How to Make a Professional Wedding Cake From Home | Cakes by MK | Skillshare

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How to Make a Professional Wedding Cake From Home

teacher avatar Cakes by MK, Blogger, YouTuber, Cake Decorator

Watch this class and thousands more

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

17 Lessons (1h 20m)
    • 1. Course Trailer

      0:51
    • 2. Equipment

      5:59
    • 3. Day 1 - Prepping Cake Tins

      4:56
    • 4. Day 1 - Cake Batter

      8:02
    • 5. Day 1 - Depanning Cake Layers

      2:10
    • 6. Day 1 - Wrapping Cake Layers

      1:43
    • 7. Day 1 - Simple Syrup

      1:39
    • 8. Day 2 - Buttercream

      7:39
    • 9. Day 2 - Levelling Cake Layers

      3:49
    • 10. Day 2 - Crumb Coat

      8:32
    • 11. Day 2 - Final Coat

      4:27
    • 12. Day 2 - Semi-Naked Cake Tier

      7:31
    • 13. Day 2 - Preparing Dowels

      3:45
    • 14. Day 2 - Stacking Cake Tiers

      6:49
    • 15. Day 3 - Gold Drip

      8:06
    • 16. Day 3 - Flowers

      3:25
    • 17. Class project

      0:33
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About This Class

Thinking of making a family members, or friends wedding cake? Or perhaps you're up to the challenge of making your own wedding cake!

The thought of making a wedding cake can be daunting, but worry no more! In this course, I'll be taking you through the process of making a wedding cake step-by-step, ensuring that you understand the crucial steps in making a wedding cake so that by the end of the course, you're left with a beautiful, structurally sound, and delicious wedding cake!

Making a wedding cake is no easy task, and often requires a few days from start to finish. To make the content more digestible, I've broken down the steps into a 3 day course, giving you time to adequately construct your wedding cake, with 16 video modules, as well as six PDF's. . 

You'll learn:

- How to correctly insert dowels into a cake (both central and support dowels)

- How to ice both a semi-naked cake and a full buttercream coated cake

- How to bake a delicious and moist cake 

- How to make Swiss meringue buttercream (vanilla and chocolate)

- How to make edible gold paint 

- How to apply a dazzling gold drip to a cake

- How to safely apply fresh flowers to a cake

So if you're ready to take on the challenge of creating your own wedding cake, then come join me in my course where I cannot wait to share my tips and tricks with you all and see what amazing wedding cakes you create! :)

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Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

Cakes by MK

Blogger, YouTuber, Cake Decorator

Teacher

Hello! My name is Maryam Khan and I am a blogger and YouTube content creator for my brand Cakes by MK, based in New Zealand.

I am a self taught cake maker and cake decorator, and have been pursuing my passion of cake making for over 2 years. Prior to this, I was working in the social services and marketing sector, with my academic background in Psychology. 

I love being able to share my knowledge and skills with others, so I am really excited to be able to share in depth classes with you all, so that you can confidently begin to create cakes of your own :) 

If you'd like to see more of what I do, you can visit my YouTube channel at www.youtube.com/cakesbymk.

 

 

 

