How to Talk and Present to Camera like a Pro! | Josiah (Jazza) Brooks | Skillshare

How to Talk and Present to Camera like a Pro!

Josiah (Jazza) Brooks, Artist, YouTuber and Entrepreneur

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10 Lessons (3h 7m)
    • 1. Introduction

      2:29
    • 2. Command Attention!

      3:56
    • 3. Face the Camera

      6:45
    • 4. Get the Production Out of your Head

      5:45
    • 5. Get to the Point

      3:59
    • 6. Editing is Half the Equation

      12:10
    • 7. Final Thoughts and Recap

      8:29
    • 8. Class Project

      4:07
    • 9. RAW Footage - Part 1

      62:12
    • 10. RAW Footage - Part 2

      76:51
87 students are watching this class

About This Class

Presenting to camera is something most people find difficult, but in a social media driven world where personality and storytelling are king, learning to face the camera head-on can be an important skill, and aside from improving your content, learning this skill will also build your confidence with real-life applications – interactions with others, and presentations for work or school, etc.

My name is Josiah Brooks – online I go by Jazza – I’m a professional full time YouTuber, so I’m pretty used-to being on camera. In addition to that, I host a kids TV show in Australia, and have spoken at live events both domestic and international. Presenting myself is a huge part of what I do, and I love doing it, but I wasn’t always good at it, nor was it as comfortable for me in the past as it is now.

In this course I hope to share as much of my own methods as possible, to help you become more comfortable presenting to camera. I’ll will teach both filming/editing tricks to help make your presentations more dynamic, as well as give performance tips and tricks to help you overcome shyness, and increase your charisma!

I’ll also assign you a class project you can participate with, to get some practical experience yourself, as well as valuable feedback from fellow students.

As a bonus, the final video of this course contains the full, unedited footage of me, presenting this course to camera. You’ll get to see the mistakes I made, you’ll see that it’s not as glamorous behind the scenes as you might feel it should be, and hopefully, you’ll learn a thing or two from seeing how I roll with the punches and improvise around my own mistakes and elements around me that are out of my control.

So what are you waiting for? Sign up to my course and join me for a lot of enlightening fun!

