Best-Paying Copywriting Gigs: B2B Emails | Alan Sharpe | Skillshare

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

14 Lessons (1h 40m)
    • 1. About this Class

      3:04
    • 2. Introduction to B2B emails

      8:11
    • 3. Anatomy of a B2B email

      7:04
    • 4. Cold email formula

      7:55
    • 5. Anatomy of a cold email #1

      8:53
    • 6. Anatomy of a cold email #2

      9:15
    • 7. Cold email mistakes to avoid

      7:52
    • 8. Warm email sequences explained

      9:13
    • 9. Anatomy of a warm email sequence

      17:02
    • 10. Use a colon in your subject line

      4:02
    • 11. Sound like grandma in your B2B emails

      4:08
    • 12. Drip email marketing converts long term prospects

      3:49
    • 13. Drip email marketing reaches ignored prospects

      3:13
    • 14. Drip email marketing prevents customer defections

      6:04
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About This Class

Welcome to my course on how to write effective B2B emails. I teach copywriters around the world how to write compelling copy. I landed my first paying copywriting assignment in 1991, and I taught my first business writing workshop in 1989. Since then, I’ve helped tens of thousands of individuals advance their careers by improving their copywriting.

This course is divided into four sections.

  1. Section one introduces you to B2B emails as a marketing medium. You learn what they are, how they work, and why writing effective emails has some unique challenges.
  2. Section two is all about cold emails, the ones you send to prospective customers to generate leads. I show you the anatomy of an effective cold email, and show you how to write a cold email sequence.
  3. Section three is all about warm emails, the ones you send to prospective customers who have requested to hear from you. I show you the anatomy of an effective warm email, and show you how to write a warm email sequence.
  4. Section four is the final section. It’s all about the power of drip email marketing. You learn why drip email marketing is so effective at cultivating prospects who are not ready to buy today, but who might be ready to buy in the future.

The ideal student for this course is anyone who has to write B2B emails to generate leads, cultivate leads and nurture potential buyers. If you need to write cold emails, warm emails and follow-up email sequences, this course is for you.

This course is practical. You and I will examine more than a dozen B2B emails to discover what works, what doesn’t—and why. You’ll learn tips, tricks and best practices from a professional copywriter.

I pass on to you all that I’ve learned about writing effective B2B emails during the last two decades. I show you the most common mistakes that copywriters make in their writing today—and then I show you how to avoid these blunders in your email messages.

Learn more about the course by reviewing the course description and frequently asked questions below. Watch the free preview lessons. Read the reviews from my satisfied students. The enroll today.

What will students learn in this course?

  • How to write effective B2B email sequences
  • How to write B2B cold emails that get opened and read
  • How to write effective B2B email subject lines
  • How to structure the sales pitch in your B2B emails
  • How to write warm email sequences that move prospects towards a sale
  • How to use hard and soft offers that generate results
  • How to boost B2B email open rates and clickthroughs

Ideal student

Copywriters who want to improve the effectiveness of their emails

Copywriters who want to earn good money by writing B2B email sequences

Language: English

Level: Intermediate

Course outline

Lesson 1: Introduction to B2B emails

Lesson 2: Anatomy of a B2B email

Lesson 3: Cold email formula

Lesson 4: Anatomy of a cold email #1

Lesson 5: Anatomy of a cold email #2

Lesson 6: Cold email mistakes to avoid

Lesson 7: Email sequences explained

Lesson 8: Anatomy of a warm email sequence

Lesson 9: Use a colon in your subject line

Lesson 10: Sound like grandma in your B2B emails

Lesson 11: Drip email marketing converts long-term prospects

Lesson 12: Drip email marketing reaches ignored prospects

Lesson 13: Drip email marketing prevents customer defections

 

Meet Your Teacher

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Alan Sharpe

Copywriting Instructor

Teacher

Are you reading my bio because you want to improve your copywriting? Bonus. That makes two of us.

Are you looking for a copywriting coach who has written for Fortune 500 accounts (Apple, IBM, Hilton Hotels, Bell)? Check.

Do you want your copywriting instructor to have experience writing in multiple channels (print, online, direct mail, radio, television, outdoor, packaging, branding)? Groovy.

If you had your way, would your copy coach also be a guy who has allergic reactions to exclamation marks, who thinks honesty in advertising is not an oxymoron, and who believes the most important person in this paragraph is you? 

Take my courses.

I'm Alan Sharpe. Pleased to make your acquaintance. I'm a 30-year veteran copywriter who has been teaching pe... See full profile

