How To Make Footage Cinematic In Premiere Pro CC For Beginners | Will Bartlett | Skillshare

How To Make Footage Cinematic In Premiere Pro CC For Beginners

Will Bartlett, Video Creator & Entrepreneur

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4 Lessons (16m)
    • 1. How To Make Footage Cinematic In Premiere Pro CC

      2:02
    • 2. 01 How To Make Footage Cinematic In Premiere Pro CC Part 1

      3:42
    • 3. 02 How To Make Footage Cinematic In Premiere Pro CC Part 2

      8:07
    • 4. 03 Final Thoughts

      1:47
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About This Class

Welcome to this free class on How To Make Footage Cinematic In Premiere Pro CC.

In this class we will cover some of the in camera techniques required to capture Cinematic looking footage, but the majority of the course will be focused on techniques and workflows you can use while editing to make your footage look more cinematic.

We discuss:

  1. What Cinematic footage is
  2. What camera aspect ratios are and the two most commonly used aspect ratios to use to get more cinematic footage
  3. An overview of several ways in camera on how to capture cinematic looking footage
  4. How to use Premiere Pro CC to make regular footage look more cinematic through several different techniques and workflows

There are many factors that can contribute to cinematic looking footage, and in this class you'll discover a number of ways to enhance the cinematic look of your footage!

