How to write an Artist Bio that will Impress Art Directors + Gallery Curators. Your Creative Story | Aerie North | Skillshare

How to write an Artist Bio that will Impress Art Directors + Gallery Curators. Your Creative Story

Aerie North, Designer + Maker ♦ Art Gallery Education

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7 Lessons (20m)
    • 1. Intro

      3:12
    • 2. Lesson 1: Technical criteria

      1:39
    • 3. Lesson 2: What art directors + gallery curators expect to read in your bio

      2:15
    • 4. Lesson 3: Art education

      2:07
    • 5. Lesson 4: Exhibits + boutiques

      2:20
    • 6. Lesson 5: Extraordinary achievements

      1:58
    • 7. Lesson 6: Example

      6:28
13 students are watching this class

About This Class

Artists need tools.  And one of the most important tool is an ARTIST BIO.  An artist bio, or biography, is important information about the ARTIST.

Art gallery curators and art directors expect an artist to have a bio. 

Artists need a bio for:

  • Call for submissions to art galleries + events
  • Writing a proposal to art directors, curators, music producers
  • Interviews for media, blogs, television, podcasts, and magazines
  • Public Relations + marketing
  • Catalogs
  • Your portfolio
  • Art, Music, Theatre, Artist Residency grant proposals
  • Websites

This class is for:

New artists who have never written or perhaps seen an artist bio.

Emerging artists who have some experience + would like help writing an impressive bio.

Established artists wanting to refresh their bio.

The definition of artist in the framework of this class includes fine art, visual art, painters, illustrators, photographers, coloring book artists, writers, animators, musicians, potters, knit + crochet art, wearable art, actors, and so many more genres.

Building your profile correctly will result in a polished professional appeal that will propel your creative business in the right direction.

Many artists dread having to write their creative story.  They fear they don’t have enough experience to impress curators and art directors.  Sometimes they have too much experience and get bogged down with making decisions on what to include in their story.   

I love the challenge of tackling words, experience, and story to create fascinating collateral supporting my artwork + my  brand.     

An artist bio is an essential marketing tool that moves your creative business forward.  Your bio has the power to create positive buzz that will result in more sales that keep you in the freelance art career that you love.      

Your Class Project is to write your artist bio and share it in the Class Project section below.

This Class Project is a great way for art directors + curators find you.  They are constantly looking for new artists and often visit classes to find new talent.  Include photographs of your artwork to gain the attention you need to move your creative business forward.

With your permission I will share your artist bio on my social media platforms giving you positive exposure to the art world and thousands of followers.

Please join me in class and together we will write an effective and fascinating bio that will impress art gallery curators and art director.

Class Content

Lesson 1: Technical criteria

Lesson 2: What are directors + gallery curators expect to read in your artist bio

