How to Paint & Draw Abstracts Class 2 Abstracting the Abstract | Joy Fahey | Skillshare

Playback Speed


  • 0.5x
  • 1x (Normal)
  • 1.25x
  • 1.5x
  • 2x

How to Paint & Draw Abstracts Class 2 Abstracting the Abstract

teacher avatar Joy Fahey, Joy of Art

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

6 Lessons (1h 3m)
    • 1. Introduction Abstracting the Abstract

      3:27
    • 2. Simple Beginning

      13:24
    • 3. Painting the Shapes

      11:36
    • 4. On the Canvas

      21:11
    • 5. Finishing the Painting

      11:22
    • 6. Conclusion

      1:32
  • --
  • Beginner level
  • Intermediate level
  • Advanced level
  • All levels
  • Beg/Int level
  • Int/Adv level

Community Generated

The level is determined by a majority opinion of students who have reviewed this class. The teacher's recommendation is shown until at least 5 student responses are collected.

41

Students

1

Project

About This Class

This is a follow on from Abstract Painting and Drawing From Start To Finish Part 1. It approaches painting with a more contemporary feel and gives you the opportunity to define your paintings

In this class you will learn -

+ how to simplify abstract shapes,

+ Use a limited palette

+ discover simple tone values

+ Understand line and space in abstraction

Simplifing your work gives you different perspectives to bring form into your creative drawing and develop new ways of expressing yourself and finding your own art style 

+ 

Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

Joy Fahey

Joy of Art

Teacher

Class Ratings

Expectations Met?
  • Exceeded!
    0%
  • Yes
    0%
  • Somewhat
    0%
  • Not really
    0%
Reviews Archive

In October 2018, we updated our review system to improve the way we collect feedback. Below are the reviews written before that update.

Why Join Skillshare?

Take award-winning Skillshare Original Classes

Each class has short lessons, hands-on projects

Your membership supports Skillshare teachers

Learn From Anywhere

Take classes on the go with the Skillshare app. Stream or download to watch on the plane, the subway, or wherever you learn best.