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Transcripts

1. Course Trailer: Hey everyone, and welcome to my course; How to Make a Provisional Wedding Cake From Home, where I'll be covering the step-by-step process of how to make a beautiful, structurally sound, and delicious wedding cake all from your own kitchen. Not only will you receive high-quality videos taking you through the process step by step, but I have also included some carefully crafted documents to support your learning, as well as a checklist to ensure that you don't miss a step. I also have some extra decorating tutorials at the end showing you how to make your own edible gold paint, and how to apply a gold drip to a cake, as well as how to safely apply fresh flowers to a cake. Come join me in my course where I cannot wait to share all my tips and tricks with you all and see what amazing wedding cakes you create. 2. Equipment: Now before we get right into studying our wedding cake, I thought I'd quickly run you guys through some of the specialist equipment that you may need while making your wedding cakes. Some of these are essential and some of these are just good to have, which make your life a whole lot easier. Now the first thing that I would highly recommend having when making multiple tiered cakes, with each tier having multiple cake layers, is to have a sufficient number of cake tins so that you're not spending hours and hours baking. For the wedding cake that I'm making today, I've got three different tiers which are all different sizes. I've got one 12 inch tier which is this big one here. Then I've got one 10 inch tier which is slightly smaller and then I've got one 8 inch tier which is my very top tier. Now for each of these sizes, I've got three cake tins each, because each of my tiers are going to be three cake layers. Now, I would highly recommend having more than one sized cake tin because this is going to save you so much time and money. One, it means that you can put multiple cake layers into the oven at once. For example, with this eight cake layer, I've got three of these cake tins which means that I can make enough butter to go into these three cake tins and then put them all into the oven at once as opposed to baking one at a time which could take me hours. That's one tip there, and also it's going to save you money because you don't have to have your oven on for hours and hours because you're baking one cake at a time. Now with these bigger layers, if your oven isn't large enough, then you may only be able to put two in at a time but even then it's going to save you so much time than baking them one at a time. So just make sure that you do have enough cake tins. Now the next thing that I would highly recommend having is a turntable, a very nice, strong turntable. Because when you're having a multiple tiered cake, it can be very heavy. The one that I'm going to be making today is probably going to be even heavier than me so you want to have a nice strong turntable that's going to be able to support that weight. Because when it comes to smoothing out the sides and decorating the cake, a turntable makes the process a whole lot easier. Now another thing that I would highly recommend having when making a wedding cake is a super large bowl. This is especially important when it comes to mixing your cake better because you aren't going to be making just one batch at a time. For example, in the cake that I'm making today, I'm going to be making four times the recipe at once, which means that I have enough cake butter to distribute into my cake tins and put them all into the oven at one. So this again is important to save you time so that you can make a lot more batter at once than just doing one batch at a time. Now, another thing that I would highly recommend having is a super strong and large cake board. Generally I would recommend having a cake board which is at least four inches bigger than your bottom tier, your largest tier. For example, if your bottom here is an eight-inch cake, then I would recommend buying a 12-inch cake board. Now the larger and larger that your cake gets, the more inches I would recommend having on your cake board. The reason for that is because when it comes to holding your cake, the more hand space that you've got at the bottom and the more space that you've got between yourself and the cake is going to make it so much easier when transporting the cake, especially if it's quite high and quite big. Because the taller your cake is, the more unstable it's going to feel. So the more grip space that you have is going to make it so much easier. For today, my bottom tier is a 12-inch tier so I've actually got an 18 inch cake board and it's quite thick as well. So you want to make sure that the larger your cake is, the stronger your cake board is. This is quite thick, this cake board, but you can also find thinner ones too. But because I've got a very large cake today, I've got quite a thick cake board to make sure that it's going to be able to support the weight of my cake. Now two more cake decorating tools that I would recommend to have is: one is a cake scraper because this is going to give you nice smooth sides on your cake, and in the course I'm also going to be showing you how I get super smooth sides on my cakes using cake scraper; and also a large offset spatula. This is going to help spread out that butter cream nice and evenly when you're making your cake. Now another piece of equipment which is more specific to when making a wedding cake from home is to have some baking trays on hand. These are really important when it comes to making larger cake layers because they can be a little bit hard to move around, especially if they're really nice and moist cake layers. What I would recommend is if you're making cake layers which are 12 inches or larger, then definitely have some baking trays on hand because these are going to help transport them from one stage to the next. Now the last thing that I would highly recommend having when making a cake, wedding cake, any kind of cake really is some kind of mixer. This is my kitchen aid that I've got here and I've got a whisk attachment on it, which has just come off. This is the whisk attachment. This is really important when it comes to making buttercream or if you're making a cake butter which requires you to cream butter. Now when it comes to the buttercream element [inaudible] , I am a Swiss meringue buttercream girl which means that I make a lot of meringue when making my buttercream. To make a meringue, it takes a lot of mixing so you can use a hand mixer for this but it's going to take you a long time and to save time and energy is just so much easier having a stand mixer. But let's say you're making an American buttercream or you're making a cake butter which doesn't require a lot of mixing or anything like that, then you can get away with just having a hand mixer as well. So that is basically the more specialist equipment which is needed for this course. I am also doing some special decorating at the end where I'm painting some gold drips onto a cake where I will be using some brushes and things like that. But that's all completely optional depending on whether you want to have that design for your wedding cake as well. But having these kind of tools should cover you to make your base wedding cake and then you can go ahead and decorate it however you like. That's basically it. Now let's get on to making our cake better. 3. Day 1 - Prepping Cake Tins: It's day 1 of making our wedding cake, which means that it's baking day. Before you start making your cake batter, what you wanna do first is you want to prepare your cake tins so that once you're done with your cake batter, your cake tins all ready to go, you can pop your cake batter in, and get your cakes straight into the oven. What I've got here is I've got three 12-inch cake tins and they're going to be for the bottom tier of my cake. I'm going to show you, guys, two ways that you can prepare your cake tins so that your cake layers come out really nice and they're not falling apart. So the first way is by using some butter and flour. What I've got here is I've got some softened butter and I've got some plain flour. What I'm going to do first, I'm just going to use a pastry brush and just dip it into my softened butter and start putting them around the bottom and the edges of my cake tin. You want to make sure that you get it right into the corners. Now once that's all nicely spread out, the next thing that I'm going to do is I'm going to put a little bit of flour into my cake tin and I'm going to move it around until the entire cake tin is completely covered. You don't have to worry about the bottom too much because we are going to finish off by putting some parchment paper on the bottom, but just make sure that the sides and your corners are really nicely covered. Then for the edges, just grab a little bowl, you can even do this over the sink, and then just start to take some of that excess flour out. To get the remaining excess flour out, just bang your cake a little bit to one corner, and then simply just discard the remaining flour on the bottom. Then you are left with a beautifully prepared cake tin. Now the last step to this is to put some parchment paper on the bottom, and this is just going to add that extra security to make sure that your cake comes out in one piece. Now the way to do that is really easy. Just grab some parchment paper, grab your cake tin that you're using, pop it on top, and then just draw a circle around the edges of the cake tin. Then simply cut out that circle, and you want to cut out the circle slightly smaller than the actual circle you've drawn, and this is for two reasons, so