Lesson 3: Artist education

Lesson 4: Artist exhibits + boutiques

Lesson 5: Extraordinary acheivements

Lesson 6: Example of an artist bio

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Transcripts

1. Intro: Welcome toe artist. Bio Impress art directors with your creative story. Artists need tools on one of the most important tool is an artist bio. An artist. Bio or biography is important information about the artist. Gallery curator is an art. Directors expect artists tohave an artist bile. You'll need one for call for submissions, toe art galleries and events. Writing a proposal Toe art directors curate ER's music producers for interviews for media blog's television, podcasts and magazines for your public relations and marketing catalogues. Your portfolio for art, music, theater and art residency grant proposals and for your website and other people's websites . This class is for new artists who have never written or perhaps even seen, an artist file. It's also for emerging artists who have some experience but would like some help on writing an impressive bio. It's also for established artists wanted to refresh their bio. The definition of artists in the framework of this class includes fine art, visual art, painters, illustrators, photographers, coloring book artists, writers, animators, musicians, Potter's, Knittig, rochet and fibre artists, wearable art like fashion actors and so many more creative genres. Building our portfolio correctly will result in a polished professional appeal that will propel your creative business in the right direction. In this class, you're gonna learn about technical criteria that's required for your artist bio. What art directors and curators is expect to read in your bio art education exhibitions and shows extraordinary achievements and an example of an artist bio. Many artists dread having to write the creative story. They fear they don't have enough experience to impress curator's and art directors. Or sometimes they have too much experience and get bogged down with making decisions on what to include in their story. I love the challenge of tackling words, experience and story to create fascinating collateral to support my artwork in Brand. An artist Bio is an essential marketing tool that moves your creative business forward. Your bio has the power to create positive buzz that will result in more sales and keep you in the freelance. Parker, that you love your class project is to write your artist bio and share it in the class project section. Below. This class project is a great way for art directors and curators is to find you. They're constantly looking for new artists and often visit these classes to find your talent include photographs of your artwork to gain the attention you need to move your creative business forward. With your permission, I'd like to share your artist bio on my social media platforms, giving you positive exposure to the art world and thousands of followers. Please join me in class and together will write ineffective and fascinating bile that will impress art gallery curator and art directors. See you in class. 2. Lesson 1: Technical criteria: Welcome back to class and this lesson. We're gonna talk about the technical criteria for your artist bio. There's a couple of technical criteria points that remain an art industry standard, saying that it's still okay to occasionally break the rules when it makes sense to do so. The length of an artist bio is generally between 100 words and 500 words. Keep it between 152 150 words that works best. However, if the curator or art director provides you with submission guidelines, follow them to the letter. An artist bio is always written in the third person. At first it'll feel a little strange to write your own bile that way, but you will get used to it and even begin to look at your art and accomplishments through new eyes. This is your artistic story, so include a great photograph of yourself. Have your picture taken to reflect your creative medium. If you're a classical musician, have your picture taken playing your instrument. If unit include beautiful yarn in your photography or a simple clear headshot works perfectly, too. Addiction is the choice of words you used to write your bio, you might be tempted to get out your thesaurus and dress up your bile with $10 words to impress the art director. Don't do that. Use language that you would use. Face the face in a regular conversation with the art director or curator. Be riel and be yourself. We'll meet you in the next lesson. 3. Lesson 2: What art directors + gallery curators expect to read in your bio: Welcome back to class. In this lesson, we're gonna talk about what art directors and gallery curator is expect to read in your bio . Your artist bio is about you. The artist, now an artist statement, is different than an artist. Bile. An artist statement is about the art. This is about you. So here's a list of things that should be in your bile. You want to include your name and the name of your studio. If you don't have a name of a studio or don't even have a studio, don't worry about it. Just don't include it you want. Include where you were born and how it influences you as an artist. Often where we were born directly influences us as an artist. Our childhood environment built who we are, so it will likely have in effect if it's an interesting effect. It's definitely something that you want to add in your bio. You want to include where you live now and how it influences you as an artist. You also want to include your art education or any other education workshops, classes that have a direct influence on your current art. If you don't have any art education. Don't worry about it. We're going to talk about that type of thing in the last lesson. When we do an example of a bio, you want to include any showings or exhibitions or boutiques where your art currently lives or recent past showings. You want to include any type of artistic philosophy or insights that you have about why you do what you do. You might want to include who influences us an artist. If you have any awards, honors, distinctions or nominations at those to your artist bio and any experience that is related to your art, the big question that your bio answers is Why