Hygge Knit ♦ Traditional Fair Isle Knitting Technique + Project. Cosy extra wide ear warmer headband | Aerie North | Skillshare

Hygge Knit ♦ Traditional Fair Isle Knitting Technique + Project. Cosy extra wide ear warmer headband

Aerie North, Designer + Maker ♦ Art Gallery Education

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5 Lessons (51m)
    • 1. INTRODUCTION

      2:14
    • 2. Pattern Instructions

      7:18
    • 3. Complete Fair Isle Knitting Project: Extra wide ear warmer headband

      35:21
    • 4. Fair Isle BONUS Tourism Video

      3:15
    • 5. BONUS Hygge

      3:05

About This Class

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Fair Isle knitwear is world renown for it’s intricate recognisable patterns and comfort.  The traditional Fair Isle knitting technique is accomplished by knitting two colors in the same row producing a variety of patterns specific to Fair Isle.  
Examples of Fair Isle include; sweaters, scarves, shawls, cowls, gloves, mittens, hats, boot toppers, socks, children wear, holiday + gifts, pillows, poufs, throws, and blankets.

Fair Isle is a remote Scottish Island, belonging to the Shetland island group, lying around halfway between mainland Shetland and the Orkney islands.  Fair Isle is about 3 miles long and 1.5 miles wide with about 70 permanent residence.  

Visitors arrive and depart Fair Isle by air and sea.  Cruise ship tourists, artists, and bird observatory guests meander through the island, enjoying the beauty and rustic geography of this North Atlantic paradise.  

This class teaches you how to knit an extra wide ear warmer headband in the Fair Isle tradition.  This is the perfect project to start your journey into stranded knitting.  

You will learn how to:

♦ Read a Fair Isle knitting chart

♦ Use circular knitting needles, which is standard practice in Fair Isle knitting

♦ Cast on and bind off

♦ Add and change colors in the project to create Fair Isle patterns


The pdf pattern chart for this project is included with this tutorial.  

If you have any questions please contact me at [email protected]