Transcripts

1. How To Make Footage Cinematic In Premiere Pro CC: thin this video, I'm gonna show you how to get cinematic looking footage inside Premiere Pro Sisi. And if you want to learn more for me, I have several other courses on video editing, as well as a YouTube channel called Ali. And Will We make Travel Videos flogs how to tutorials and review videos, all based around cinematography and editing or filmmaking in general. So we have a ton of other great content on our YouTube channel. If you want to check that out on Allie and will, we will cover some of the in camera techniques required to capture cinematic looking footage. But the majority of this course will be focused on techniques and work flows you can use while editing. To make your footage look more cinematic, we will discuss what cinematic footage is. What camera aspect ratios are the two most commonly used cinematic aspect ratios, an overview of how to capture cinematic looking footage in camera and how to use Premiere Pro Sisi to make regular footage look more cinematic. There are many factors that can contribute to cinematic looking footage, and in this class you'll discover a number of ways to enhance the cinematic look of your footage. Now here's the final result of what will make by the end of this class 2. 01 How To Make Footage Cinematic In Premiere Pro CC Part 1: The editing techniques that I'll use in this video can be used in any program. So if you're not using Premiere Pro, you can still follow along before we jump into Premiere Pro Sisi. Let's talk a bit about how we can get cinematic looking footage in camera. Getting it right in camera will make all the difference and will really help sell that cinematic look. Once we get to the editing room. There are a number of factors that contribute to getting that cinematic look, but the main ones are aspect ratio, which is the ratio between the width and the height of your footage. Then there's color grading, which is adjusting their colors to get a certain feel in your footage. From there we have lighting, which is either the natural light in your scene or the controlled lights you've added in your scene or a combination of both. And then there's camera movement, which means how the camera was moved and operated while getting the footage for the aspect ratio. There are many different ratios that are used. For example, four by three was very popular with VHS tapes back in the day before high definition, but these days. The most common is 16 by nine, which is the aspect or issue of 10. 80 p, or full HD beyond the four by three in 16 by nine aspect ratios. There's another aspect ratio commonly used in Hollywood cinema, which is what's being referenced to when we say the words cinematic, cinematic looking footages footage that looks like Hollywood cinema movies. These blockbuster feature films most commonly used an aspect ratio of 1.85 to 1, which is slightly wider than HD footage and 2.39 to 1, which is very wide screen. There aren't really any rules about which aspect ratio Hollywood movies should be shot in so often it's up to the director or cinematographer, an aspect or issue of 2.39 to 1, or close to that will to most people appear more visually pleasing. If we think about what are I see, you'll notice that our I see with a very wide view as well, so naturally footage with a wide aspect ratio will be aesthetically pleasing. It'll feel higher end. This is for two reasons because the footage matches more closely with what our eyes can see as we said, and two, because we're conditioned to be used to big budget feature films and how they look with their wide aspect ratios. It's just something that has come to be normal to us. So the two options for aspect ratios are. You can either film in a wider aspect ratio if your camera allows, or you can crop your footage later when you're editing. Okay, so I'll cover color grading later in this video. Lighting can have a huge impact on the look of your footage, and some would argue it's the biggest contribution to cinematic looking footage. Since this video is focusing more on the post production ways to make your footage more cinematic, I'll only touch a bit on lighting. I personally think there are many factors to getting cinematic looking footage, and not anyone is the most important. Rather, they each can play a part, depending on what you're filming. Using controlled lighting to shape the light. Hitting a subject can be very effective in creating a feel or mood within your scene. Utilizing stylized lighting to create a dramatic feel can contribute to cinematic looking footage, while on the other side, the lighting set up for a really bright and evenly lit scene won't contribute all that much to a cinematic look. Since we're trying to recreate the cinema look of Hollywood movies, you'll notice that the camera in these movies is almost always moving. So when you're filming, use a slider or a gimbal to allow the camera to move around your subject or down a path which will show a lot of perspective change Beyond that, filming in slow motion will help make the footage look more cinematic because it Smoothes out the footage. It makes it look more dramatic. Now, keep in mind. It's not a rule that the camera has to move to make it look cinematic, but it does help. All right, let's now dive into Premiere Pro Sisi and I'll walk you through how to make your footage look more cinematic in the editing room. 3. 02 How To Make Footage Cinematic In Premiere Pro CC Part 2: Okay, now we're inside. Premiere Pro. I have two sequences created, one in a regular, 1920 by 10 80 then a 2nd 1 in a 1920 by 8 16 This is going to be the more widescreen cinematic look. So first will go through the 1920 by 10 80 in our sequence. I have a bunch of clips in a row that Alley and I shot during our trip to British Columbia , So it's just a bunch of nature shots. There's a shot of alley walking, a shot of some birds, and it ends with a clip of me at the end, and the clips were shot in slow motion at 120 frames a second. So right off the bat, this is going to give you a lot more of a cinematic look, a more dramatic feel, and also you'll notice that the camera is moving in. Almost every single shot in this one is a slight pan. This one, it moves along the log, showing the water in the background, and then this shot would be the exception. It doesn't have any movement at all. This one has a slow pan to the right. Then we have this one of Allie walking forward with some camera movement, moving forward as well, and then a zoom in onto the foggy lake and then a pull back away from the water, fall