Transcripts

1. Introduction Abstracting the Abstract: Hello and welcome to this new class. This is really a follow on from the abstract made simple for beginners class that I have done. And I would strongly suggest if you haven't done that and you would like to get the most from this class. Then I would suggest doing that 1 first and then moving on to this one, because it will make a lot more sense if you do. So in this class, what we're going to do if you like, is abstract, the abstract. So you will remember if you've done a clause before, we did a lot of free drawing where we did lots of different kinds of interesting drawings. And what I'd like to do in this class is take that one step further to make really contemporary abstract painting. So we take out of those designs, the simple line, and then make some great paintings. So here is one or two of the ones that I can show you that we're going to do in the class. We're going to do so on paper to begin with. And then we're going to do one on a canvas. And we're going to use a limited palette. So what does that mean? It means only a few colors. So for example, obviously white and black are our two main stays in-between that I've got some burnt sienna, I've got some bluff white, and I've got some yellow ocher. And I'm also using a little bit of pink in one of them. So you can decide on your limited palette that we want to keep the lines very well. What kind of keep it very crisp and clean and very, very contemporary. So we're kind of simplifying and simplifying very different to what we did in the last class, but using the same starting method with our free drawing. So it's an interesting process and I think you'll find it very helpful because it, it makes you focus more and produce different kinds of very interesting paintings. So we're not going to need an awful lot of materials. Just get the colors, the acrylics that you like, and the brushes that you want to use. I've just got a few brushes here, starting with a large one and kind of going down the scale to the small one. So that's basically all I'm using. And some black markers, white markers, or whatever color you decide that you want to use because, you know you're going to choose your color palette and that could be completely different from mine, which is fine and gray. And I want you to kind of experiment for yourself. But the exercise is about abstracting the abstract. So it'll be a very interesting class and I hope you enjoy it. So let's get started. 2. Simple Beginning: So as we've done before with our free drawing, we're going to do the same thing. The same thing again. Now I just I just did this one earlier on. But again, I want you just to relax. Take a nice deep breath, focus on what you're doing and we're just going to allow the thing to unfold. So I've drawn my space here that I want. And then I just allowed myself to do, do the drawing. So you can do the same just with the squares and you can make it as intricate or as simple as you want. This is now done quite a few lines in here. I could do all of that, It's more simplified. Now I'm going to, I wanted to experiment with this one and it gives you a chance to see what you can do. Now I've got a limited palette. I've used. I've got here a Naples yellow and white laugh. A, what's this one? Raw sienna and black. I've also got some white here on the side if I, if I want to use it. So basically I just want big strokes. I've got three brushes. I've got to medium size and a bit of a bigger one. And I just wanted to block in the areas. So very different from what we've done before. And obviously we're going to layer it. But so I want to insert a block in my main areas and then we can have a play around with it. So when I think about, about this, is that water here? I'm just using water in a moment and just to give it a little bit of this in here. So I've got like a nice kind of creamy of off-white color. So I just want to literally, and this is just on cartridge paper. It's not, you know, it's not watercolor paper or anything. You can do it basically on any paper. This is just for me to be able to to be able to show you what I'm doing. And I've kind of got an idea of how I want this shape to be. You know, we can keep coming back into it. Basically do whatever we like. But I think it's sort of, it's helpful just to see what we could do, which is a very different approach to what we've done before. So I'm just going to carry on with this color. It's going to come right down here. Voltage here. And of course, you know, certain, it would seem as if it goes against the grain of tone value. And there's also a composition involved in it because we want, we want that picture to be balanced. And that's what I think is important to remember. So I want this to kind of, I know we're doing squares, but I want a bit of interest in here. Bring this down here. And then I kind of theory it needs to be some over here. And we can fiddle with it once we've done our main, main block in, I feel a little bit darker to go across here. So we've got the main, that color in it I was thinking about. Now then I want to quote some of the black skin. So I'm just taking the black. And again, I'm going to just put these shapes in it and it's all about shape. You know, when we've been talking before, what are you thinking about? Our shapes? And this kind of very modern, modern kind of picture there. Nice verb through very modern houses. Minimalistic and maybe not your thing. But it's nice to be able to have this under your belt. So if you wanted to do something like this, you could. So just kind of locking it in here. So I've got a nice black piece here. Here. And you know, it doesn't take long to do. And not too worried about straight lines at the moment. Because what we're going to do is once all this is dried, we can use a pen to do the other lines. So this is going right to the bottom, right to the bottom here. So you can see how this, how this can work with your own, with your own design. And actually then put some black down here. Yeah. And you know, this is just like sketch ready for if I want to highlight, good and I want to transfer it onto Canvas. And