do you make art? That's a huge question. So you want to make the list of all the answers toe Why you make art Keeping in mind that list that we went over at the beginning of this lesson from that list pulling all the gems that will impress the readers of your bio in the next lesson will discuss your art education. I will see you in less than three 4. Lesson 3: Art education: Hello and welcome back to class. And this lesson. We're gonna talk about artists education. If you went to art school or attended poetry workshops led by Leonard Cohen or took acting classes from Lee Strasbourg, you would obviously include that in your artist bio. But what if you're like a lot of artists and you didn't go to art school? But you might have taken relevant workshops, training e courses or distance learning that are still considered art, education, skill share. Creativelive and coursera are my favorite remote education platforms. Course. Sarah partners with top universities around the world toe offer free courses online for anyone to take. I've taken a lot of coursera courses, but I don't include all of them in my artists. Bio. Depending on who is going to be reading my artist bio, all include Those type, of course, is, for instance, I took art therapy workshops and in art therapy course through the Museum of Modern Art in New York Online. I would include that in my art teaching bio, the design classes that I took from the California Arts. I would include in my repeat pattern design artists bio. You might have even taken courses that youth think aren't really related to your art. But think of this. Say you took guitar lessons for an entire year and you finally decided you're just not going to pick it up. You're just not gonna play the guitar, but you're a painter, and you end up painting pianos and you paint funky images on guitars and instruments than adding those guitar lessons that you took for a year could be a really interesting fact. In your artist bio. I encourage you to spend some time on the skill, share creativelive and coursera websites and visit them often for art and business courses that will move your art career forward and you can include them in your artist bio. Meet you in the next lesson. 5. Lesson 4: Exhibits + boutiques: Welcome back to class. In this lesson, we're gonna talk about exhibits and boutiques. Choosing which exhibits am boutiques to include in your bio depends on who's reading it. You'll have several different artists bios written, and they're short, so you can do that. You'll have a standard bio for your website or brochure, but you should tweak it a little if it doesn't quite fit some galleries or events. For example, if your watercolor portfolio ranges from babies to adult nudes and you're submitting to Parents magazine, your bio for Parents magazine will include your baby and Children. Information. Save the adult nudes for a different audience if you have one or no exhibits, but you have something coming up in the future, then include that information in your artist bio. If you don't have any exhibits and you don't have anything coming up, then get really creative. Think of anyplace you've shown your art. Have you participated in craft shows, festivals, contests, fairs right about those experiences? Even if you have submitted your work for a contest and it didn't win, you can write that you were a nominee for that contest or that you had a showing in the library. Ask places that will just show your art restaurants, cafes, your favorite coffee, Shaw libraries these air all places where you can get exposure and include that in your artist bio art galleries and have boutique shops that sell artists were. If your art has been featured in any type of our gallery, shop at that information to your bile. If selling your artwork in our gallery boutique is something that you haven't done, but you're interested in doing that, then take a look at my skill share class called Cellular Art in Art Gallery and Museum boutiques. That'll give you an insight on how to get into that market. If you're new to the artwork and don't have any experience, then start making a list of where you can display your art. Before you know it, you'll have a huge list of exhibits and boutiques to choose from for your bile. I'll meet you in the next lesson 6. Lesson 5: Extraordinary achievements: Welcome back to class. In this lesson, we're gonna talk about your extraordinary achievements. This is a Superfund part of the artist bio. It might be a little as one sentence, but it could have a huge impact. It might not be the extraordinary achievements that you're thinking about. This is where you get to mention that you participated in four triathlons or organized 25 people. Tune it or Cochet 1000 hats for premature babies. Or you lived on a boat once owned by Bobby Kennedy. Or you want a contest making marshmallow tower. Or you helped your 98 year old grandmother rebuild a snowmobile or you're the eldest of 17 Children. The extraordinary achievement or event should fit into your bile. For example, here's Steve's bio. Steve celebrated his 40th birthday by skydiving and Maui. Unfortunately, he veered off course, landing in the middle of a wedding, breaking the maid of honor's arm. The good news is Stephen the maid of honor got married in Maui 10 months later, and she shares his love a pottery and help Steve open his first studio last August. Everyone has a story that can be added to a bio If it fits, use it. If it doesn't fit, save it. You'll likely use that extraordinary achievement in your art career. At some point, it could be the subject of a great guest blawg post or a podcast where you can mention your art business. Start making a list of achievements that you've done that are maybe a little quirky or some little talent that you have that you can fit in to your artist bio. Giving you that little bit of interest that's going to spark something in the art director or gallery curator toe. Want to give you a call and meet you? Don't add an extraordinary achievement just for the sake of adding it to your bile. If it fits, use it. It could be the story in your artist bio that gets you in a gallery or a graphic design contract. Meet you in the next lesson 7. Lesson 6: Example: welcome back to class. In this lesson, we're