Idioms Native English Speakers Use (Set 1) | Able Lingo ASL | Skillshare

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Idioms Native English Speakers Use (Set 1)

teacher avatar Able Lingo ASL, American Sign Language (ASL)

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

11 Lessons (35m)
    • 1. Introduction

      2:24
    • 2. "beat around the bush"

      3:14
    • 3. "not playing with a full deck"

      3:05
    • 4. "a hot potato"

      3:16
    • 5. "to keep ___ at bay"

      3:11
    • 6. "see eye to eye"

      3:24
    • 7. "a bed of roses"

      3:17
    • 8. "keep a stiff upper lip"

      3:17
    • 9. "in a nutshell"

      3:16
    • 10. "wet behind the ears"

      3:01
    • 11. "keep your nose clean"

      3:07
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About This Class

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In this course, we're going to explore ten (10) essential idioms commonly used by native English speakers. 

  • You can use these idioms with ANY native English speaker you meet.
  • You can use these idioms in ANY English speaking country.

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What is an idiom?

  • An idiom is a group of words with a hidden meaning which is understood because native speakers use it all the time.

Why study idioms?

  • Idioms are used all the time. Studies have shown that idioms are used three to four times per minute. That's a lot!
  • The ability to correctly use and understand idioms is an easy way to see how fluent someone is in English
  • Idioms allow you to speak English like a bossIdioms are for people who want to speak more fluently so they can communicate like a native English speaker.

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Each lesson focuses on one (1) idiom and has three (3) parts:

  1. Definition with examples
  2. Tips for Use or Other Ways To Say the idiom
  3. Conversation example with the idiom used multiple times

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Here is the list of ten (10) essential idioms covered in this course:

  • "beat around the bush"
  • "not playing with a full deck"
  • "a hot potato"
  • "to keep ___ at bay"
  • "see eye to eye"
  • "a bed of roses"
  • "keep a stiff upper lip"
  • "in a nutshell"
  • "wet behind the ears"
  • "keep your nose clean"

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This course is perfect for:

  • People who live or work in an English speaking country
  • People who have frequent contact with native or advanced English speakers
  • People who wish to teach the English language
  • People who want to better understand the culture of an English speaking country
  • Anyone who wants to communicate like a native and speak English like a boss