Transcripts

1. Introduction: presenting to camera is something most people find a little bit difficult on in a social media driven world where personality, storytelling, a king learning to face a camera head on can be an important skill. Now, aside from the obvious byproduct of having better content, learning to present well can also improve the way you present yourself in different work scenarios or social situations. My name is just so I Brooks online. I go by jazz ER and I have a YouTube channel called Drawer with Jazz, which is my full time job. And as it recording, this course has over 2.4 million subscribers and growing also have a TV show here in Australia, a kids TV show called Cartoon It Up and I speak domestically and internationally at different events and conferences. As you can imagine, being on camera and talking to camera is a big part of it, and by now I'm pretty comfortable with it. But I wasn't always comfortable with it, nor did I start off is particularly good at it. But after doing it for a long time, I've learned a whole bunch of things that I'm hoping can be helpful to you in this course. In this course, I plan to share with you the tips and tricks that I've taught myself over the years of creating independent content that hopefully you'll find useful in hoping you'd be more comfortable with a camera in learning some editing and presentation tips and tricks to make your content more dynamic and also some performance tips and tricks that will hopefully help you overcome whatever shyness you have or any awkwardness you feel when creating video content and talking to the camera. In this course, I also share a group project that I'm encouraging you to participate in and used to get feedback and improve your own talking to camera skills. You can also explore and help other people who are developing Marion talk to camera skills by sharing feedback on their presentations and project entries as well beyond the in depth course on the project. I'm encouraging you to participate in. There is also a section in this course at the end, which shows all off the raw footage as filmed from this camera off my recording of this entire course. So if you want a reference to sort of see what it looks like behind the scenes without any editing or publishing, and really see how I roll with the punches and my personal approach to presenting to camera . That's something you might find interesting and valuable as well. So what are you waiting for? Join me in my skills course today, along with my friend, this sandwich for a lot of inviting fun. The sandwich fit will make a lot more sense in the course itself. Trust me. So you got making a stop? Of course I know. 2. Command Attention!: your audiences. Attention is your most precious commodity, and whether you're delivering educational material or trying to make people laugh, the most important aspect of your presentation is how captivating you can be your audiences . Attention is your most precious commodity, and whether you're delivering educational material, we're trying to make people laugh. The most important aspect of your presentation is how captivating you can be. Now consider my opening phrase, which I repeated twice the first run through You might not have really heard what I was saying. You heard it, but you probably didn't make as much sense of it as the second time through with emphasis and passion coming from me, your brain sort of hold onto words a little bit more because I'm engaged. Your brain naturally wants to be more engaged. And if you use the analogy of a classroom with a teacher who doesn't really care about what they're saying or putting on the board, that's sort of an invitation for students to zone out and shoot spitballs and write notes to each other on the opposite end of the spectrum. If you have the teacher who's enthusiastic and passionate about what they're presenting and making eye contact, really getting excited. Even the kids that are a little too cool for school might not be able to help it pay a little bit of attention, and that's just something worth keeping in mind now. In today's day and age, people's attention is more fragmented than ever. I'm guilty of this myself when eyebrows YouTube to watch videos old pic of video and play it and immediately minimize it corner of my phone and look for the next video to play. And if the video I initially started isn't holding my attention enough all interrupted with the next video. And that will be a cycle that repeats itself. People's behavior, particularly in the digital age, is begging for something to grab and hold on to. And that really is what this course is about, and specifically what we're gonna start talking about commanding people's attention. Commanding attention doesn't need to mean being super loud or talking really far store, even using jump cuts or just being overwhelming in general, although those things do have their place from time to time. Really, what I'm talking about is confidence on a familiarity with the presentation style that you've adopted and the content off your content. I wanted to just open up just outlining the core aspect of holding people's attention, specifically having that confidence to command it on. In doing so, I want to just give two little adages that I'm sure you've heard before. But worth keeping in mind when it comes to developing that confidence first and you will have heard this a 1,000,000 times before is practice makes perfect, and that is true. Watch the behind that seems full, uncut, raw stuff and you'll notice that I stumble about a lot. If anything, I've learned a lot about editing and knowing how to make myself look polished when I'm actually not sometimes. But that's all part of the process. And just knowing that that's normal is important, too. So while practice makes perfect, does countin doesn't mean you get better over time. It's also worth remembering that you'll never actually be perfect, but you may become perfectly comfortable with the process, and that's just another way to look at it. The second I there's going to mention was to fake it until you make it, because the reality is, especially if you're starting off feeling uncomfortable in front of a camera is a very normal thing. Most people do feel uncomfortable with the camera, and in certain circumstances I still do, too, even after doing this failure. So it's important to remember that sometimes that fear or anxiety or discomfort will be there, and that's okay. Just allow it to exist and just pretend it doesn't. So that's it for the opener of this course. Really, I just wanted to lay a bit of a solid foundation and ground your expectations in the direction we're going to be focusing on in helping you present camera. But moving on in the next video, we're gonna focus on some specific tips and tricks that you can use to aid your comfort with the camera. I'll see you there. 3. Face the Camera: in this part of the course, we're gonna talk about facing the camera head on. Now, talking to camera and creating your own content or video in yourself can be a little awkward and feel a bit stupid, particularly if the entire production is in your hands and you're responsible for putting it all together. And it's all on your own initiative. And then beyond that. Sometimes it could be painfully awkward to realize how silly you might look to others that may or may not be there when you're talking to the camera. And yet, have you ever noticed that in interviews and documentaries, all of the people who often being interviewed don't really seem uncomfortable, even when those people may be on the camera for the first time ever, have very little on camera experience? In many cases, these people seem like that not bad speakers, and in most cases they seem somewhat comfortable. For some reason, the existence of the lights and the cameras and the production seems less intrusive to them than it does to you sitting in front of your dear Salah and recording yourself for your own or someone else's content. I believe this unite comfort can be attributed to to factors. The first is that in most of those instances I referenced. They're actually talking to another person and not to the camera in an interview, they usually across from someone who was off camera and talking to them. The second factor is that the entire production is out of their hands and therefore out of their minds. There's no anxiety attached to how the lighting looks or what the cameras picking up or if things were in focus. And that could be a cause of a lot of anxiety for someone setting up and running to the entire production themselves, who is also on camera. So in the next video following this will talk about factor to the getting the production out of your head part. But in this video, I want to talk about how you can feel more comfortable talking to the camera as if it was a person speaking as your authentic self, as if you're being interviewed and actually talking to someone as yourself. Which brings me to what they will not surprise you is my first point. To talk to the camera is if it's a person not a group of people, not a camera just through the camera. You're speaking to one person because in most cases it's actually going to be one person watching your content, obviously, but sometimes lots of instances of one person and my videos on YouTube, for example, average several 100,000 views each. But if I was recording a video feeling like I was talking to several 100,000 people through the camera, I would crumble under the pressure. It would be terrifying. But even now, as I speak to the camera, I feel like I'm speaking to a person that can remove a lot of anxiety that comes along with performance and also help you speak more comfortably. As a result, even though my full time job technically entails entertaining or visually presenting to millions of people, I still feel like it's an intimate process when I make the content and I feel like that makes a huge difference to the viewer because it's an intimate viewing experience and that's the way it should be. It makes the interaction more engaging in personal and interesting. The second thing I want you to try and adopt in the way you present. The camera is to try and be personal, uncomfortable. Now that sounds like a given being like, Yeah, big, good on camera. Do that know what actually mean is interact with the person, the camera in the same way you would with a person. And if you feel like making a Joeckel poking fun at yourself, if you feel like there's some room for improvisation or just something a little bit off the rails, that's okay to do and come back to because it's going to make the entire process as well as the entire result, feel way more natural and entertaining. A more practical way of approaching it is to think of the lens of the camera as a deep, dark I. Ah, you. Maybe that's a bit scary. I think of the barrel of the lens of the camera as eyes and I stare through the barrel and not at it, because if you look at it and focus on it, then you're building some anxiety or expectations around something you're did actively doing something. Instead, I try and look through the lens and speak to a person. Now we've mentioned speaking to the camera as if it's a person on being personal and comfortable. The first thing sort of ties in with those but is a really key component in making them effective. And that is maintaining eye contact, which I'm doing right now. And there are two things that I often see which intrude on that which people fall back on because of the insecurity or uncertainty in staring down the barrel of the lens, Feeling a bit silly? One of those is relying on a viewfinder. I have one in front of me right now that I can see what position I'm in Yunan and most selfie cameras have of you find out on many DSLR is have a viewfinder that can flip out on in many cases, especially for novices. That can be a bit of a fullback or something that they rely on to feel comfortable or to make sure they look good and shot. But the problem with that, particularly with Selfie cam or a DSLR, is that the viewfinder is always off to the side a little bit, and it would be like if I was having a conversation with you talking like this immediately when I break eye contact and I talk like this, or even if I flip back and forth like this, it distances you from your ability to connect with me. Andi. It disengages you from the content that I'm making Point made. I hope so. The second way that people's eyes stray is using something like this. A script script, a great I write scripts quite a lot, but I rarely if ever, actually read them while I present. If anything, I read a dot point and then present and stuff up 50 times in favor of maintaining eye contact so that I eventually get one full read through so that it feels natural. And like I'm talking to a person rather than forcing a line to be read accurately now, viewfinders and scripts can be really important, and I use them all the time, so I'm not trying to say, Don't use them. But what I'm saying is, when you actually recording the content part, when you're actually talking to the person to talk to the person, and if you have something you need to say specifically or if you need to be in a position specifically toe sort that out around the actual content so often. Before I take a lot, check over the script to take a few moments to soak it in. I'll make sure I'm in frame and then all present and often or stuff up. And I'll just repeat that process until I get at least one take where I'm fully engaged with the camera. And that's the most important part. In the next video. We're gonna talk about the second of the two comfort, affecting factors that I've mentioned opening up this video on but is specifically how to get the production side of things out of your head. I'll see you there. 4. Get the Production Out of your Head: When you're independently recording or creating your own content, you can be really hard to not feel weighed down by a lot of the technical elements that rely on you. Now in traditional media, there is a person for every job. There's a person whose job it is to sort out the lighting. There's a person who does. The sound is a person who does the gathering and the grip and the audio and the camera. And the director and the person actually on camera doesn't have to worry about any of that stuff. However, if you're a one person production crew like myself, if you're not careful, these responsibilities and technicalities 10 way your performance down or make you seem a little distracted or feel a little anxious. Think of the production process as a sandwich. Stick with me. You begin by setting up a solid foundation. This is your pre production, getting your pre production ready and tell setting up lights, testing and setting up your audio, getting the camera in frame and ready and getting all the settings so that you don't flick . Is there anything else you need to worry about and checking all the batteries that you need lined up will power supplies for stuff. Just getting all of those details off the production lined up on ready to go without you needing toe watch each of them all the time. Mixed comes the tasty part. We've laid down our foundation and the middle part. The tasty part is where we've set up everything that allows us to put house spread down so that we can forget about the process and just put on the things that make it flavor. Cem. Give it some personality Possess now. Of course, you can use flavors that are a little more predictable about people used to well that you're comfortable with. But this is also the part where you can start to experiment a little bit and get a little bit tasting and add some Sprinkles and garnishes to make your production interesting and memorable. Maybe had a little bit of chocolate source to your presentations. And who knows, maybe you could add a couple of Sprinkles just to ah, I don't know, fanciful I now our Sprinkles and garnishes of fun. But there is such a thing is too much. So if we're adding a lot of flavor. Just make sure to do so with a sense of balance in mind. With that, handle them our recording, down or out, flavor and spread. Put down. The last part of our production process is the post production, and this is all of the stuff that comes after you finish the recording, everything that package is it and makes it look nice and leaked. The point is, with the technical stuff left to before on after your presentation it leaves. The entire result is something that's a little more package but allows you to improvise and have a little bit of fun. When you're putting down your spread, the result is nicely presented. Tasty trade. Take this son will be it. For example, I scripted this whole section, so that's the preproduction planted. All that got the materials mostly ready and ready to go. And then the actual recording of it is the bit where I get to admire the flavor and improvise a little bit on duh, have some fun. The post production part of it, the stuff I leave too late up, is running even. It'll up and you don't see the mistakes I make, which yeah, Let's say there was a few actually forgot one or two little things that I had to fix up. But you didn't see it because I've packaged it'll nicely and you're left ignorant off this stuff up that I make. But you're left with a really nice flavor. Sprinkles really add a lot. Why don't I eat more? Sprinkle sandwiches of the real question because this is a damn good sandwich. If you want to make now, this is literally the end of the part of the script for this video. It was a sandwich metaphor for the production process to sort of help get the production out of your head. But now that I fish recording it, I've eaten half of the sandwich and I want to eat the other half. Say, I thought maybe you'd enjoy joining me for the finalization of this metaphor. Say it through to the end together. Oh, you can click ahead and watch the next pot, but I know something tells me you're going to enjoy staying around with me and watching