going to look at an artist bio. Example. Google's a great place to see thousands of examples of artist bios, but not all of those bios will impress art directors and gallery curator. Here's an example of an artist bio that includes the technical criteria of being between 105 100 words written in the third person What art directors and curators is expect to read in your bile artist education exhibits and shows and boutiques and an extraordinary achievement or some quirky little fact about the artist. Here's a profile of our artist Emily Ford. This isn't her bio. This is just things that she wrote down about herself, and she did it in the third person just to get used to it. So here we go. Emily Ford always loved watercolor painting. She attended the University of Portland and Oregon and majored in English. She left school early because she was offered a job teaching English in South Korea for a year. Emily ended up staying in Seoul for five years. During those five years, Emily met and married a fellow English teacher from Montreal. They moved to Montreal and have twins. Emily found her watercolor paintings while unpacking. She tripped over the box when the twins were four years old and we signed the mop for preschool art classes. When the twins started the first grade, Emily was offered an art teaching job at the same community center where the twins took art . Emily, her husband and Children moved to Portland to help boat Emily's aging parents. Emily's husband started a marketing business from their home well. Emily volunteered at the Twins school and took the odd art and marketing class online and at the community center. That led to Emily. Taking a few more watercolor painting classes, Emily started working part time teaching art to Children and teens at the community center . And when the twins were in the seventh grade, Emily built up a large number of watercolor paintings. She even started painting ceramics and taught herself how to make repeating surface pattern designs so that she could design her own fabric on spoon flour. Emily sold some of her watercolor and brush letter and greeting cards at the Schools Arts and Craft Sale, made a few tea towels for friends from her spoon flour designed fabric. Emily now wants to start an art business and needs to write an artist bile. So now Emily wants to go over to the local art collective studio and ask if she conjoined an exhibit her watercolors, ceramics, repeating surface powder, designed fabrics, rush letter in greeting cards and tea towels. She's worried that she's got too many art modalities on the go and will appear a little unorganized. She decides to approach the art collective studio with her watercolor paintings first and then add brush letter and greeting cards. In a few months, Emily decides to write one artist bio focusing on watercolors and a second bio focusing on repeat surface pattern designs for licensing that she could do online. Here is the artist bio that Emily wrote for the art collective studio. Emily Ford literally fell in tow. Watercolor landscapes. When she returned from teaching English in Seoul, South Korea, she tripped over unpacked boxes, releasing the paintings she created while overseas. Born in Portland, Emily has painted landscapes of both the Pacific Ocean sunrises and sunsets after her years teaching art for the Montreal community Children's art programs, and we picked up her paintbrushes once more and created a large body of artwork. Since 2014 the Museum of Modern Art in New York City offered remote art classes that help further Emily's Our Education, and his latest project is a series of organ landscapes where she adds the playfulness of her twin daughters and Montreal born husband William. Still teaching Children art Emily has plans to add adult art classes tour schedule in the new semester, much less clumsy. Now Emily keeps her watercolor landscapes in frames ready for their new walls. Emily's bio is 100 and 50 words, so it fits within the technical criteria. There's a nice picture of Emily and her family on the beach now. She didn't use absolutely everything from her profile. She only used information that would be relevant for the curator at the art studio that she wants to approach. She made some interesting points that the curator will likely really want toe learn more about Emily, such as her time in Seoul and Montreal, and the curator will likely really want to see the paintings of the sun rises over the Pacific Ocean from South Korea on the sun, sets over the same ocean from Oregon. MoMA Offering remote art classes is a super interesting fact that few people know about. Emily opened with a giggle about tripping over boxes containing her paintings and referred to her past clumsiness in closing. That's a nice touch. She included her Contact information and website, which will have great photographs of Emily's framed paintings on walls and perhaps even a one minute behind the scenes video of Emily painting and further talking about her story today, start writing your artist bio by writing a detailed profile about yourself on why you make art, your education, your experience and something interesting. Like Emily did. A book tripping over boxes Know who the reader is so that you can use relevant information from your profile. Keep your words between 105 100 words and write it in the third person. Use a good photograph of yourself and tweak your artist bio based on who the readers are and what you want. The bio to communicate. Thank you for taking this class. Are you hope you found it helpful and will start right in your artist bio. Today I have two other classes that you might find helpful as you launch your art career. One of them is called Pricing Handmade Jewelry for profit in your online store, retail shops, boutiques and art galleries. This really applies to anything that you want to sell in your online shot retail shops, boutiques and art galleries. The second class is sell your art in art gallery and museum boutiques. Please stay in touch in either the community section below of this class or join my email list for free weekly art at Ari North at gmail dot com. And please let me know if I can share your class project artists bio with my social media audience and thousands of followers.