this just gives me an idea and it's a nice way for me to show you how you can compose this. And actually I wanted to bring this over here. Looking at the composition of this. It's difficult for me to do it sitting down the line. So I'm going to bring this down a bit. Okay, So you've got the idea. And then I'm going to pretend just for the sake of time because you just don't want to watch me just blocking in that I've painted this or white. So Kyler, pretend that that's what I've done. It's not quite dry yet. But then I've got various Martha's here in black and in white. And you can use anything that you like. You can use crayon, you could use charcoal. But I'm going to says fine, I'll see if I can find a good marker for here. So this is kind of one for thin lines. So I might decide that I'm going to put some thin black lines in. And then I might decide to put some thicker ones and see what this one is. So this one's a bit thicker. I kind of feel that it would be interesting to do something like this. Let's have a look. Let's come across here now this might not be dry enough that it might work. I think come across here. I could come across here. So I could add my lines in and draw on top if I wanted to, I'm going to put another line down here. You see how this could work. I'm not outlining everything, but i'm, I'm going to put one here. I like this idea, another one here. So I've got a nice kind of mixture of the two. I mean, it's just rough, but you can see what I mean. Then you might decide, you might put something else in it. I like the simplicity of there, so I'm going to just leave it like that as a sketch, as an idea. So that would kind of start you off on doing something very sort of abstracting from your, from your original drawing. So this is one. And then you might decide going to take this out. And you might decide that you're going to do something similar with circles or even like with triangles. And I did a free drawing here earlier on. And I love this because again, you could do something really interesting with these triangular shapes. I mean, they're not all triangular, but it gives us a base. And that's what I've been talking to you about. So now we're going to do these these triangles. Now, just before I start explaining what I'm doing, I'm sorry, I did the whole video and there was something wrong with the volume. So I'm actually going to talk you through what I'm doing. So I've done the triangles and I'm going to look at this now, doing it with some different kind of colors, still staying with the limited palette. Going to do it a little bit more gray. And it's interesting when you have a look at these. A very bold shapes. What you can do with them. It's quite remarkable, actually, the different kinds of effects that you can get from such simplicity. So, and it helps you really kind of focus what you're doing with your painting. You know, when we're just free and letting ourselves be intuitive, it's fantastic and I would never say anything different from that. But when you're actually doing something like this, it's very much more focusing the mind and helps you if he like, contain your your experience of painting. You know, personally this this kind of thing to me is more challenging than not she just freeing up and doing what I feel like because it's got a lot more structure to it. I'm not thinking thinking about it. I'm just allowing something else to happen. But for me, it's, it's quite a discipline to do something like this. I don't know whether you will find that too, but I'm, I'm very free with my colors and going for it, whereas this actually has to kind of pull me in, in a different way. So again, I'm just kind of blocking the coloring here with an off-white sort of light gray. And obviously, your limited palette can be anything that you want it to be. But it's also again, a discipline to do the the limited palette and to see what you can get out of it. I think it's very, it's very fascinating. And I remember very much when I was first learning to paint, my professor used to say to me, You know, just use one or two colors and find what you can do with them. And this kind of modern contemporary look. It's very much into doing that. When I look at Pinterest and go on Instagram, there are many people who are doing. These are contemporary, very simple, but bold paintings using a limited palette. So you can say I'm going into the gray here and just going into the spaces. And you know, you can decide for yourself and you can change it as you go. I mean, there's no hard and fast rule about it. And you can keep layering it and giving it some depth. Just showing you here how you can really simplify your free drawings and seeing what might happen with them. It's kind of quite exciting. And I enjoyed this myself very much because, you know, takes you on a whole new different experience and interesting learning and skill, which is what we're, you know, we're attempting to do. And I'm so excited now that we have the Facebook group. And it'll be wonderful to see your paintings up there and share. Share what you're doing. Get inspiration from other people and see what they're doing. And very excited about that. So if you haven't joined yet, um, I'm sure there's a link on the on the website you can go and find it. The joy, I think it's joy PE classes group. So you can see what you're up to. So now I've got a bit lighter here into the corner. Again, just kind of deciding on how to make different tones from that limited palette. And of course, the black makes a fantastic dramatic contrast. And it's the contrast in the paintings that give it that real energy in and makes us look, makes us look at it. If you're looking at a painting and suddenly something jumps out at you because it's got so much contrast, you vent to stop and look and it's intriguing. So the blacks can be very dramatic in these kind of, these kind of paintings. And you know, these are, these are just little kind of sketches to give you the idea. And I'm going to show you how we can also add to it once we've done the blocking in. And you can actually turn these into a very nice series of smaller works as well as putting