And for creative news, please sign up on AerieNorth.com

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Transcripts

1. INTRODUCTION: Ferrell Knitwear is world renowned for its intricate, recognizable patterns and comfort. The traditional Fair Isle knitting technique is accomplished by needing two colors in the same row, producing a variety of patterns specific to Fair Isle. These examples of Fair Isle include sweaters, scarves, shawls, Cowell's gloves, mittens, hat who toppers, socks, childrenswear, holiday and gifts, pillows, proofs, throws and blankets. Fair Isle is a remote Scottish island belonging to the Shetland Island group. It lies about halfway between mainland Shetland and the Orkney Islands. Fair Isle is about three miles long and 1.5 miles wide and is home to about 70 permanent residents. Visitors arrive and depart Fair Isle by air and sea cruise ship tourists, artists and bird observatory guests meander through the island, enjoying the beauty, nature and rustic geography of this North Atlantic paradise. This class teaches you how to knit an extra wide here warmer headband in the Fair Isle tradition. This is the perfect project to start your journey into stranded knitting, you will learn how to read a Fair Isle knitting chart, use circular knitting needles, which is standard practice in Fair Isle. Knitting had a cast on cast off and weave in the ends and how to add and change colors in the project to create fair Isle patterns. The pdf pattern chart for this project is included with this tutorial. If you have any questions, please contact me at hello at airy north dot com and for creative News, please sign up on airy north dot com. 2. Pattern Instructions: hello and welcome in this lesson. We're gonna go over the pattern completely, which contains the chart and the written instructions. The skills that you'll need is to know how to cast on and bind off. I go very slowly in the tutorial so you can watch how I do it. You could slow down the video pause and back up tow. Watch again if you like. You need to know how to do the knit stitch. The Purl stitch and stranded knitting in the feral tradition is generally done in rounds, so you'll need to know how to use circular needles. And you'll need to know how to read this church, which we're doing in this lesson. The materials that I used for this project are five millimeter, 16 inch circular needles. You'll need two colors of worsted weight or DK yarn. I used a wool blend. I believe it was 85% wool and 15% nylon. It worked out beautifully. It's very warm and nice and stretchy. You'll also need a darning needle and scissors. The abbreviations for the chart and the written instructions are K is knit. P is pearl and here in the chart you could see that you pearl here and knit here and then to repeat the four stitches that will be doing in most of the rose. They'll be repeated from the Asterix to the Asterix. So that's what that means. That Asterix Toe Asterix means to repeat the pattern from the very first Asterix to the last one, by the number of times indicated in the pattern. M. C is main color, which in this case is a nice creamy color that I used. And in the chart, the main color is indicated by the white squares and CC is the contrast in color or the second color of yarn. And that's indicated in the chart with the block squares. And here I write. This is the perfect project for knitters, new to Fair Isle tradition of stranded knitting. The chart to the right demonstrates the four to color stitches you will be repeating 20 times because we have 80 stitches in every round. 20 times four is 80. The first and the last four rounds are knit two Purl, two repeats, and that gives a nice edging. And this year, warmer fits most adults. Let's scroll down these air the written instructions. So the first thing to do is to cast on 80 stitches onto the circular needle. You do have an option of just knitting one round before and after this edging the knit two Purl two edging in the main color. It gives it a nice little crisps. Start to a project. So in rounds 124 you're going to be repeating knit two Purl two. When reading a Fair Isle chart, you start right here in the bottom right hand corner and you read from right toe left and then go to the second round, right toe left and the third round right to left and continue that from right toe left. So you're building up starting on the right, so these 1st 4 rounds are knit to the Asterix knit two Purl two Asterix. So everything between the Asterix we repeat and we repeat that 20 times. Then from rounds 5 to 21 were going toe. Follow the chart, repeating the same four stitches per round 20 times because four times 20 is 80 and then round 20 to 25 is knit two Purl two. To finish off that edge, it'll show you when we go all the way up, there's the knit two Purl two all the way around. So to read this chart, we start off with our knit two Purl two edging for the 1st 4 rows. You have an option of just doing one complete row in your main color, and then when we start the pattern and you'll see this in the tutorial, what you do here is main color for one stitch, and then the next three stitches, our contrast in color. Then you repeat that again. Main color for 13 Contrast in colors. Main color for 13 contrast in colors, so you only ever have to remember four stitches per round, and this is very clear in the tutorial. The next round, when you start, you'll do two stitches of main color. One contrast ing one main, and then that just repeats two. Main contrast, in contrast, ing two. Main contrast. In contrast, ing. The next row is all main color all the way around, and then this is nice and easy because it's just alternating. So its main color contrast in color main color contrast in color, main color, contrast and color the entire round, and then when you start the next round, you just alternate that. So you get a nice staggered look. So then you do contrast ing main contrast in Maine. Contrast ing men main the entire round. And then to finish off the motif, you go back to main color contrast ing main color contrast ing all the way around, and then the next five rows are complete are an entire round of main color than our entire round of contrast in color than