me enjoying this text in trade. But you want to eat a sandwich right now or you grossed out because there's 11 mark right here picking up the lovely. Ask him on Rice Mountain with this, uh, whoever invented the pain of butter and Nutella sandwiches. Genius, Do you know I have been the peanut better intelligent night? It's a recent about a cup says the same thing. Which means that this is basically a recent spate about a cop. Oh, my God. I'm a genius. Have you enjoyed my closer? This bits last some formal. Maybe people the next section. You could go take a break and make yourself a peanut butter and Nutella sandwich. Good. If you don't really making out really good sprint to in French, let me just point out you just sat through a couple of minutes. I'm watching me eat a sandwich, huh? You must feel like an idiot. See, in the next part, I want to get winking dinner. I love it. I love it. 5. Get to the Point: What's the point of your presentation to educate? Entertain? Maybe both ensure that you're familiar with what you're delivering and why people are watching so that you don't spend too much time fluffing around the edges and risk losing people's attention. That precious commodity. We talked about the start of this course. You're gonna want your content to be concise, to keep people's attention. Some of the major causes of causing these presentations to go on tangents and lose people's attention is a lack of preparation on a lack of polish. Both of things can be addressed with a script beforehand on the editing after now in the next video, we're going to talk about the editing part. So in this video we're gonna focus on how to follow a script. And there are lots of different ways that you could do this, and no one way is right. But the presence of a script to sort of keep you on track can be pretty important now. For some productions, people use something called a teleprompter, which enables the textile the script vessel was reading to be shown in front of the camera lends itself so while they're reading it they still feel like they're making eye contact. This is useful for longer productions, where a script is somewhat necessary, and it does help maintain that eye contact. But as you can imagine, reading a script is less than organic or authentic, so it does potentially remove a little bit of that personal connection. On the other hand, some people like to just have docked points or thematic outlines where they improvise around that, and they do stray a bit while just adhering to core themes or docked points. I tend to personally stick to more of the latter of the two and improvise a lot around just a few core themes. But for something like this, where I have specific chunks of information that I want to effectively deliver, I like toe have a script with paragraphs laid out that I can follow strictly at sometimes and loosely at others. In fact, the way I'm delivering this video is I have the script in front of me, with everything written out, almost word for word but divided into visual chunks with dot points and paragraphs so that there's usually a rough length of something that I can somewhat commit to memory and try and present, and if I stray even a little bit, that's OK. As long as the core of the information is there on the presentation is comfortable. Sometimes the way it's delivered or the specific words are really important, and it'll take a lot of takes to get something spoken exactly the way that I've written it down. And then in other instances, it's more of an idea that I'm trying to convey on, even like right now, it's more comfortable for me to try and communicate that idea authentically without worrying about the specific wording. I find it's useful to do that and then just crossed off the paragraph. Once you feel like you've delivered it effectively, and I feel like that one did pretty good, so I'll just crossed it off. I think it's also important to state at this point that having a script doesn't mean you have to deliver the script perfectly either word for word or even in a specific number of takes. Sometimes I take 2030 40 or another absurd number of takes to get something that feels right, and sometimes I'll just have a few key themes that Fuller in a few different paragraphs and somehow have navigated naturally, Um, in my own authentic voice through all of those themes, without referencing the script very much so the actual delivery can vary, But I think it's definitely important to lay down some sort of a project plan before you deliver to camera so that you have something to ground yourself to when you have moments of uncertainty. Trust me, there has happened quite a lot, even after doing it for years. So even if they're dot points to refer to every now and then, or just a few key themes to make sure you're keeping to the point, just make sure that whatever the point is, you try and stick to it. Now, even with a solid foundation to follow, the presentation won't always be clean. So that's where the next part comes in editing, which we'll talk about next video and, specifically, how you can extract the best and most clean and effective parts of your performance to create the most cohesive experience for your viewers. 6. Editing is Half the Equation: the title of this part of the course is editing is half the equation. But in my experience, editing is frankly, ah, lot more than half of the equation. And if you go forward and watch the role footage of this course, you will know exactly what I'm talking about. That's why I've added this chapter on editing being half the equation, but also why I've added all of the raw footage to the end of the course off me making this course because I really want to try and hit the point home that when you create your talk to camera stuff, it's going to feel really unpolished, and it may look really unpolished until you get a chance to actually cut it up and polish it a bit. And that's what editing does. So in this section, we're not actually going to explore the technicalities of editing this a lot to be taught there and a lot of different programs. So if you want to learn to read it, I would encourage you to go check out other parts of skill share and look up editing and learn from a bunch of other people on different programs that you can use to edit. I personally use Premiere Pro. I started off in Camp Tasia. I know some people who use Vegas. That's just the whole mixed bag that we're not gonna go into in this video, but really here. I want to talk about two perspectives of editing when it comes to talking to camera, the first being how you can shape the way you present to the camera to be effective for your edit later on, and then also from the other direction. How you can edit to extract the most out of your performance. So first performing for your edit There are a few little things that I keep in mind that I do physically and mentally to make sure that my performance is easy to follow and also cohesive once it is edited. The first years when I make a mistake trying to pick up where and the first is when I make a mistake, I try and pick up where I left off. In fact, I'm just going to include that mistake I just made to show you exactly how I did that. I had my hands down here and I went up here to talk. I stuffed up and I went back down. Here first is when I make a mistake, trying to pick up where where I last left off can continue, even though there was a chunk that stuffed it up. If I stayed up here in the edit and went immediately from here to here, it just sort of makes it look a bit sloppy. I think of these moments of sort of freezes. Sometimes it will be halfway through a sentence or a gesture. I make an end on before I pick up on the next section and are trying get my brain to sort of hold onto those moments before I complete the next section. And if I stuff up, I could just go back to those moments on pick up where I left off. Once I fully completed, I take note of where I finish on. Then I continue that process of having that be the next solid foundation to pick up from if I stuff up again. Another thing I keep in mind with the physicality of my performance when it comes to emphasis in the edit is with things like gags and jokes to really push yourself physically or make some interesting moments between you and the camera just with the edit in mind, knowing that you can do things like zoom in or exaggerate colors or make something look ridiculous or overemphasized or hilarious. There's so much you can do in the edit. Andi. You'll have more power to do that if you perform with that in mind, This could be intentional or unintentional if I make a mistake often all sort of trying to amplify that in the edit. But if I'm aware of it while I'm doing it, I might sort of just bring more attention to it, knowing that I'm going to focus in on it later on in the edit, Try not to hide your mistakes. Sometimes, if that's going to add to the humor or help captivate your audience a little bit, helped bring it to the forefront so that when you edit, you can amplify it. Another way I perform with the edit in line is the way I deliver retakes Now. Sometimes I'll get through an entire part of a scripture and entire point or section and have delivered each of the key components. But it might just not feel right in those instances will go back and just do the same thing once or twice, just until it feels right. And even if I have the whole section recorded cleanly, sometimes I'll try and get a few more. Just so have more toe work with. And that's just another way I like to perform with editing in mind. You're gonna want the best cuts of everything to make something work. Well, Another thing I wanted to touch on is a lesson actually took from a singing teacher I had many years ago. Who said When you perform or sing to people, most people just remember the start and the end in the middle is just gravy now, while that's strictly not true, and if there's something particularly memorable Lord not memorable in the middle that can shape people's attention. That is worth keeping in mind that when you present the camera, especially in the chunks that you perform part in, to open up with bravado and to close with certainty as long as in the middle you hit all the right points and you maintain cohesion. It's more important that you start confidently and with energy and you close with closure even just then, I just think that just that with closure doesn't that feel nice, doesn't it? Just with closure just close with the closure, it just wraps it up it just package it. Now let's move on to talking about how you can edit to get the most out of your performance . As I'm sure you're aware, there are many different ways of presenting to camera and many different styles, and the way you develop your talk to camera style is gonna be unique to you. Editing is itself a communication method that is going to take shape as your presentation skills take shape. So as I mentioned before, this isn't going to go into the new degrees of how to edit or anything like that, so you can go check out the rest of school share to learn how to do that. But really, I want to touch on some tips and tricks when it comes to applying different mind sets, two different kinds of editing and a few other things that you can keep in minds to get the most out of your performance. The first thing to keep in mind when you edit and to get the most value performance specifically to hold people's attention is something like all cutting dead space. Basically, any time I'm not talking or getting a specific point across, even if I am talking and it's not part of the point, I'll cut it sometimes and depending on the tone on going for, if I'm being particularly comedic, I will cut quite aggressively. Sometimes I cut large chunks of actual talking to camera stuff if it doesn't feel like it is bringing value or holding people's attention. And sometimes I am editing so aggressively and cutting dead space so effectively that I even remove breaths out from a performance when I'm trying to keep things really stopping some people at it so aggressively that they overlay words from one cut into the other, sometimes called a J cut or an elk with video connects. But the audio overlaps one word, finishing as the other words beginning. It's often associated with extreme talked camera videos with words over. Energy is really intense. There's barely any moment of quiet over him to breathe. Unless, of course, it's a punchline or adds to a jerk, often in the style of presentation, the speaker will be moving around the space rapidly. This could be affected because it keeps the viewers attention always moving with presented . This is generally pieced together in a lot of chunks of what you it doesn't see is the way that these whole sentences are broken up into tiny porter. A single paragraph is never actually completed in its entirety. And the recording that looks really fragmented. But putting it all together seems cohesive and snapping somewhat instant. While this could make for a really punchy result of this is mostly the work of editing. And it can also take the pressure off when you're recording, give you room to improvise and also give you a lot of room to make mistakes. Most of the stuff won't be seen, really. Just take the most high energy moments that connect well together and just hear them up really tight. This is where I'm going to encourage you to go watch the raw footage of this heart of the video being recorded. You will see exactly how disjointed it is. I'm gonna put the time code right here so you can see exactly where in the rule footage video you can go to to see me recording this disjointed, snapping jump cut a bit. And if you are watching come back, you realize that this entire small section of dialogue I've constantly and intentionally moved around to hold your attention. But it's also taking a lot longer to record than you might think, because that recording so snappy now on the opposite end of the spectrum, we have the more formal style of presentation. This is appropriate for new shows or interviews and things like that. Where are editing takes a back seat to the performance itself, But even the performance can be somewhat undertone because the content is a little bit more chill. So even podcasts and stuff like that. It's less about intensity, and it's more about cohesiveness and getting everything done in one take. So it's OK to read off a script as long as you have a little bit of confidence and you ground yourself while constantly coming back and maintaining eye contact. I'm reading off the paper, but as I've read, I'm making sure to have a bit of a slower pace where I can be a little bit more articulate . My personal style preference lies somewhere between these two. I like to have the grounded foundation of a script but also like to play and have a little bit of a snapping moment here or there, or have some energy. Andi have a bit more of a jump in and out with the cut itself. But as a result, off my improvising and leaving a little bit more room to make a mistakes, it also means that there's a little bit more cleaning up to be done. So I want to talk a little bit about a few tips and tricks that I use to clean up my edits . When my performance is a little bit more relaxed, the first thing I do is remove dead space to keep things snapping. And I usually follow the wave form or that big audio chunk just to see where a word ends and the next one begins so I can bring those together. Sometimes I will get rid of a breath and look, I mentioned. Sometimes we get rid of lodge. Irrelevant chunks were I've spoken just sort of goes off in a different direction. However, you'll find that doing this can sometimes especially in the more high energy way of presenting cause visual glitches. Hands start in one position and move into a different position. And in the next cut your hands are immediately out like this. It's gonna look a little bit, shall we say, distracting unless it's done intentionally, like I just did. The next thing I do in my edit to make my performance seen more seamless is I bring the camera in and out in postproduction. I will do this for two reasons. One, there is something happening in continuity. Either my hands are in one position and somewhere else the next, and I need to distract from that because I don't have another take to pick from so sometimes or punching and zoom in or crop or I will go out. And that will distract from the fact that my hands have been here and in the next, take their moves and even in the next take have moved again. Seeing what I've done there just moved in and out a little bit and helps just create more of a visual distraction overall, to help avoid the emphasis. Now, if I don't do the punching in and out of my hands around here and then the next take my hands of right here and then the next Take my hand to hear again or I've moved to a take next where my hand is over here, it becomes pretty distracting. So zooming in and out can help do that on the other instance in which I like to zoom in and out is actually to help shape people's attention, particularly if I change the tone of voice I'm speaking in or I emphasize a joke or I change the subject. I find that zooming in or zooming back out can help people feel like they're honing in or paying more attention to the next thing or they're opening up to. We're releasing themselves from something that just listen to a little bit so that latest German brings me to the conclusion of this video, and I'll just point out, too, that that zoom out thing I just did that cause I transitioned into the summary part of the video. So you shape your attention and shape how the video feels a little bit in practical demonstration there in practical. That's not a good word. Great. Now I'm gonna punching it out to emphasize the fact that I made a fool of myself. But I'm gonna keep this take in there just to show how relatable and funny I am because we all make mistakes. Pause for effect. Good. I'm good at presenting camera. I love the improvising