it's going to get rid of any of that pin so you don't open whatever you've used, so that it doesn't get into your cake. Also by having a slightly smaller, it's going to make sure that it doesn't crease up along the sides of your cake so that you have a really nice flat edge. Once that's all cut, you're simply just going to place your parchment paper onto the bottom of your cake tin. There it is, a beautifully prepared cake tin and ready to go. Now the next method that I'm going to show you, guys, is using a specific product, I really like this product. It's called Wilton Cake Release. Now, this stuff is really amazing, you just need a little bit around your entire pan, you don't need to worry about buttering or flouring them, and then you simply just put some partial paper on the bottom and your cakes come out perfect every time. Now the reason why I didn't just want to show you guys this way is because I know that in certain places you may not be able to find this Wilton Cake Release easily, but not to worry, this first method that I've shown you is perfectly fine as well and your cakes will come out really nice. What you do with this Wilton Cake Release, it's really easy, you just grab your cake tin, squirt a bit of the Wilton Cake Release on it. Again, using a pastry brush, you're just going to spread that all around the pan. Then for the bottom, I'm just going to do the same thing with the parchment paper, so just cut out a round circle. Now you can cut out these round circles beforehand which would make it easier, but just for the purposes of showing you guys, I'm just doing it this way. Then I'm just placing it on the bottom of my pan. There it is, my second pan is ready to go. Depending on whichever method you prefer and what you have access to, you can choose that method. Now, the next thing that I'm going to do is I'm going to finish preparing all of my cake tins and then we're going to come back and start working on our cake batter. 4. Day 1 - Cake Batter: When it comes to making a wedding cake batter everything you use is supersized because you're making so much more cake batter than you normally would, especially if you're making a really large cake like the one I'm making today. The way that I like to make that a little bit more manageable when you're doing it from home because you probably don't have big mixers and things like that, that you might find at a professional bakery, is I like to split up the tiers and do it tier by tier. What I'm going to start off by doing is making the batter for my 12-inch tier first. Then I'll cook my 12-inch cake layers, and then I'll go ahead and do my eight tier and then my eight-inch tier. What I'm going to be doing first, is I'm going to be showing you guys how I make my batter for my 12-inch tier. You guys can use whichever cake flavor or batters you like, maybe you have something that runs in the family which maybe adds a bit of sentimental value to your wedding cake. But what I'm going to be doing today is making my chocolate and raspberry cake, which is going to be the flavor for my wedding cake. I'm not going to show you that how I make the batter for all the tiers, but the reason why I wanted to show you how I make the batter for my 12-inch tier is because it's the largest tier and I wanted to give you guys a visual element of what the equipment you're using will look like so you're prepared when you come to making your wedding cake at home. The first part to making this cake batter is to melt a whole bunch of ingredients over a double boiler. My double boiler is usually a small pan with a decent sized bowl, but because I'm making four times the recipe than I usually would for my 12-inch tier I've got a big pot on the bottom. Then I've got a really big bowl on the top, which I'm going to be melting all of my ingredients in. If you're not quite sure what a double boiler is it's basically just a pot full of hot water, and the steam of the hot water is what's going to melt the ingredients that I place in this bowl. The reason that we do that is because when you're melting things especially like chocolate, you don't want to overheat it. Otherwise it can start to turn into a weird texture and things like that. It's just to make sure that we're not burning any of the ingredients that we're wanting to melt. What I'm going to do first, is I'm going to put all my ingredients into this bowl. What I've got here is I've got some unsalted butter, some dark chocolate; 50 percent dark chocolate I'm using. I've also got some coffee which I'm going to be placing in some hot water which I've got here and mixing that up, and then I've also got a whole bunch of sugar here. I'm just going to combine all those ingredients into my bowl, and then just keep mixing it slowly until it's all nicely melted together. I'm just mixing my coffee into my hot water, I'm going to mix that around and then pour that on top. I will have the full quantities to all these ingredients as well as the different amounts of the recipe that I'm using for each tier in the PDF which is attached to this video. What I'm going to do next is I'm just going to leave my pot boiling on a medium heat, and then I'm just going to keep stirring my mixture every now and then until it's completely melted. Once the mixture is nice and smooth, you want to take it off the heat and let it cool down for about 10 minutes or so. While it's cooling down, you can go ahead and prepare the rest of your ingredients. What we've got here is we've got a whole bunch of eggs, some vegetable oil, some milk, some all-purpose flour, cocoa powder, baking powder, some salt, and some baking soda. We're going to start off by mixing in the milk in our bowl and I'm going to use a hand mixer to mix it all around. Just keep in mind this does splatter a little bit when you first add in your milk, so I've got little specks of chocolate all over me. Just keep that in mind. The next thing that I'm going to do, is I'm going to add my eggs to my mixture and I'm going to mix it in between each addition. Because this is quite a large amount of batter, I'm going to mix two in at a time. Once all the eggs are nicely mixed in, I'm going to add in my vegetable oil and mix that in too. The next thing to do is to sift in all of our dry ingredients, and then mix that together until it's just combined. Because this is quite a lot of batter, I don't think my mixer is going to be big enough. If you do have a bigger mixer at home, then you can totally use that. Just make sure you don't over mix it. Instead, I'm going to be using a large spoon to help me fold in the mixture. Now that most of my flour is mixed in, I should be able to put my mixer back in now. So I'm just going to finish off with my mixer really quickly just to make it really nice and smooth. My cake mixture is all done now, it's ready to put into our pre-prepared cake tins and then we're going to finish off with some raspberries on top. I've got my three 12-inch cake tins here, and I'm going to start off by pouring my cake batter evenly into each cake tin. If you're not confident in eyeballing this, then you can weigh each of your tins just to make sure that they all way around the same weight so that they cook evenly. I've got all my cake batter into my cake tins, and now the last thing that I'm going to do is I'm going to put some strawberries into these cakes. The reason why I didn't mix them in is because some of my cake layers are going to be naked cakes or see naked cakes, and so that means that some of the cake is going to be showing through. I don't want any of the raspberries to get on the edges of the cake because that's going to stop me from having a nice straight cake edge. Instead what I'm going to do, is I've got some frozen raspberries here. To prevent them from sinking from the bottom, I'm going to coat them in just a little bit of flour. I'm just putting up that a flour in, and I'm just going to shake them around. Then I'm going to start sprinkling them on top of each of the cake layers. I'm just going to finish off by getting a spoon and slightly covering the raspberries with a little bit of cake batter so that they're in the cake batter, but just make sure that you don't push them right to the bottom. That is it. Our cakes are ready to go into the oven. I will have the cook time in the PDF which is attached to this video, and we'll be back once they're ready to take out of their cake tins. 5. Day 1 - Depanning Cake Layers: My 12-inch cake layers are all cook now, and they've been cooling for about two hours. While they were cooling down, I went ahead and made the cake better for my 10-inch cake layers, and I pop those into the oven. Now, when making a mud cake like the one that I've made today, it's really important to make sure that you allow the cake enough time to cool so that everything solidifies and comes together. Which means that when you come to turning out your cake from your cake pan, it's not going to fall apart or break, especially when you're making bigger cake layers like this. It's really important to give it enough time to cool before you turn it out of the cake pan. Now, the way that I'm going to take my cake out of my cake pan is I'm going to get something which is as large as the cake pan. Today I've got this baking tray here. What I'm going to do is I'm going to place that on top of my cake, and then I'm going to flip it over and my cake should come right out. Now, usually with smaller cake layers, maybe like eight inch or six inch cakes, you can just use your hand and turnover, and it should just come out and you can hold it on your hand. But with these big cake layers, it's simply just not a good idea to use your hand because it may not be able to support the entire cake, it might just crumble or fall apart which you don't want. Basically, I'm just going to do that. If your cake doesn't come right out, then what you can do is just help it a little bit by running a thin knife or anything that's straight and thin around the edges of the cake, and that should help release it so that when you do turn it over, it should come right out. But I'm going to try without my knife first. My cake is out of the cake, so now it's looking really nice. The edges are really nice and smooth, so that's going to help us build a really beautiful cake. Now, basically you just want to do the exact same thing with the other cake layers. Now, what I'm going to do next is I'm going to take all my other cake layers out and then I'll be back to show you how I wrap them up to leave them overnight to make sure they stay really nice and moist. 