in the water to reveal more of myself staring off into the glacier. So these are the clips that make up our sequence, and they do have cinematic elements to them, such as the camera movement and the slow motion. So besides that, you can consider the location itself cinematic. So location is important as well, but you'll notice there's no music, no sound effects, no color correction or grading. The footage has not been cropped to a wider aspect ratio. We haven't done any editing zooms to enhance the camera movement, and we also haven't added any overly effects. So as it is, this sequence isn't all that cinematic, especially when we compare it to our cinematic sequence. That's in the 1928 16 which includes all of the work we've done. So in the final cinematic edit, we have light leaks of the top. We have an adjustment layer, which is our color grading. We have zoom in and outs on our clips, which are right here, the key frames. Besides that, we have a soundtrack that builds over time, and then it drops the main beat of the song. But halfway through and then further down, we have all of our sound effects. So now let's go through this edit all sure, exactly what I'm doing in order to create this cinematic look. So for now, I will turn off our late leaks, our color grading and our music. And then that will leave us with the key frames humans we've done. And then, besides that are sound effects and with just our sound effects and are raw clips with the zoom key frames. Let's have a listen and see what we're working with. - Okay ? So that gives you an idea of what the sound design is doing in this cinematic edit. It really helps glue in all the clips together and make it feel a lot more riel and dramatic, and it pulls you into the edit a lot more. Next, let's turn back on our music. And now I will solo the music so that our sound design does not play So right around here, when the clip changes. Listen to that part specifically because when I turned back on the sound effects, you'll hear how much this buildup sound effect adds to that area. Okay, so now let's turn back on everything and then pay attention to that same spot now with the sound design, but so that I'll show you what that sounds like. It really, really helps sell that whole build up into the next part of our edit. Sound design is often overlooked, but it adds quite a lot to the end. Final result. I could have added a few more sound effects, which is when the bird jumps off. You could literally spend days working on the sound design, so keep that in mind. Sound design and music play a big factor in getting that cinematic look. Next is the aspect or issue. I've set up this sequence at 1920 pixels wide by 816 pixels tall, and that matches that 2.39 to 1 aspect ratio that we talked at the beginning of the video. So that also plays a role in getting that cinematic look. If you don't want to create a sequence like this, you can also use just a regular HD 16 by nine aspect ratio and then crop it with black bars on the top and bottom and then export in wide screen. Like this, a lot of people choose to add the cropped black bars to their footage to create a water aspect ratio. And in my opinion, that's totally fine, even though technically creating it like this and its own sequence is the right way to do it. Next. Let's talk about the editing zooms that we mentioned before, So on this clip here, I've zoomed in slightly to about 115%. Keep in mind, the more you zoom in, the more quality loss you will get. So don't do Min too much. If your video is intended for YouTube, then it's not too big of a deal to do that. So I have it at 115%. And then by the end of the clip, it goes to 100 and what that does is it adds a little more of a dramatic feel to your footage. So in this case, the footage zooms out as it plays, and it sort of reveals more of the forest. If you do that to the majority or all of the clips in your edit, it will help add that dramatic cinematic feel. Then, from there we have our color grading or color correction. So for us, I've done my color grading on an adjustment layer above the footage. This allows you to do it as easy as possible. You can turn all the effects off it once, and I would recommend doing it that way. So with Lumet tree color open, you'll see that I have a lot applied. This is one that I've created, and if you want to learn more about that, you can check out my skill share course. That'll teach you about color grading and will go a lot more in depth. But essentially I have a color let applied. I have it set to 80% intensity, and if I cycle the adjustment layer on and off, you'll see what that does. Color grading can add quite a lot when it comes to getting that cinematic look. So do not overlook it. And for this specific color grading that it did, you'll see that there's a lot more contrast and saturation. There's also a pump of the blue and teal colors, and the greens get pushed a little bit as well. So it's not a rule, but typically in cinematic footage, your black levels will be a lot darker. They will look very contrast e and then moving on from there. The last step will show you to get cinematic footage is by using overly effects in this edit. I have quite a few. As you can see here, there's probably a dozen or so light leak effects and let's turn them on. And that's what this is here, the blue lens flare or late leak that's on top of the footage so that the footage you can see what it's doing and with the footage way so it doesn't have too much. It's more of a subtle effect, and I have reduced the opacity to a lot of these 4. 03 Final Thoughts: keep in mind. It's all about adding subtle changes throughout your entire edit so that the end result changes in a big way. As mentioned, there are many factors that can contribute to a cinematic look like aspect ratio, frame rate, color grading, camera movement, music, sound effects, sun flares, light leaks and so on. So you don't need to use all of the factors we talked about to get cinematic footage. But generally speaking, the more of those you use, the more cinematic your footage will be. So I hope this video was helpful to you, and you learned how to make your footage look more cinematic inside. Premiere Pro. And if you want to learn more for me, I have several other courses on video editing, as well as a YouTube channel called Ali. And Will we make travel videos, flogs how to tutorials and review videos, all based around cinematography and editing or filmmaking in general. So we have a ton of other great content on our YouTube channel. If you want to check that out on Allie and will way