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Transcripts

1. Introduction: In this course, we're going to explore 10 essential idioms commonly used by native English speakers. Thieves are idioms that you can use with any native English speaker, their idioms that you can use in any English speaking country. So you might ask yourself, What is an idiom? An idiom is a group of words with a hidden meaning, which is understood because native English speakers use it all the time. You might also ask why study idioms? Idioms are used all the time. Did you know that studies have shown that a diem's air used 3 to 4 times per minute? That's a lot ability to correctly use and understand Idioms is an easy way to see how fluent someone is in English. Idioms allow you to speak English like a boss. Idioms are for people who want to speak more fluently so they can communicate like a native English speaker. In this course, each lesson focuses on one idiom and is divided into three parts. The first part is the definition with examples. The second part is tips for use or other ways to say the idiom. The third part is an example conversation where we show you the idiom, and we use it multiple times. This course is perfect for people who live or work in an English speaking country. People who have frequent contact with native English speakers, people who want to teach the English language to others, people who want to better understand the culture, often English speaking country people who want to communicate like a native and speak English like a boss. All right, let's get started, master your idioms and master your English. 2. "beat around the bush": Henry said. Tom, please do not beat around the Bush anymore. We really need to know what you think about this business deal, Tom said. To beat around the Bush means to avoid talking about the main topic. If we beat around the bush, we're trying not to talk about something important. Let's practice Mary beat around the Bush for three days because she didn't want to make a decision. Sam decided to stop beating around the bush and ordered pancakes. Hey, the tedium beat around. The Bush has two parts. A verb and a proposition. All phrase around the bush is a proposition. All phrase. It's fixed. It won't change. Great beat is a verb, and it will change. So if you're talking about a situation in the past, present or future, you need to update the verb. Here are a few examples Yesterday, Tom beat around the Bush for five hours. Right now, Tom is beating around the bush and wasting our time. Tomorrow. It's very likely that Tom will beat around the bush for another five hours. Please stop beating around the bush. What I don't beat around the bush. I always stay right on topic. Then Why don't you want to talk about my promotion? Uh, you don't deserve a promotion. What? Um uh, you show great devotion. Is that really what you just said? So what do you think of our new office space? See, you're doing it again. You're avoiding the subject. Maybe I am. What's it gonna take for you to stop beating around the bush? $1 million in cash? 3. "not playing with a full deck": Fred keep saying there's a pink magical dragon hiding in his basement. We think that maybe friends not playing with a full deck not playing with a full deck means someone is a bit stupid, crazy and not very intelligent. This person does things in a way which does not make sense. Let's practice. Even though Fred is not playing with a full deck, we like to joke with him about the pink magical dragon living in his basement. The idiom not playing with a full deck is mostly used in the third person singular with he and she. This is probably because it's kind of rude to call someone crazy to their face. Let's use this idiom in the past, present and future. In the past, we can say Maria wasn't playing with a full deck. She thought she was a banana. In the present, we can say Maria is eating the teacher. She's definitely not playing with a full deck. In the future, we can say Maria won't be playing with a full deck if she keeps sniffing glue. Did you see what happened to day at work? Know what happened? Henry jumped on his desk and started singing. I'm a cute little monkey. Oh, that. Ah, he's done that plenty of times. So you're saying he's not playing with a full deck? Right? He hasn't been playing with a full deck since, uh, the monkeys attacked him at the zoo. That's kind of creepy. What do you think Henry would do if I gave him a toy monkey for his birthday? 4. "a hot potato": Tom always talks about politics. Often people get uncomfortable around him because the issue is such a hot potato. Tom needs to chill out. A hot potato is a subject that's not easy to talk about. It makes people upset, Want to argue? And there's no easy solution. Not everyone will be satisfied. Let's practice. Be careful, Tom. Politics is such a hot potato that you risk losing friends. Maybe you should talk about something less controversial. Here are other ways to say a hot potato. Politics is often a hot potato. Politics is often a sensitive subject. The situation in the Middle East is a hot potato. The situation in the Middle East is a controversial issue. Deciding how to spend our money can be a hot potato. Deciding how to spend our money can be a dangerous topic. Henry Sanity is a hot potato. Henry. Sanity is a contentious matter. All right. See you later. Can I ask the boss something about his wife? Who? That's kind of a hot potato? Why is it a sensitive issue? Yesterday his wife was arrested by the police. Whoa, that is Ah, hot potato. What did you dio? She was caught stealing underwear from a store. That's it. She also stabbed one of the police officers in the eye with a pencil. Holy cow. Ah, I can't wait to tell everyone at the office. That's not a good idea. What do their Children think about what happened? 5. "to keep ___ at bay": Tom is trying really hard to keep Henry at bay. Henry has been causing huge problems and stress for everyone lately. Tom needs to avoid Henry to keep something at bay or to keep someone at bay means to avoid or stay away from them because they cost problems and stress in our lives. Let's practice. Henry was able to keep the hungry tigers at bay. Sarah was able to keep her crazy neighbors at bay by building a wall. We have many options for filling in the blank on this one, as long as what we use makes us upset, annoyed or stressed out, it'll work. In other words, it's something or someone we want to avoid or stay away from. Last night, we tried to keep the ferocious lion at bay, so we didn't get even. Right now, Mary is really annoying. Fred is doing all he can to keep her at bay tomorrow, Smelly Peter will be at work. I'm going to keep that stinky guy at Bain no matter what. All right. See you later. Why are you trying to keep me at bay? What do you mean? I swear you're trying to avoid me and keep me at bay. Well, you are kind of annoying and talk too much. What? I'm not annoying. I'm adorable. Everyone just loves me. I'm the most popular guy at work. The blast loves me. The workers love me. I love myself. So why are you trying to keep me at bay? Why don't you just leave me alone? 