6. Day 1 - Wrapping Cake Layers: All my 12-inch cake layers are out of the cake tins now and I'm going to show you how I store them overnight. Now when you've spent all of this time and effort baking these cakes, you really want to make sure that they stay nice and moist, and they're not dry the next day when you come to icing them. Now with bigger cake layers, it can be a little bit tricky because you don't want to move them around too much because you don't want them to break. But a really easy way to wrap them up is to simply get some cling wrap or Glad wrap and just wrap it around the cake, and then cover them with a towel or a sheet, something that's going to prevent any air from getting in and then they'll stay nice and moist overnight. I'm going to show you guys now how I wrap one of them and then I'm going to do the exact same thing with my other cake layers. I also placed them on these individual pieces of parchment paper because it makes it a lot easier to move around and handle. I'm just going to break some Glad wrap, and I'm just going to slightly tuck it in underneath the bottom of the cake. I'm going to do that on all side. Then I'm going to do one more this way so that the entire cake is covered. Now, once all the Glad wrap is completely covering the cake, you're ready to just cover it with a sheet or towel, and then it's good to stay overnight. Now, I'm pretty much just going to do the exact same thing that I've done with these 12-inch cake tiers, with both my 10-inch and 8-inch cake layers. Then I'm pretty much going to wrap them up and keep them all sitting together overnight, and then it should be good to go tomorrow morning. 7. Day 1 - Simple Syrup: Now the last thing I like to do on Day 1 of making my wedding cake is to make some simple syrup so that it's ready for the next morning when I come to start stacking my cake layers. Now, simple syrup is basically a syrup which contains equal parts sugar to water. I'm starting off with some hot water so that my sugar can completely dissolve in it and then lift with this nice clear syrup. Now that syrup is what we're going to put on top of our cake layers when we're stacking our cake tomorrow and that's going to help keep our cake layers really nice and moist because we are making it ahead of time and we are going to be taking it in and out of the fridge to allow the icing to harden up once we ice our cakes. That's just going to help prevent our cakes from drying out. The way you make simple syrup is really easy you simply just get some hot water, some sugar, simply put your sugar into your hot water, and then just mix it together until it's completely dissolved. Now some of you may be worried that simple syrup is going to make your cakes too sweet. Now the key thing here is just not to put too much onto your cakes, but the great thing about simple syrup is that it actually just amplifies the flavors even more. It's a nice little touch to your cake to help keep it nice and moist as well as amplify those flavors. As long as you don't drown your cake and simple syrup, you'll be absolutely fine. My sugar is completely dissolved now and we're left with this clear syrup, which is also slightly thicker than just the normal texture of water, which is what you want. Now what I'm going to do is I'm simply going to cover it up and then we'll be back tomorrow for Day 2 of making our wedding cake. 8. Day 2 - Buttercream: Now we're ready to make the buttercream for our wedding cake. The buttercream that I'm making today which is the type that I traditionally make for most of my cakes is a Swiss meringue buttercream. The reason why I like Swiss meringue buttercream is because it's nice and stable, and it's not too sweet as well. The first step to making Swiss meringue buttercream is to combine some caster sugar and some egg whites together, and put that over a double boiler so that it starts to heat up a bit and all the caster sugar completely dissolves into the egg whites. What I'm going to do first is I'm just going to put my egg whites into my caster sugar and mix that together with my whisk until it's completely combined. Now just keep in mind that I will have the full quantities to all these ingredients in the PDF which is attached to this video, and we're making large cakes like this wedding cake. I like to make two batches of my Swiss meringue buttercream at a time, so that's how much seems to mix up well in my mixer because I think if I tried three batches, it would just be too much for my mixer to handle. A quick tip for you guys is differently try and double or triple your recipes for your butter cream because this is going to quicken up the process in case you might need to make seven batches of buttercream if you're making a large cake, and it's just going to take forever if you do each batch individually, so just a quick tip for you guys. Again, you guys can choose whichever butter cream you guys like. Just like with the cake flavor, you can choose whichever cake flavor that you like. Now if you're not quite sure what a double boiler is, it's basically a Bain-Marie. What you do is you just get a sauce pan, fill it about halfway with some water, and then bring that to a simmer, and then basically turn your heat down to a low heat so that you've just got some nice gentle steam coming up from it, and then pop your bowl with your ingredients. Just make sure it is a heat proof bowl on top of your source pan, and then basically that heat which is coming from the hot water is what's going to gently heat up your ingredients. In this case, we're using this method because we don't want to overcook our eggs. Now once you've placed your bowl over the heat, just make sure you keep stirring it every now and then so that the mixture is heating up evenly, and the way that you know it's done is when you feel a little bit of the mixture between your fingers and you can't feel any sugar granules anymore. Now this may take a few minutes or so, so just be patient with it, and you can tell when it's starting to come together because the egg white start to loosen up and your mixture is a lot more easier to stir, so just check it in a few minutes and see how you're going. It's been about five minutes now that my mixture has been sitting on my double boiler, and as you can see, it's definitely a lot more liquidly and easy to mix together, and I feel like it's pretty much done, so I'm just going to quickly put a little bit between my fingers, and make sure that I can't feel any of that caster sugar. That's really nice and smooth. I can't feel any sugar granules which means we're now ready to whip up our mixture, so I'm going to transfer it now into my stand mixer here and I've got the whisk attachment on, and I'm basically going to whip that together for at least 15 minutes or so. This is a double batch, so it's going to take a little bit longer than normal, and basically that's going to whip it up into a nice white meringue and we want it to be nice and cool, so if it does take longer than 20 minutes or so to become nice and cool, just feel your bowl to check the temperature. Then you can pop it into the fridge for maybe 5-10 minutes just to help it cool down a little bit quicker or get a frozen bag of vegetables or something and pop that against the side of your ball as well which will also help cool down the mixture a little bit quicker. My mixture has been going now for about 15-20 minutes, and as you can see, it's turned into this beautiful fluffy white meringue which is what we want, and now the next thing that I'm going to do is I've got a whole bunch of unsalted butter here which I'm going to slowly add to my meringue. Now you do want to do this slowly because if you add your butter to your meringue too quickly, then it's going to deflate your meringue which we don't want, so just slowly add your butter in a little bit at a time. I've mixed in all of my butter now and as you can see, we're left with a really silky smooth Swiss meringue buttercream. Now a few things to keep in mind with Swiss meringue buttercream is one you want to make sure that the butter that you're using is really nice and soft, so you want it to be the consistency where you can squish it between your fingers, but it's still holding its shape, and this is what's going to allow it to incorporate it really well into the meringue. Now a second thing to keep in mind is as you're mixing your mixture together and slowly adding the butter, at one point it's going to seem like your mixture is cooling, but don't worry. That's supposed to happen, so just keep leaving it mixed together and it'll end up with a beautiful silky smooth texture like this. Now the next thing that I'm going to do is I'm going to add in some of my vanilla essence that I've got here. You can use an essence or extract, whatever you've got on hand, and I'm just going to add that into my buttercream so that it turns into