stuff. It's good fun. Anyway, Point is that is it for this video. We've talked about how to perform for your edit on how to edit to get the most out of your performance in the next video. We're gonna sort of summarize and wrap up the course, and I want to also share some final thoughts. And if you find a little mindsets that I hope will be helpful to you in your future presentations, see what I did? I will say that the clergy I'll see you there. Closure. This course is so helpful. It's sorry, Helpful. I just run the question thing 7. Final Thoughts and Recap: in closing. I want to go back and recap on a few things that I feel like I could use some extra emphasis, but also a few additional votes. That I hope will be helpful to you in the first is just to remind you of that first thing. We talked about the importance of commanding people's attention. Command people's attention, dammit, Commanders, I command you to command it. I bring you back to the lovely analogy off the production sandwich. Each of these three parts is a really key component in commanding people's attention. The first that foundation, the pre production, the way you set up the camera, the way you like thing that the audio. If you have bad audio or it's badly little cameras in an uncomfortable position, it's going toe adds to the risk of you losing people's attention. Next, of course, comes the middle bit. The presentation talked to camera stuff. It is the most important, and if you don't have something halfway tasty and there you lose people's attention regardless of what the sandwich part around it is made up. So when you present the camera, make sure to be yourself and try and have fun and relax and know that you can make lots of sandwiches until you find the right combination of flavors and things that you can produce time after time and just get better and better. Just try and take that pressure off yourself and explore and have a bit of fun. That's what the flavor is about. Finally, of course, we have the top of your sandwich, the final part of the enclosure, the rapper, the thing that meetings it all up and makes it presentable and easy to consume, editing the music, retouching the video and all that stuff. But it's important to remember, of course, that you don't have to have a perfect production or post production for the flavor to really shine. Now, in this Seo share course, I've attempted to hold your attention as much as I possibly can. You'll notice that through the course specifically, if you go back and watch, I've bought the camera in and out at times to sort of help transition and hide certain mistakes. I've tried to keep your attention and help you feel comfortable through this whole course by maintaining eye contact, even though I have a script I'm following. I'm prioritising communicating with you first and foremost in a way that feels natural, uncomfortable and then beyond that, when I'm not zooming in around, I know that I could get a bit old and looking at the same thing through the whole course of a video can get pretty old. So I also like to cut away to something called B roll or just video image overlays, just to help give you a breath of fresh air every now something different to look at and re center your focus in on beyond all of that stuff, which is the plan stuff in the way I can shape my performance before and after to try and help hold your attention. I also have fun in the process. You'll notice that there are jokes through the course off this whole course. The course of this whole course, like this accidental pun plan ways what? I'm getting distracted. The point is, if I stuff up or if I feel like there's something to chase in the middle, when an idea occurs to me or I feel I feel like an improvisational spark, come along, I'll follow it and have fun with it because at the end of the day, yes, this is an educational course, but that doesn't mean it has to be boring. It could be fun, too. Learning can be awesome. Fun schools cool When you play by the rules, I'm I'm delighted. Dinner parties. I promise I don't have dinner parties. I'm actually very alone. That's not surprising, given I spend the majority of my time talking by myself alone to cameras. But I feel like I'm talking to you. That's what keeps me saying The point is, in this course I have tried to hold your attention. I've been hungry for it. Ravenous even. I want your attention. So I want to be informative, entertaining and hold it with every asset I have. It might dispose it from the pre and post production to the performance itself and just having fun and being intimate and creative. That I feel, is really what matters when it comes to presenting to camera. It's the stuff around the presenting the camera as well on the relaxing and enjoying the process. Which brings me to the last thing I wanted to come back to. You know, I've sort of touched on it very briefly, but I really want to emphasize that in your production sandwich. That middle bit to the presentation and the fund you have in the flavor you develop is the most important part. You don't need. A fancy studio will set up a lighting production camera equipment. I started off with a cheap, crappy webcam, no lying equipment, no professional sound equipment. I had a crappy computer, but I still built a following and exponentially over time grew the production assets I had to work with, along with my production value, while focusing on the presentation itself. Even the post production you can use free or cheap editing stuff and even things like audacity for your audio. That's a free or open source program. And there's noise removal tools and all this other stuff. There's really affordable stuff out there now. You can even do a lot of editing and post production on a phone. Nowadays, with free APs. There's just so much out there that's available for you to use so you don't need to feel like production quality or production space or technical equipment is the thing stopping you from making engaging content because at the end of the day. Let's face it, if you had a choice between a sandwich that had really nice bread, bet was sort of stinky, moldy cheese in the middle that tasted garbage. But you're not gonna eat that sandwich. But if you have a sandwich that was slightly stale not that great bread, but a delicious center. I think you'll agree with me about the reality is you pick that sandwich, Tom. Often time. I think there is one more thing I want to mention with this course, and you probably wear this by now. I really like sandwiches. Thank you so much for watching musculature. Of course, that does bring us to the end of the course and in wrapping up, I just wanted to introduce the to next videos, which are part of the course, but not technically part of the presentation particles. One of the videos is a project, so I'm going to assign to you project that you can if you so choose, participate in to sort of help you learn the process yourself in developing on talk to camera skills and beyond that, also share your projects with your classmates here on school share and get some feedback. And I would encourage you if you post a project to also go through and share feedback on other people's projects as well. Just keep in mind we're all here. We're all trying and learning. So just be constructive and positive on just help people get the most out of their own performance while trying to get the most out of your own. The second and last video in this entire course is the entire raw footage off the talk to camera course presentation. And so far that's two hours and 10 minutes with footage. It's probably going to come out to about two hours and 22,025 minutes, so obviously it's a long chunk of the course additive in there. But I really do feel like I want to provide as much reality as possible into the behind the scenes of making stuff and talking to camera. And the reality is a course that goes for 20 minutes might take two or three hours to put together. There is a bit of work that goes into presenting camera. The point I really wanted to make in posting that whole roll footage section is it's not perfect when you present the camera. Most of the people you watch on the Internet have a lot of stuff that you haven't seen. That a lot of mistakes they've made that you haven't seen have gone into developing Meskill and even the content watched. So I hope you enjoy watching that. And I've tried toe involved my my thoughts in the process as I make mistakes and improvise around them. And also, as life happens around the process is, well, you'll see all of that. So I hope that's valuable to the very last thing I wanted to say in wrapping up. This whole presentation part, of course, is just that I want to thank you, because when I opened up by saying that the attention of your view is the most important asset, I really believe that and as a result, you're giving me your attention through this course is really something I'm very grateful for. I hope you enjoy participating in our project and if you feel like spending any more time and attention on watching that raw footage, then good luck to you because it's messy. Thank you for watching muscular share course and until next time I'll see you later 8. Class Project: welcome to the class project outline within the skill share cause. This is where I give you a bit of an assignment that you can participate if you so choose before I reveal that to you that I want to begin by saying two things. The first is that I would encourage you to participate if you want to develop your talk to camera skills. And even if you don't plan on being a content creator anything like that, it could be a useful exercise to sort of help you understand that process on may be. Be ready for it if such an opportunity presents itself in the future. The second thing I want to mention is just to be sensitive to people whose projects you watch and review. A lot of people participating will be doing so for the first time. Some of them will be younger or older. I just want everyone who participates and reviews each other's work and put their work out there themselves just to keep a peaceful mentality and just to be really positive because, especially when we present ourselves on camera, it can be really daunting, and the scariest part of that can be the audience you're submitting to. So if you've made it through this whole course, I'm really hoping that you understand what goes into presenting the camera and also a lot of the anxieties that can work against us. So as a result, some of the presentations you see might feel a little unpracticed or uncomfortable, and that's OK, because we're all learning and we're all putting in the effort, and that's a big step to make. So make sure to be encouraging that. And if you're willing to give it a go yourself, I just want to let you know. I really appreciate that, because that does take a bit of bravery, especially if it doesn't come natural to you. Feels a little bit uncomfortable. So good luck and have fun. The assignment I'm giving you is to present to us your sandwich gold sandwiches. What I mean by that is I would like you to make a video. You could be making a sandwich. You could just be holding a sandwich. Or just talking about a sandwich with sandwich would refer to your production itself in the course of your video. Presenting the camera, tell us about your production. The basic foundation of your sandwich. Talk about the the source, the secret juices that making a sandwich tasty that spreads that using the Sprinkle that added the extra flavor. And then, of course, the post production. This should be helpful in a number of ways. It will help the skill share course in class members to see the production process at least talked about what programs people are using, what cameras and lighting people are using. And you can do things like use B roll cuts and use footage or images off parts of your production to sort of cut away to to sort of help you learn how to shape people's attention . Because obviously, the most important part of the sandwich itself and your assignment is how you present it. So I want your focus to be on your president into camera, how you're conveying your style. You might take it a little more formally. You might be really goofy or do something in a sketch comedy sort of style. But whatever it is, try and find what feels authentic to you. You don't necessarily need to feel like you need to be like a certain style like a certain presenter. Try and find what is comfortable for you and follow what fuels creative and interesting for you in the way you describe your production sandwich. So that is your assignment. Just submitted as a link to a YouTube video, it can either be public or enlisted. That's fine. And of course, I would encourage you to include a little bit of a ride up underneath, just sort of explaining why what you do, what you have to get out of it on a little bit of that, that production side of it, too, in the write up. But leave most of the content in the explanation to the video, because I really want to see people practicing with the way that they speak to the camera and attempt to hold people's attention. That way it may feel confronting, and it might also be a little bit of work, especially with the set up and then the post production. But it's all part of creating your own content on presenting your own styles. So that's the class project. I wish you the best of luck. And of course, I commend any of you brave enough to dissipate it could be a little daunting, but I hope that in stepping out into the unknown or trying something different and maybe if you're used to doing a little bit of president into camera, trying to up your game a bit and really focus on some of the things we talked about, so you can hold people's attention as much as possible. I'm looking forward to exploring something entries and leaving a bit of feedback myself. But regardless of how you go about it, I hope you have fun and I wanna thank you for watching this course. I'll see you later. 9. RAW Footage - Part 1: okay. Here. Yeah. This is the raw footage portion off the V. I just want to make sure everything's on the batteries on. Okay. Cool. On audio. I'm assuming that you better hope is all here. Sorry if you couldn't tell this. This'll chunk of the course is the raw, uncut chunk of the course. So starting from the very beginning, all the way through, you just going to get the whole behind the scenes of how I put this course together and I'm hoping that's informative is to you know, how I present the Cameron stuff. So I wanted to start off with just you guys before I start the actual course camera. According, I just want to introduce the set up a little bit. I want also preface by saying that the equipment I'm using and the actual sort of more complex stuff if you're starting off, don't feel intimidated. This is I've been doing this for a very long time. I started off with a web cam and a crappy computer. Though I didn't have lying equipment. I didn't have fancy sound equipment or anything like that. Sorry. This is all stuff that can come over time. but I thought I would intro you by sort of showing the set up I am using now if you couldn't tell him actually blogging because I'm always making content of all sorts. So this is my behind the scenes off the behind the scenes off the behind the scenes sets of sort of behind the scene inception. So in the stop, distinct because I've grabbed that portion. But using my phone camera, I'm gonna film some footage off my set up from my perspective. So you can see how this all together. So I'm just gonna hit record and ding Yeah, that's what I'm looking at now. So coming out here, my set up entails of bench desk, you can see I've got a whole bunch of stuff down here. These are gonna be props for the videos. I've got my script. I've got a camera only used for a portion of the course. I've got my main camera there. Now, I do have a TV set up just with the hasty on my over there, and that's just as a really big reference. I can just make sure I'm always in shot. Just see if I'm you know, my four whole foreheads getting shiny due to swear tour if something's flickering or anything like that, just to make sure it's all really Katie's. If otherwise, you can use the viewfinder, anything. I'm just doing this because it's further away on. I do have some led studio lights. I have three. If I come back around here, you can see that two of them a shining on the backdrop just so that it creates this sort of luminescent glow sort of thing behind me on also wanted them to be in camera so you can actually see. There's a bit of a studio set up. I thought that was a cool esthetic. And then I have one light, which is lot brighter, and that's just pointing at me. So have a little bit of light reflecting off of the back of the wall toe like a little bit from behind and a little bit from the sides. But really, this is the main light, and these are just sort of secondary. So that's the equipment side of things. I should also point out these panels is one there and one there. These are just sound panels on these just help because I have lots of flat surfaces in the studio. It just stops the sound being so bouncy. So sometimes people have things fixed, the walls. I actually have some sound panels in the ceiling, But rather than having a super expensive acoustic treatments set up, you can do the same thing with rugs with pictures on the wall just with fluffy things just around the room. You can't even hang a blanket if you find you. You know you have really hard surfaces, and it sounds echoey. There are really great hacks you can use to get a good sound. Anyways, that's the set up. I just thought I'd also intro by showing you a little bit of my starting ritual so that I mean, I don't really need a film with this anymore. Um, I can put this away. Actually, that's just gonna be a distraction. So I'm now getting wrong, getting nervous. I'm getting a bit short of breath. I'm now going to get ready to actually do the course, but before