an entire round of main color than entire round of contrast in color and an entire round of main color. At this point, you'll be repeating this motif and then this motif to balance out the pattern. So let's go up and take a look. So here we just do main color contrast in Maine color contrast ing all the way around 20 times, then contrast in Maine. Contrast in Maine all the way around 20 times. Then again, main contrast ing main contrast ing all the way around 20 times one complete round of main color, and then we're back to that little T motif of Maine Maine Contrast, ing main main main contrast, ing mate, and then we're finishing off with main three contrast ing main three contrast ing all the way around 20 times, so you have 20 times for which is 80. And then you have the option of putting one entire round of main color before you start the edging for knit. Two Purl to knit two Purl two all the way around so that you end are up with 25 or, if you add it, those extra main color rose. You'll have 27 and then bind off at the end and we've in your ends. The tutorial will clearly explain everything visually. Ah, copy of this pattern is also included with the tutorial. 3. Complete Fair Isle Knitting Project: Extra wide ear warmer headband: this knitting project will be to create a Fair Isle tradition. Knit it headband or ear warmers. It's a very thick headband. It definitely covers the ears. You can even use this as a neck warmer. The yarn that I'm using for this project is a whoa blend, and the sample that I'm going by to create this is a previous year. Warmer headband again nice and thick, this one. I used 100% acrylic yarn, and this project has three different colors. We've got the main color and contrast in color. One, in contrast, in color to this is our sample our example that we're going to refer to when making this year warmer. There is a difference. But for a first time Fair Isle project, working with two different colors of yarn is best to begin with. Let's get started and create this beautiful year. Warmer headband. The materials for this project are two colors of your favorite yarn. In DK or worsted weight. You'll need a pair of scissors, a darning needle and a pair of circular needles. These needles are five millimeter circular needles and their 16 inches in length. Choose colors that you like that aren't too close to each other, they go together. That could be a little bit contrast Ng If you like these air the same types of yarn just in different colors I will be turning this yarn into a ball like this for easier use. First thing that we have to do is decide which yarn is our main color and which will be our contrast ing or secondary color. I've decided that I'd like this nice, creamy color to be my main color, this beautiful mossy green to be my secondary color. This project requires us to cast on 80 stitches onto our circular needle. So I'm just gonna move my secondary yarn and cast on to cast on. We start with a little slip knot, place it on to your needle and we're going to cast on 80 stitches to three four by 75 76 77 70 eight, 79 and 80. I've cast on 80 stitches and I counted them twice to make sure that I do have 80 stitches when I cast on the working yarn is on the left. But when I work, I work the working yard with my right hand, which is the English method. I like to have a crisp, even neat start to my project. So I'm going to do one whole round just needing. So I'm gonna start because we work in the round. We want to work knit, stitch on Lee. We don't need Pearl unless it's called for in the pattern, which in this case we do knit two Purl two for our edging. We want to make sure that all the stitches air lined up in the same direction. There's no twists, and now I'm just going to start my first knit round. The first round is always a little tighten, a little sticky, but then it gets much easier. So continue all the way around, pushing your stitches up as you need them, and I'll meet you at the end of this round. I've just completed the first net row. I recounted again to make sure I had the 80 stitches just in case I dropped something because that first row is very tight and finicky. So, by just knitting one round, you're creating much looser, workable stitches, making sure that everything is pointed in the same direction. So I've got the beginning of my projects, all pointed in. Nothing has curled or turned, and I'll be ready to start my mitt to Pearl two. The knit stitch or the stock Annette Stitch that will be using for this project will look like this. This stock in that stitch we've got those V's when you're working flat with needles to get the stock in that stitch, you knit one side and then pearl the other side so you get those curls that happy face, sad face, happy face that base net one side pearl the other side with circular needles. We don't need to do that. We can just keep knitting unless the pattern calls for pearling, which this one doesn't were about to dio in flat knitting. If you just kept needing back and forth back and forth, you would constantly get the's stitches, thes type of stitches, the garter stitch. If you pull a gardist that you can see that their RVs, but usually it just looks like these ridges here. Let's begin our knit two Purl two edging to begin. I'm going to just knit, too. Net two. Bring that working yard to the front and Pearl two. Bring that looking your into the back mitt, too. Bring the working your into the front. Move up my stitches and pearl two. Working her into the back knit, too, working her into the front pearl. Two. Continue that all the way around till we get to this tale. I'm using my tail as my stitch marker. So I know when the round has finished. We will be finishing with Pearl to because we started with Mitt too. So it will always be knit two Purl to knit. Two. Purl two. So let's continue and I'll meet you at the end of this rope. I've just completed my first round of edging with knit two Purl two. It will end up looking like this net to pearl to knit two, Purl two. So this pearl to knit two Purl tune it to and this is what the edging will look like. We're going to have four rows of knit two Purl, two altogether and then we will start the Fair Isle Strand admitting project