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Transcripts

1. About this Class: Hi, I'm Alan sharp and welcome to my course on how to write effective B2B emails. I teach copywriters around the world how to write compelling copy. I landed my first copywriting gig in 1991, and I taught my first business writing workshop in 1989. Since then, I've helped tens of thousands of individuals advance their careers by improving their copyright. This course is divided into four sections. Section 1 introduces you to B2B emails as a marketing medium. You'll learn what they are, how they work, and why writing effective e-mails has some unique challenges. Section two is all about cold emails, the ones you send to prospective customers to generate leads. I show you the anatomy of an effective cold DML, and I also show you how to write a cold email sequence. Section 3 is all about warm emails. The ones you send to perspective customers who have requested to hear from you. I show you the anatomy of an effective warm e-mail and show you how to write a warm email sequence. Section four is the final section. It's all about the power of drip e-mail marketing. You learn why drip e-mail marketing is so effective at cultivating prospects who are not ready to buy today, but who might be ready to buy in the future. The ideal student for this course is anyone who has to write b to be emails, to generate leads, cultivate leads, and nurture potential buyers. If you need to write cold emails, warm e-mails, and follow-up e-mail sequences. This course is for you. This course is practical. You and I will examine more than a dozen B2B emails to discover what works, what doesn't, and why. You'll learn tips, tricks, and best practices from a professional copywriter. I pass on to you all that I've learned about writing effective B2B emails during the last two decades. I show you the most common mistakes that copywriters make in their writing today. And then I show you how to avoid these blunders in your e-mail messages. Learn more about the course by reviewing the course description and frequently asked questions below. Watched the free preview lessons, read the reviews from my satisfied students, then enroll today. Looking forward to seeing you on the course. 2. Introduction to B2B emails: If you want to earn a living as a copywriter, you should seek out projects to pay the best rates. One of those projects is B2B, email copywriting. Email copywriting pays well, because email is the top digital channel for generating B2B leads. In a recent study, 73 percent of respondents said e-mail was their top pick for generating leads for their organizations. Let me clarify a few terms so that you understand what's going on here. B to B is shorthand for business to business. Some businesses sell only to consumers. Some businesses sell only to businesses. Huggies, for example, manufacturers, a line of diapers. They sell these to consumers, That's a B2C sale. Bowing on the other hand, manufacturers a line of commercial aircraft. They sell these two businesses, that's a B to B sale. B2c and B2B are also different in how much time a purchase typically requires. For example, if you need diapers, you see an advertisement, visit a store, find the diapers, pay the cash, and you're done. Your buyer journey is 30 minutes. Business to business. The buyer journey is longer anywhere from a few months to a few years. If you own an airline, for example, and if you're buying a fleet of 30 Boeing 737 commercial jets, where each jet costs a 124 million. Your buyer journey isn't so simple or so quick as buying diapers. B2b purchases are neither short nor easy. They are long and complicated. If you own an airline, for example, you start by identifying a need. You then hunt for solutions. You search for aircraft manufacturers. You create a shortlist of those aircraft manufacturers and you issue a request for proposals. When you get the proposals, you evaluate the proposals and you create a shortlist of two or three likely vendors. You then interview those aircraft manufacturers on the shortlist seeking answers about aircraft flight performance, operating costs, technology safety, environmental sustainability, cabin features, fleet strategy, political influences, risk assessments and more. Then you visit the assembly lines of a few of those aircraft manufacturers. You choose your top pick. You then enter negotiations over price, quantities, expected time of delivery, return policies, warranties, and other terms. Then you make your purchase and you take delivery of your aircraft. Your buyer journey may very well be 12 months, not 30 minutes. As you can see, the buyer journey in B2B is longer and more complicated than the buyer journey in B2C, it involves more decision-makers. In B2C marketing, particularly in online marketing and retail marketing, you might reach a potential customer with your marketing message, and they might turn into a customer within minutes. But in B2B marketing, your first contact with a potential customer almost never leads to an immediate sale. B2b be emails are valuable. And this is where email copywriting comes in. From the time a potential customer reads your first marketing message to the time that that business person makes a purchase. That business will be researching challenge or their problem. They'll be looking for solutions. And then there'll be researching your company and your product and your service. Your goal as a B2B email copywriter is to educate potential customers and move them along this buyer journey toward a sale. And the most effective way to do this, according to B2B marketers, is with email. As you can appreciate, when the product you're selling is expensive and when the buying process is long and complicated, what you say in each of those emails is vital. This is the main reason B2B email copywriting paste so well, because each email is so valuable in the sales process. Now there are two kinds of B2B emails. They're used in lead generation as cold emails or warm emails. Cold emails or messages sent to potential customers that you have no relationship with. The goal of the e-mails is to generate a lead. You want the recipient to respond to your email by saying, yes, I'm interested, tell me more. Warm emails or messages sent to leads who have been in contact with you in some way. Perhaps they completed the contact form on your website, or they clicked one of your ads, or they downloaded a white paper from your website. Warm emails are typically sent as a series, one after the other, spaced apart by days or weeks with the goal of moving the lead closer to something other than a purchase, such as a sales appointment, a demo, a trial, or a free consultation. B2b emails are about lead generation, not selling B2B email copywriting, your goal is rarely to make a sale. Your goal is usually to generate a lead or to nurture elite. Going back to our B2C example, if you are sending an email promoting a discount on Huggies, diapers, your email can be short and to the point, just a picture of the diapers, the sale price, and a call to action by Huggies at 50 percent off, your goal is to make a sale. But if you are writing to a business that is considering buying a fleet of aircraft, your email won't be so simple. That's because your buyer has multiple things to consider before placing an order and multiple stages to move through before making a purchase. Your goal with each email is education and lead nurturing. B2b emails are usually in a series. B2b email copywriting is all about anticipating the needs and problems and challenges of your potential customers and then addressing them one at a time. This means B2B email copywriting is rarely about writing one email. It's usually about writing a series of emails, a series that follows a logical sequence and cadence. This is the third reason that B2B email copywriting is such a lucrative gig. Businesses pay well for strategic, well-crafted e-mail sequences that move potential customers along a buyer journey toward a decision. B2b email copywriting is measurable. This is the fourth and final reason that B2B email copywriting paste so well, it's results can be measured. You can measure how many people receive your e-mail, how many people open your e-mail? How many of those people click on the link in your e-mail and so on. This means that as a B2B email copywriter, you can prove your value to potential customers. The more value you can prove, the more money you can charge for your e-mail copywriting services. 3. Anatomy of a B2B email: When you sit down to write a marketing email, you need to understand the unique medium of email. Email marketing is unique in that there are things you can do with emails that you can't do with other marketing methods. Other marketing methods such as social ads, blog posts, and webpages. Let's do an anatomy of a marketing email so that before you write a single word of copy, you understand the unique medium you are dealing with. Email. Let's start at the inbox, which is where your reader comes across your marketing message for the first time. This is what an email inbox looks like in Gmail without the preview pane. And here's what it looks like with the preview pane. Notice that when the preview pane is turned off, you can only see the following. The name of the email sender, the email subject line, the preview texts, and the date that email arrived in your inbox. If there's an attachment, it will also show here. This is where your job begins in the inbox, what you put in the from field, the subject line and the preview text has a tremendous impact on whether your recipient opens your email or not. Now click on an email to open it. Emails come in two styles, HTML and plain text. Html emails are designed. They typically include images, colors, and logos. Plaintext e-mails are just that plain text. You can see that this email has a logo and an image. Overlaid on the image is a heading and a call to action. This entire section is called. The header. Beneath the header is the body of the e-mail. This e-mail starts with a greeting, Dear Sir or Madam, followed by a comma. In the world of direct mail and direct response, this part of the EML is called the salutation. Following the salutation is the opening line next to your email subject line. This is the most important sentence you will ever write as an e-mail marketer. Notice that the email is broken down into paragraphs. Each paragraph consisting of roughly three lines, not three sentences, but three lines. In the body of the e-mail, you see a link underlined and blue. Links play a vital role in e-mail lead generation because the goal of every