them on Canvas. And we will experiment with doing something with on watercolor paper. But this is on cartridge paper, but actually holds acrylic really well. And the more layers you put on it, the better it is. So it's worth, it's worth it to, even to do these little sketches on, on the cartridge paper. So again, going with the flow, where might this, where that might mistake it. And as you're painting it, you'll get a feel, which is what I've been talking about throughout the course. You know, you go with your gut feeling, where does it want to be placed? And can't kinda predict that before you've actually done it. So once you get started, something else takes over. Which is the exciting thing about painting, in my opinion. I'm looking at these triangles when you've got a format like that, It's very helpful because it gives you that structure. And if you remember, when we were doing the drawings, we did them in different textures with charcoal and pen. So now it's a nice opportunity to, to do it in paint. Just doing the edge here with the smaller brush and get that edge with the bigger brush. And, you know, it's kind of coming together. Isn't it interesting how it all, how it all works? I've, I've really enjoyed actually putting this together because it's something different for me. And I have done some very, very big paintings like this before in the past, but not the small one. So I've enjoyed experimenting with this and seeing what's going to happen and then sharing it with you. So here I'm putting a white in buff white. You know how much she filling it all in this time rather than leaving those spaces. So you can actually see the whole process. And you've got the paints quite thick here. And it's nice to then obviously wants this for this first layers in. I'm not going to do it on the video, but, you know, I will do myself, go back over it with another layer. So it kind of really builds up the whole texture of the painting. And as she go, as I've said, it leads you into saying, you know, what goes where. For me personally, I I don't project, I want this there in that. I just kinda go with the flow of it and see how it feels. And here again, with the limited palette, you can change the tones, which I think is really something further for you to explore. See how many tones you can get out of. And then we're going to perhaps add a little bit of color later. But just so, you know, experiment and see what, what really It's creating and enjoying this whole process. And some of the artists that you might look at to see how the shapes work are. Say Miro for example, just doing the hair dry here. So I'm, I'm, I don't want the noise of this to be on. So I'll just I'm going to cut this a bit so not wasting time on watching me hairdryer it. Okay. So now it's dry. We can do something. We can do something else with it, which will be interesting. So I've got here some markers, as I mentioned to you before. And you can really go to town with doing things with there. So I'm just kind of neat running up the edge of this triangle here with a black marker. But again, you can experiment and see what might happen. And if you, if you have also done the course on getting unstuck, you might remember how we could experiment more with what we could do next on a painting. So if you haven't done that course, it's worth looking at because Give you lots of ideas of different ways you can do a painting without actually going into it immediately. So here, you know, you can just do some free drawing on top of it. You can outline some of the shapes. You can be as bold, as adventurous as you like and see what happens. So I really enjoy just kind of playing and seeing how we could really alter this and give it some more dynamism. So in see here how that could work adds a new dimension to the painting. So I find it fascinating to me to be this kind of stuff. And it's so free, can have such fun with it. It's great. So, you know, it's worth experimenting and seeing what you come up with. And again, you know, outlining the edges if you want to. You can also add, haven't done it in this, in this section, but you can also go over it in some white if you like. And I think the one that we're going to do on the canvas, I'm going to to add some of that in. But you can then maybe if you want to say, for example, you've got a room that you particularly want to painting for and it's got a color in it, you might then decide to add just a color into it somewhere. I've just got some markers here. And you can see I can add a color if I want to. Might not be right, I might change it, which is what I'm actually going to do here. Just to show you different effects. If you caught it in bright red or you could put it in orange, you've partitioned in any color you like, but you can see the effect that it would have on the picture. Suddenly you've got a focal point at Wow, and it really kind of springs into life. So then if you don't like that, you can always paint it out and width with me. I'm just putting some of this Yana on top of it so you can sort of see the difference. But the possibilities are endless. You know, you'll come up with probably some much more amazing ideas when me and really have fun and enjoy doing these very kind of simple but very dynamic paintings with just a limited palette. And they, you know, they don't take long to do. And you could do a whole little series of them and have a whole range of great paintings for the wall. So it's looking good, isn't it? And different and simple and impactful. So you'll really enjoy having, having fun with these and interesting shapes. And the shapes give you a structure to start with. That's, that's the point. You know, to have a starting point. That's one of the challenges that a lot of people have, is where to start. So when you have this under your belt, you know your shape just squares or circles and triangles and not obviously all the derivatives of that. But you've got a starting point. Which one she gets started and you get in the zone, it can take over, but the starting point is always the difficult bit. So now if we kinda look at the other painting together with this one, you can see how they can go. You can get a whole really great series of very contemporary dynamic modern paintings from using this technique. So I hope you've enjoyed that. And now we're going to go on and do something on a canvas. 