a vanilla Swiss meringue buttercream. Now that that's mix in, my buttercream is basically done. Now for the cake I'm making today, I'm going to be using both vanilla Swiss meringue buttercream as well as a chocolate Swiss meringue buttercream, so what I'm going to do next is I'm going to show you guys how to turn some of your vanilla Swiss meringue buttercream into a thickened and delicious chocolate Swiss meringue buttercream. To make a chocolate Swiss meringue buttercream, it's really easy. I've just got some vanilla Swiss meringue buttercream that I made from earlier. Then I've got some 50 percent dark chocolate here, and then I've got a little bit of butter as well, and the full quantities will be in the PDF which is attached to this video. Now what I'm going to do first is I'm just going to grab my butter and I'm going to put that into my bowl with my chocolate in it, and then I'm just going to melt that in the microwave, and the way that I'm going to do that is I'm going to put it in for 22nd bursts, and I'm going to give it a little mix in between each burst until it's completely melted. Just remember not to keep in the microwave for too long, otherwise you might burn your chocolate. Now I'll be back once my chocolate is completely melted. Now once the chocolate is nicely melted, it should be nice and silky smooth like that. The next thing that I'm going to do is I'm simply going to fold this chocolate into my Swiss meringue buttercream, and just make sure that you've given your chocolate 5-10 minutes to cool down a little bit before you pop it into your Swiss meringue buttercream, and then once that's nicely combined, you're left with a super delicious chocolate Swiss meringue buttercream. Now before you use this for your cake, you want to pop it into the fridge for about half an hour just to allow it to solidify a little bit, because that melted chocolate will have soften your buttercream a little bit, so just pop it into the fridge for about half an hour or so before you use it to ice your cakes. 9. Day 2 - Levelling Cake Layers: Now once you're finished with your buttercream, you're ready to start stacking your cake layers. Now before you start stacking your cake layers, you first need to trim off the tops of all of your cake layers so that your cake layers are really nice and flat. This is going to make the cake stacking process a whole lot easier. It's going to help your final tier be really nice and level. Now the way that I'm going to do this is pretty easy, but it can be a little bit tricky when it comes to dealing with larger cake layers. Again, I've chosen my 12-inch cake layers to demonstrate this so that you can see some of the different tools and equipment you might need to manage these larger cake layers. What I'm going to do first is I've got two baking trays here. What I'm going to do is I'm going to put one on the bottom of my cake, one on the top of my cake. Then I'm going to flip that over and place it onto my turntable. I'm just going to remove the gland wrap first, slide one of my trays under. I'm going to place one on top. Then you just want to really quickly flip it. Just remember it is a little bit heavy, so just be careful. We've got the top of our cake now. Now the way that I'm going to trim off the top is I'm going to get my serrated knife. I'm going to hold it up against the edge of the cake at the height that I want to trim it. Then what I'm going to do is I'm simply going to turn the turntable and cut an edge around the top of the cake. Now my knife's going to stay in the same place and it's just my turntable and my cake that's going to be moving. You want to keep your knife in your hand really nice and straight and the same position as you're making this cut around the cake. Now once you get back around to your initial cut that you made, you're going to keep going around the cake again, but this time you're going to slowly start bringing your knife into the middle of the cake. Just remember to keep it really nice and straight. Now, I've got a really nice fudgy cake, so it can be a little bit messy. I'm going to start taking off some of the tops of my cake and just putting them into a bowl. Now once you've taken off all of the excess cake from the top of your cake. Just have a look at your cake and spin it around and see if there are any parts which seem higher than other parts. Then you can continue to just work on it and trim your cake. But other than that, I'm happy with this one. I'm going to do the exact same thing with my other cake layers. Now before I put this cake layer away, I am going to put some simple syrup on it now so that it can start soaking in, so that it's all ready to go when I start stacking my cake layers. I've got my simple syrup here from earlier. Now the way I'm going to do this is I've just got a spoon and I'm going to put spoonfuls of the simple syrup all over the top of my cake layer. Now I'm simply going to slide off my cake onto my parchment paper. I've got a nice flat cake layer ready to go. I'm basically going to do the exact same thing with the other 12-inch cake layers, as well as my 10-inch and eight-inch cake layers and then we are going to come back and start stacking this cake. 10. Day 2 - Crumb Coat: We're now ready to start building our cake. What I've got here to build our cake on is a really big 18-inch cake board, and it's quite thick as well. Now, you want to keep in mind that when making a large wedding cake, you really want to make sure that your cake board is nice and strong because the last thing you want is when you're carrying your cake to transport it, the cake board breaks and your cake falls apart. Just make sure that you've got a nice, strong cake board. Now, another thing to keep in mind is you want to make sure that your cake board is big enough so that you've got at least a couple of inches on either side so that when you come to transporting your cake, you've got enough hand space to carry your cake and it feels nice and stable. Sometimes if your cake board is too small, say it's only like an inch or two bigger than the bottom tier of your cake, it can be quite close to the edge and when it comes to carrying the cake, it feels like it's really close to you, and it's going to fall, and it's more likely for you to touch the cake and maybe ruin some of the decorations. Just make sure that it's nice and big so you've got enough space on the edges when you come to transporting and even decorating your cake. Now, the first thing that I'm going to do is I'm going to get some vanilla Swiss meringue buttercream, which I have in a piping bag. I'm going to pipe some of that onto my cake board and spread it out a little bit, and then I'm going to get my first cake layer and put that on top. Now, again, with our large cake layers, I'm going to be using my baking trays to help me pick up the cake layer and flip it around, and then I'm going to place it on top of my cake board. Now we're just going to do a really quick flip, and now I'm just going to slide my cake onto my cake board. Then you can just shift it around if it's not quite in the middle. That looks good. Then just remember to remove your parchment paper. Now, the next thing that I'm going to do is I'm going to pipe some vanilla Swiss meringue buttercream around the rim of my cake, and then I'm going to fill the middle with some chocolate Swiss meringue buttercream. Now, the reason why I'm doing that is because my vanilla Swiss meringue buttercream is slightly more stable than my chocolate Swiss meringue buttercream. So just to ensure that my cake is nice, and stable, and well-stuck together, especially when it gets a little bit hot, I'm going to be using my vanilla Swiss meringue buttercream on the edge to act as a nice stabilizing factor to my cake. I'm just using my offset spatula to help me spread it out nice and evenly. Now, once the buttercream is nicely smoothed out, the next thing that I'm going to do is I'm going to pop the cake into the fridge just for about 10 minutes or so. The reason for that is because right now it's in the middle of summer in New Zealand and so the buttercream is a little bit soft and the cake layers are really heavy, so I don't want the cake layers to simply just squash all my buttercream and just push it out to the side. If it does a little bit, it's okay. But by putting it into the fridge just for about 10-15 minutes to allow the buttercream to harden up a little bit, it's going to make the stacking process a lot neater. I'm just going to pop this into the fridge and then we'll be back to do our next cake layer. My cake's out of the fridge, now the buttercream is firmer, and now I'm going to go ahead and put my next layer of cake on top. Now, this can be a little bit tricky because you need to slide it onto the middle of the cake. Once it's on, you can move it around little bit to get it in the right spot. Then I'm going to do exactly the same thing I did before and pipe a rim of vanilla buttercream on the outside and fill the middle with some chocolate Swiss meringue buttercream. Now, I'm going to pop this cake into the fridge again for about another 15 minutes and then we'll be back to put our last layer on top. My cake is out of the fridge now and I'm going to go and put my last layer of my cake on the top. Now, you just want to make sure with your last layer that you are flipping it over so that the bottom of the cake is the top of our tier so that we have a really nice flat top. I have already been doing that with the other layers, but it's not 100 percent necessary. But with the final layer, you do want to make sure that you are doing that flip so you have the bottom on the top. Now, another thing that I did notice when I was placing my second layer