email is to persuade the reader to take an action. And the easiest action to take is to click a link. This action can be tracked. The email has a concluding paragraph. This is where you typically find the call to action. Following the call to action, you have the farewell. This AML does not have one, but it typically says sincerely or best regards or something along those lines. Then comes the signatory section. The signatory is the person sending the e-mail. This is where the sender of the e-mail gives their name, job title, phone number, address, and other contact information. This sender chose to include a Head and Shoulders photo. You can see from other email messages that you have the option of including images and calls to action elsewhere in your e-mail, not just in the header or at the end of the email. In the footer is where you put links to your privacy policy, your mailing address, instructions on how to unsubscribe and other information that keeps your email in compliance with privacy and anti-spam laws in your country. Now if you return to the inbox and follow the logical sequence of the e-mail. This is what you learn. The recipient raised the name of the sender, the subject, and the preview text, and makes an immediate decision on whether to open the email, trash it, or leave it for reading later. Upon opening the email, your reader's eye goes immediately to the top of the e-mail, glances at the header if there is one, and then the eye drops down to the salutation if there is one. Next, your prospect reads your first line of copy. If that sentence is compelling and intriguing, and if it promises a benefit, your reader continues reading. The body of the email follows a simple formula. It describes a challenge the reader has, describes a solution, offers something of value as the next step for the reader to take and invites the reader to take an action. The e-mail concludes with a farewell and a sign-off. As you can see, you have multiple opportunities from start to finish of engaging your reader and keeping their attention. Now this also means that you have multiple opportunities for losing your reader. Your goal as an e-mail marketing copywriter is to use each section of every e-mail to your advantage. You're from name, your subject line, preview text, heading, salutation, opening line, Body Copy, offer, call to action and conclusion. They all play a vital role in grabbing and holding the attention of your potential customers. The from name, subject line, and preview text grab attention and give the reader a reason to open your e-mail. The header image and heading if you use them, give the reader a reason to keep reading. The salutation greets your reader, and establishes the relationship between you, the writer, and then the reader. The opening line arouses curiosity. The next few sentences demonstrate relevance and establish credibility. The main body of the email offers a solution to the readers problem. The conclusion of the e-mail offer something of value and calls the reader to take an action. When you master these elements of your marketing emails, you see the results of your labor in higher open rates, higher click-through rates, and increased sales. 4. Cold email formula: There are two kinds of e-mails used to generate leads in business to business marketing, warm emails and cold emails. A warm email is one that you send to a warm prospect. And a warm prospect is someone who knows your company and has shown some level of interests in what you offer. A cold email, on the other hand, is one that you sent to a cold prospect. Someone who has shown no level of interest in what you offer. A cold email is the electronic equivalent of a cold call over the phone. Your prospect is not expecting it and did not request it. Warm emails and cold emails share one characteristic. You send them to people who are likely buyers of your products or services. The hardest of the two to write is the cold email. That's because the recipient doesn't know you and you don't know them. Which means you have no relationship or common experience or shared understanding to work from. Plus, your email is an interruption. Here's how you write a cold email using a proven formula. Step one, write a subject line that intrigues. Don't begin your e-mail with a subject line that gives away everything your email is about. And don't start your subject line by talking about yourself or your company or what you are offering. The only goal of your subject line is to persuade your prospect to open your e-mail. Your e-mail subject line serves the same function as teaser copy on the front of a direct mail envelope. It entices the reader to open your email and start reading. This means you must do two things with your subject line. Demonstrate relevance and arouse curiosity. You demonstrate relevance by naming or alluding to a pain or challenge that your prospect has. And you arouse curiosity by hinting at a solution. Here's an example. Imagine you work for a company that develops an open source API that helps businesses develop bots and other types of conversational AI, artificial intelligence for customer engagement, that's quite a mouthful. Your prospects have a number of challenges in this area. One, app development costs are high. To app development is complex. Three, apps usually launch later than planned. You can use any of these pain points in your email subject line. Like this. Customer engagement app? Yes. Complexity, no. Reducing your app development costs. Launching your customer engagement app sooner. You'll notice that these subject lines name a pain, promise a benefit, but do not mention how they are. Examples of subject lines that intrigue. Step number 2, demonstrate relevance immediately. In the body of your email, you must prove to your prospect that your message is worth reading. You do this by proving that you understand the prospect and have something of value to offer them. The easiest way to do this is to name a major challenge that you know your prospect is likely facing. Let's stick with our example. Your accompany that develops an open source API for developers. You know that one of their challenges is reducing development costs. So you begin your email like this. Hi Bob, if you're developing bots and other types of conversational AI for Customer Engagement, I thought you'd want to know of a way to reduce your development costs. This opening sentence demonstrates relevance immediately and offers a benefit without naming the solution, naming the company or introducing descender. Step number 3, introduce your solution. Now you offer a solution to your prospects challenge by introducing your product or your service, something like this. But Sherpa is an open API platform for customer engagement. We've already designed, coded, and tested every feature your customer engagement app needs, such as enriched mobile, social and messaging, conversational AI processing, and CRM ticketing and collaboration. These features are pre-built and available from our open API at a much lower cost than developing them on your own. Step 4, offer something of value. The most effective way to generate a lead with cold emails is to offer an exchange of value. You offer the prospects something and you ask for something in return. The least effective way of generating a lead with cold emails is to ask the reader to phone you. Most prospects don't want to talk with the salesperson. Just as most shoppers don't want to talk with a retail sales clerk. This means your cold emails should feature two offers, a soft offer and a hard offer. A soft offer is something of value that your reader gets without having to talk with anyone, such as a white paper or a special report that they download from your website. A hard offer is something of value that your reader gets in exchange for talking with a salesperson, such as a product demo or a free assessment. Here's an example of what I mean. If reducing your development costs is a priority for you next quarter or any quarter for that matter. I invite you to download our white paper, seven ways to lower your app development costs. If you are ready to learn more about our solution, call me today to schedule a demo and get started with your 30 day free trial. Notice that this paragraph features both the offer and the call to action. The soft offer is the whitepaper. The call to action is download, our white paper. The heart offer is the demo. The call to action is called me today. In each case the prospect gets something of value and you get something of value. They get the white paper or the demo. You get the contact details or their engagement over a phone call. The secret to the success of this cold e-mail prospecting formula is intrigued, relevance, benefit, and brevity. If you grab your prospects attention, demonstrate that you understand their pain, describe a solution and offer something of value. And if you do all of this as quickly and as succinctly as possible, you'll generate leads with the email. 5. Anatomy of a cold email #1: One of the hardest jobs in lead generation is writing effective B2B cold emails. I say effective because writing cold emails isn't hard. Anyone can write a lousy cold email, and most people do. But few people can write an email that's effective, one that prospects open, read, and respond to. If you need to write cold emails to generate leads, you'd be wise to examine an effective cold email and then copy all the things that are correct about it. To start, here's a quick refresher. A B2B cold email is a message that you send to a potential client that the potential client did not request and does not expect a a cold email is the online equivalent of the cold-call. It's unsolicited and usually an interruption. In writing and sending your cold e-mail, you have a few goals. Number one, you want the email to get past spam filters and get delivered to your recipients. In box number two, you want your recipient to open your email and not just delete it without reading it. And number 3, you want your reader to respond to your message in the way you intended. So here's an example of a cold B2B email. It's being sent by a company called click cart AI, a software firm that develops an e-commerce plugin that uses artificial intelligence to help online merchants predict and display on their shopping carts what customers want to buy before they searched for it. That's a mouthful. The target market for this email is large online retailers. And the job function being targeted is Chief Technology Officer, Chief Data Officer, and Chief Analytics Officers. In other words, this is an email promoting a technical solution