using two colors. I'm going to continue to do three more rows and then we'll meet back here to continue the project. The magic part of the project is complete now, So we have knit two Purl to knit two Purl tune it to and so on to complete the edging. So that would be this part of the headband. Now it's time to add our second color. So I'm gonna use this as an example. We have a total of 80 stitches for this project, so we're going to be working in four stitches times 20 times around, which equals 80. So we're going to do these four stitches. We're gonna do our contrast in color, contrast in color, contrast in color, main color, and then repeat that three contrast in colors and the main color. And repeat that three contrast in colors and the main color, and we'll do this 20 times, and that will complete that very first row of just those three contrast in colors and the main color. And I'm going to show you how to do that. So here I have my edging and my main color is still connected to the project and will always be connected to the project. And now I'm gonna add my secondary color to do that. I'm just going to create a little tail and leave that down and now we'll just be doing the knit stitch all the way around. So we've got three contrast ing colors and one main color. Who's gonna add the new color and mitt it on there? Add the new color and mid it on. Add the new color and it on the tail in the back is secure and will be weaving in the tail at the end of the project. The secret to stranded knitting is to make sure that your tension is consistent and that you don't pull too hard on the back. When you're moving along, you're carrying along. You're floats. These air called floats. Let me show you on this example. So here we have the main color, the cream color and the red heart. And when we turn it over, you could see that these floats. So these air the main color that we just floated along until we needed it again and we don't pull too tight if I pulled really tight, this would be all puckering and weird looking like that if I pulled it too tight. So let's get going on this. So I put on my three contrast in colors. And now I'm gonna add my main color. So I'm not gonna pull it really tight. I wanted to just move along the backside very naturally, as if we're just taking it along with us with a pulling tight. They're just gonna need it on. And there it ISS. So there's the float and is nice and loose and still creates a bit of, ah, elastic feel stretchy feel. And then we're going to move along again with the green, and you can see how it crosses over here, just like in the example it just crosses over. Now, in some projects, you're gonna have long strands, long floats in the back. You have the option of in this case what I did is catch the float by just wrapping around that contrast in color. You see, I just wrapped it around, and in this case I didn't. So it's quite long the pattern that we are using, I specifically wrote, so you wouldn't have long floats. You would just have these tiny little floats, which is perfect for a first Fair Isle project. So let's continues. I've got those 1st 4 and we're doing these in groups of four. So I one end up with 20 groups of four like this. So I'm going to knit on the green and just with the my fingers, I'm going to just separate the two colors and then it on the green, one to three and then it on the cream. I usually pull my stitches apart and exaggerate my stretch and then have my float come along on it. So now I've got that next group before I'm gonna do that green again, one to three, pull it apart a little bit, and then my cream color to do that again. One to three and my cream color. Let's take a look at the back. So there's my floats. I'm just bringing along both yarns at the same time, and they'll continue that and at the end of the road will meet here to move on to the next row. All right, that round is completed. Three greens, one cream, three greens, one cream. And now we're back at the beginning and we're ready to go on to our next row. Let's look and see what happens on the other side. So the other side we have carried our yarn with us all the way around. It's okay. If it looks a little loose at the beginning, it will tighten up. But it will still give you a nice spring for wearability. Let me show you on this example. This is actually nice and stretchy and that's because the floats were just long enough in the back and not too long. And everything was carried together all the way through. So now we're working on the next row, which is the contrast in color over the middle contrast in color of the first row. So in this case, we start will be starting with main color, contrast ing main color, main color and then again, main color, contrast ing mean color, main color. And because map is involved in this, we have 80 stitches. All together, we're going to be using groups of four times 20 to make 80 and that will be the pattern main color, contrast in color, main color, main color. So let's start back together our next row main color. Tune it on Contrast in color over that 2nd 1 I mean color, main color. I mean color, main color. So there we have it. We've got the three on the bottom and the one right in the middle. Let's do that again. Main color contrast in color, main color, main color and I'm watching my tension pulling along As I go, there's my tension Main color contrast in color with that up main color main color again. Main color contrast in color. I mean color, main color. So the only thing I have to remember is four stitches. I don't have to remember 80 stitches and I'm going to continue this on will meet at the end of this round to start the next. And that road was completed now. So what we have is 123 and then the contrast in color above the middle one just here, like you're 123 The contrast in color above the middle one and that goes all the way around the next row is nice and easy. It's just the main color all the way around. So we'll start and finish that together and they will move on to this group. So let's start the main color pushing up my stitches as I need them. I'm just gonna leave my secondary color. My contrast in color just behind the project. And just with my cream color, my