onto my tier is that it was a little bit hard to slide off my baking tray, and I think that's because it's really moist on the part where I've cut it. What I did is I just placed some baking paper onto my baking tray, which should help me slide my cake off a lot easier when I'm placing it on the top. If you do have someone to help you with this, then definitely get them to help you because these cake layers are really heavy and it just helps if you've got someone to hold something for you. I'm just going to move it so that my cake is in the middle. Remember to take your parchment paper off. Now, once you're happy with how it looks, and it looks like the cake layers all aligned, the next thing that I'm going to do is I'm going to do a crumb coat on my cake. Now, a crumb coat is basically your first layer of buttercream that you put all around your cake to trap all the crumbs, and then you pop that in the fridge to allow the buttercream to become nice and hard, and then you put your final layer of buttercream on top of the deck so that none of the crumbs show up on your outer layer of buttercream. I'm just going to go ahead and do my crumb coat now using my vanilla Swiss meringue buttercream. Now that I've got buttercream all over my cake, the next thing that I'm going to do is I'm just going to scrape some of that off so that it's nice and smooth. Now, this doesn't have to be really neat because we are going to be going and putting another layer of buttercream on top shortly, so don't worry if it's not as smooth as you'd like it to be. Now, when you are scraping off the excess icing from your crumb coat, just be a bit careful because if you are using different flavors like I have, then sometimes one of the flavors might come into the white buttercream. For example, my chocolate is slightly in some of my white buttercream. So when you're scraping the excess buttercream off your cake scraper, make sure you don't scrape it into your white buttercream otherwise it's going to tan your white buttercream. Instead just put it into a different bowl. Then I'm just smoothing out the top by pulling that excess buttercream into the middle of the cake. Then just have a quick look at your cake to make sure that you've covered the cake everywhere. If there are really large chunks of crumbs anywhere on your cake, you can just pull those off. But apart from that, my cake is looking good and now I'm going to pop it into the fridge for at least 30 minutes to allow the buttercream to become really nice and firm, and then we'll be back to put our final layer of buttercream on. 11. Day 2 - Final Coat: The buttercream on my cake for my crumb coat is nice and firm now, so I'm going to go ahead and put my final layer of buttercream on. I'm going to start off by smoothing out the top. Then I'm going to go on with the sides. Now I'm just filling in some of the little gaps and then I'm going to scrape it out again. Now once the sides of your cakes are almost completely straight and smooth, don't worry if it's not absolutely perfect because I'm going to be showing you guys soon how I get really smooth sides and sharp edges on my buttercream cakes. But for now, as long as it's almost there, then you'll leave it at that. Then I'm just going to clean up the top now and then we're going to pop the cake again into the fridge. Again, don't worry if this isn't perfect because we are going to clean it up once it's back out of the fridge. Now I'm just going to clean the bottom of my cake board. Now I'm going to pop this into the fridge. Now you need the buttercream to be really nice and firm for this last little part I'm going to show you guys. Make sure that it's in the fridge for at least an hour and then we'll be back to smooth it all out and then out here is ready. My trick to getting super smooth buttercream and really nice sharp edges is to simply scrape cold buttercream. My cake's been sitting in the fridge for about an hour. The buttercream is really nice and firm. Now I'm simply going to just start gently scraping the buttercream off, just very gently because I don't want to scrape too much off. What you'll notice is it'll start to reveal this really smooth buttercream. Just to remember to take off any excess buttercream off your cake scraper every time you're scraping. Now, as you can see, I've got a gorgeous smooth buttercream on the sides of my cake. Now the next thing that I'm going to do is I'm going to smooth out the top with my cake scraper. Now I'm really gently just smoothing out the sides again just to get any of that excess buttercream on the edge. I am pretty happy with how that has turned out. Now normally, if this wasn't a tiered cake, I'd spend a little bit more time smoothing out the middle. But because we are going to be placing another cake on top and you're not going to be able to see it. I'm not going too fast, too much about it. Now the next thing that I'm going to do is I'm going to smooth the tops of both of my other tiers. I'm not going to smooth the sides because those are semi-naked cakes, so there's not enough icing on the sides to scrape off, but I am going to smooth the top, just how I smooth the top of this 12 inch cake. Then once I've done all of that, we're going to be back to start sticking our tiers. 12. Day 2 - Semi-Naked Cake Tier: Now we're ready to move on to the 10-inch tier for our three tiered cake. Now, when it comes to a tiered cake, you simply can't just put the tiers on top of one another, otherwise the weight of the top tiers is going to be way too heavy for the bottom tier and it's going to make it crumble in and there's going to be no support for the bottom tiers. What we need to do is we need to prepare our top tiers on cake cards, and what we need to do with these cake cards is we need to make a hole in the middle of the cake card so that our cake tier can go through our central dowel. Now, if you're not quite sure what a central dowel is or how doughs work when it comes to making a tiered cake, don't worry about that because I'm going to explain the whole process in detail further on in the course. But for now what you need to know is you need to have a cake card. For a 10-inch cake, I've got a 10-inch cake card, and then for my eight-inch tier, I've got a eight-inch cake card. What I'm going to do is I'm going to make a hole right in the middle of cake card. I need to make sure that my cake card, the hole that I put in the middle of my cake card is going to be big enough to fall through my central dowel. Now, this is my central dowel here. This style is what's going to sit right in the middle of our cake, and I'll show you how to put that all in later. Now, what I'm going to do is I'm just going to mark the middle of my cake card and I'm going to make a circle using a sharp small knife. I'm just going to cut the circle out and then just make sure that it fits through my central dowel. You can use a ruler for this if you're not quite confident in eyeballing it. Now, once you've cut a hole in the middle of your cake card, it doesn't have to be perfect. As you can see, mine is not very round, but the main thing is that it's in the middle, and then you just want to double-check that your cake dowel can fit through it. As you can see, my cake dowel fits in well, so I am good to go. Now, the other thing is, my top two tiers are going to be semi-naked cakes, which means that they're not going to have a very thick layer of icing on them. In order to make sure my cake card doesn't show, I'm just going to trim the edges a little bit so that it's a tiny bit smaller. I've trimmed my cake card and now I'm ready to start stacking my cake layers. The way that I'm going to do that is basically exactly the same way that I did my bottom tier. As my cake board, I've got an acrylic disc here, so that's what my cake is going to be sitting on. Then I'm simply just going to place my cake card on top of my acrylic disc, and then I'm going to pipe a little bit of vanilla buttercream around the center of my cake card. Now I'm going to place my first cake layer onto my cake card. Now, because these cake layers are slightly smaller, they are a lot easier to handle, so I don't need baking trays or anything like that. I'm just going to use my hands to handle them. Just remember to take off the parchment paper from the bottom and then simply place it onto your cake card. Then you can adjust it just to make sure that it's in the middle. Now I'm going to start by piping aroma vanilla buttercream on the edge of my cake. Now, because this is a semi-naked cake, I really don't want any of my chocolate buttercream seeping out. I'm actually going to put two rims and then fill the middle with chocolate buttercream. Now I'm going to do the same thing like I did with my bottom tier. Pop this into the fridge for about 10 minutes to firm up and then I'm going to do the next layer. I've just taken my cake out of the fridge, the buttercream is nice and firm so I'm going to put my next layer of cake on top. Again, just remember to remove the parchment paper and then just gently place your cake on top. Now I'm going to pipe my two vanilla buttercream rims again, and into the fridge it goes again. My cake is out of the fridge again and I'm going to put my final layer on top. Now, once you've placed the top layer on, just have a look around the cake and just make sure that it's nice and straight and level. If you do notice at the top that it's slightly higher on one end, just push it down really gently with your hand and it should level out. Now, because I'm going to be making this a semi-naked cake, that means that we're only going to put one code of icing on it, and so we don't really have the opportunity of doing a crumb coat. What I like to do before I