to technical buyers. These buyers are concerned with finding technical ways to improve the customer experience of their online stores. This e-mail is being sent to reach buyers who are either at the awareness or the consideration stage of their buyer journey. In other words, they are researching their challenges and they are considering solutions, are not looking for a product just yet. Let's examine the email. The subject line says, following up on my voicemail. This is because this e-mail is being sent by a salesperson. Click carp AI. First, the salesperson phones the prospect that the salesperson can't reach the prospect and has to leave a voicemail. The salesperson follows up the same day with this e-mail. I think you'll agree that this is a friendly, non salesy email subject line. It's likely to get past spam filters because it does not have any trigger words in it, such as free or by, or money or risk-free. It's also conversational. Following up on my voicemail is an abbreviated shorthand way of saying I am following up on my voicemail. This makes the subject line informal and friendly, which makes the e-mail more likely to get opened. If the salesperson was not following up on a voicemail. And if this was just a traditional cold email, the salesperson could use an equally effective subject lines such as want to predict what your visitors will buy or predicting what your visitors will buy. The body of the e-mail features a personalized salutation. It doesn't start with a pitch. It starts with a greeting and a personalized greeting. It that one of the tallest hurdles when writing B2B cold emails is establishing credibility and relevance. And one of the quickest and most effective ways of doing both is to start your e-mail with your prospects first name. Everyone likes the sound of their name. And when someone uses your name, they grab your attention because they clearly know you in some way. The first line is the most important line in any e-mail. If your prospect doesn't read this line or if your prospect reads this line and stops reading, your cold email is sunk. Your goal with your opening line is to establish rapport and introduce the prospects challenge or pain. At the same time. You need to establish rapport so that the reader begins to trust you and you need to bring up the prospects challenge or pain so that the prospect sees that your email is relevant to them. This writer of this email starts like this. As someone who operates an online store, you likely wonder how you can increase your sales by predicting what customers will buy or at least improve your odds of guessing correctly. This opening line establishes credibility by acknowledging that the recipient operates an online store. This is clearly not a bulk email being sent to businesses of every kind. It also brings up the prospects challenge in a gentle way, you likely wonder, it says, how you can increase your sales by predicting what customers will buy. An in your face opening would sound like this. You operate an online store. You must increase your sales by predicting what your customers will buy. Our writer takes a gentler approach. You likely wonder, this is a wise idea. You don't want your first sentence to sound like a lecture. You want it to sound like something a colleague or a friend would say over a coffee. Now the writer introduces the solution to the prospect's pain. So I thought you'd be interested at taking a look at our data intake platform, which uses embedded predictive and learning capable algorithm fields to predict and display what your customers want to buy before they have to search for it. Again, notice the friendly language, quote. So I thought you'd be interested in taking a look at dot-dot-dot. The language of this paragraph is technical because the reader is technical, the buyer is technical. The paragraph states what the software does. That's the feature. Then it describes how this helps the online merchant. That's the benefit. Now the writer invites the reader to take some action. Quote. Want to discover if clicked card AI is a good fit for company name. Feel free to schedule a complimentary consultation with me on a day that works for you. And then there's a link that points to the scheduling software on the website or learn more by downloading our whitepaper, predictable sales, using AI to give your online store customers what they want before they search. Unquote. Notice that there are two offers and two calls to action. Offer one is a hard offer, a complimentary consultation over the phone. The second offer is a soft offer, a free white paper. The writer uses two offers because some prospects are ready to talk with a salesperson, but most are not. Making two offers increases the chances that this email will generate a response. The writer ends on a friendly, informal note, all the best for now, and includes name and contact details. This B2B cold e-mail features just three paragraphs and only 100 words. And yet it accomplishes a great deal in that short space. It grabs attention, arouses curiosity, establishes credibility, names, the prospect's pain, introduces the company, describes a solution, names of benefit and offers the reader something of value in exchange for the prospect taking the next action. If you want to boost the effectiveness of your cold emails, follow this formula. You'll warm up your lead generation in no time. 6. Anatomy of a cold email #2: One of the hardest jobs in lead generation is writing effective B2B cold emails. I say effective because writing cold emails isn't heart. Anyone can write a lousy cold email, and most people do. Few people can write an effective 11 that prospects open and read and responsive. If you want to write cold emails that generate leads, you'd be wise to follow a formula. To start a quick refresher. A B2B cold email is one that you sent to a prospect who hasn't heard from you and it's not expecting to hear from you. Your email is an interruption in writing and sending your cold e-mail. You have a few goals. Number one, you want the email to get past spam filters and get delivered to your recipient's email box. And you want your recipient to open your email and not just deleted without reading it. And number 3, you want them to respond. So here's an example of a BDB cold e-mail. It's being sent by plumbing, leads, a company that generates sales leads for residential plumbing contractors. The target market for this email is small residential plumbing contractors, the kind who do not have a marketing department or any experience with content marketing or online advertising. These potential customers are busy, distracted and they're over prospect. Did they receive many emails each week from companies promising to generate leads for them. This e-mail is being sent to reach buyers who are at any stage of the buyer journey, whether that's awareness, consideration, or decision. Let's look at the e-mail. The subject line says, firstname, does company name need this? The firstName and company name fields will be populated by the email program that sends this email. Like this. Bob, does Tucker plumbing need this this subject line is personalized but vague. It's personalized because the prospect gets lots of email pitches like this each week from strangers. Personalizing the subject line makes it more likely that the recipient will open the email since the message is clearly addressed to him by name, the subject line is vague in that it doesn't say what it is about. For example, it doesn't say say Bob Tucker, does your plumbing company need leads, that would be a giveaway. That would be giving away too much information too soon. So the vague subject line arouses curiosity. Instead, I think you'll agree that this is a friendly, non salesy email subject line. It's also likely to get passed. Email spam filters. The body of the e-mail features a personalized salutation. It doesn't start with a pitch, it starts with a greeting and a personalized greeting. It that one of your tallest hurdles when writing B2B cold emails is establishing credibility and relevance. One of the quickest ways to establish both is to start your e-mail with your prospects first name. Everyone likes the sound of their firstName. And when someone uses your name, they grab your attention because they clearly know you in some way. The first line is the most important line in any e-mail. If your prospect doesn't read this line, or if you're a prospect reads this line and stops reading, your email is dead in the water. Your goal with your opening line is to establish rapport and introduced the prospects challenge or pain. At the same time, you need to establish rapport so that the reader begins to trust you and you need to bring up the prospects, challenge or pain so that the prospect sees that your email is relevant. This writer of this email starts like this, true or false. Most companies that promised to send your company a steady supply of qualified plumbing leads don't. This opening line establishes credibility by acknowledging that the recipient operates a plumbing business, a business that the sender knows by name. This is clearly not a bulk email being sent to every business of every kind. An opening like this presents the pain point, challenges the prospect a little but does not come across as hard sell. A hard sell opening would sound more like most companies that promised to send you a steady supply of qualified Plumlee don't. Our writer takes a less direct approach by forming this as a quiz, true or false, this is a wise idea. You don't want your first sentence to sound like a lecture or a pitch. You want it to sound like an engaging way of speaking to your reader, getting their attention and interest. Now the writer introduces the consequences of this pain point. Most companies that promised to send Tucker plumbing a steady supply of qualified plumbing leads, don't. Instead, they hand you a bunch of unqualified leads who waste your time. Or even worse, they send you the same leads that they send to your competitors expecting you to lower your prices to compete? No thanks. This paragraph is based on interviews conducted with plumbing contractors. Their top complaint was getting unqualified leads. In other words, getting the leads, sorry, getting the names and phone numbers of homeowners who didn't want to buy just yet, didn't need a plumber right now, or in some other way, we're not motivated to hire a firm like Tucker plumbing. The second most common complaint from plumbing contractors was working with lead generation companies who sent them leads but also sent the same leads there everybody else, all of their competitors, forcing