How ro recite 'Daffodils' by William Wordsworth | Serena Greenslade | Skillshare

How ro recite 'Daffodils' by William Wordsworth

Serena Greenslade, Elocution Teacher since 1994

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10 Lessons (31m) View My Notes
    • 1. Daffodils Introduction

      2:28
    • 2. Word PIctures

      1:26
    • 3. Enjambed Lines

      2:45
    • 4. Daffodils - The Poem

      1:18
    • 5. Verse 1

      4:15
    • 6. Verse 2

      3:21
    • 7. Verse 3

      2:56
    • 8. Verse 4

      3:03
    • 9. Posture when reciting

      7:05
    • 10. Bringing it together

      2:00

About This Class

This course will show you and explain to you how to make the poem 'Daffodils' by William Wordsworth sound interesting and the advice for this poem will help you make all poetry sound interesting and unforgettable. How to make the important words stand out, how to be clear and expressive. We will not wonder why certain words were used instead of other words - we will take, almost at face value, the words on the page and make them sound convincing.

Transcripts

1. Daffodils Introduction: must make one thing clear. This is not an English literature course. We are not particularly concerned why William Wordsworth used one word and not another we're not concerned with. What was he thinking at that particular time when he wrote that particular line? It doesn't matter to us. We have the poet. We have it in front of us. We're going to read it. We are going to take it or less at face value. I mean, obviously, we know he's talking about daffodils, and I'm gonna put our interpretation to it This hour interpretation. I could teach five people to recite this poem. They could all be brilliant, but they would all be different. This comes down to personal taste as much as anything else. I'm going to show you how to use the punctuation, how to read it when there isn't any punctuation, which is almost as important, if not more report. I'm going to show you how to make certain words start out, have to bring them to life. Your audience may just be an elderly, aren't it? May be a child. 8 may be that you are reading this in a festival or an exam or an audition or any other presentation. We want the audience, whoever they are to enjoy the poem toe, understand your interpretation of the poem we want. You ask the reader at the speaker to enjoy the experience and to look as though you're enjoying the experience so I would show you how to stand, how to read, when to look up, where not to look up. We will have fun. Um, so I'm hoping that by the end of this course, you will be dying to get onto another poet, perhaps another classic poem or a modern going. I have included the poem as a download so that you can print it out and you can have the whole home in front of you the whole time. But we'll go through it on this course, one of us at a time, and then we'll bring it all back together again at the end. So let's try daffodils by William Wordsworth 2. Word PIctures: before we begin the poem, I just want to go over a couple of basics that will help you understand what we are going to be doing on why we are doing it. The words create pictures in our minds. As speakers, we need to be able to share these images with our listeners. If I say daffodil, you will get a picture in your mind. It should be of a yellow flower on depending on how much you know about that deals, it could be quite detailed. Or it may be quite plain when you read aloud Wordsworth's poet. You want the listeners to be able to imagine the scene of all these daffodils, and it is your challenge to use the words to create correct images. The important words need to stand out, and there are various ways of doing this power. Pausing variety of pace are the main methods. In the next few lectures, I will explain which words I think need to stand out on how I would make them stand out. You will also be given the opportunity to repeat after me on follow along. You may find at the end of the poem that your interpretation is slightly different from mine, but as long as your images can be shared, there's nothing wrong with that. 3. Enjambed Lines: I mentioned previously that punctuation is important or, more importantly, that the lack of punctuation is critical. A lot of them, when they read a poem, think it's got short lines. So they read a line and they stop. They read the next line and they stop. They read the next line. Take your breath. It's true that I would say, the majority of cases. A line of poetry has a comma or a four star at the end of it, which means you stop. You take a breath. However, sometimes in poetry there are no full stops. There's no common. There's no punctuation at all. That's the end of the line. So this is called and jump in on the sense carries on into the next line. You must hold that last word because you've got to keep the field in the form of the poem, but you must not take a breath. The sense has to carry all an example is I wandered lonely as a cloud that floats on high over trails and hills. We will come across this on the cover of us, one of the polling, but there's no confirmation after cloud, so it cast a carry on. Uh, this is very, very important on if you can't manage the two lines in one breath, then you need to grab breath halfway through the second line. Um, so I wondered, Lonely as a cloud that floats on high of trails and hills. You take the breath there you will find this makes poetry much more interesting to use a speaker. This means that the poem makes much more sense. Another example on in German line is, um she looks at her flowers and thinks it makes sense to