main color just knit all the way around and I'll meet you at the end of this round. Let's finish up this road together, and I know that it's the end of the row because I'm all out of green. My row is just the main color, and also there's my tail, which acts like my marker. So I want to more stitches to begin the next row. Now we can really see that first motif on our ear warmers, three stitches and one in the middle for the contrast in color. This is looking very nice and are edging looks good, and now we're ready to move on to this part over the pattern. This part of the pattern is just alternating main color contrast in color main color contrast in color all the way through one row and then the row above it. We do main color contrast in color, the opposite, and then the role. Above that, we go back to the beginning and just threw opposite of the row underneath. This particular motif is perfect for first time Fair Isle knitters because you will start to get used to controlling two strands of yarn. See you are tensions still good? How I like to hold my yarn is to put my main color on top and my secondary color on the bottom. That's just my preference. I hold both in my palm and then I'm just going to alternate. So how I want this is I want to stitches above this to be green, which means I'm starting green here and then I'm just gonna alternate as I go along. So I'm going to do green net and then cream Main color knit here. Main color Contrast in color. Main color Contrast in color. Main color Contrast in color. Main color Contrast in color. I'm watching my tension as I go along, still very stretchy, both yarns air coming along and I'll finish this up and I'll meet you at the end of this round. Let's finish this throw together. Main color contrast in color. Now you are going to come across where you have two of the same colors beside each other. That's okay. That's where the Rose meet. The important thing to Dio is just to follow what we were doing so we were putting a main color over contrast in color and a contrast in color over main color. So here we have the contrast in color. We want to knit the main color and here knit a main color. It's too, but that's the nature of knitting in the round with Fair Isle. So now we are back at the beginning. He Comptel. There's our stitch markers, so to speak, and our first tune, It's of our edging. And here we're gonna finish off that motif, that third part of the motif by alternating our colors again. So we have a main color We're gonna nit a contrast in color main color contrast in color all the way around To get this type of motif, let's start together and finish together. I've got my contrast in color over my main color main color over my contrast in color. See what the back looks like. So you see, there's some nice pole on that nice stretching nous, so when we wear it, it conf it a lot of different sizes with this type of stretch. Okay, let's finish off this motif and I'll meet you at the end of the road that motif is now completed. Now we're gonna work on the next round. Now, the next four rounds 1234 will just be alternating. So you'll just do straight knitting all the way around with one color, we're going to start with the main color all the way around, and then the green color, the secondary color all the way around main color all the way around and contrast in color all the way around. And that's all you do. You don't have to bring the yarn with you when you are doing just one color the entire way around. So I'm going to continue that on and you continuous well, and we'll meet at the end of doing four rounds. So 80 stitches of main color, 80 stitches of contrast in color, 80 stitches of main color and 80 stitches of contrast in color. I'll meet you at the end of those four rounds. Those four rows are now completed, so that was a complete row of main color contrast in color, main color and contrast in color. So looking at the sample now, the sample, of course, is three colors and were dis using too. But we can still use this. So what we've done here is the 1234 ropes. So now we've completed more than half of the year warmer. The next few rows you'll be able to exercise this skill. You learned Emmys rose because of what happens here happens here. So we'll continue on with a row of original color. And then we'll do 123 rows of the alternating motif just like we did here, then one main color. And then we're gonna work this one backwards. Instead of doing three contrast in colors and one original color, we're going to start with the original color and then contrast in color. Original original original contrast ing original Original original Contrast ing. I will go all the way around, and I just made sure that this lined up with this stitch for balance. And then the next round will be just like that first round, which is contrast. In contrast, in contrast, ing original contrast. In contrast, in contrast, ing original. So there's nothing new in the second part of the ear warmer, So I'm going to continue on with the pattern again. I'll go over it. We'll have a whole row of original color, and then we'll alternate. Original contrast ing original Contrast in original contrast in original contrast ing all the way around. And then we'll alternate on the diagonal for contrast in original contrast in Original. And then the third row of that particular motif will be the opposite again. So we get that nice little zigzag, or X, and then the next row is all original all the way around for 80 stitches and then following up, matching up that very first motif that we did. But we're doing it backwards. So we have original contrast ing original original original contrast ing original, original original contrast ing all the way around. And then that last row before we do our knit two Purl two for the last part of the edging and the binding off we do contrast. In contrast, in contrast, ing original contrast. In contrast, in contrast, ing original. So I will continue on these rows and you continue on and we'll meet just before we go into The edging pattern is now completed. The only thing left that we have to do this one complete round using our original color and then we can start on our knit two Purl two edging to