I do so I just want to run you through a few of the core things before we just jump straight into it and one of them is this. You may have noticed this. This is again another one of those nonessential things. But when you start using bright lights, especially for long periods of time, you will start to notice in video footage that you get shiny and your skin starts toe secrete a little bit of sweat and stuff like that. So this is just a mat sort of semi clear powder thing on, Basically, and you'll you'll know notice in TV shows you have you ever seen, like behind this in sections where they have hair and makeup? Come on in, the in the ad break or whatever the purpose of this is actually just to get rid of that little bit of shine, it just sort of adds a match surface to skin just so that when using bright lights, you know, shiny because I think this is less about creating a looking more about minimizing distraction. This is something I started to do when I noticed didn't comment to my videos. People would say your forehead is brighter than my future, and that was just like, Oh yeah, really glowing there. What can I do to fix that? So They're all little incremental things. Sound light, even how you sort of fix up your shiny forehead? There are little little tips and tricks picked up, so I usually do that just before filming. And then sometimes in the middle of the shoot, all noticed. I'm getting a bit Shawnee, so, you know, break. We'll just do a bit of that. Get back to otherwise I'm pretty good to go. Also have a watertight seal. Most will be grabbing that throughout. And I should also warn you that I cough and clear my throat a lot. I don't know if I have a throat more susceptible to gunk, but my apologies in advance. I have my script ready. Have a red mark ready to cross off each section as I feel. I've completed it effectively and unready. Sorry, I have my wildest lab, which is gonna be my Would you just turn on one birth me under the camera That should be turning on now for merits on there. Andi, I'm just gonna tap here. Okay, So that's picking up my ordinary and I think I'm good to go, so I'm actually just gonna record. Okay, So, lane camera is recording now. Okay, I probably wouldn't have mentioned this in the course, but that Justin is a collapsing so that in editing I can take the audio from this camera on this camera and then the video of my flap in the audio. Just line it all up so I really loud clap or to the start of a video is just one of the parts of my ritual bottles. A really practical because it means that everything's even lined up. So he jumped straight into it with a bit of an interest. Of course, I need to get out of the headspace of presenting to the camera, get into the headspace of presenting to people find presenting the camera could be something. Presenting the camera is something most people find difficult. But in a social media driven world where story telling his king what personality and storytelling is keep learning to face camera. You being here is making me nose okay. Presenting the camera is something most people find difficult. And in a social media driven world where personality and storytelling king, presenting the camera can be a pretty useful skill to have do one more. Take that learning to face the camera head on can be an important skill. Presenting to camera can be some presenting to camera and something most people find a little bit difficult on in a social media driven world where personality storytelling, a king learning to face a camera head on can be an important skill outside from obvious. Now, along with that skill, aside from improving your content being well spoken and now along with that skill aside from now, if you develop that skill aside from having content that is improved, it's also got some real life payoffs. It can help you be confident in presentations or in different social circumstances. Do you want more of that now? Learning this skill aside from improving the content that you're creating, this is also the by product of some real world benefits, like having better presentations with workplace projects or with social interactions with others. Do you want more now? Sod From now, aside from the obvious byproduct again, I will point out you'll notice that my hands go back to the same position when I restart. It's just a something to do. You sort of training stuff to know where you left off and try and pick up there. Aside from the obvious byproduct of improving your content, there's also some real world benefits of being ableto present now, aside from the obvious byproduct of improving your content now, aside from the obvious byproduct of having better content, learning to present well can also improve the way you present yourself in different work scenarios or social situations. I'm happy with that. My name's just Ibrox online. I go by jazz. Er I'm a full time youtuber with the channel with As of recording this video, over 2.4 million subscribers and growing also have an Australian television Children's show . And I've spoken internationally and domestically to hope my name is just sidewalks and I'm a full time YouTuber from the My Name's decide Brooks Online I go. My name is just my hamster side Brooks Online. I go by jazz A. I run the channel drawer with jazz amongst others, and I'm a full time YouTuber. But aside from that, I also have a Children's television show here in Australia, and I speak domestically and internationally on a whole bunch of different events and conferences and stuff. So being in front of people and specifically speaking on camera is something I'm pretty used to by now. Now, while presenting myself is a pretty big part of what I do, I've not always been good at it. I've just done a lot of it on gotten better over time. And this course is dedicated to sharing as much as I can with you on how to make your presentation skills specifically to camera as good as they can be. At least from my perspective, I skipped a bit from my perspective with a dumb add on. This could do that, hoping again you'll notice. I'm just adding my thoughts as I go every now and then when I get ready to present, there's just a few seconds where I just sort of re ground myself in getting ready to present. Sometimes that means sort of shifting my position toe where it was or two wears comfortable . Also looking at myself in the viewfinder, making sure I'm Senate and sometimes doing some facial things like smiling or just like stretching my mouth just to sort of snap my facial muscles to rest in a more amiable face that's scratch and coffee. My name's decide. Brooks and I go online by jazz oi running YouTube channel called Drawer with Jazz It which is my full time job and as a recording this video I have 2.4 million subscribers. But that aside, I have a Children's TV show here in Australia and I we'll start again. My name's just I Brooks I'm my name's just I Brooks I'm My Name is just My name is it Just Got my name's just I Brooks I got online by jazz A and I run a full time. My name's decide Brooks. I go online as jet. My name is just I brooks online. I go by jazz A and I have a, uh, see, it looks so simple once it's edited, but there's a lot of this crap. It's not regretting toe. Add the rule footage thing you can see all my Stop my name Mr Side Brooks Online. I go by jazzier and I run the YouTube channel drawer with jazz, which, as of recording this video, has 2.4 million subscribers on growing. I also have a TV show here in Australia, a kid's art TV show, and I speak Domecq, I was in the role. My name is just I brooks online. I go by jazz r and I'm a full time YouTube with the channel called Draw With Jazz with over 2.4 million subscribers. But beyond that, I also have a TV. The sounds like braggadocious have to. You have to do that. Welcome to my world. You can be like me, Damn it, This is stupid. I feel stupid. I feel stupid when I talk about myself. That's why I did this stuff out. I have to look confident. My mistress, I brooks online. I go by jazz ER and I have a YouTube channel called Drawer with Jazz It, which is my full time job and as a recording. This course has over 2.4 million subscribers and growing also have a TV show here in Australia. A kids TV show called Cartoon It Up and I speak domestically and internationally at different events and conferences. Ondas. Part of what I do as you can imagine, being on camera and talking to camera is a big part of it. By now, I'm pretty comfortable with it unless there's someone watching, but I wasn't always comfortable where That nor was I. But I wasn't always comfortable with it. Nor did I. But I wasn't always comfortable with it. Nor did I. Start off is particularly good at it. But after doing it for a long time, I've learned a whole bunch of things that I'm hoping can be helpful to you in this course. Okay, I'm happy with that. I mean, in this your share course, I hope to share with you as much as possible to help you overcome your shyness. In this course, I hope to share with you as much as possible to help you become more comfortable presented to camera filming and editing tricks come in fullness tips. Interest in this cause I plan to share is much of my own methods and knowledge in this course I hope to share in this course. I share as much knowledge and know how as I in this course here. In this course, I share all of the tips and tricks that I've developed over my career in this. In this course, I hope to share with you the tips and tricks that I've sort of taught myself over the years in this cause. I hoped In this course, I plan to share with you the tips and tricks that I've developed myself because I invented talking to camera. In this course, I plan to share with you the tips and tricks that I told myself over the years and creating independent content that hopefully you'll find useful in helping you be more comfortable with a camera in learning some editing and presentation tips and tricks to make your content more dynamic. And also some performance tips and tricks that will hopefully help you overcome whatever shyness you have or any awkwardness you feel when creating the content and talking to the camera. Okay, light in the course. Also lighter in the course. I was a share a group project with later on the course also share a group project with you in a sign you ace later in the course. I also happen later in the course. I also reveal a group in this course ill sir. I also share in in this course I also in this course, I also share with you a group project. I'm encouraging people to participate in and get feedback from in this course. I also share a group project that I'm encouraging you to participate in and used to get feedback and improve your own talking to camera skills. You can also explore and help other people who are developing Maren talk to camera skills by sharing feedback on their presentations and project entries as well. One page 13 to go on top of the course and the project itself. I also have this camera here, which is a bit of a behind the scenes glimpse at the end of the entire course. There is the entire beyond beyond the course beyond the in depth court. It's beyond the in depth course on the Greek project beyond the India, of course, and the project you can participate in beyond the in depth course on the project you can participate in. There is also an extra part of the course where there is a beyond beyond the in depth course on the group, beyond the in depth beyond the in depth course on the project, I'm encouraging you to participate in. There is also a section in this course at the end, which shows all off the raw footage as filmed from this camera off my recording of this entire course. So if you want a reference to sort of see what it looks like behind the scenes without any editing or publishing and really see how I roll with the punches and my personal approach to presenting to camera, that's something you might find interesting and valuable as well. So what are you waiting for? So what are you waiting for? Joining me and my So what are you waiting for? Joining me. So what are you waiting for? Join me in my course today and jump into the So what are you waiting? So what are you waiting for? So what are you waiting for? Join me in my course today along with my friend, this sandwich. And so, what are you waiting for during me and my skill share course today? So what do you want? Say what are you waiting for? A sign up in? So what are you waiting for? Join me and my skills course today, along with my friend, this sandwich for a lot of inviting fund, the sandwich bit will make a lot more sense in the course itself. Trust me. So you got Assad cool, So no, I'm gonna cut it off before the bite. Oh, that's off to you. Trial I've done. Okay, so that's the opening. I'm actually gonna stop. Stop the main camera every time will be different section of the course. So that's the stuff and start attention when creating content. Attention is the most precious commodity. When creating content, attention is the most precious commodity. And whether delivering educational material or comment or trying to make people laugh when creating content, attention is the most precious commodity on whether delivering educational material or trying to make people laugh. The most important aspect is when creating content attention is your most precious commodity, and whether delivering educational material are trying to make people laugh, The most important aspect of your presentation is captivating bay. This is so hard to pull off having super G. It is super. It's gonna try and do it all in one. Take attention is the most precious commodity on whether delivering educational material we're trying to make people laugh. The most important aspect of your presentation is how captivating you can be when creating content attention is your most valuable resource, and whether creating educational content or trying to make people love. Your presentation will depend entirely on how the most important aspect of your presentation that's for holding the paper thing when, when presenting content when presenting content attention is the most precious commodity on where the truck, when presenting content attention is the most precious commodity. And whether delivering educational material or trying to make people laugh, the most important aspect of your presentation is how captivating you can be when creating content attention is your most valuable asset on whether you're presenting educational content or you're trying to make people love. Oh, through this, holding twice for God's bag. The most important aspect of your presentation is how captivating thanks so much. Attempt your viewers. Attention is the most precious commodity on whether you're delivering educational material . We're trying to make people laugh. The most important aspect of your presentation is how captivating you can be your audiences . Attention is your most valuable asset on whether you're trying Teoh on whether you're delivering educational material, your audiences attention is the most you're boarding. This is attention is you deviated from the script, but I prefer mine deviation, added it. You're always is attention. I have to be more land your audiences. Attention is your most precious commodity on whether developed deliver your audiences. Attention is your most precious commodity on whether delivering educational material or trying to make people laugh. The most important aspect of your presentation is how captivating you can be your audiences . Attention is your most precious commodity on whether you're delivering educational material or trying to make people love the way you present is the most important aspect of her so close. The most important aspect of your presentation is how captivating you could be. Surprise your audiences. Attention is your most precious commodity on whether delivering educational material we're trying to make people laugh. The most important aspect off your presentation is how captivating it can be. Your audiences Attention is your most precious commodity on whether you're delivering educational material or trying to make the audience laugh the way you present it is going to be the most important aspect of your presentation. Far so close. The most important aspect presentation is how captivating you can be. But you watch this part of, of course, you hope that seems so effortless. It's not stupid old your audiences. Attention is your most precious commodity, and whether you're delivering educational material, that trying to make people laugh, the most important aspect of your presentation is how captivating you can be. Your audiences. Attention is your most valuable asset. Andi. Whether you're delivering educational material or trying to make the audience laugh, the white the most important aspect. The most important aspect of your presentation is how captivating you could be, even if you take 40 takes to say the one sentence. By the way, I'm not hamming it up for the behind the scenes camera. You guys just never see this stuff your audiences. Attention is the most your audiences. Attention is your most precious commodity, and whether you're delivering educational material or trying to make people laugh, the most important aspect of your presentation is how captivating you can be. Your audiences. Attention is your most precious commodity on whether you're delivering educational material . We're trying to make people laugh. The most important aspect of your presentation is how captivating you can be. Oh, boy, Shivers went down my spine. Finally, it feels nice when you take the box. You could be even when it takes a lot of effort. So I ended like it's some picking up like this. Just check now. Consider my opening phrase, which are repeated twice. The first run through you might not have really heard what I was saying. You you heard it, but you probably didn't make much sense of it as the second time through with emphasis and passion coming from me, your brain sort of hold onto words a little bit more and