3. Painting the Shapes: So you can see I'm going into the gray here and just, you know, going into the spaces. And, you know, you can decide for yourself and you can change it as you go. I mean, there's no hard and fast rule about it. And you can keep layering it and giving it some depth. Just showing you here how you can really simplify your free drawings and seeing what might happen with them. It's kind of quite exciting. And I enjoy this myself very much because, you know, takes you on a whole new different experience and interesting learning and skill, which is what we're, you know, we're attempting to do. So now I've got a bit lighter here into the other corner. Again, just kind of deciding on how to make different tones from that limited palette. And of course, the black makes a fantastic dramatic contrast. And it's the contrast in the paintings that, you know, give it that real energy in and makes us look, makes us look at it. You know, if you're looking at a painting and suddenly something jumps out at you because it's got so much contrast you then to stop and look, and it's intriguing. So the blacks can be very dramatic in these kind of, in these kinds of paintings. And you know, these are, these are just little kind of sketches to give you the idea. And I'm going to show you how we can also add to it once we've done the blocking in. And you can actually turn these into a very nice series of, of smaller works as well as putting them on Canvas. But this is some cartridge paper, but actually holds acrylic really well. And the more layers you put on it, the better it is. So it's worth, it's worth it to, you know, even to do these little sketches on, on the cartridge paper. So again, going with the flow, where might this, might this takers, and as you're painting it, you'll get a feel, which is what I've been talking about throughout the course. You know, you go with your gut feeling. Where does it want to be placed? And he can't kind of predict that before you've actually done it. So once you get started, something else takes over. Which is the exciting thing about painting, in my opinion. And in looking at these triangles, when you've got a format like that, It's very helpful because it gives you that structure. And if you remember, when we were doing the drawings, we did them in different textures with charcoal and pen. So now it's a nice opportunity to, to do it in paint. I'm just doing the edge here with the smaller brush. Edge with the bigger brush. And, you know, it's kind of coming together. Isn't it interesting how it all, how it all works? I've, I've really enjoyed actually putting this together because it's something different for me. And I have done some very, very big paintings like this before in the past, but not the small one. So I've enjoyed experimenting with this and seeing what's going to happen and then sharing it with you. So here I'm putting a white in, buff white much she filling it all in this time rather than leaving those spaces. So you can actually see the whole process. And you've got the paint is quite thick here. And it's nice to then obviously wants to those first layers in. I'm not going to do it on the video, but I will do myself, go back over it with another layer. So it kind of really builds up the whole texture of the painting. And you know, as you go, as I've said, it leads you into saying, you know, what goes where. For me personally, I I don't predict. I want this there and I just kind of go with the flow of it and see how it feels. And here again with the limited palette, you can change the tones, which I think is really something further for you to explore. See how many tones you can get out of. And then we're going to perhaps that a little bit of color later. But just so, you know, experiment and see what, what really is creating and enjoying this whole process. And some of the artists that you might look at to see how the shapes work. Our, say Miro for example, just doing the hair dry here. So I'm, I'm, I don't want the noise of this to be on. So I'll just I'm going to cut this a bit so not wasting time on watching me hairdryer it. Okay. So now it's dry. We can do something. We can do something else with it, which will be interesting. So I've got here some markers, as I mentioned to you before. And you can really go to town with doing things with there. So I'm just kind of neat running up the edge of this triangle here with a black marker. But again, you can experiment and see what might happen. And if you, if you have also done the course on getting unstuck, you might remember how we could experiment more with what we could do next on a painting. So if you haven't done that course, it's worth looking at because it gives you lots of ideas of different ways you can do a painting without actually going into it immediately. So here, you know, you can just do some free drawing on top of it. You can outline some of the shapes. Can be as bold, as adventurous as you like and see what happens. So I really enjoy just kind of playing and seeing how we could really alter this and give it some more dynamism. So you can see here how that could work. Adds a new dimension to the, to the painting. So I find it fascinating, but I need to do this kind of stuff. And it's so free, can have such fun with it. It's great. So, you know, it's worth experimenting and seeing what you come up with. And again, you know, outlining the edges if you want to. You can also add, haven't done it in this, in this section, but you can also go over it in some white. If you like. Can I think the one that we're going to do on the canvas, I'm going to to add some of that in. But you can then maybe if you want to say, for example, you've got a room that you particularly want to painting for and it's got a color in it, you might then decide to add just a color into it somewhere. I've just got some markers here. And you can see I can add a color if I want to. Might not