plants more Jew lives where once was a shed. So there's no punctuation after sense. She looks at the flowers and thinks it makes sense to plant. So you you hold on to it. You just let it go. Some words are easier than others. If that world happens, to end with a tough order is harder and you have to make more use of your vowel sounds. But if we have any of these in the poem, we will discuss them when we get to very important for Ritu ation or lack of punctuation 4. Daffodils - The Poem: stuff in Deals by William Wordsworth I wandered lonely as a cloud that floats on high over bells and hills when all at once I saw a crowd, a host of golden daffodils beside the lake, beneath the trees, fluttering and dancing in the breeze, continuous as the stars that shine on twinkle on the Milky Way. They stretched and never ending. Lying along the margin off Obey 10 thousands or I at a glance tossing their heads and sprightly dance. The waves beside them danced, but they out did the sparkling waves in green. Poet could not but be gay in such a jock into company. My gaze on gazed but little thought what wealth the show to me had brought oft when on my couch I lie bacon or in pensive mood, they flash upon that inward eye, which is the bliss off solitude. And then my heart, with pleasure, fills and dances with the daffodils 5. Verse 1: Now I'm going to read Verse one without any expression. I'm just going to read the words as they are written. I wandered lonely as a cloud that floats on high o avails Unt hills when all at once I saw a crowd, a host of golden daffodils beside the lake, beneath the trees, fluttering and dancing in the breeze. Now it was clear it wasn't too fast, but it had no expression. So I'm now going to show you how to make it interesting your listeners on interesting for you to say. So we'll start with the 1st 2 lines, I wondered, lonely as a cloud floats on high O bells and hills. The first thing to note here is that at the end of the first line, there is no punctuation. The sense has to carry on to the next line. It's an in jammed line. On it is called a suspense Serie pause. You're pausing and just suspending. You're holding onto that word so it carries on. If you can't manage to say two lines in one breath, then just grab a breath on the second line. I would suggest after the word high, so I'll try again, I wondered. Lonely as a cloud that floats on high o veils and hills Now you've got floating and you got high So lift your voice Make it sound as though it is floating Make just lift the pitcher bit on high So I'll say it once more And then you repeat it after me, I wondered, Lonely as a cloud that floats on high over veils until now Your turn one. Oh, good. Now, when all at once I saw a crowd, it happened suddenly Make it sound as though it waas sudden Um, don't go too fast. But again, what a little bit of excitement when all at once I saw a crowd You try it School, right? Ah, host off golden daffodils Now these deaths deals They were dull, their golden So make that stand out. So you're is the word golden. It's something special. It's something valuable something that would take your breath away. So those two lines when all at once I saw a crowd Ah, host off golden daffodils. Now you try it so crap. Good. Where were they besides the leg beneath the trees fluttering and dancing in the breeze. So again fluttering and dancing. It's light. It's fun. There's nothing too heavy in serious, the usual voice. So I'll say it once more than you repeat it. After me beside the lake, beneath the trees fluttering and dancing in the breeze, you try good. So now we have our first bus, I wondered, lonely as a cloud that floats on high o veils and hills. When all at once I saw a crowd. Ah, host of golden daffodils beside the lake, beneath the trees fluttering and dancing in the breeze. Now I will go on to us, too. 6. Verse 2: first to first thing here is again at the end of the first line We have no punctuation So once again we have a suspense Serie Falls on the word shine The word continuous implies something that is long and continues to continue The world Don't make it short We've got twinkle You know something Twin calls again Lift to picture your voice So the 1st 2 lines should be continuous As the stars that shine and twinkle on the Milky Way We held on to shine We make it sound like it was shining So you have a go The stars that shine and twinkle on the Milky Way Good Now you see that time I took a quick breath after twinkle Now the next line they stretch did never ending lying the longer margin off obey again We have a suspense serie pause at the end of line We have stretch, stretch the word they stretched Never ending Lying along the margin over bay You try it strange along the margin over they good 10,000 So I at a glance it wasn't 10 it wasn't 1000 . It was 10,000. That's an awful lot. Make it sound a lot, and the gloves a quick glance. It's quick. The very nature of a glance is that it's quick 10,000. So I at a glance tossing their heads and sprightly dance. If you toss something, you throw it up into the air, so make your voice sounds as though it's up in the air. So those two lines 10,000. So I at a glance tossing their heads and sprightly dance. Now you just try those two lines. So after Mom, right, right. So now we have the whole verse continuous as the stars that shine and twinkle on the Milky Way. They stretched never ending, lying along the margin over Bay 10 thousands all I at a glance tossing their heads in sprightly dance. Now we have a contrast between the beginning of the verse, which is a bit slower, continuous as the stars that shine a bit slower. By the time