How To Make A Linocut Print | Emil Underbjerg | Skillshare

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How To Make A Linocut Print

teacher avatar Emil Underbjerg, Linocut Printmaker

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

8 Lessons (14m)
    • 1. Introduction

      1:02
    • 2. Tools

      1:53
    • 3. Designing Your Print

      2:41
    • 4. Class Project

      0:39
    • 5. Carving

      3:38
    • 6. Printing

      3:22
    • 7. Cleaning

      0:41
    • 8. The End

      0:22
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About This Class

My name is emil underbjerg, i’m an artist and linocut printmaker. I’ve been working with linocut printmaking for the last couple of years, exploring and experimenting with the technique and in this class, i will teach you the most accessible and easy way to make your own linocut print at home, without an expensive printing press.

This includes all the steps in the process

- how to design and draw on your lino

- how to carve and how to handle your tools

- how to print your lino

- how to clean your tools

- tips and tricks to achieve the best results

List of Materials:

-a sheet of linoleum, they come in all kinds of sizes and qualities. I primarily use the brown version, however, it can be a little tricky to work with, but it holds details very well compared to the soft cut version which you can see here. if this is your first time working with linocuts I would recommend the soft lino
- a pencil or a pen
- masking tape
- a carving tool, I use these Pfeil carving tools, they're sharp and easy to work with. the cheap tools can be a bit dull and thus more difficult and actually more dangerous to work with, as they can slip and you risk cutting yourself more easily. in this class, I'll be using a couple of different ones, but if you're just starting out you can easily make do with just one.
- then you need either a spoon, a barren or a bone folder which I prefer.
- paper to print your linocut on. for this class, I will be using Japanese Kozo paper which is easy to print on and very durable.
- block printing ink - I recommend using Cranfield safewash relief ink as it's very pigmented and is easy to clean even though it's oil based, but you can pick any colour or brand you want and for this class.
- a surface to roll the ink onto, like this sheet of glass. you can also use a sheet of acrylic or any other smooth and even surface
- a brayer or an ink roller. these rollers come in different sizes and qualities as well. I have a 20 cm one and a 5 cm one, but for this project, you don't need more than one. the big ones can be a little pricey but if linocut printmaking is something you know you'll be doing more than for this class, I would recommend getting one like this.
- and finally a sponge and some soap to clean the ink off your tools once you're done. I like using laundry detergent as it doesn't foam as much as say, dish soap but you can use any liquid soap you prefer.
- optionally I would also recommend using a bench hook