be right, I might change it, which is what I'm actually going to do here. Just to show you different effects. If you caught it in bright red or you could put it in orange, you could participate in any color you like, but you can see the effect that it would have on the picture. Suddenly you've got a focal point at Wow, and it really kind of springs into life. So then if you don't like that, you can always paint it out. And with me I'm desk putting some of this Yana on top of it so you can sort of see the difference. But the possibilities are endless. You know, you'll come up with probably some much more amazing ideas when me and really have fun and enjoy doing these very kind of simple but very dynamic paintings, you know, with just a limited palette and they don't take long to do. And you could do a whole little series of them and have a whole range of great paintings for the wall. So it's looking good, isn't it? And different and simple and impactful. So you'll really enjoy having, having fun with these and interesting shapes. And the shapes give you a structure to start with. That's, that's the point. You know, to have a starting point. That's one of the challenges that a lot of people have is where to start. So when you have this under your belt, you know your shapes or squares or circles, new triangles and not obviously all the derivatives of that. But you've got a starting point. Which one she got started and you get in the zone, it can take over, but the starting point is always the difficult bit. So now if we kind of look at the other painting together with this one, you can see how they can go. You can get a whole really great series of very contemporary dynamic modern paintings from using this technique. So I hope you've enjoyed that. And I will then go on and do something on a countess. 4. On the Canvas: Okay, Now we're going to come to the Canvas. So got the canvas ready. And I'm going to do like a simple drawing over the top of it, a free drawing. We're going to keep it as simple as possible. And, you know, I do lots of different sketches here are some of my sketches here. And I'm going to do something like this one. And we want to keep it as a Minimum palette. So I've got here certainly entertain him. Wife's, some bluff, white, some pink and black. We're going to see what happens. Those colors mean there's cost. So it's going to be a very, very simple painting, but hopefully very powerful and interesting for the rigid block. So just get organized. I'm just going to put the underneath CO tone. And I want that to be the Allies sort of creamy. I'm just going to put this here. Tiny bit of gray. So the grays and the pinks will always lovely together. So that's kind of autonomy I'm feeling at the moment. So when I'm just doing the sketch here, I'll just block it out slightly. So if I'm coming here with the first area and then I'm going to come all the way down from here. I had, I kind of want this to be curvy here. And then I've got kind of like a block over here, which I rather like kind of an interesting shape. And so we've got this here, here, coming down from here on bit of a curve. And then I've got a nice flock over here. So I just hope. And what I like is I like this shape. All of my flower shape. I kind of thing that would be a kind of quite interesting. And I want to sort of reiterate that down here. That line straight. So it's going to be a bit like that. So reiterate the shape. And then I want to have a line which will come right over and back down. So I've got this shape again here. So compositionally, it kind of works, okay? And then just divide these lines on being these as I go. So very simple. And let's see what happens. We don't know the way until we start. So I'm just going to put the grain here to begin with. And I'll do this first layer. See what happens. And you want to keep it simple. Simple but interesting, unbalanced composition and the way you want it, you want to run and stuff. So I've got that nice soft gray to start with. And I'm also going to put that soft gray in down here. So you can see here would be. So when you're doing your own, just make sure that you're balancing your colors up. Even though there are minimal, you know, you want them to feel. You want it to feel balanced. Okay, so we've started, let's do this in black because that will give us a nice dynamic. So this is, this shape is coming into black. And we need other preparation is more about the drawing and deciding where it's going to go. Painting itself is fairly straightforward. You just filling in the shapes. But you want to make sure that. You've got your drawing so you kinda know where you go and get very different what we've done before other than doing the free drawing. Kind of get more sharp. But I'm not here. To put some black into here. You can say it can quite quickly come together. Is going to go back down because my family is hurting. Certainly know for a modern house. He's kind of paintings are very nice and kind of are in keeping with that sort of style. If that's your thing. This area here. And we'll essentially is we can correct when we finish views and lacking credit hand edge if you need to. Not necessarily, but you might need to. Sometimes it may and might need to write that. First day 10. Okay. Okay. So now we're going to come over to this side. My tissue. Very different, isn't it? To what I normally do? But it's always nice to do different things. So for this one, I want to use the laugh. And I'm going to put a bit of pink in it, which will be a bit different. Kind of takes its horns in Japanese. It's a lovely color. So I'm coming down here with this kind of fluffy pink, which is really nice. And have fun with it. I made, you know, always paint over it if you don't bind it. And then I'm going to just enhance that. Good. Very honestly, it's not all the same. Yeah. Just kind of blend in together a bit. Not all saying it's of interest. So I'm going to use a bigger brush really. And then I'm going to call this blush color here. It would be nice to add gray with it. Got already. Mix that into becoming too here. It is dark and she told us that it makes it more interesting. Some