makes a little bit more sensitive because I was paying more attention and and putting more into it. You, as a result, sort of subconsciously pay more attention and invest more of your attention in it. Because I'm or engaged your brain wants to be more engaged and use. This is not because I'm engaged. Your brain naturally wants to be more engaged. And if you use the analogy of a classroom with a teacher who doesn't really care about what they're saying or putting on the board, that's sort of an invitation for students to zone out and shoot spitballs and write notes to each other on the opposite end of the spectrum. If you have a teacher who's enthusiastic and passionate about what they're presenting and making eye contact and really getting excited, even the cool for school kid. Even the kids that are a little too cool for school might not be able to help it pay a little bit of attention. And that's just something worth keeping in mind now. In today's day and age, people's attention is more fragmented than ever, and I am very guilty of this. Myself is a modern content consumer. Even when eyebrows, YouTube videos, I tend to find a video to start playing and then minimize it in the corner while I search for the next video to play, almost interrupting the other video or just completely stopped. Now Mountain is Diane age now. Today's day and age people's attention is more fragmented than ever on. I'm guilty of this myself in a whole bunch of ways. One notable way is when eyebrows YouTube to watch a video I'll start one playing minimize itself is down in the corner and immediately look for the next video to play, even when I've started a video on def. That video I started isn't holding my attention, all just interrupted with the next video, and that vicious cycle repeats itself. I'm dying for something to really grabbed my attention. But the same time, it's harder for things to grab my attention these days than it was earlier on. That's probably my body Now. Today's day and age people's attention is more fragmented than ever and hard toe hold onto . I'm guilty of this myself when eyebrows YouTube to watch videos on pick a video and play it on immediately minimize it corner of my phone and look for the next video to play. And if the video I initially started isn't holding my attention enough all interrupted with the next video. And that will be a cycle that repeats itself. People's behavior, particularly in the digital age, is begging for something to grab and hold on to their attention. And that really is what this course is about and specifically what we're gonna start talking about commanding people's attention, Thanks. Commanding a commanding attention doesn't need to mean being super loud or talking really far store, even using jump cuts or just being overwhelming in general, although those things do have their place from time to time. Really, what I'm talking about is confidence and familiarity with the subject matter. You're talking about on the president start on, the presentation stalled that you've adopted. Really? What I'm talking about is confidence on the familiarity. Really, What I'm talking about is confidence and familiarity with the presentation style that you've adopted and the content off your content. It's too decent takes in there. So that's the first thing I wanted to start off by outlining. Is that so? That's the first thing I wanted to start off by. Outlining is the importance of confidence and familiarity in your presentation, but not to the point of worrying about it too much. In fact, it's better to sort of learn to ease up about it and forget the process as you become comfortable with presenting to camera. So in the next part of this course, we're going to talk about that specifically, we're going to talk about how to develop a comfort with the camera or a least sort of forgetting the uncomfortable aspects of talking to camera. But before we move on to that, I just wanted to start off with just reminding you that now, developing these things takes time and practice being confident with the camera developing , send someone go behind the scenes. Yes, there's someone. How can you do now? These things take time to develop, Of course, confidence with the camp. At least now these things are learned things, and I can. Now these things are learned skills and you can learn it. Why is the TV turning on it? Screensaver say it's not a little smooth. Let's go. All right. Moving around has made me sweat slightly also maybe not being able to develop deliver a single line in one time. I'm a professional, so these things are learned skills and you can learn and develop them yourself. They take time to develop, of course, confidence and familiarity and comfort. But before we jump into the next course of But before we jump into the next part, of course, where I talk about how you can develop comfort or at least disassociate with discomfort in presenting to camera, I wanted to just open up just outlining the core aspect of holding people's attention, specifically having that confidence to command it on. In doing so, I want to just give two little adages that I'm sure you've heard before, but worth keeping in mind when it comes to developing that confidence first and you will have heard this a 1,000,000 times before is practice makes perfect, And that is true. I am by no means perfect, and I've been doing this a long time. In fact, watch the behind the scenes full, uncut, raw stuff, and you'll notice that I stumble about a lot. If anything, I've learned a lot about editing and knowing how to make myself look polished when I'm actually not sometimes. But that's all part of the process. And just knowing that that's normal is important, too. I just i you Jesus so hot. They exactly what was doing that? Stop that sweating. So while practice makes perfect, does countin doesn't mean you get better over time. It's also worth remembering that you'll never actually be perfect, but you may become perfectly comfortable with the process, and that's just another way to look at it. The second others are going to mention was to fake it till you make it, because the reality is, especially if you're starting off. Feeling uncomfortable in front of a camera is a very normal thing. Most people do feel uncomfortable with the camera, and in certain circumstances I still do too, even after doing this for so is important to remember that sometimes that fear or anxiety or discomfort will be there. And that's okay. Just allow it to exist and just pretend it doesn't. So that's it for the opening. That part of the course. I just wanted to lay down a little bit of a solid foundation before we move forward. But I guess that's it for this video. I'll see you guys. So that's it for the opening. A part of the course. I just wanted to lay down a bit of a solid foundation before we move on to some specific tips and tricks and techniques. But yeah, I thought it would be important. So that's it for the opener of this course. Really? I just wanted a lay a bit of a solid foundation and ground your expectations in the direction we're gonna be focusing on in helping you present to camera. But moving on in the next video, we're gonna focus on some specific tips and tricks that you can use to aid your comfort with the camera. I'll see you there. Okay. Okay. Check. Still recording in this part of the tour of course in this part, of course, we're gonna talk about facing the camera head on. Now, talking to camera and creating your own content or video in yourself can be a little awkward and feel a bit stupid, particularly if the entire production is in your hands and you're responsible for putting it all together. And so on your own initiative. And then beyond that. Sometimes it could be painfully awkward to realize how silly you might look to others that may or may not be there when you're talking to the camera yet something I find really interesting and thought it could be. And yet something I find really interesting is if you watch documentaries or interviews. Ah, lot of the people being interviewed don't really have on camera experiencing yet most of the time. And in most interviews and documentaries, people seem really comfortable and don't seem to be aware of the presentation skills they feel. They require. All this the presentation set up. That's yeah, And yet with that being said, have you ever noticed that in most interviews or documentaries, people talking on camera aren't often very uncomfortable, and often these people who are being interviewed for documentaries or for new shows don't have on camera experience. But the fact that they're not aware off the skills that? Nope. And yet, have you ever noticed that in interviews or documentaries or in news programmes where people are being talked to? And yet have you ever noticed that in interviews and documentaries or candid and yet have you ever noticed how, in interviews or in documentaries, people who are being interviewed or and yet have you ever noticed that in? And yet have you ever noticed that in interviews and documentaries, all of the people who often being interviewed don't really seem uncomfortable, even when those people may be on the camera for the first time ever, have very little on camera experience in many key. In many cases, these people seem pretty comfortable and actually like well spoken in many cases, in many cases, these people seem like they're not bad speakers, and in most cases they seem somewhat comfortable Somehow. The whole production to these people in the interviews or documentaries is somewhat irrelevant to them, and the lights and cameras don't seem is intimidating to these people with a very significant lack of experience, on camera compared Toa someone like you who might set it all up in front of a camera and then feel really uncomfortable of it all of a sudden and then feel really uncomfortable across this off. For some reason, the existence of the lights and the cameras and the production seems less intimidating to and for some reason, the existence of the lights and the cameras and the production seems less intrusive to them than it does to you sitting in front of your DSLR and recording yourself for your own or someone else's content. Uh, look, yeah, I'm living all of this in about 50 minutes. Life. I hope you're enjoying it. Good Lord, 50 minutes of roll footage about five minutes of I didn't fight. That sounds like it ratio. That's about right. I believe this innate comfort can be attributed to two factors. The first is that in most of those instances I referenced. They're actually talking to another person and not to the camera and then interview there, usually across from someone who is off camera and talking to them. The second reason is because the the second, the second factor, is that the entire production is out of their hands and therefore out of their minds. There's no anxiety attached to have a lighting looks or what the cameras picking up or if things were in focus. And that can be a cause of a lot of anxiety for someone setting up and running to the entire production themselves, who was also on camera. Yea, so in this video and the next figure on the course, we're going to talk about those two factors and how we can apply some levels of comfort in your own productions and talking to camera sessions without necessarily need. So this video. So in the next video we're going to talk about so so in the next video following this will talk about factor to the getting the production out of your head part. But in this video I want to talk about how you can feel more comfortable talking to the camera as if it was a person speaking as your authentic self, as if you're being interviewed and actually talking to someone as yourself. Which brings me to what you will not surprise. It was my first point to talk to the camera is if it's a person which takes the first, the first thing or the first mindset out, Mon cept the first month said I would encourage you to adopt is to know speak to the camera . The first mine said I would encourage you to adopt is to speak to the camera is if it's a person, not a group of people, not a camera just through the camera. You were speaking to one person because in most cases it's actually going to be one person watching your content. Obviously, sometimes lots of instances of one person and my videos on YouTube, for example, average several 100,000 views each. But if I was recording a video feeling like I was talking to several 100,000 people through the camera, I would crumble under the pressure. It would be terrifying. But even now, as I speak to the camera, I feel like I'm speaking to a person on that can remove a lot of anxiety that comes along with performance and also help you speak more comfortably. You'll also notice that I'm doing it with this camera. You guys are actually to me, one person standing off to the side that I'm turning to to poke fun at myself for the mistakes on make, trying to talk to the camera. So it's just worth outlining that that counts, even for the behind the scenes stuff that I'm doing is I actually think of the camera as a person, a person here I can stuff up in front of a person here. I'm trying to present properly to just something we're giving you money as a result, even with talking as a result, even though my full time job technically entails entertaining or visually presenting to millions of people, I still feel like it's an intimate process when I make the content. And I feel like that makes a huge difference to the viewer because it's an intimate viewing experience and that's the way it should be. It makes the interaction more engaging and personal and interesting. - The second thing I want to help the second thing, I want you to ground your thinking and when you talk to the camera is too. The second thing I want you to try and adopt in the way you present a camera is to try and be personal and comfortable. Now that sounds like a given thing like Yeah, big, good on camera. Do that know what actually mean is interact with the person, the camera in the same way you would with a person. And if you feel like making a Joeckel poking fun at yourself or, you know, if you feel like this, if you feel like there's some room for improvisation or just something a little bit off the rails, that's okay to do and come back to because it's going to make the entire process as well as the entire result fuel way more natural and entertaining. A more practical way of approaching it is to think of the lens of the camera is a deep, dark I Maybe that's a bit scary. A set of, uh, I I think of the barrel of the lens of the camera as as eyes and I stare through the barrel and not at it, because if you look at it and focus on it, then you building some anxiety, your expectations around something, you actively doing something. Instead, I try and look through the lens and speak to a person. The first thing on a mention is eye contact. Now we've talked about what happened, comes up with nothing. Now we've mentioned speaking to the cameras. If it's a person on being personal and comfortable, the fair thing sort of ties in with those but is a really key component in making them effective. And that is maintaining eye contact, which I'm doing right now. And there are two things that I often see which intrude on that which people fall back on because of the insecurity or uncertainty in staring down the barrel of the lens or feeling a bit silly. One of those is relying on a viewfinder. I have one in front of me right now that I can see what position I'm in Yunan and most selfie cameras have of you find out on many DSLR is have a viewfinder that can flip out on in many cases, especially for novices. That can be a bit of a fullback or something that they rely on to feel comfortable or to make sure they look good and sharp or you know the problem with that. But the problem is, but the problem with that, particularly with Selfie cam or a DSLR, is that the viewfinder is always off to the side a little bit and it would be like if I was having a conversation with you talking like this. It just completely disengages you from the eye contact that we had and lessons my ability. It completely disengages you from the eye contact that we have that was holding your attention and it disengages you from the conversation. I'm trying to hold him. It dis 10. RAW Footage - Part 2: and we do it coil up to go one and another footage on camera. When you're when you're independently recording or creating your own content, you can be really hard to not feel weighed down by a lot of the technical elements that rely on you. Now in traditional media, there is a person for every job. There's a person whose job it is to sort out the lighting. There's a person who does the sound. There's a person who does the gathering in the grip on the audio and the camera, and the director and the person actually on camera doesn't have to worry about any of that stuff. However, in the age of social media stuff where people are in charge of their own independent productions like I am, it's important to be able to handle that stuff and not let the technical side of things where you down. However, if you're a one person production crew like myself, it can be a little bit hard to balance all of those things in a production and not have the anxiety off handling. However, if you're a one person production crew like myself, it however, if you're a one person production crew like myself. If you're not careful, these responsibilities and technicalities 10 way your performance down or make you seem a little distracted or feel a little anxious. Okay? And the problem with this next analogy is this a bit stale? But this have to do. No, it's too stale. I'm literally going to run away for one minute. Wrapped two pieces. Oh, my God. I ruin it! Oh, no. Is in French. I'll be back in a very great my keys. Here are my keys. Okay? Huh? Okay. Were too soft. Fresh pieces of bread. And the great irony of this whole farcical tangent is that this whole section was about having everything prepared. So