6. "see eye to eye": Oh, no. Tom doesn't think we'll ever see eye to eye on this project. We just have to many different opinions in too many different goals. It may be a failure to see. Eye to eye means to have full agreement on something. If we see eye to eye, we agree we have the same understanding and expectations. Good news. We sat down and had a meeting with Tom. We talked about our differences, and now we're able to see eye to eye. The project will be a success. Here are other ways to say see eye to eye Tom and Mary See eye to eye on the details. Tom and Mary fully agree on the details. I don't think we see eye to eye on this matter. I don't think we're in agreement on this matter. If we can't see eye to eye, we can just cancel the party. If we can't be of the same opinion, we can just cancel the party. The only way we can see eye to eye is if you give me $1 billion. The only way we can be in sympathy is if you give me $1 billion. If we don't see eye to eye. Our plan to rob the candy factory will never work. You are the one that doesn't agree with me. We must do it at night. But if we go in during the day, we can wear cool candy uniforms. If someone after I d were screwed. Yeah, it looks like we're not gonna see eye to eye. I know We can parachute in and enter through the roof. That sounds awesome. Do we see eye to eye now? Yes. What should we do with the candy we steal? 7. "a bed of roses": After taking the new sales job, Tom realized it was not going to be a bed of roses. Tom had to work 20 hours a day and travel six days a week. A bed of roses means that things are easy, comfortable and trouble free. If something is a bed of roses, weaken do it pretty easily and without much effort. Even though his job was not a bed of roses, Tom was paid $1 million per year. Tom decided to keep working, even though it was difficult. Here are other ways to say a bed of roses. Henry thought the spy job would be a bed of roses. Henry thought the spy job would be a piece of cake. Don't worry. The preliminary interview is a bed of roses. Don't worry. The preliminary interview takes no effort at all. If you think the exam will be a bed of roses, you'd better think again. If you think the exam will be super easy, you better think again. The life of a celebrity is a bed of roses. The life of celebrity is trouble free. All right, see you later, robbing the candy factory with a bed of roses what? I was caught and put in jail for two years. Oh, well, for me it was a bed of roses. It was trouble free for you because you escaped. Why did you stop to eat candy while the guards were chasing us? I was scared. I froze. The candy was delicious because you stopped candy. My escape was a bed of roses. The candy was delicious. What happened after the guards caught you? 8. "keep a stiff upper lip": Wow, that guy was really rude and disrespectful to Tom. He even insulted Tom's mother. Somehow, Tom was able to keep a stiff upper lip. To keep a stiff upper lip means to be able to control our emotions. When something unpleasant happens, something bad happens, but were able to stay focused and not lose control. Even though Tom was angry at being insulted, he was able to keep a stiff upper lip and stay focused on his goals, showing his anger would have been a waste of time. This idiom has two parts. The verb keep and the phrase a stiff upper lip. The phrase a stiff upper lip will not change fantastic. However, we need to update the verb keep to fit the situation. Here are some examples Everyone was crying during the movie, but Fred kept a stiff upper lip. The riot around us is sharking and violent, but I'm keeping a stiff upper lip so I can survive. Your girlfriend will most likely break up with you. You'll need to keep a stiff upper lip to not show your emotions. I know the situation is difficult, but you need to keep a stiff upper lip. It's so hard to be brave when you get a bad haircut. I know I cried like a baby the last time they cut my hair too short. I remember you were able to keep a stiff upper lip and move forward. You're right. I was able to keep my emotions in control. Ah, your hair. It's so beautiful. I feel so ugly. Don't worry. Your hair will grow back. What would you do if your hair was a short is mine? Oh! 9. "in a nutshell": Tom gave a business presentation for five hours. Everyone fell asleep at the end, Tom said. In a nutshell, this presentation was a complete waste of your time in a nutshell means in brief or in summary we say any nutshell when we want to take a bunch of information and summarize it into a few sentences. At the end of the long presentation, Fred said to Tom, I want to say many things, But in a nutshell, this was the worst business presentation I have ever seen. Here are other ways to say in a nutshell. In a nutshell. Our boat is going over the waterfall in about 10 seconds. In a word, our boat is going over the waterfall in a boat. 10 seconds. In a nutshell, the stock of our company is going through the roof. In summary, the stock of our company is going through the roof. We asked them to explain the issue. In a nutshell. We asked them to explain the issue very briefly. Sam told us in a nutshell. Why he's planning to jump off the building. Sam told us in a few words why he's planning to jump off the building. All right. See you later. Hey, boss. You wanted to speak with me? Yes. Please tell me in a nutshell. Why you should be promoted. Well, I only come to work two hours late. Oh, really? I only take ah three hour lunch break. I only leave two hours before everyone else. I didn't know that in a nutshell, I'm one of your finest employees. What will you do if we decide to promote you? 10. "wet behind the ears": Fred, Ask Tom. So is this new person that we're hiring for the job wet behind the ears? I hope not, because we really need someone with experience. If someone is wet behind the years, they are inexperienced, immature and still learning. They don't have a good idea of what's going on, and they still need to improve. Tom said to Fred, Don't worry. The guy that I hired is really experienced and knows what to do. I made sure to check to make sure he's not wet behind the ears. Here are other ways to say wet behind the ears. Sam was so wet behind the ears that we've fired him in on Lee two days. Sam was so inexperienced that we fired him in only two days. I used to be wet behind the ears, but I learned quickly and grew up fast. I used to be really immature, but I learned quickly and grew up fast. From the way Peter held the sword, everyone could tell he was wet behind the ears. From the way Peter held the sword, everyone could tell he was unskilled and untrained. All right, see you later. I can't believe how wet behind the ears. You are. What do you mean? You don't have any web design skills at all? I know how to turn on the computer. Can you create a website? Well, I use websites on my phone. You are so wet behind the ears. I'm still getting paid more than you. How in the world did you get hired to work here? 11. "keep your nose clean": Tom said to George, Be careful. You need to stay away from those guys. They're really bad. You need to keep your nose clean or in the future, you may have problems. To keep your nose clean means to be careful and to stay out of trouble by not doing anything wrong. You need to be careful and choose wisely. So you protect your reputation. George said to Tom. Wow. Do you remember those guys I told you about? They robbed a bank, and now they're all in jail. I'm glad I kept my nose clean. Here are other ways to say keep your nose clean. We tried to warn him, but Henry just couldn't keep his nose clean. We tried to warn him, but Henry just couldn't stay out of trouble. If you can't keep your nose clean, the police will lock you up in jail. If you can't stop committing crimes, the police will lock you up in jail. If you want to get a higher position here, you must keep your nose clean. If you want to get a higher position here, you must behave properly. All right. See you later. Why can't you keep your nose clean. I can. I have a tissue right here. That's not what I mean. You need to be more careful who you hang around. What, you don't like my friend? No, I don't like your friends. They're all criminals and Gangsters. We don't do anything bad. Just rob a few bangs. If you don't choose new friends and keep your nose clean, you can live here anymore. I'm gonna call my Gamester French and you'll be sorry.