variation of color. And Kay, How's that? Looking interesting, isn't it? I'll have to wait for this to dry before I do this one. And then this is going to be white. So again, you can see how incredibly minimum and says, but interesting as a piece for modern space, right? So then I got to tell now with the white. Okay, fair enough. Yeah. So you can't really see this in mind. And just going to lock this in with the white. And hopefully my when you've done this, the rest of it will be dry and we can put last it in. So it doesn't take very long. But it's all the preparation and the understanding of it that's important to understand, to get the simplicity of it. And two, signs your design. Through the free drawing. It was beautiful patterns and play together. Step is that so what? I can only catch that in white and gray and we don't want gray quite yet. And this is all white. And this one's obvious. One is edge to catch. Block. Will have it then. Now my feeling is that we, I think this would be great. So I'm just going to mix up a bit more gray. Come in here. And focal point. So I'm just putting this grain here. Yeah. Looks just like that. And I think this could be the pink. We're going to mix the gray with the pink. And then we want to keep the nice consistency. Ok. Ok. The edges. You can see this or I'm not in the way. My go with that one a bit more lighter pink. And this one I think should be white. Thanks. Kinda like a stand out there. And then we've got the Eastern around. And so it really didn't take very long. Escaped the plaintiff here. And we've got to be careful here. Might have to outline this with synth. Why Penn is to get the shape? Yeah. Got it. Right? I don't know whether works. Yeah, Possibly. So let's just do that. Same pink that come here. It's got some nice kind of feminine, masculine feel to it. Not too girly and not to my skin. That's what I was thinking when I was doing a lot of the squares. Harsh. It's kind of nice to soften it up with something that's not quite so harsh. So now we've got this is to go, which is going to be interesting. But I need to let it dry. So let's let that dry and then I'll come and do a little bit. So I've left this over night and I was having a really good look at it to see what more I could do. So what I've actually done is I've put two more lanes on it because it was just one layer, needed a lot more to it, a bit more depth. And I really defined the edges. And my thinking and feeling is now what I'd like to do. I love this. I decided it's kind of like interesting and I want to put a stem from here, a thin black line I'm going to put here. And then I'm going to put this line in here. And then I'll see, I've had, has thought about doing something more here, but I want to wait to see what happens when I've done that. And I feel like It's interesting the emotion that I get from it. And I'd be intrigued to know what erosion you get from it because it's such a contemporary piece. Can we get an emotion? And obviously we can. And when I was looking at it last night, I was thinking to myself, it's like one sort of belief has grown from this long store. Can it felt like to me the name that came into my mind was survival. And having gone through this incredible world changed with the COVID. And I've spent a tremendous amount of time, probably like a lot of you isolation, which actually has been great because I've been there, a lot of fainting. But nevertheless, there's kind of like a survival mechanism kicks in. And I kind of feel that this represents, you know, there was these blocks and we couldn't move. I couldn't do this. And then it's a little bit like maybe on our, on our paths in the yard or the garden, that's going to say in the UK, you know, you get lots of weeds and they come up through concrete. How do they do that? But anyway, they do and they survive. It feels a little bit for me, like this is coming up through all that and hit this place and it's going to go on. So that's kinda my funny take on this picture. But I'm quite pleased to write it because I wanted I didn't, I would say really I didn't want it to be just static as a modern piece of wall art. I wanted it to have some kind of emotion, passion, and that's what kind of came up with me. And, and to me this is like potential. It's like an a, isn't it? The shape here. And then there's this half egg shape here. But these feel like potential that can push up. Maybe my thought was that I wanted to wait and see is to put another one in here. But I think it would detract from just the power of seeing that white leaf. But anyway, so let's see, I'm going to put it on the flat because it's going to be easier for me to draw it. And I'd be interested to hear what your thoughts are. And then when you look at your own piece of work, what are you getting from it? You know, what is arising in your feeling about what it's representing, however minimal it is. You know, there's, if there's a feeling there and you know, when you look at real expression, contemporary abstract art and you see artists, for example, Knight, Robert, Motherwell, Jenny got kind of a few lines, but there's dynamism in it. If you look at my TCE, the same thing. So there's no reason on earth why you can't have the same thing too. So enough of my rambling. Let's get on and finish this and see what happens. 