blend mode to give us a little bit of detail. Something like this. And then I want to mask them out. So they're kinda behind these pipes. So add a layer mask and I can choose my pyramid. So I'm holding down Command clicking and I'm going to Shift Command click for these pipes. And now I can go ahead and paint away these people. So they're like behind that. And then I'll deselect by hitting Command D. And then I'm going to put in one more person in this in this scene. And this person have a cutout that I'm going to use. So it's this guy and there's an alpha channel. So I'll Command click that Alpha channel, click and drag into the scene. So now I'm just going to paint this guy with white from our color scheme. And the easiest way to do that is click this little icon that looks like a checkerboard, that's lock transparent pixels. And that will allow you to paint directly on him. So I'll just go back and choose a soft brush. Paint this dude into here. Change the blending mode to something else, something like that. So he's kind of not too prominent in the scene that they got up here. Maybe I could duplicate this. Whenever we go, something like that. It's kinda push him over. And then what I'm gonna do is I'm going to add a stroke around him. So if I create a new layer, call it stroke, and then I command click this layer underneath. What I could do is go Edit stroke. And then I'll just add a black stroke, one pixel on the outside. What that's gonna do is just add a little line around him, kinda delineating this person just so it matches everything else over here. Alright, so I can just take these layers and then drop them into a group and I'll call this, actually I'll take these people and put them in that group too. I'll just call this people. And then what I'm gonna do now is I'm going to add some curves adjustments. So if I go into this adjustment thing down here, go to curves. I can go to my red channel. I can increase the reds a little bit. I can go to my blue channel, increase the blues like in the shadow areas, something like this. I can go back to RGB, play with the contrast, Something like that. So that's going to dramatically change the look of our scene. And this is pretty cool. And then I'm going to add some construction lines in here. So if I just create a new layer, I'll just say construction lines and I'll pick a light color from our color scheme. Go back to here and just start painting with like a one pixel brush. Something like this. To kind of give it a little bit of detail. I'm holding down shift when I'm doing this just so these are nice and straight. And then maybe another one over here, that's become pretty good. Maybe there's a few that are kind of coming off this way. Another one this way. That's looking pretty cool. I'll change the blend mode of this. Too vivid light that's looking pretty good. And then I'm going to add some additional lines in here. Just kind of on the ground, something like this and you want it to be in perspective. It's just adding a little bit more detail into our scene. And again, I'll take this, I'll put it on a vivid light and we can mask out some of these. So I want it to be under the pipes. And a command click my pipes, go to my brush. Just get rid of those lines. Command click My Pyramid. Get rid of some of those underneath there. And then I'll just kinda soften some of these edges, just painting away with a soft brush. And then I go back to the, my construction lines, paint away some of these, give these softer edges as well. And then I'm going to add another highlight on top of here. For this top little cube. Just call this kilo. And this one. I'll also put on a different blend mode. I think that's pretty good. It's not too over the top. And maybe we're going to add some additional highlight lines. So I'll create a new layer. I'll just call this highlights. And maybe where the light is hitting these, these forms up here, I could just add a little highlight, something like this. Wherever you think there needs to be highlights, go ahead and add them. And from there, we're pretty much done. So what I'm gonna do at this point is just organize my layers in Photoshop. I'll take all these adjustment layers, drag it into a group, and I'll call this adjustments. And if you wanted to add a little vignette to this, you could as well. I'll show you how to do that. So I'll just name this and vignette. And I'll pick a darker, dark color from in here. And I'll hit G on the keyboard, fill this layer, put this on a multiply blend mode. And then I'll just take the opacity down. And I can add a layer mask and just kinda paint away the stuff that's in the center. And that's just going to darken our edges just a little bit and help focus the viewer on the main part of this image. And that completes this tutorial. 14. Conclusion: Congratulations, you've made it to the end. Thank you so much for enrolling in this course. I hope this series of lessons helped you gain an understanding of how to combine traditional art techniques with 3D tools. I wish you all the best with your work and your creative endeavors. If you desire, follow me on social media for a project updates and new work. If you've enjoyed this class or have any feedback for improvement, please leave a review. Thank you again and bye for now. 15. Bonus Lecture: So one thing that's really helpful is saving your assets for future projects. So one of the things that I like to do is once I'm done with the project, I'll come up to my content browser. And you'll see in here I have a whole bunch of models that have created over the years. So I've saved this stuff if I ever need it for future projects. If I ever need something that's like a background element or whatever, it's always here. And I can use this for whatever. So I have everything. We're doors and windows, the buildings, abstract shapes, roof, structural elements, trees, you know, all that kinda stuff. So I'd suggest that you do the same. So a really easy way to do this is within your content browser, I'm just going to go to these 3D models or create a new folder. And I'll just call this Demo. And within this folder, all you need to do is go through and drag and drop a bunch of your models in here. So if I go to this, the centers, probably something I don't want right there. But these random spheres, I think these would be really helpful to have. Like if I needed it at some random spheres and a different project, I have this random effector applied to it. The spheres are already there and it will save me a few minutes and creating it. So other things that I might want to do is add the city in here. So all these background elements that we created, you know, that, that'll come in handy for a new scene. The center pyramid. I think that's a really good one. These pipes, we could do these individually if we want. So I could just take this dry, drag it in here. Here's some pipes, here's some wires. My snaky type of form, some birds. And even if you wanted, you can add your lighting back in here. Because he already set up an environment, a main light and a fill light. So I can add that in here. So this comes in really useful. So if you're working on a different project, say File New. Now all you have to do is go into your content browser and you have a bunch of assets that you can work with. So if you double-click your pyramid here it is, you don't have to recreate it with the techniques that I showed you. It's already there, you know, and then you can start tweaking some of this stuff. What if you wanted this pyramid to have like a Varro NIH fracture on it, you could do that. What if we go into here, MoGraph, add grown, I fracture. I'll put this up in here. And now with this brain I fracture. I can go into my sources. I can add additional breaks in here. I can go into the object. I can have this start breaking apart and starts looking pretty cool. You can also go to the sources and you can offset some of these. So if you wanted to top of this, to have more breaks than the bottom, there you have it. I have more more breaks in the top. So reusing some of your assets is a really good thing. You know, you'll get a lot of mileage out of this and it's going to save you a ton of time. So anytime you do a project that I would suggest that you put your content inside of this content browser and a custom folder. So I just want to show you a few extra pieces that I did. So here's the original piece that I showed you. And using almost all of the same assets, I created this, this other piece where I had this pyramid. I elongated it a little bit at its Brunei fracture to this pyramid, then Brunei fracture to this topic cube. I had a little figure in here. If you were standing on a balcony overlooking the scene, background, background city with different buildings and we talked about. And then I also created a different piece where we were looking through the pyramid with a Verona fracture and some spears up here with some cracks in the ground. And all of these are basically using the same assets. So it's just a good habit to get into. Thanks again for watching.