you don't get anxious when you record, but that's like sometimes this happens. So let this be a lesson to you. Willing to sit through an hour of crap to get to all of my stuff ups. When it happens, just make sure fix up the production thing, get everything prepared around it, and then take a moment to regained composure. Said space. Obviously, I messed up things a little bit by kicking the lot. Andi not having the right materials, but that's okay, because that happens sometimes. Trying to be sweat. Do I make myself look like I haven't run out in the sweltering heat to grab a sandwich in a section entirely about a sandwich? Editors, Please cut everything before this. Why not? Because there is a opening section are recorded. So keep at it. This is valuable. Valuable Behind the scenes. Look at my size. Who this part means to sink, get the time production out of your head. Proceeds to preach people while stuffing up the entire production. No. Shiny. Okay. Think of the production process as a sandwich. Stick with me. Here you begin by setting up a solid foundation. This is your pre production. This foundation entitles your lights, camera the space, getting your pre production ready and tell setting up your lights, testing and setting up your audio, getting the camera in frame and ready and getting all the settings of a flick. Is there anything else you need to worry about on checking all the batteries that you need lined up or power supplies for stuff? Just getting all of those details off the production lined up. I'm ready to go without you needing toe watch each of them all the time. Then comes the tasty middle pot. And now I need to get this old in one take because I can't on the spread of sandwich. So I'm gonna have to add a little bit when you recording yourself, release your mind. Technical stuff. Want you the recall button. You should have. Really relax. This is where frieze best percent. Okay, so this whole section this section next the spread is about being comfortable with improvising and just you set the foundation Say good to go. So I should be able to get this in one take mixed comes the tasty part. We've laid down the foundation and the middle part. The tasty part is where we've set up everything that it allows us to put how spread down so that we can forget about the process and just put on the things that make it flavour. So give it some personality and Passats. Now, of course, you can have some flavors that are predictable and people used to, but this now, of course, you can use flavors that are a little more predictable and that people used to well, that you're comfortable with. But this is also the pot way. You can start to experiment a little bit and get a little bit tasty. Add some Sprinkles and gosh is to make your production interesting and memorable. Maybe had a little bit of chocolate source to your presentations. And who knows, Maybe you could add a couple of Sprinkles just to, uh, I don't know, fancy. FYI, your content, I mean scripts, Sprinkles of fun. But there can now our Sprinkles and garnishes of fun. But there is such a thing as too much so. If we're adding a lot of flavor, just make sure to do so with a sense of balance in mind. That being said, with that handled in our recording, down or out flavor and spread put down. The last part of that production process is V post production, and this is all of the stuff that comes after you finish the recording everything that packages it and makes it look nice and neat holding this in place while I read just why my hands are in the same places where I left off on this liquid, there's a point to it. The point is, with the technical stuff left to before. The point is, with the technical stuff left to before on after your presentation it leaves. The entire result is something that's a little more package that allows you to improvise and have a little bit of fun when you're putting down your spread. The result is a nicely presented, tasty treat. Take this, son would agree. For example, I scripted this whole sector, so that's the preproduction planned. It all that got the materials mostly ready, ready to go. And then the actual recording of it is the bit where I get to admire and flavor and improvise a little bit on. Have some fun, the post production part of it, the stuff I leave too late up just running, eating it all up. And you don't see the mistakes I make which, yeah, let's say there was a few actually forgot one or two little things that I had to fix up. You didn't see it because you have packaged it'll nicely and your left ignorant off this stuff up that I make. But you left with a really nice level. Sprinkles really add a lot. Why don't I eat more? Sprinkle sandwiches of the real question because this is Dad. Good sandwich, if you know what I mean. Because this is a damn good sandwich. If, you know, make this is actually really concerned. I'm sorry. This is This is literally the. And now this is literally the end of the part of the script for this video. It was a sandwich metaphor for the production process to sort of help get the production out of your head. But now the fish recording it. I've eaten half of the sandwich and I want to eat the other half. Say, I thought maybe you'd enjoy joining me for the finalization of this metaphor. I see it through to the end together. Oh, you could click ahead and watch the next. Poppet, Something tells me you're going to enjoy staying around with me and watching me enjoy this text. Trees. I have. No, this is scripted. I just wanted to eat a sandwich. But you want to eat a sandwich right now or you graced out because there's a lot of mark right here picking up all the lovely Ask him on gross mouth noises. Uh, whoever invented the pain of butter and Nutella sandwiches genius. You don't amend the peanut butter in the telescope night. You know reasons by the cups. It's the same thing. It was basically a peanut butter in telephone, which means that this is basically a recent string about a cop. Oh, my God. I'm a genius. Uh huh. Happier during my cool safe, there's bits less, some for more. Maybe I'm Maybe I will. The next section you could go take a break and make yourself a peanut butter and Nutella sandwich If you got room. Really? This principle of your to mm. Let me just point out you just sat through a couple of minutes watching me eat a sandwich. Oh, you must feel like an idiot. See, in the next part when I get thinking, put another. I love it. That is literally what I was soaking had funding. Improvising on that, an appropriate metaphor and a tasty minute. Powerful stuff This construct sweet crumbs, floor eat. From the time did I spill water on my share? I did. It's not that noticeable. Okay, this can go another. Okay, everything's in frame. Got peanut butter on my math. Now. What is the point of your What's the point of your presentation to indicate to entertain. Maybe, did a wife ensure that you're familiar with what you're delivering and why people are watching so that you don't spend too much time fluffing around the edges and risk losing people's attention? That precious commodity. We talked about the start, of course, one of the biggest culprits of causing people to go on too many tangents, or where one of the biggest culprits, in my opinion, in causing people to go on too many tangents or get away from the point, is a lack of preparation or and one of the biggest culprits, In my opinion, that makes people on one of the biggest culprits, in my opinion, that causes people to stray away from the court now one of the biggest culprits, in my opinion, that causes people to stray away from the main point of their content. Now to the biggest culprits that now two of the biggest parts of now two of the biggest causes, in my opinion, is to wife now two of the biggest causes of keeping, uh, of in your content, I'm just gonna add Libolo because the script isn't making sense to me. you're gonna want your content to be concise, to keep people's attention on some of the major causes of causing these presentations. To go on tangents and lose people's attention is a lack of preparation on a lack of polish . Both of those things can be amended or both of things can be addressed with a script beforehand on the editing after. So in the next video, we're gonna talk about the second of those things the editing part. And in this video, we're gonna talk a little bit about script, how you can follow that enough to keep people's attention, but most of all to stay on point. Now, we're gonna talk about the second of those in the next video. But the first, the script we're going to talk about in this figure specifically some different methods you can use to follow along with the script on how you can use the new pope. Now, in the next video, we're gonna talk about the editing part. So in this video, we're gonna focus on how to follow a script, and there are lots of different ways that you could do this and no one way is right. But the presence of a script to sort of keep you on track can be pretty important. Uh huh, some people, and particularly for lengthier presentations now some productions now for some productions people use something called a teleprompter, which enables the text or the script that some was reading to be shown in front of the camera lends itself so while they're reading it, they still feel like they're making eye contact. This is useful for longer productions, where a script is somewhat necessary, and it does help maintain that eye contact. But as you can imagine, reading a script is less than organic or authentic, so it does potentially remove a little bit of that personal connection. On the other hand, some people like to just have docked points or thematic outlines where they improvise around that, and they do stray a bit while just adhering to core themes or dot points. I tend to prefer something closer to the ladder, and in situations like this, where I am presenting bulk off, I I tend to personally stick to more of the latter of the two improvised a lot around just a few core themes. But for something like this where I have specific did. But for something like this, where I have specific chunks of information that I want to effectively deliver, I like toe, have a script with paragraphs laid out that I can follow strictly at sometimes and loosely and others. So, for example, I'll have a paragraph, for example. Okay, in fact, the way on delivering this video is I have the script in front of me, with everything written out, almost word for word but divided into visual chunks with dot points and paragraphs so that there's usually a rough length of something that I can somewhat commit to memory and try and present. And if I stray even a little bit, bets. Okay, as long as the core of the information is there on, the presentation is comfortable. Sometimes the way it's delivered, all the specific words are really important, and it will take a lot of takes to get something spoken exactly the way that I've written it down. And then in other instances, it's more of an idea that I'm trying to convey on, even like right now, it's more comfortable for me to try and communicate that idea authentically without worrying about the specific wording. So even right now, I'm actually straying from the script quite a bit, but communicating the core point that I'm trying to convey, I find it's useful to do that and then just cross off the paragraph once you feel like you've delivered it effectively and I feel like that one did pretty good. So I just pressed it off. Moving on. I think it's also important to state at this point that having a script doesn't mean you have to deliver the script perfectly either word for word or even in a specific number of takes. Sometimes I take 2030 40 or another absurd number of takes to get something that feels right. And sometimes I'll have, ah, lengthy few chunks of content where I just organically have happened to deliver all of the content. Pretty and sometimes old just have a few key themes that following in a few different paragraphs and somehow have navigated naturally, um, in my own authentic voice through all of those themes, without referencing the script very much so the actual delivery can very but it's just important to lay down that friend, but it's just important to lay down that family, but it But I think it's well with. But I think it's definitely important to lay down some sort of a project plan before you deliver to camera so that you have something to ground yourself to when you have moments of uncertainty. And trust me, there's happen quite a lot even after doing it for years. So even if that dot points to refer to every now and then, or just a few key themes to make sure you're keeping to the points, just make sure that whatever the point is, you try and stick to it now. That being said, even with a foundation that you're following the delivery isn't always that eloquent. Which takes us to the next video, where we talk about editing and how you can get the most from your content Now. That being said, even with a solid foundation to follow, that does now that being said, even if you have a solid foundation to follow, that doesn't mean that the presentation is always gonna be clean, which now, even with a solid foundation to follow the presentation won't always be clean. So that's where the next part comes in editing, which we'll talk about next video and specifically, how you can extract the best and most clean and effective parts of your performance to create the most cohesive experience for your view up right. - The title of this part, of course, is ended in years, half the equation. But in my experience, editing is, frankly, a lot more than half of the equation. And if you guard forward and watch the rule footage of this course, you will know exactly what I'm talking about. That's why I've added this section is up. That's why I've added this chapter on editing being half the equation, but also why I've added all of the raw footage to the end of the course off me making this course because I really want to try and hit the point home that when you create your talk to camera stuff, it's going to feel really unpolished, and it may look really unpublished until you get a chance to actually cut it up and polish it a bit. And that's what editing does. So in this section, we're not actually going to explore the technicalities of editing this A lot to be taught there and a lot of different programs. So if you want to learn to read it, I would encourage you to go check out other parts of skill share and look up editing and learn from a bunch of other people on different programs that you can use to edit. I personally use Premiere Pro. I started off in Can Tasia. I know some people who use Vegas. That's just a whole mixed bag that we're not gonna go into in this video, but really here. I want to talk about two perspectives of editing when it comes to talking to camera, the first being how you can shape the way you present to the camera to be effective for your edit later on on, then also from the other direction how you can edit to extract the most out of your performance. So now let me talk. So so it first performing for your in it. There are a few little things that I keep in mind that I do physically and mentally to make sure that my performance is easy to follow and also cohesive once it is edited. The first is when I make a mistake trying to pick up where and the first is when I make a mistake, I try and pick up where I left off. In fact, I'm just going to include that mistake I just made to show you exactly how I did that. I had my hands down here and I went up here to talk. I stuffed up and I went back down here. And that just means that through the edit when I removed that where I last left off can continue, even though there was a chunk that stuffed it up. And if I stayed up here in the edit and went immediately from here to here, it just sort of makes it look a bit sloppy, shall we say? Yeah, well, I think of these moments of sort of freezes. Sometimes it will be halfway through a sentence or a gesture. I make an end on before I pick up on the next section and I try and get my brain to sort of hold onto those moments before I complete the next section. And if I stuff up, I can just go back to those moments and pick up where I left off once I fully completed. I take note of where I finished, and then I continue that braises of having that be the next solid foundation to pick up from if I stuff up again. Another thing like keep in mind with the physicality of my performance when it comes to emphasise in the Edit is with things like gags and jokes. To really push yourself physically or make some interesting moments between you and the camera just with the edit in mind, knowing that you can do things like zoom in or exaggerate colors will make something look ridiculous or overemphasized or hilarious. There's so much you can do in the edit, Andi. You'll have more power to do that if you perform with that in mind, even something as simple as turning to face the camera and stuff. This can be intentional or unintentional. Often, if I stuff up in the editor, this can be intentional or unintentional if I make a mistake often all sort of trying to amplify that in the edit. But if I'm aware of it while I'm doing it, I might sort of just bring more attention to it, knowing that I'm going to focus in on it later on him. Yet try not to hide your mistakes. Sometimes, if that's going to add to the human RL, help captivate your audience a little bit helped bring it to the forefront so that when you get it, you can amplify it the everything with another thing to note when it comes to performing for your edit. Another thing I Another way I performed with the edit in mind is the way I create. Another way I perform with the edit in mind is the way I deliver retakes Now. Sometimes I'll get through an entire part of a Scripture and entire point or section and have delivered each of the key components. But it might just not feel right in those instances will go back and just