the plumbers to compete by lowering their prices, something most plumbers don't want to do. So this copywriter takes this research and includes it in the first few sentences of the email so that the recipient understands, that the sender understands the plumber's paints and frustrations and challenges. This copywriter is following a common formula for writing cold emails. Arouse curiosity. Greet the reader in a personal way, establish credibility and irrelevance by naming the prospect's pain, then describe the consequences to the prospect of not addressing that pain. Now the writer introduces the solution to the prospect's pain. Firstname, if you're sick and tired of empty promises, Let's talk. Plumbing leads generates qualified exclusive leads for plumbing contractors. Notice how the solution matches the pain. The pain is unqualified, leads the solution offered is qualified leads, the pain is leads being sent to competitors in the same area at the solution is exclusively. He's now the writer fleshes this out a bit more so that the prospect understands the value of the service. Our service is unique because you only pay for qualified leads. No other plumber in your city gets your leads. Our services free to test. Your first two qualified leads are on us. Now the writer invites the prospect that takes some action. Want to schedule a call with me to learn more, reply to this email or simply call toll-free. This is a simple and direct call to action. It asks for an appointment. That's because plumbing leads wants to generate qualified leads with this email. They want leads who have a need, have a budget and are ready to act. Now, this email does feature an offer though. It's there in the bulleted list. Our service is free to test and your first two qualified leads are on us. So that's actually two offers, a free test and free leads. One way to improve this call to action is to invite the prospect not to a sales call, but to a free trial of the service. It would sound something like this. Is your company interested in testing our service to see how we generate exclusive, qualified leads for your planning business in your city. Call me today to set up your free trial. The writer ends on a friendly, though formal note, sincerely, and includes name and contact details. This b to be cold e-mail features just three paragraphs and only a 105 words. And yet it accomplishes a great deal in that short space. It grabs attention, arouses curiosity, establishes credibility, names the prospect's pain describes the consequences of not addressing that pain, introduces the company, describes a solution, lists multiple benefits and offers the reader something of value in exchange for the prospect. Taking the next step. If you want to boost the effectiveness of your cold emails with prospecting, follow this formula. You'll warm up your lead generation in no time. 7. Cold email mistakes to avoid: One of the hardest jobs in business to business lead generation is writing effective cold emails. A cold email is a message you send to a prospective client who has no business relationship with your company and who neither requested your e-mail nor is expecting it. Cold emails are hard to write because they are the electronic equivalent of the cold call. Most prospects don't like receiving cold calls, and most salespeople don't like making. Cold emails are also unpopular because they rarely work. The majority of cold emails go straight to the trash can. But this isn't a problem with the medium. It's a problem with the message. Here are the top four blunders that B2B marketers and B2B sales people make when writing cold emails. Blunder number 1, a subject line that's all about you. Your prospects see two things. When you're cold e-mail arrives in their inboxes, the name of the sender and the subject line of the email. If the subject line is all about you and your firm and how amazing you are expect to end up in the trash can. Here's what I mean. Look at the subject line from a firm that offers managed Cloud services to businesses. Quote, We are the best managed cloud services provider, unquote. Now this may be true and it may even be relevant since many businesses like to trust their cloud computing to leading firms and not to amateurs. But this is the wrong place to boast. Your email subject line is not where you talk about yourself. It's where you talk about your prospect. So eliminate the words we, us, our, and I from your email subject lines talk about your reader instead, Uses subject line like this quick question about managed Cloud services. An email with that subject line is more likely to get opened and read. Blunder number 2, no personalized greeting. If you receive an email from someone who addresses us, dear sir, or madam, What do you do? That's right. You hit the Delete button. That's because the e-mail is clearly from someone who literally doesn't know the first thing about you, namely whether you are a man or a woman. The same goes for an email address to To whom it may concern another candidate. For the trash folder. Your immediate goal with the start of your email message is demonstrating relevance. You must give your prospect or reason for reading your message. And you can't do that if you sound like you don't know the first thing about your reader, overcome this blunder by addressing your email to your prospect by name, right? Dear Bob. Or if your approaches more formal, dear Ms. Carruthers. If you prefer an informal approach, right. Hi, Bob or good morning, Samantha. Blunder, number 3, starting with you and your company. Biggest mistake I see in B2B cold emails is opening sentences and paragraphs that are all about the sender, the sender's company, and the sender's product or service. You've received emails like this. So I don't have to show you an example, but I will anyway, you know the approach. Open the email. You start reading the first sentence and it sounds like this. I worked for Acme networking solutions and we are the top suppliers of the catalyst 9000 series to Fortune 500 firms who we offer a full suite up networking solutions. Our experience is unparalleled. That's why firms choose us, even ends with the sender. I, we, our, US. The opening is all about the sender, not the recipient. This is the proven way to get deleted. But if you want your prospect to read your cold email opening, opened by talking about them. Congratulations on your firm being awarded that major contract in Seoul. Since you'll be in the market for land core and distribution switches, you may want to consider sourcing through a firm that has extensive experience helping US based firms like yours get up and running in South Korea, my firm, dot-dot-dot, blunder number four. Slow in getting to the point, you have three seconds to grab the attention of your cold email prospect. If your first few sentences fail to grab attention, you lose your chance to turn your recipients until leads. This means you must grab attention immediately. Your first few sentences aren't the place for a lengthy introduction to your topic or for a circuitous elocution about something abstract. You're opening is where you fire your largest canon. To quote David Ogilvy. Here's an example of how you don't start your e-mail. We've reviewed a lot of project management apps for a lot of landscapers and contractors in the last 19 years. And we've seen the same problems over and over. Most small business owners instinctively know they need a project management app for their workers these days, but most are woefully unaware of what options exist and which option is right for them. Some choose to work with a software developer and spend far more money than they need to on an app. Some choose to hire a friend of the family who happens to be good with computers. And they end up with an app that does nothing for their business. Some brave souls choose to build their own app using a free tool and end up frustrated by the process, unquote. That's a 129 words and you still don't know who is writing chew or why. Here's how you do open. Are you losing business? Because your workers don't have a good project management app. You can find out right now by taking our free shrug test. Here's what you do. Dot, dot, dot. That's 33 words that name a pain point, allude to a solution, offer value, and asked for an action. All communicated in one-quarter of the time the other writer took to communicate nothing. Writing cold B2B e-mails doesn't have to be as painful or as frustrating as cold calling. Just as effective cold colors work from scripts that are proven to generate results with prospects. So too, can you work from a cold email template that works, avoid these top four blunders. And you'll write cold emails that prospects open, read, and respond to. 8. Warm email sequences explained: B2b email copywriting is all about anticipating the needs and problems and challenges of your potential customers and then addressing them one at a time. This means B2B email copywriting is rarely about writing just one email. It's usually about writing a series of emails, a series that follows a logical sequence and cadence. Let's look at what email sequences are, what they are for, and what they are supposed to accomplish. First of all, they're used for lead generation. The e-mail sequences I am talking about are the ones that are used to generate leads or inquiries. Email sequences are also used in B2B and B2C marketing after someone has made a purchase. But I'm not talking about those types of sequences. I'm talking about e-mails that are sent in a series to someone who is not yet a customer. Their goal is to generate and nurture leads. There are also triggered by an event. B to B. E-mail sequences use to generate leads are typically triggered by an event that the recipient takes. For example, a prospective customer sees an ad online and clicks it. The add takes the person to a landing page that offers a white paper downloaded in exchange for the person's name and email address. The person gives that information and downloads the white paper. Requesting the white paper triggers the email sequence that follows. Because this person requested the whitepaper, a white paper that is of interest. Only two people in the target audience. This person is considered to be a lead, someone who might become a customer. You can also add people to an e-mail sequence manually upon their request or if they meet other criteria that you decide. E-mail sequences are typically automated. B2b marketers set up the series in their CRM or marketing automation software. They determine how many emails will be in the sequence and they determined when