place my icing on my cake is I like to just go through and remove any crumbs which are lying around anywhere, and even any big crumbs which might be poking out of the sides of the cake. I've dealt with all the crumbs on my cake, and now the next thing that I'm going to do is I'm going to ice my cake. Now, what I'm going to do first is I'm going to put a thick layer of butter cream on the top of my cake and then I'm going to smooth it out with my offset spatula. But don't worry about it being super smooth because I'm going to show you guys later on my secret trick on how to get super smooth sides on any edges on a buttercream cake. Just make sure you've got a nice thick layer of icing on the top. Then I'm going to start icing the side. I'm just going to put a thin layer of icing on and then I'm going to scrape it with my cake scraper until I can start seeing that part of the cake coming through, which has this, gives us semi-naked look. You also want to make sure that your buttercream is really nice and smooth, so smoother than normal, because in that will give it the opportunity to get into all the little holes in the sides of the cake. Now I'm just filling up any little holes with more buttercream. Now I'm just going to smooth out that top lip of buttercream. That's my 10-inch tier tear. Now I'm going to pop it in the fridge to allow the icing to become really nice and firm before we come and clean it up a little bit. I'm going to leave it in the fridge for at least an hour so the buttercream is really nice and hard. In the meantime, I'm going to go ahead and work on my eight cake, and I'm basically going to do exactly the same thing that I did with this 10-inch cake. If you want to recap, you can go and watch the previous videos. 13. Day 2 - Preparing Dowels: Now one of the most important things when it comes to making a tiered cake is to ensure that you've given the cake enough structural support by placing dowels in the cake. Now there are two types of dowels that you insert into a tiered cake, with the first being a center dowel or a central dowel. Now this dowel is usually a long dowel and it's going to go right in the middle of all of your tiers. In our case, we've got three tiers. This central dowel is going to run through all of our three tiers. Now the purpose of the center dowel is to basically keep all our cake layers together. This is especially important say when we're transporting a cake or if you're moving it from A to B because what it's going to do is it's going to make sure that the top layers don't just topple off. Even if you're going down a slope or if you're taking it somewhere and you're traveling in a car and when you are going down a hill or going up a hill and your cake is slightly slanted, the top layers aren't just going to topple off because you've got the center dowel right in the middle, keeping it all stuck together. That is the purpose of this center dowel. Now the second type of dowel that you're going to find in a cake is the support dowels. Now the support dowels are basically thin rods as well. They are usually slightly thinner than the center dowel. They are also very strong. What they're going to do is they're going to provide support to the bottom tiers to help lift the weight of the top tiers. Now if I just placed my 10-inch cake on top of my 12-inch tier, and then my 8-inch tier on top of my 10-inch tier without putting any dowels, then the weight of those top tiers are going to be way too heavy for my bottomed tier and the cake is simply going to start sinking in, which you really don't want. Now these support dowels basically go into any cake tier which has another tier on top of it. For example, in this case we've got a 12-inch tear on the bottom, so we're going to be placing support dowels in there to hold the weight of our 10-inch tier. Then our 10-inch tier is going to also have support dowels in them to hold the weight about 8-inch tier. Our 8-inch tier, which is right at the top, that's not going to have any support dowels and that is because it's not holding any weight on top of it. Now, the way that you measure your support dowels is really easy. Here's one that I've pre-measured for my 12-inch tier. The way you do it is you basically just get a dowel, hold it up against the side of the cake, make a little mark at the height that the cake finishes with a little knife or something like that, and then simply just cut your dowels out. What I'm going to do is I'm first going to show you how I cut my dowels, and then we're going to bring our cake and start putting our dowels into our cake. What I'm doing first is I'm just using my support dowel that I measured earlier to help me mark the links that my other support dowel should be. Then I'm simply just going to cut through the dowel. For my 12-inch cake, I'm going to be placing five of these support dowels in the cake, and then for my teenage cake, I'm going to be placing four support dowels in that cake to support the weight of the 8-inched tier. Now, generally the rule is the heavier the tier, the most support dowels that you put them. Now these support dowels that I've got they are really, really strong and so five should be fine for the bottom tier and then four for my middle tier. I've got all my support dowels ready to go for my bottom tier, so I'm going to start stacking this cake. 14. Day 2 - Stacking Cake Tiers: Now, when it comes to sticking your cake tiers, you want to make sure that your cakes are really nice, and cold, and the buttercream is firm because we are going to be fiddling with the cakes a little bit, and so you want to make sure that you're not smashing the icing everywhere. Also you want to make sure your hands are nice and clean because you are going to be touching some of the icing. Now, the first thing that I'm going to do is I'm going to place the center dowel right in the middle of my bottom tier. Now, you can use a ruler for this to mark where the center of the cake is, but if you're confident in eyeballing it, then you can do it like that as well. You just want to push that right down, and just make sure that it's straight. Now, once this cake dowel is nicely in the middle of the cake, the next thing that we're going to do is we're going to be putting in our support dowels, which are going to be supporting our next tier that we're going to be putting on top. I've got five support dowels, so I'm going to be placing them evenly around the center dowel. Now, a key thing you want to keep in mind when placing support dowels into your cake is that you don't want to put it too close to the center dowel, but you also don't want to put it too far out that it's going to show and that the cake card that out tier is sitting on isn't going to be sitting on your dowel. The key thing here is to make sure that the cake card underneath is sitting on top of these dowels because that's what's going to help keep the tier up and make sure that the weight of this tier is not falling on this bottom tier. Now, once all the support dowels are in the cake, the next thing that you want to do is you want to put some butter cream on top of the dowels, which is going to act as a glue to stick your next tier that you're going to be placing on top to the bottom tier. Now, ideally you want your support dowels to be flushed with the buttercream. As you can see, mine are little bit high, I made them a tiny bit too tall. But that's okay, I'm just going to put extra butter cream so that it becomes level, and then when we finish up, I'm going to fill in any gaps with more butter cream. Just make sure that you're not putting your butter cream too far out because you don't want it to reach the area which is going to be exposed. Now that I've placed the butter cream on this cake, the next thing that I'm going to do is I'm going to get my 10-inch tier and I'm going to put that through my center dowel and gently rest it onto my 12-inch tier. Now, it is a little bit hard to explain, but hopefully this is all making sense. Now, that's the reason that we cut that little hole in that cake card earlier that our 10-inch tier's sitting on, because that little hole is what's going to slide through the center dowel. Now, the way that you take your cake off your cake board or acrylic disc, whatever you've got it on, is really easy, you just get something that's sharp and flat, and just slide it under the bottom of the cake and it should pop right off. Basically, you just lift it up a little bit, pop your hand underneath the cake card, and then simply lift the whole thing up, and then put it through the center dowel. Just be really careful with it. Then just gently drop your cake down. Because the cake is cold, you can move it around a little bit if it's not quite in the middle. Now we're basically going to do the exact same thing with the next tier. As you can see over here, there is a bit of cake which has popped up at the top, but that's okay, you can easily fix that up. Now, for my last tier, I'm going to start off by placing some support dowels into my 10-inch tier, which is going to support my eight-inch tier. I'm just going to place them around my central dowel just like how I did for my 12-inch tier. You should feel when they hit the bottom of the cake card. Now I'm going to slide off my cake again, and then I'm just going to slide it through the center dowel. Then just make sure that it's in the middle. Now, I'm just going to clean up my hands and then we'll be back to clean up the cake. Now, the first thing that I'm going to do is I noticed that the top is slightly high on one side, on that side over here. I'm just going to scrape it out a little bit with my cake scraper just to even it out. Now, that looks a lot better now. Now the next thing that I'm going to do is I'm going to start cleaning up the bottoms of the tiers. Now, the way that I'm going to do that is I've got some butter cream here in a piping bag, and I've just got a really small round nozzle on it, and I'm going to start piping a small rim around the bottom of each of the tiers, and then I'm going to smooth it out with my cake scraper. I'm just holding my cake scraper at a slight angle just to make sure that I don't scrape off any other icing from the cake. My wedding cake is all stacked now and it's ready to be decorated. 