5. Finishing the Painting: Okay, well, I've got to mark appends here wrong with a very fine tip and then one with a stronger tip. Now you could do your lines in anything really what I sometimes do with I'm not sure. I would use a piece of chalk because then you can rub it out in the best way to rub out chalk is with baby rights and gotten here just at the moment at hand. But you can always draw with that and then and take it off just if you want to make sure and you're not certain. But I'm going to kind of dive in here. I've got it this way round. Not sure if they're going to be able to see all of it if I turn it the other way round, draw the line. But basically what I'm going to do is put a line down here with the thin one. I might change it, but I'm going to see what it looks like with the thin line first. And then I can always make it I can always make it bigger if I need to. Just okay. So I'm just going to come all the way down here. And it doesn't have to be absolutely straight and might go over anyway. Just so you can need a steady hand. I okay. So I think I'm going to go over that a little bit more. And I'm not in the way here. The camera me is an immune camera and just getting used to it. So getting the right angles still haven't got it quite right yet. But I know this is a stalk, so it's not absolutely. I kinda wanted a bit freehand and I want it to be different from this one coming over. Let's just watch that. And you know, these finer details at the end really can make a huge difference to a painting. This is kind of like the plus bit. All right, so let's come down here. I'll say maybe I'll go over in the second one. I may know painted, then. Just see how I feel about that. Yeah, I think it's okay for now. Now I'm going to do these lines here. So I'm going to use the other pen. So fingers crossed it out message. So it's basically, it's coming from here. So I'm actually working on now I'm going to make it say care. Just wanted to get with us that down. Okay. So let me go back over that. Possibly an entity with this. I just wanted to get it right. And then I want it to be thicker in men. And then here it's come out here. I'm just not sure about that. Okay. So I think what I'm going to do now is I'm going to paint that should have come out a little bit more. Maybe. Paying for that. You see you can make mistakes. Let me just see how I feel about that. I'm going to paint over this course you can do. So. I'm just going to cut for a minute. I'm going to paint over that and then I'm going to come back to it. So seeing some things like this happen and it's not quite right, it's not flowing enough. Okay, So what was interesting was I put it on the easel and had a look at it. And actually it was fine. So I've actually gone over it a little bit more. But I still feel it could be a little bit thicker. And I decided when it was on the easel, but I would strengthen that line a little. But I don't think there's enough contrast between the thinness in this and the thickness of that. So I'm going to go over it. So when it was flat, I couldn't see it. But actually when it was that whether I can turn it that way so you can see it. Maybe can I put it on the use of anywhere in a minute? But It's reiterate the egg shape. And it's completely changed the dynamism of the painting. So I'm really fascinated with what's happened. But I do think it needs to be still a little bit thicker. So I'm just going to do that. And we see you never know when you look at it flat, It's whole different thing to looking at it when your when it's upright and how it should be not going to be looking at paintings flat. So this is going to thicken this up a little. I'm just using an acrylic marker. He's a really easily available and works. This is called pacemaker. And this one, I've got a whole collection of different lawns and you can get them from the App Store or Amazon. So I'm just thickening this up a little. And and I've taken it round gray shape that I see that looks better, doesn't it? Turn this round for do this side. And so yes. Lesson. Was the budget on the easel before you make an assessment? I think it's actually worked quite well. They can in this line a bit. It's such a fascinating process, isn't it? Painting and drawing. So drawing in my IT skills the pan. Just take my Nova and I love it. Tell us that. I think that's fine. Okay, So I'm going to put it on the easel now we can have a look. And I think we might say that that's completed. What do you think? So let me turn the camera around and then we'll have a look. So here we are on the easel. So it looks very different, doesn't it? From how it was before and a different emotion. I'm going to have to spend a little time meditating on, on this now because it's, it's changed so dramatically with especially with putting this in. It's lovely x-ray and I think that it's worked well. I'm going to leave that I like the simplicity of that list. You know, it's mirrored with the shapes. So compositionally, I think it's working really well. One of the things that I didn't mentioned to you, and so I painted the edges, so I've taken it round, which gives the painting a very nice finish, professional finish. And when you're doing yours, you know, see what changes as you develop it. But it's, you know, it's an interesting experience. It's different to what we were doing before. And I would love to see your paintings, share your art. I'd love to see it and see what emotions are the people come up with. You might tell me, you got a completely different idea and feeling from the painting. But anyway, I've really enjoyed doing extra lessons. And I hope you have two. And going back to your creative drawing, that's where it all starts. It focuses you, gets you in the zone and then abstract, then some of those lovely drawings onto a contemporary piece. 6. Conclusion : So here we are. We've finished this interesting class, and I hope you found it helpful and inspiring. I really enjoy doing these simple paintings because there's actually a lot more to them than we realize. And it can really give you a new way of expressing yourself through very simple and interesting lines. You know, you only have to look at say, motifs or Miro, or I think I mentioned Robert, Robert Motherwell. And you know, when you have a look at some of those very powerful line drawings, they still give you an emotion and a feeling. It's a wonderful way to extend your art experience and new ways and new possibilities of expressing yourself with your art and painting. So I'd love to see what you've been doing. So please put your pictures in the projects. It's always lovely to go through and, and have a look at your different paintings and it's inspirational for all of us. And if you'd like to see a little bit more of my work, please go to my website, it's joy Fe artists.com. And maybe there's some things there that would inspire you. I look forward to seeing you on the next class. So until then, happy painting, take care and see you soon. Bye for now.