complete this and then a casting off because we don't need are green anymore. We can create a little bit of ah, tail and cut that off and then we will We've this in at the very end. Let's take a look at the inside. Everything's nice and even and balanced. It's good and stretchy. All right, I'll begin with you. And then we will continue together to start our knit two Purl two edging for four last rounds. I will meet you at the end of this round. Here we are at the end of that last round where we just used the main color and now we are going to do our four rows of edging knit two, Purl two. So I'm just gonna move my stitches up onto my needle. No, to pearl. Two it to Pearl two. I'm gonna continue this and you continue your work and then we will meet once we've done knit two Purl two for four rounds. The earmuffs headband is complete now, so let's take a look at what we've done. We started off with nicked to pearl to knit two Purl two to create an edge. And then we did the first motif of three contrast in color and one in the middle. And then we just did a nice band of the original color. And then we did an alternating main color and contrast in color four rounds off both of our colors alternating. Then we repeat it the 1st 2 motifs and finished off with knit two Purl to knit two Purl two to finish off the edging. Now we're going to cast off to cast off in the round is very similar to the same, is actually cast off or bind off with straight needles. We just knit two on. Take that 2nd 1 up and over toe, let it drop off their it ISS do that again and lifted up and over. Okay, I'll continue. You continue. Could see that we have that nice edging. And when we finish off completely binding off, I'll meet you here for the weaving in of the ends. Let's finish up the last couple of stitches binding them off, and then we could just take that last ditch right there. Let's create a little bit of a tail and cut off the arm. Now we could take out our needles. And with that little loop, I'm going to thread through my little tail just a pull it nice and tight to create a knocked. So here's the project. It's all finished. Now let's weave in the ends. We're gonna turn it around, turn it inside out and see the ends. Okay, So we have our beginning and entail and the beginning and the end of the contrast in color . I'm gonna get my darning needle and thread it through. Now, here. I'm just gonna pick up some stitch in the back and create a little Not some people don't like having not So I really like having a nice secure not I'm not gonna pull it to too tight and take the project. I would of It's nice, comfy, stretchy mode. And now with the rest of the tail, I'm just gonna thread through some of the strands of yarn back here. There we go. That should keep it nice and secure. I'll do the same with the contrast in color on this side. Thread it through my darning needle. Just gonna go through anywhere, pull it through, create my little not tighten it up, but not terribly much. And then just go right in between supplies of the wall and pull it through nice and stretchy before I cut it. Now my beginning and my end. I created that. Not so I don't have to make another. Not and then I'm just going to go through some of these plies. I don't wanna pull too tight. Another centimeter so into the project. There we go. Snip off the excess. And our last one I like to see this is the beginning of it. Yes, I'd like to see where I can get it in. So it looks seamless. That's pretty. I will create a little not here, but make sure that not is on the inside and then just thread through just in between some of these Strand's. Yeah, well, that take off the excess. Let's turn it inside. Over. Right side out. And there we are. Oh, this is very nice. Look at that stretch. You can really get a few different sizes out of this. Here you are 4. Fair Isle BONUS Tourism Video: way. 5. BONUS Hygge: Julia is a Danish work the art of comfort and happiness. Denmark is located so with of Norway and Sweden, north of Germany and east of the United Kingdom. Although it has no direct English translation, Julia has been described as the art of creating comfort and happiness who is intimate and cozy. It is the presence of soothing, happy things. You know who gah when you feel it. It's when you are spending time with a loved one, enjoying your favorite arts and crafts in a cozy cafe with a friend or sharing comfort food and conversation with friends and family books have been written about Hyuga. Among my favorite is Mike Vikings. The Little Book of Hyuga. The Danish Way to Live Well. Mike is the CEO of the Happiness Research Institute in Copenhagen and has spent years studying the magic of Danish life. He's committed to finding out what makes people happy and has concluded that yoga is the magic ingredient that makes Danes the happiest nation in the world. The United Nations, third it studying on listing the happiest countries in the world in the 19 seventies, Denmark is consistently in the top five, often being number one, and what's really interesting is that being the happiest countries in the world has little to do with well. According to the World Bank, Denmark rates 20th economically per capita, Norway's six sweetness 15th Finland is 23rd and Canada where I live. It's 19th. Geographically, the five happiest countries are located in the Northern Hemisphere and share similar climates and customs. It's our long, snowy winters that makes us take part in cozy, happy indoor note door activities. Were able to apply are happy optimism to the cold, dark season. That's yoga. This is my Hyuga, my little cottage in the woods and Ontario, Canada. We are off the grid with solar panels and a wood stove. My art studio is nestled behind the cottage. This is where I create my artwork and designs on my classes. My artwork is sold in a variety of art galleries and boutiques, and in my online shop I love teaching art and design classes and galleries, studios, classrooms and online. I've been teaching for over 20 years with an eclectic resume of creative subjects. I am fascinated with digital art in the entire universe of endless designs to create. I look forward to e meeting you in this course. Together we will create good Puga