15. Day 3 - Gold Drip: So now we're onto the base part, which is the decorating. Now I'm going to be adding a gold dripped my wedding cake and to do that, I need to start off by making a white chocolate ganache so that I can put a white drip onto my cake, give that some time to sit and become nice and firm and then I'm going to be painting it with some edible gold paint, which I'll show you how to make it a little bit later on. Now to make my white chocolate ganache, what I've got here is I've got some white chocolate and some heavy cream. Now the ratio that I'm using is one part heavy cream to three parts chocolates. So in this case I've got a 180 grams of white chocolate to 60 grams of heavy cream. Now the way that you make this chocolate ganache is really easy. So I'm just going to put my heavy cream into my chocolate, mix it around a little bit, and then I'm going to melt it in the microwave on a low heat in about 10 seconds bursts until it's all completely melted. Now I'm going to pop this into the microwave and I'll be back once it's all melted. So my chocolate and my heavy cream are nicely melted together and I'm left with this beautiful chocolate ganache. Now, if you notice the color of the chocolate ganache isn't quite white, so we melt white chocolate actually has a bit of a yellow tinge to it. Now normally if I was wanting a white chocolate trip, then this is the time where I would add some white food coloring to my chocolate ganache and that would give it this nice white, bright color. But in this case I'm going to be painting my drip gold. So having that yellow tinge is actually a good thing because that's going to help my gold color shine through even more. Now generally when I put drips onto a cake, I like to use a spoon just because I like the way that the drips form using a spoon. But when it comes to a tiered cake, it's much easier to use a drip bottle for this. Now this is mainly because when it comes to the middle tiers, it's really hard to kind of get a spoon in there because he's only a little bit of space next to the tiers. So a drip bottle is a lot better for this. So what I've got here is basically just like a sauce bottle you can get it from the $2 shop and what I'm going to do is I'm just going to pull my white chocolate ganache into this bottle. Now once you're ganache in your bottle, just pop the lid on top and now it is almost ready to pour onto your cake. Now, a few things you need to keep in mind before you just go ahead and add your drip to your cake is: Firstly, your cake needs to be really nice and cold and this is what's going to help the ganache sit as it drips down the side of your cake. If your cake is not cold enough, then the drips are just going to keep dripping. They're not going to sit and you're going to end up with all this ganache at the bottom of your cake, which you really don't want. Now the next thing you need to keep in mind is you want to make sure that your ganache isn't too hot, otherwise it's going to melt your buttercream. So I'd suggest leaving it sit for at least 10 minutes and then just checking the consistency to see that it's at the right consistency and doing a test drip on your cake to see that it's dripping the way that you want it to drip. Now if you do find that your ganache has been sitting for too long and it's gone too thick. Then what you can do is pop your ganache into the microwave for about five seconds just to loosen it up a little bit and then it should be nice and drippy again. On the other hand, if you noticed that your chocolate ganache is too thin and it hasn't thickened up nicely yet then just continue to let it cool down and sit and become a little bit thicker, and then it should be good to drip onto your cake. So what I'm going to do is I'm just going to let this sit for about 10 minutes or so and then I'm going to do a test drip on my cake to see whether it's dripping the way that I want it to drip. So my ganache has had some time to sit and now I'm ready to pull the drip onto my cake. Now, like I said, I'm going to start off with a test drip first just to make sure that my ganache is at the right consistency. Now what I'm going to do is I'm just going to first choose the front of my cake and then I'm going to add a drip to the top of my cake. I'm going to do a half drip and then I'm also going to do a half drip on my second here. So I'm happy with how that drip has dripped. So I'm going to drip the rest of my cake. So I've added my side drips to my tiers, and now I'm going to pop my cake back into the fridge to allow the ganache some time to sit so that it becomes nice and firm so I can paint it. So my white chocolate drips have sit now. They firm to the touch, which means that I can go ahead and paint them. Now I'm going to quickly show you guys how to make an edible gold paint. Today I'm going to be using some super gold luster dust, and I'm also going to be using some water as my liquid to make my paint. Now the most common form of liquid people use to make a gold paint is alcohol, because alcohol evaporates really quickly, which means the paint is going to dry really well. But because I don't take any form of alcohol and the bride who's cake also doesn't take any form of alcohol, I'm going to be using water as an alternative and I've done this many times before and it still works great as well. So the way that you want to make your edible gold paint is simply by adding a little bit of luster dust to a little bit of water and then you just keep adjusting the quantities until you kind of have a paste like texture. It shouldn't be too thick that it's kind of just sticking to your brush, but thin enough that you can swirl it around and use it as a paint. Now I'm just starting off by adding a little bit of water. Now, as you can see, we're starting to get this beautiful gold color coming through. Now my paint is a little bit thin, so I'm going to add a little bit more of the luster dust. So that looks like a good consistencies. So it's nice and liquidy, but it does have a slight thickness to it because you don't want it to be too thin and that's basically how you make edible gold paint. I'm going to go ahead now, grab my cake and start painting my drips. Now I'm just starting off by doing one coat and then I'm going to do a second coat on top of that. Now if you manage to get some onto your cake, like I have, a really easy way to fix this is to just up a angled brush and a little bit of water and then just take it off. Don't worry if it looks a little bit uneven on your first coat because we will be doing a second coat. Now, as you're painting your drip, you may notice that your little pot of edible gold paint may start to dry up a little bit and if that is the case, just simply add a little bit more water and it will turn back into a paint. So I finished painting my gold drip and now we're ready to put some fresh flowers onto this cake. 16. Day 3 - Flowers: The flowers for my cake today are going to be fresh roses. I've got a beautiful selection of peach roses here, as well as some greenery. What I'm going to do is, I'm going to start placing these fresh flowers into my cake. Now, one thing to keep in mind, well, actually two things to keep in mind when placing fresh flowers into a cake is to make sure that, one, you've given them a quick rinse. Now, this is especially important for store-bought flowers because they can be sprayed with pesticides and things like that. So you just want to make sure that none of that gets into your cake. Secondly, you want to make sure that you wrap all of your flowers before you stick them into your cake. Now, the reason why we wrap the flowers is because, one, it's going to stop any of the liquid that's in the stem of the rose from getting into your cake, and two, it's going to help your flowers last a lot longer because it's going to trap that water inside. Essentially, it's like giving some food to the flowers. What I'm going to do is, I'm going to start placing the roses into my cake first. The way that I generally like to add flowers to my cake is to put them at different heights and I find that this adds just a nice, different element to the cake. I've got one large rose left which I really want to use. What I'm thinking is just the small little part over here. I'm going to put the rose in there, but I'm going to make it a lot smaller by pulling off some of the petals. I've got all my roses in my cake now. Now I'm going to go ahead and just add greenery around the cake. I think I am all done. This is my final wedding cake. 17. Class project: We've now reached the end of the course, and I cannot wait to see what amazing cakes you will create. Do remember to make use of the PDFs which I have made for you guys, as well as the checklist which has all the key steps in making a wedding cake to make sure that you don't miss anything crucial. Apart from that, if you want to see more videos from me, you can find me on my YouTube channel at Cakes by MK. I've also got a whole bunch of great recipes that you may want to try out, including some you might want to try out for this cake, at www.cakesbymk.com. Thank you guys for your time, and I cannot wait to see what you create.