we get to the end of the first of sorry, the end of the second of us is much faster. Were dancing were glancing. It's a much quicker feel to it, so I suggest you press the pause button and try the verse yourself. Now we go onto US three 7. Verse 3: 1st 3 The first thing to notice is once again we have a suspense serie pause. At the end of the first line, the sense has to carry on, and we need to hold that word to keep the form and shape of the poem. However, we are given the chance to take a breath. After the word danced, the waves beside them danced, but they out did the sparkling waves in greed. A poet could not but be gay in such a jock and company. So again, this this part of the verse moves along a bit. So have a go the ways. No, they take the sparking waves and a poet could not. But the game in such a chocolate company now that first bit was quite straightforward. Now we come to a bit. We slow down, I gazed. Andi gazed. This time we're not glancing. It's not quick is not a quick glance with your eyes. This time you are staring. You are gazing, so slow it down and make it sound as though you're gazing with your voice. I gazed on, gazed. Make that a sound long vowels sound. Just try those four words. I gazed on Gazed, you trying canes good. And then we carry on this time another suspense reports, but little thought What wealth the show to me had broad. Now trying to hold onto the word thought is quite difficult because it ends with a consummate sound which has to be clear and crisp. So we have to hold on to the 11th or to then move on. But little thought what wealth show to me had broad. So just try that little bit. Oh, well, he showed me had broad. So what do those last two lines again? I gazed and gazed, but little thought what wealth showed me had brought. So now we do the whole of us. The waves beside them danced, but they out did the sparkling waves in green. A poet could not but be gay in such a jock and company. I gazed on, gazed but little thought what wealth the show to me had ruled. Now again, I suggest you pools and try the whole verse, and then we'll go on to verse or 8. Verse 4: the last verse. When on my couch I lie vacant or in pensive mood You guessed it. We've got a suspensive re pause again are the lie Now the thing about the word lying is recalled that lovely vowel sound I Your mouth should change shame. I ni brings the word alive on We have it again in a minute in Would I? So in these 1st 2 lines, we have full off the comma should take a break when on my couch I lie vacant or in pensive mood Make it sound as though you are thinking about this because bacon pensive is thoughtful. So once more when on my couch I lie and vacant or in pensive mood, you try not to fast because you're lying on a couch. So here we go. Oh, when on my couch I lie thinking or in pensive mood. Now they flash upon that inward eye, which is the bliss of solitude. We have I lovely. I sound again with the suspensive report so you can hold on to it. But this time sort of thinking and lying around these images flash into your mind. Flash quickly, they flash upon that inward eye, which is the bliss of solitude. So it stopped their solitude on your own. Quiet. Now you trying flush upon the unified which is and then we finished the whole poem. And then my heart with pleasure fills and dances with the daffodils. Your heart is filling with pleasure. So here we got a bit more of a fullness or sound. And then you're dancing Onda. We have a comrade the end of the lines with no suspense. Serie Paul's here, so on and then my heart with pleasure fills and dances with the daffodils. You try it and then my heart with pleasure feels dances that deals. Just a note to make sure that these words fill daffodil or ill signing on e is not feel it's no f e l s field Phil different Simon It filled. So again, pause the lecture, go over the hope of this verse and then in the next lecture will bring it together on talk a bit more about the technical sides of actually reading and saying a poem out loud 9. Posture when reciting: Now that you've learned how to say your poem, how to read it so it sounds interesting. You need to be able to stand or sit on recited or read it looking professional on and feeling comfortable. First of all, if you're saying it from memory, stand with your hands down by your side. Don't fiddle. Don't put your hands behind your back, Fiddle, Don't fiddle with your floating. Perhaps you have pockets. Don't put your hands in your pockets. Don't fiddle with the sleeves. Don't put your hands in front of you fiddle so down by your side Don't lock your knees. You don't need to stand to attention. You're not a soldier, You're not a gymnast. You're not a ballerina. You need to stand straight, but be comfortable. Also, be aware of the clothes you're wearing. Don't wear uncomfortable shoes that you've never stood in before. Don't wear clothes that are too tight so that while you're standing there, you thinking I wish I happen to all this. The data by aside, If you're sitting, be aware of your feet. Don't let your feet swing backwards and fours don't tap your toes If you're sitting behind a desk or a table. Be aware of the fact that even though you can't see your feet, the audience will be able to. So there's a lot to think about. But just practice and don't sway backwards. And forwards don't sweep side to side. Try to stand still, which is not in itself. So just practice. Standing up, standing still seed stand in front of a mirror. Do you sway from side to side? Do you go backwards and forwards? Just see how you stand. Practice standing still. Now if you're reading it, of course your hands