do the same thing once or twice, just until it feels right, even if I have the whole section recorded cleanly. Sometimes I'll try and get a few more just so I have more toe work with. And that's just another way I like to perform with editing in mind. You're gonna want the best cuts of everything to make something work well together. You're gonna want the best cuts of everything to make something work well, another thing that might be worth keeping in mind. Another thing that might be worth keeping in mind that helped me out sometimes is a lesson that I actually got from a singing teacher of many, using another thing that I find helpful for another month along the while we're talking about performing for the sake of out, and it's something that I find helpful to think off from time to time. Which is a lesson I actually took from my singing teacher many years ago. He once said to me that in a performance, people only really remember the start on the end off your presentation before the last member last little. Now, the last little mind shape never last little Mind said. I wanted to add to the now while we're on the topic of performing for the sake of the best you can get, something I find useful to think off is now What work. Another thing I wanted to touch on is a lesson actually took from a singing teacher I had many years ago. Who said when you perform or saying to people, most people just remember the start on the end on the middle is just gravy now, while that's strictly not true. And if there's something particularly memorable Lord not memorable in the middle that can shape people's attention but is worth keeping in mind that when you present the camera, especially in the chunks that you perform parts in to open up with bravado and to close with certainty as long as in the middle he hit all the right points and you maintain cohesion, it's more important that you start confidently and with energy and you close with closure, even just that I just did that. Just that with closure. Doesn't that feel nice? Doesn't just with closure just close with the closure, it just wraps it up. It just packaging you guys. Uh, yeah. Next we're going to talk about editing. Next. We're gonna move on to talking. Now let's move on to talking about how you can edit to get the most out of your performance , as I'm sure you wet as I'm sure you were wet. Now, as I'm sure you're aware, there are many different styles of presenting to camera and everyone is going toe haven't developed their own unique of Uniqlo. Now, as I'm sure you're aware, there are many different ways of presenting to camera and many different styles. And the way you develop your talk to camera style is gonna be unique to you. Ending is itself a skill set that's going to really help, and editing is itself a communication method that is going to take shape as your presentation skills take shape. So as I mentioned before, this isn't going to go into the new degrees of how to edit or anything like that, so you can go check out the rest of school share to learn how to do that. But really, I want to talk to him. Some tips and tricks when it comes to applying different mon sets, two different kinds of editing and a few other things that you can keep in minds to get the most out of your performance. The first thing to keep in mind when you edit and to get the most value performance specifically to hold people's attention is something like whole cutting dead space. Basically any time on not talking or getting a specific point across. Even if I am talking and it's not part of the point or cut it, sometimes in depending on the tone on going for. If I'm being particularly comedic, I will cut quite aggressively large chunks of talking that doesn't really lodged large chunks of talking that doesn't really count or even enough dead space. Large, large chunks of talking that doesn't contribute to the content very much and even small chunks to the point off on occasion. Removing even breaths because it's not useful lodged large chunks where large chunks I have to get back most trying Now how you how you do this, how aggressively you cut dead space in your footage is up to you and up to the style that you're going for. Sometimes I cut large chunks of actual talking to camera stuff if it doesn't feel like it is bringing value or holding people's attention. And sometimes I am editing so aggressively and cutting dead space so effectively that I even remove breaths out from a performance when I'm trying to keep things really snapping some people at it so aggressively that they overlay words from one cup into the other, sometimes called a J Cut or Anel cut, where the video hits where the video hits a point where the audio overlaps but where the video connects. But the audio overlaps one word. Finishing as the other word is beginning. Moving now some some people who serve aggressive with coming. Now, when people do that and cut so aggressively, it sounds a little bit like this. It's often associated with itself something associate. It is often associated with more extreme talk to Camera V. It's often the Soviet. It's often associated with extreme talked camera videos, where words overlapping in the energy is really intense, and there's barely any moment of quiet over him to breathe. Unless, of course, it's a punchline or adds to a jerk, often often in the style of presentation. People will move around, often in the style of presentation, often in the style of presentation. Despicable move around the space rapidly, often the often in the style of presentation. The speaker will be moving around the space rapidly. This could be effect. This could be effective because it keeps the viewers attention. Always moving with this could be effective because it keeps the viewers attention always moving with presenter. But this is generally but this is generally pieced together in a lot of chunks and the view this. But this is generally pieced together in a lot of chunks of what the view it doesn't say is the way that these whole sentences are breaking up into tiny portions where a single paragraph is never actually completed in its entirety, and the recording of it looks really fragmented. But putting it all together seems cohesive and snapping somewhat instead. So while this could make for a really punchy result of this is mostly the work of editing. And it can also take the pressure off recording, give you room to improvise and also give you a lot of room to make mistakes because most stuff will be seen on and really just take the most high energy moments that connect well together and just pay them up really tightly. Gari, watch this pop. This is where I am on record to go watch the raw footage of this part of the video being recorded. You'll see just exactly how disjointed it is. I'm gonna put the time code right here so you can see exactly where in the raw footage video you can go to to see me recording this district and snappy junk Honey bit. If you go watch that and come back, you'll notice that I'm doing intentional moving and pausing. And if you get what if you go watch it and come back with us and you go, If you go watch it and come back, you realize that this entire and if you're watching come back you will, is that this entire small section of dialogue I've constantly and constantly intentionally moved around to hold your attention, but it's also taking a lot longer to record than you might think, because they're recording it so snappy. Okay, now, on the opposite end of the spectrum, we have the more formal style of presentation. This is appropriate for new shows or interviews and things like that. Where are editing takes a back seat to the performance itself, But even the performance can be somewhat undertone because the content is a little bit more chill. So even podcasts and stuff like that. It's less about intensity, and it's more about cohesiveness and getting everything done in one take. So it's OK to read off a script as long as you have a little bit of confidence and you ground yourself while constantly coming back and maintaining eye contact. I'm really off the paper, but as I've read, I'm making sure to have a bit of a slower pace where I can be a little bit more articulate my personal preference. But my personal style preference lies somewhere between these two. I would like to have the grounded foundation of a script, but I also like to play and have a little bit of a snappy moment here or there or have some energy. Andi have a bit more of a junk in and out with the cut itself, but as a result, off my improvising and leaving a little bit more room to make a mistakes, it also means that there's a little bit more cleaning up to be done. So I want to talk a little bit about a few tips and tricks that I use to clean up my edits when my performance is a little bit more relaxed Now, the first thing is, as we've mentioned, removing dense spice are getting rid of places that the first thing I do is remove dead space just to keep in the first thing I do is remove dead space to keep things snapping. And I usually follow the wave form or that big audio chunk just to see where word ends and the next one begins so I can bring those together. Sometimes I get rid of a breath, and like I mentioned, sometimes I get rid of large, relevant chunks where I've spoken. Then it just sort of goes off in a different direction. However, you'll find that doing this can sometimes, especially in the more high energy way of presenting cause visual glitches if your hands starting one position and move on to it. If you had. If your hands style in one position and move into a different position and in the next cut your hands are immediately out like this, it's gonna look a little bit, shall we say, distracting unless it's done intentionally like I just did. The second thing when it comes to editing for your performance is so in line with that. The next thing I do to help the edit, so the next thing I keep him. So the next thing I do in my edit take my performance seemed more seamless is I bring the camera in and out in postproduction specific. I will do this for two reasons. One, There is something happening in continuity. Either my hands were in one position and somewhere else the next. And I need to distract from that because I don't have another take to pick from so sometimes. Or punching and zoom in or crop or I will go out on that will distract from the fact that my hands have been here on the next take their moved and even though the next take have moved yet, see what I've done. They have just moved in and out a little bit, helps just create more of a visual distraction overall, to help avoid the emphasis. Now, if I don't do the punching in and out of my hands around here, and then the next time my hands of right here and then the next type my hand to hear again or I moved to a take next where my hand is out here, it becomes pretty distracting, so zooming in and out can help do that, and the other instance in which I like to zoom in and out is actually to help shape people's attention. so less about covering mistakes and more about getting them to sort of listen in a bit more , particularly if I change the tone of voice I'm speaking in or I emphasize a joke or I change the subject. I find that that zooming in or zooming back out can help people feel like they're honing in or paying more attention to the next thing. Or they're opening up to releasing themselves from something that just listen to a little bit. So that wraps up this part of the video, of course, where I've talked about presenting for the camera so that later German so that ladies and gentleman wraps up this part of video. Of course, where I've talked about editing so that latest German, it brings me to the conclusion of this video. And I'll just point out, too, that that zoom out thing I just did that cause I transitioned into the summary part of the video. So you're knows that do that sort of shape your attention and shape how the video feels a little bit in practical demonstration there in practical. That's not a good word. Great. Now I'm gonna punching it out to emphasize the fact that I made a fool of myself. But I'm gonna keep this take in there just to show how relatable and funny I am because we all make mistakes. Pause for effect. Good. I'm good percentage. God. That's why I love the improvising. Uh, I love the improvising stuff. It's good fun. Anyways, point is, that is it for this video we've talked about how to perform for your edit on how to edit to get the most out of your performance. In the next year, we're gonna sort of wrap up, share some final thoughts and hopefully just summarizing package. It'll for you in a way that in the next video, we're gonna sort of summarize and wrap up the course. And I want to also share some final thoughts and a few final little mindsets that I hope will be helpful to you in your future presentations. I'll see you see what I did Now I will say to declare, Do you think I'll see you there? Closure. This course is sorry. Helpful. Sorry. Helpful. I just ruin the question thing. Sorry. Why? Let's add that again. I'll see you in the next course. Isn't that nice, except I said it. See when the next course not. I'll see you in the next video. I'll see you in the next video. I'll see you in next video. It doesn't feel complete. We'll see you. So I'll see you in the next video. Doesn't that feel more complete? I ruined it again. Done it. Oh, end on that. All right. In closing, I want to go back and recap on a few things that I feel like I could use, some extra emphasis and a little bit of recap, but also a few additional thoughts that I hope will be helpful to you. The first is just to remind you of that first thing. We talked about the importance of commanding people's attention. Command people's attention, dammit! Command it. I command you to command it. I'm I bring you back to the lovely analogy off the production sandwich. Each of these three parts my stuff. Each of these three parts is a really key component in commanding people's attention. The first that foundation, the pre production, the way you set up the camera the way you like thing that the audio, if you have bad audio or it's badly little cameras in an uncomfortable position. It's going to add to the risk of you losing people's attention. Then, of course, comes the performance. They talk to camera stuff that really we're focusing on in this course. This is the bit that makes the biggest impact. Of course, the start in the end, or you don't have much of a sandwich. Next, of course, comes the middle bit. The presentation talked to camera stuff. It is the most important. And if you don't have something halfway tasty and there you lose people's attention regardless of what the sandwich part around it is made up off. So when you present the camera, make sure to be yourself and try and have fun and relax and know that you can make lots of sandwiches until you find the right combination of flavors and things that you can produce time after time and just get better and better. Just try and take that pressure off yourself and explore and have a bit of fun. That's what the flavor is about. Yeah, finally, of course, we have the top bid to the post. Finally, of course, the final part of the rapper of your sandwich blood. But not least, of course, the production pop last but not least, the topper or the postproduction part of your production sandwiches, things like editing and sound and putting it all together. But while it is a n'importe part of packaging your final production sandwich and making it easily finally, of course we have the topper of your sandwich, the final part of the enclosure, the rapper, the thing that meetings it all up and makes it presentable and easy to consume editing the music, the retouching of video and all that stuff. But it's important to remember, of course, that you don't have to have a perfect production or post production full of the flavor to really shine. Now, in this Seo share course, I've attempted to hold your attention as much as I possibly can. You will notice that through the course, specifically if you go back and watch, I've bought the camera in and out at times to sort of help transition and hide certain mistakes. I followed a foundation that I've tried to hold your attention by Keith. I've tried to keep your attention and help you feel what I've tried to keep your attention and help you feel comfortable through this whole course by maintaining eye contact. Even though I have a script on following, I'm prioritising communicating with you first and foremost in a way that feels natural, uncomfortable and then beyond that, when I'm not zooming in around, I know that I get a bit old and looking at the same thing through the whole course of a video can get pretty old. So I also like to cut away to something called B roll or just video image overlays, just to help give you a breath of fresh air every now and then, something different to look at on re center, your focus in and then beyond all of that stuff, which is the plan stuff in the way I can shape my performance before and after to try and help hold your attention. I also have fun in the process. You'll notice that there are jokes through the course off this whole course. The course of this whole course, like this accident pun plan ways what? I'm getting distracted. The point is, if I stuff up or if I feel like there's something to chase in the middle when an idea occurs to me or I feel I feel like an improvisational spark. Come along, I'll follow it and have fun with it because at the end of the day, yes, this is an educational costs, but that doesn't mean it has to be boring. Could be fun to learning. Can be awesome. Fun schools cool when you play by the rules. I'm a delighted dinner parties. I promise I don't have dinner parties on actually very alone. I spent an awful I spent an incredibly, I spend a phenomenal amount of time talking to my. That's not surprising, given I spend the majority of my time talking by myself alone to cameras like talking to you. A