those e-mails will be sent. Then the CRM or marketing automation software sends emails. On those days. The emails in a B2B lead generation sequence also follow a logical order based on the action the lead took to trigger the sequence. How many emails they have received and any actions they have taken during the sequence. For example, a company that is offering a whitepaper as a download starts their email sequence with an e-mail welcoming the recipient and giving them a link to the download page for the white paper. That's the first email in the sequence. A few days later, the company sends the lead, the second e-mail in the sequence. This one asks the lead what they thought of the whitepaper and asks if they have any questions. A few days later, the company sends another email, this one discussing a pain point that the lead likely has or discussing a point made somewhere in the white paper. Each email in a B2B sequence should take a different slant on the same topic and feature a unique offer. For example, an e-mail sequence sent to prospective customers who have demonstrated interest in subscribing to a software as a service accounting platform might look like this. E-mail one. The email topic, whitepaper, download link. There's no offer. The call to action is click here to download your white paper. E-mail number two in the sequence, the topic is how to choose between Software as a Service and on-premise software. The offer is a free self-assessment. The call to action, which is best for you find out by taking our free self-assessment. Now, click here. E-mail number three. The topic is the total cost of ownership of Software as a Service accounting packages. The offer is a free demo. The call to action, take your free demo. Now, click here. Email number for the topic is mistakes to avoid when choosing Software as a Service accounting software. The offer is a free trial. The call to action is take your free trial. Now, click here. You'll notice that every email in this sequence is about Software as a Service, accounting software. Features a different slant on the topic. You can also see that each e-mail features a unique offer and a unique call to action. Also notice that as the series progresses, it moves the prospect closer to a sale. Which brings me to my next point. B2b e-mail sequences that aim to generate leads should be mapped to a stage in your buyer's journey. Those stages are awareness, consideration, and decision. At the awareness stage, the buyer realizes that they have a problem. The consideration stage, the buyer defines their problem and researches options to solve it. During the decision stage of the buyer journey, the buyer chooses a solution. Your email sequence should meet buyers where they are in their buyer journey. For example, if they are at the awareness stage of the buyer journey right at the beginning, your emails should focus on educating your buyers about the problems your product or service solves. If they are at the consideration stage, your email should provide information and resources that help your buyers solve their problems. And if your buyers are at the decision stage right at the very end of the buyer journey, your sequence should focus on moving buyers to choose your solution. Thanks to the power of customer relationship management systems and marketing automation software, your e-mail sequences don't have to be linear. In other words, they don't have to follow one after the other in a sequence automatically. You have the power to take Lee's out of one sequence and put them into another sequence based on the actions they take with your emails. For example, if you have an email sequence that's aimed at buyers at the consideration stage of the buyer journey there right in the middle. And if one of your recipients clicks on a link in one of those e-mails. And by doing so, shows clearly that they have some kind of an intent to purchase your solution. You don't have to leave them in your consideration sequence. Instead, you can remove them from that sequence and send a message for one of your sales reps to get on the phone and to call that prospect because they're ready to buy. As you can appreciate by now, B2B e-mail sequences used in lead generation are designed to move leads down the buyer journey towards a decision. Each email and the sequence educates, offer something of value and asks the recipient to take the next step in the buying process. The beauty of e-mail sequences is that they help you scale your lead generation efforts because they are automated. They go out to your perspective buyers while you are busy doing other things. This is one of the major benefits of email sequences. They ensure that you follow up on all of your leads even when you are preoccupied or busy. The secret to success in sales is follow-up. After all, persistence, but pleasant follow-up. 9. Anatomy of a warm email sequence: If you want to be successful at business to business lead generation, you must learn how to write effective e-mail sequences. A B2B email sequence is a series of messages sent to a perspective customer with the goal of moving that person along their buyer journey toward a decision. The sequences typically consist of an introductory message, a series of followup messages, a final message. The first email introduces the sender to the recipient. The follow-up sequence features individually emails that offer something of value and encouraged the recipient to take an action. The final email is the final ticket, the can of persuading the recipient to take the desired action. The goal of B2B e-mail sequences is lead nurturing or lead cultivation. The goal is rarely to make a sale. The goal is usually to get the prospect to take the next action in the buying process or sales cycle. This might be to request a demo, sign up for a free trial, or book a complimentary consultation with a sales rep. The best way to learn how to write a B2B email sequence is to analyze a successful one. We're going to look at an email sequence being used by a firm that designs, develops, and manages custom apps for Fortune 500 online retailers. This sequence consists of five emails, prospects received the first email after they have visited a landing page and requested a Buying Guide. This is important to know. Before you can write an effective email sequence, you need to know what communication the recipients have received up until that point. You need to know what the company has sent and why the person is receiving the sequence. In this example, prospect saw an online ad for a Buying Guide that tells them that 10 reasons they might need a new e-commerce platform. They clicked on the ad and were taken to this landing page. On the landing page, they gave their name and contact details and they asked for a free copy of the guide. This is when they were added into the email sequence. The first email in the sequence is the welcome e-mail. It Thanks The buyer for requesting the guide and introduces the company. The subject line seems straightforward, but as actually carefully worded. Here is your guide. This message communicates immediacy. Here is your guide. It communicates personalization. Here is your guide, and it communicates practicality. Here is your guide. You can improve this subject line by saying, here is the guide that you requested. But doing so doubles the character count, making the line twice as long. You must assume that Plenty of your prospects will be reading your e-mail on a smartphone or a tablet, a small screen. So the shorter your email subject line is, the better. The first line of the email is a personalized greeting. This is good. It proves that the sender knows the recipient, then the e-mail thanks the recipient for requesting the Buying Guide. This is vital because the goal of your first-line is to establish credibility and irrelevance. You must show your reader that you have a relevant reason for writing them. And this line does exactly that. The first paragraph also features the download link for the Buying Guide. This is also vital because you can't expect your prospects to remember the landing page where they requested the Buying Guide. And you can't expect them to remember where they were directed to the download page, then the writer finds a gentle way to make a soft sell. By the way, if you're migrating to Shopify big commerce or Magento and you need help with customization or integration. Call me today for a complimentary consultation, unquote. Notice that this offer is tied directly to the topic of the Buying Guide. To Buying Guide is about reasons to migrate to a new e-commerce platform. This offer is for a free consultation about an aspect of that migration, namely customization and integration. Then the writer introduces his company. At fortuitous, we design, develop, and manage custom mobile apps, web applications, and enterprise e-commerce solutions for global brands. Brands like whiskers, toms, and the tennis channel. This paragraph describes what the company does and who they do it for. It drops the names of three major online retailers. One for each of the three verticals that this company is targeting with this campaign, namely pets, shoes, and sports equipment. The writer ends the email with a call to action and supplies, a phone number and includes a signature block that contains more details about the company and about the sender. The second email in this sequence goes out to everyone who received the first email but did not respond. The subject line accomplishes the goal of grabbing attention and demonstrating relevance. Notice that the subject line is personalized with the recipients first name. The body of the email starts with a short one line paragraph. I have a quick question for you. Grabs attention and almost guarantees that the reader will continue reading. The writer reminds the reader why the reader is getting this e-mail, gives the download link again, then asks the question, are you switching e-commerce platforms? Partly because you are dissatisfied with your e-commerce partner. A partner who no longer returns your calls. A partner who has left you stranded with a system that goes down, isn't compliant, or puts you at risk, unquote. These questions are based on insights that this company has about its buyers. It knows that its potential customers face these challenges with their e-commerce vendors. These are the top pain points. So the writer presents these pain points as a series of questions to demonstrate that the writer understands the challenges and needs of the reader. Then the writer presents a solution by introducing his company again and by showing how leading online