don't need to be Biocyte. You need to hold the poet Whether this be a book or typed out, we'll come to that in a minute. Now you need to make sure that you don't hide your face, so don't hold it so high that you can't see the audience and they can't see you. You may feel very comfortable not being able to see them, but the whole purpose of this is to share share this information, share this poet So you need some kind of communication, some kind of eye contact. By the same token, don't hold it too low. So that you are looking down at the ground. You don't want your words to go down into the book. They won't be able to hear you. And again you want to be looking at them. Ideally, you will hold it so that you can see over the top of the piece of pain For all the book, no words can go over the top ons. You could make eye contact you will need from time to time. Although you are reading it to look up, you need to see if you're all idiots are still there. Do they look confused? Do they look a So they're enjoying it on. They need to see you that you know they are there. You are sharing it with them. So hold it so you can see above the piece of paper on the book. If you are sitting down on reading, try not to rest it on your lap. Apart from looking unprofessional, it again means that you will be looking down. Your words will go down into the book down into your lap. So again, hold it just above you Hold it so that you can see above it even if you are sitting in a chair. If you are reading this poem, you still need to make eye contact with your audience, so you need to look up occasionally. The easiest way I have always found to do this is the way I was told was toe underlying important words. Now it's not critical if you underline one word, but you don't look up until the next word. It doesn't matter, but it reminds you to look up on its points out. The important words to you now, most of us. If we look at a sentence on read it to ourselves, we could look up and remember the first couple of words so many people don't look up until they're about three lines in Look up right from the start. You are sharing this with your audience. They want to know that you're sharing it. So look up for the time. Daffodils by William wants work and looked out of the Cohen. Take a breath. Remember the first couple of words until a cup to say I wondered. Then you look like them again. Lonely as a cloud that floats on high said look up for floats on high, and then you look back down, we'll bales of hills that don't look up and down too much. You don't want your head nodding up and down. That's just irritating to listeners. So do it. Gradually, slowly pick out the important words. If you find it difficult because you're worried you are going to lose your place, I would use my thumb just as I'm holding the piece of paper just to slide my tongue down, which gives me a rough idea where I am. But if you really can't do it, please always look up on the first couple of words and always look up on the end words and then anything in the middle that you can manage. But if you practice looking up, you should find it quite easy. And if you practice your piece enough, then you almost know it off by heart anyway. So look up to share this information with your listeners. Now you may find that you have found your poem in this instance daffodils, but it is in a book which is very big and heavy and awkward to hold. You need to feel comfortable you don't want to stand there, will sit there holding a book thinking the page main turnover is too heavy. I would suggest that you type it out or write it out underlying the important words, and then stick the piece of paper onto a piece of card. This makes it look professional. You're not just holding a flimsy piece of paper, but it is easy for you to hold. It isn't heavy on. This is ideal for Children. It's something I usually do when people are taking exams or reading in a festival. And it also means you could write a couple of little notes on top of the paper. Things like Standstill smile, look up. So type it out, write it out underlying the important words, and then stick it onto a piece of card. You can choose something quite fancy literary, glittery pink or dark blue black. Anything doesn't matter what it is. Just make it comfortable toe hold on so that it looks professional from the other side, for the people are looking at to you 10. Bringing it together: I'm going to read it using mine typed out stuff onto a piece of card. I won't hold it like this on. I won't have time to go. I would hold it so you can see my face. And if you were there, I could see you. I would look up on some of the important or interesting words so that I'm sharing this with you. Daffodils by William Wordsworth, I wondered, lonely as a cloud that floats on high o veils and hills my own At once I saw a crowd Oh, so the golden definite news beside the lake beneath the trees fluttering and dancing in the breeze continuous as the stars that shine and twinkle on the Milky Way They stretched never ending line along the margin of obey 1000 So I at a glance tossing their heads since frightfully dance The waves beside them danced but they upstate the sparking waves in green Poet could not but be gay in such a joke and company. I gazed on gazed but little thought what wealth the show to me had brought. Go home When on my couch I lie in bacon or in pensive mood, they flash upon that inward eye, which is the bliss of solitude. And then my heart, with pleasure, feels that's dances with the daffodils. Thank you. I hope you enjoyed the course. Please have a look at my bonus lecture details of other courses.