retailers uses company to solve the same challenges that this prospect may be facing. Then the writer offers a free resource, a page on the website that describes how this company delivers client success. The goal of this offer and this link is to get the reader to demonstrate buying intent by taking the next step in the buying process, the writer concludes by inviting the reader to get in touch if the reader's needs are immediate and pressing. So notice what the writer has done here, created a soft offer and a hard offer. The soft offer is the link to a webpage. The heart offer is the phone call to discuss a challenge. Most prospects aren't ready to talk with a salesperson. They click on the link. A minority of prospects have an immediate need and they pick up the phone. The 30 million, the sequence goes out to everyone, as you can imagine, who received the first email and the second email, but didn't respond. The subject line grabs attention in the form of a question aimed at the prospect's pain and dealing with issues that are discussed in the Buying Guide that the prospect download it. The opening sentence keeps the prospects attention by reiterating that pain. By the time you finish reading our e-guide, you realize that your current e-commerce platform is likely putting your business at risk, unquote. The second paragraph spells out the pain in detail. The risk of loss of business continuity, for example, or the risk of fines or a halt to your operations because of a lack of PCI or ADA compliance or the risk of losing market share because you can't upgrade your system, because it won't integrate with your point of sale system or for any number of pressing reasons, unquotes, then the writer presents a solution to the prospect's pain. If you need to reduce or eliminate your risks online, Let's talk at fortuitous, we design, develop, and manage custom mobile apps, web applications, and enterprise e-commerce solutions for global brands. Then the writer presents new information. We have a proven and sophisticated software development process and methodology to minimize, mitigate, and manage project risk. Our process ensures the successful delivery of your project on schedule and within budget. This is one of the best practices in writing email sequences, presents a new fact, a new pane, a new benefit in each e-mail in the sequence. Don't just write a series of five e-mails that say the same thing in different words. Instead, write a series of five e-mails that communicate your value proposition in five ways. The writer concludes with a friendly, personalized call to action that has customer focused. Do you want to see if my firm is a good fit for and their company name goes in there, called me at this number to book a complimentary consultation. The fourth email in this sequence, you guessed it goes out to everyone who received the first three emails but did not respond. The subject line is provocative but Playful. It's designed to get the email opened. The first line grabs attention by stating a negative. That implies that a positive is to follow. Global e-commerce. Brands don't come to us because we specialize in Shopify, big commerce, or Magento. They come to fortuitous because they have a problem. A theme that doesn't render properly on mobile, for example, or a widget that doesn't integrate with their point of sale system, or they have issues with localization. These pain points are the top frustrations and challenges that this company's perspective customers face. This company discovered these pain points through research and through interviews with its clients. Here in this email, the writer presents these pain points at the beginning of the email to grab the attention the reader, and to demonstrate relevance. The writer then presents a solution by describing who companies, like the prospect's company come to the writer's firm for help. They come to fortuitous because we design, develop, and manage custom mobile apps, web applications, and enterprise e-commerce solutions for global brands. And they stay with us because we solve their e-commerce problems. Then the writer presents a soft offer, a link to an article that discusses a unique aspect of e-commerce platforms. The writer ends with a hard offer, a complimentary consultation. The fifth and final email in this sequence makes a final attempt to move the prospect a step closer to a purchase. This e-mail goes out to everyone who received the first four emails but didn't respond. The subject line is tied to the topic of the Buying Guide that the prospect requested and downloaded. The subject line is rendered as a question. Questions boost open rates. The first line of the email asks this question, but personalize it for the prospect's company. Then the writer offers an answer to the question by offering a free resource and giving a link to it. Then the writer brings up a vital point about choosing an e-commerce platform. And that is that 20 percent of the functionality that enterprise online retailers need in an e-commerce platform comes through customization. Now that is a service that this company offers. The writer ends with another hard offer, again, personalized for the readers company, offering a complimentary consultation. You will see by now that there are a number of things you must do to write an effective B2B email sequence. Number 1, craft email subject lines that demonstrate continuity between what the prospect has done and what you, the sender are doing. For example, they download a Buying Guide. So you send an email with the subject line here is you're buying guide number to begin each email by establishing continuity. Remind the reader why you are writing. Refer to an action they took or to your last email. Prove that you have a connection with the reader and that you have a reason for writing. Number 3. Demonstrate relevance quickly. Give your prospect a reason to read your e-mail. Do this by showing your prospects that you understand their challenges or pain. Number four, offer a solution, introduce your product or service, and describe how it solves your prospects. Challenge. Number 5, offer proof. Name the companies that are using your solution or offer other proof that your solution works. Number 6, offer something of value. Offer the prospect a white paper, a Buying Guide, a free consultation, a free trial, a product or something else of value, so that they take the next step in the buying process. Number 7, mix things up, keep to one main selling premise throughout your series, but mix things up in each email by describing different challenges, offering different solutions, and offering different things of value, such as white papers, free demos. If you do this with your email sequence, you'll generate more leads. You'll nurture those leads, and you'll generate more sales. 10. Use a colon in your subject line: Please forgive me for being so candid, but I'd like to talk about the subject of your colon, the colon in your email subject line. That is one of the most effective ways to boost your e-mail marketing. Open rates is to improve your subject line. The more relevant your subject line is to your customers, the more likely they are to open your email. Since you have a limited amount of real estate in a subject line, that's around 40 characters. The easiest way to boost the relevance of your subject line, to put your keywords or hot-button topics at the front of your subject line, followed by an explanatory phrase with a colon in the middle. Your customers read your email subject lines from the left and they move to the right. So your goal with busy readers whose fingers are poised over the delete key all the time, is to grab their attention with the first few words of your subject. That's where your colon comes in. Your colon separates the attention grabbing keywords from the explanatory copy that comes later. Let me give you an example. Using the subject of this lesson. I write email marketing letters for a living. My target audience is marketing managers who use email to sell their products and services, and they also use it to cultivate sales leads. When these folks go online and search for help with their e-mail marketing, they type these kinds of questions and keywords into their search engine. Email marketing course. Mortgage, lead, email marketing, targeted email marketing. What these three search phrases have in common is the phrase email marketing. So if you want to make my e-mail cells that are relevant to any of these three groups. You should put email marketing at the beginning of the subject line and not at the end or in the middle. Then to show that my message is relevant to each audience, I must also put the next most important keyword near the front of the subject. As I can. For example, if I'm offering a course on email marketing to real estate agents, I shouldn't say enroll in our course for real estate agents on email marketing. Why? Because that puts the keywords at the end of the subject line. Instead, I should use my trusty colon and say email marketing course for real estate agents, colon, Enroll Now. If I was writing an e-mail sales letter to mortgage brokers and if I was offering them help with generating leads for their practices, using email to do that, I wouldn't write a subject line that said ten mistakes to avoid in mortgage lead email marketing. Why not? Because the keywords come at the end. Instead, I would write mortgage, lead, email marketing colon, ten mistakes to avoid. Test this idea yourself with your next email blast and see what happens. When you take care of your colon. Your colon takes care of you. 11. Sound like grandma in your B2B emails: The secret to persuading your customers to open and read your e-mail marketing messages is to make your messages sound like a note from your grandmother. Your customers receive three kinds of emails. Email from family and friends. That's personal. Email from colleagues and suppliers, that's work related. And e-mail from advertisers legitimate and span. The least important of these emails, I'm afraid to say in the minds of your customers, are the promotional messages from you and me. Most customers say, granny comes first, the boss comes second, and purported wives of deposed Nigerian leaders come last. That's because your customers and prospects read newspapers, magazines. They watched the news that go online and follow the news. For entertainment, they watch shows, they gone, therefore, the news and the show's not to be pitched. The same goes for your phone. Your customers prospects use their phones to talk with people that they care about. That does not include tele marketers. The same goes for your email. Your customers and prospects read emails primarily to learn stuff and to do stuff, not to buy stuff. Which is why I recently unsubscribed from a popular e-mail newsletter. All it seemed to do was pitch products. Just about every issue. Tried to sell me something instead of teach me something or tell me something. The author is a well-known and well-liked consultant and author. I like him. I signed up to learn from him. But just about all that he did with his emails, what's pitch me his products week after week. So I said sayonara. Start with your subject line. Graph. Mpa is in hospital, will arrest the attention of your reader sooner than a subject line that says, our furniture sale has many bargains for you. So think of how you would grab the attention of a loved one in a letter or a phone call, and then write your email subject line using that same visceral power. Well, while telling the truth, Of course. Next comes your salutation. Don't use Dear customer or any of its lane cousins. Address your reader by name, say Deer Alan, or Dear Mr. Sharp. You would just family members, colleagues, and vendors by name because you have a relationship with them. Extend the same familiarity to your customers and opt-in email prospects. And when you do that, they will immediately feel more inclined to read. Email. Then write only about things that are at the greatest concern to your readers, appeal to their self-interest. You email birthday cards to your friends and family. You phone mum and dad on their wedding anniversary. Do the same in your promotional e-mails, sort of by putting your readers first, making them the star of every email and making them feel important to you and appreciated. They'll love you for it and they'll give you their business. 12. Drip email marketing converts long term prospects: One of your most valuable assets is people who won't buy from you today. They are the majority of your prospects. But if your business is typical and I hope it isn't, the majority of your sales leads slip away and never give you their business. Drip. E-mail marketing is the way to win them. In two studies, trade magazine publishers, corners and Pennington, discovered that around half the people who inquire about an advertisement that they see in a trade magazine, place an order within 24 months. So what should you do with these buyers who aren't ready to buy? What can you do today to get their business within 24 months? Well, here are two things you shouldn't do. Don't pass all leads to sales. Salespeople want qualified leads. And a qualified lead in their view, is someone who is ready to buy real soon, not 12 months or 24 months from now. Most salespeople lack the resources and the patients to follow up with every sales lead for months, they concentrate instead on immediate opportunities. And number two, don't wait until the lead is ready. A lead who isn't ready to buy for a number of months needs to hear from you between now and when they are ready. Otherwise, they will forget you or you will forget them. Or a competitor will come along during that interval and grab your leads attention and their business. The most effective way to convert long-term leads into sales is drip. E-mail marketing. Drip e-mail marketing is the process of sending relevant messages to your prospects until they are ready to buy. Drip e-mail marketing is like drip irrigation, where farmers and gardeners apply small amounts of water to plants over long periods of time. Drip. E-mail marketing is usually automated and relies heavily on e-mail marketing, letters and newsletters sent to opt-in subscribers. Drip, e-mail marketing is effective because it helps you stay in touch with the people who are not ready for a sales call today. Drip e-mail marketing keeps your brand and your messages in the top of their mind. Drip. E-mail marketing ensures that you follow up with every single sales lead and only handover to your salespeople. The leads who are primed and ready to discuss a purchase. You and I tend to forget the people who don't stay in touch. But you tend to remember people who phone you, email you, or write to you over time. That's the beauty of drip e-mail marketing. It helps you show a sustained interest in your prospects until they're ready to buy. 13. Drip email marketing reaches ignored prospects: Do you snub 25 percent of your potential customers? If your business is typical, you do. According to a five-year study that measured the effectiveness of reader response cars in trade magazines, only 75 percent of response cards sent in by perspective customers or followed up by a salesperson. That means 25 percent of all sales leads were ignored. They were ignored because the problem facing most businesses is not lead generation, but lead cultivation. Salespeople can follow up with only so many leads a day. Their day planner is already full, so they tend to concentrate their energy on the hottest prospects. What does that mean? It means they ignore deliberately or simply through neglect the leaves that they lack the time to pursue, which as I said, is 25 percent most leads. But you can follow up with every single sales lead and inquiry that your business receives using drip e-mail marketing. With drip e-mail marketing, you follow up with every lead immediately and automatically. You send helpful informative messages to your prospects over time until they are ready to buy. Drip e-mail marketing gets its name from drip irrigation. The method that farmers and gardeners use to apply small amounts of water to plants over long periods of time. Drip e-mail marketing is effective at following up with all sales leads and inquiries because the process is usually automated. Your salespeople don't have to add dozens or hundreds of leads to the content managers for follow-up. Instead, the people in marketing qualify each lead first, the hot leads go directly to sales. The warm and cool leads go into the drip. E-mail marketing system. You schedule a series of drips you automatically make to every lead who enters the system. These trips are usually an email letter or email newsletter. Because your leads have requested to hear from you by email, they welcome your e-mail, marketing messages. Sending a repeated, relevant messages to this list of opt-in prospects is the heart of drip e-mail marketing. Your salespeople will thank you for it. And so will those potential customers who almost got away. 14. Drip email marketing prevents customer defections: My wife bought a new Honda Civic 25 years ago and still remembers the salesman who sold it to her in Columbus, Ohio. She never bought from that salesman again because she married me and she moved to Canada. When Y2K arrives, we traded her civic for a Ford pickup truck. Then we sold the 4D and bought a Chevrolet Astro van. Then we sold the Astro van and bought a Honda Odyssey. But my wife never talks about the guy who sold us the Ford or the Chevy or even the Honda Odyssey. She only remembers the nice guy from Columbus, Ohio, and she remembers him for only one reason. He stayed in touch. That's swell guy from the Honda dealer in the Buckeye State phone to my wife for years after she drove her new baby off his lot. He'd asked about how things were going with her car, whether she was still enjoying it, whether she was satisfied with the service she was receiving at his service departments? His calls were friendly, low key, and never bother. He never leaned hard on my wife to refer friends and family her way, but she made referrals anyway. He never pressured her to trade up to a newer model, but she would have given him her business anyway, except that I came along and asked her to marry me and moved to Canada north to great frozen tundra. I mentioned all of this because of a startling challenge that you face as a business owner or marketer. According to a study conducted by the United States government, 68% of businesses dump one supplier and switch to another. Not because of price and not because of quality, and not because of product selection, but because they have a vague feeling that their supplier doesn't care for them anymore and shows that lack of concern by failing to stay in touch. If you have a neighbor who doesn't drop by for coffee anymore, you assume the relationship has soured. If you have a boyfriend or a girlfriend who doesn't phone anymore, Doesn't text anymore. You assume the relationship has headed south instead of north, the direction Canada, where it should be headed. Friends, stay in touch. That's how your customers see it. They figure that if you care about them and want their business again, you'll stay in touch. And if you don't, you won't. Or perhaps I should say it this way. Your customers don't usually think if he doesn't want my business, he won't stay in touch. Instead, they infer from your behavior. If he wanted my business, he'd stay in touch. Since he hasn't he doesn't. The problem with staying in touch with customers, of course, is twofold. Particularly if the interval between sales is measured in years, such as house purchases and car purchases. First, you may not know what to say. And second, you may lack the discipline to stay in touch with customers for years after a sale, knowing all the time that they're not likely to buy. This is where drip e-mail marketing is so effective. Drip e-mail marketing isn't Chinese water torture. Drip e-mail marketing is the commercial equivalent of drip. Irrigation. Farmers and gardeners can walk out to their fields and gardens and water them manually, assuming they remember to do so at the right time and use only as much water as, as needed. Or they can install pipes over their crops and drip small amounts of water on their plants over long periods of time automatically, not too much and not too little. Drip. E-mail marketing is an effective way to stay in touch with customers because the process is usually automated. Your salespeople don't have to schedule follow-up calls with hundreds of past customers. Instead, they enter the customer's email address and name into a program, usually an auto responder. And that system sends informative, helpful pre-written messages to their customers over time. These messages include tips, resource guides, news, special reports, and invitations to events. There's no hard sell. There's not much soft cell for that matter either. With drip e-mail marketing, staying in touch with your friends becomes automatic and therefore more likely to happen. Customers who receive your drip e-mail marketing messages might not be like my wife and still be talking about you 20 years or 30 years after the sale. But you never know.