Meet Your Teacher

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Emil Underbjerg

Linocut Printmaker

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Transcripts

1. Introduction: Hi, guys. Welcome to my class on how to make a line a cut at home with only a few basic tools. My name is Emiliano via, and I'm an artist online. The cut printmaker I've been working with Lana could print making for the last couple of years exploring and experimenting with the technique. And in this class, I will teach you the most accessible and easy way to make your own line. It could print at home without an expensive printing press. This class is for anyone interested in line, occurred printmaking and would like to try it for themselves, whether you're an artist who would like to explore new technique. Or maybe you have no prior art or printmaking experience making Atlantica, it's both fun and rewarding for anyone, and you can achieve great results by following this class. By the end of this class, you will know all the steps involved in making your own line could print from drawing and planning your print to carving the line. Oh, and finally how to print it at home and along the way I will share tips and tricks that will help you create your own beautiful print 2. Tools: all right before we get started, these are the tools you need to make your own line occurred. Print a sheet of line. Oh, they come in all kinds of sizes and qualities. I primarily use the brown version, however, it can be a little tricky to work with, but it holds details very well compared to the soft cut version, which you can see here. If this is your first time working with Lina cuts, I would recommend the soft conversion as it's much easier to work with a pencil or a pen masking tape. Accounting tool. I used these file cabin tools. They're sharp and easy to work with. In this class. I'll be using a couple of different ones, but if you're just starting out, you can easily make do with just one tool. Then you need either spoon a barren or bone folder, which high prefer paper to print your line. A cut on for this class. I would be using Japanese co so paper, which is easy to print on and very durable block printing ink. I recommend using Cranfield Safe Wash Relief Inc as it's very pigmented, and it's easy to clean even though It's all based a surface to roll the ink onto, like this sheet of glass. You can also use a sheet of acrylic or any other smooth and even surface a Brera on in Corolla. These rollers come in different sizes and qualities as well. I have a 20 centimetre one on a five centimeter one and finally a sponge and some soup. I like using laundry detergent as it doesn't foam as much as, say, dish soap, but you can use any liquid soap you prefer. Optionally. I would also recommend using a bench look like this one, which I made myself from a sheet of MDF and some scrap wood. 3. Designing Your Print: all right, Step one. When it comes to the design of your line occurred print. The possibilities are practically endless. For this class, I will be working with this picture off a flower, some text and a couple of geometric shapes. But you can do patterns, abstract shapes, animals, plants, portrait's text or a combination of all of them. I like working on a white surface as it's easier to see what I'm doing, but this is not necessary for you if you don't want to do it. If you do, just remember to send it once it's dry. To avoid bumps on the surface, I'm going to start by sketching the flower with the pencil directly on the surface of the line. Oh, then I also want to incorporate a text element, which in this case, is the last name off the flower. If you want to use text, just remember to myriad before printing it out, transfer it to the line. Oh, simply use a piece of parchment paper with graphite on one side. Finally, I'm going to add a couple of circles and a square in the corner to balance out the composition. When I'm satisfied with sketch. I'll link it with a permanent marker. When designing your print, it can be a good idea to decide if you're going to camp around the lines you just run or if you're going to have on the lines and leave all the surrounding areas alone. 4. Class Project: for the class project, please share a sketch of the line of cut you would like to do, either on paper or on a sheet of line. Oh, using one or more elements, you would like to incorporate a figurative element, such as a flower and animal, a figure or any other object You find interesting lettering, abstract geometric shapes, repeating patterns or anything else you find interesting and would like to use in your final print. I'll a scan. Your drawing will take a picture off your line. Oh, and then share it in the class Project gallery. You're of course, also welcome to share your final print. I would love to see what you come up with. 5. Carving: Step two now that I'm done drawing and thinking it's time to start carving and I'll talk a little bit about how to handle your tools and other tips and tricks to help you be safe and achieve the best results. First of all, I would like to point out these tools can be quite sharp, and if you're not careful, you can end up cutting yourself. I recommend always cutting away from yourself, or at least not tow. Watch your other hand. There are two main ways than I cough. One is sort of a digging motion that produces these nice, rounded strokes. The other is quite similar. But instead of the smooth digging motion, I'll simply lift the tool and break the off. Cut away with my fingers, and this gives the stroke and more angular end. Depending on the size of the piece. The carving process takes quite a while, so just be patient. I have spent more than 20 hours on my largest pieces, so don't be discouraged by the slowness. I find. It's almost like meditation. You have to be really focused the entire time. Otherwise you end up injuring yourself or the tool slips and you accidentally kind of away something you wanted to keep. I hold the tool in my right hand like this with handle resting in the palm of my hand. The other hand pushes down on the blade or the metal part of the tour. You can come in many different ways, and you will quickly find the way that suits you. Just make sure you're carving away from yourself and not to watch your other hand when you're coming. It is a good idea to take breaks often to relax your arms and to make sure you're not straining your muscles too much as you can get quite sore if you work for several hours at a time, for bigger pieces are usually only work on it for a couple of hours a day. In order to avoid sore muscles for the areas behind the flower, I use different. I don't use it often and only to remove large areas of material on. The reason for this is simply that I don't like it as much as the other tools because I can't hold onto it very well. The handle is shaped differently and thus isn't as comfortable to use as the file tools. I've only ever cut myself once, and it was right at the end of a big piece I had been working on for several days, and I was getting impatient to finish it. Long story short. I now have a need double scar on the tip off for my left middle finger, and this is why I also recommend using a bench hook or a non slip surface. It allows you to be more safe when working for the areas outside the border. I simply use a pair of scissors to cut away the excess material, as you can see here. 6. Printing: once you're done having it's time for the third and final step printing your line, a cut printing is arguably both the most fun and annoying part of making a line occurred print. You need to experiment a bit to get a feel for the ink and the paper, but if you use the ink and paper, I recommend you will be off to a good start. First step is to squeeze out some ink onto your glass or plastic surface. Now you simply dip your roller into the ink and start rolling it out into the square. It's important to roll out and even layer of ink to make sure the whole surface of the roller is covered. You then applying to the whole surface of the line. Oh, making sure it's a nice even coat all over to check. If you've covered the surface evenly, it helps to angle the line. Oh, as you can use the light to catch any dry spots. If you're going to do more than one print, it can be a good idea to mark where the line Oh, and the paper is placed to ensure that all the prints turned out more or less the same. When you've covered the surface, you can place your paper over it. When placing the paper, I start by gently pressing the paper down with my hands to make sure it touches all over before I start with my bone folder. You then go over the whole surface while robbing with a bit of pressure. I use a bone folder as I can press very hard with it. But you can also use spoon or any other tool you have with a smooth surface. Different papers can take different amounts of pressure, so experiment to see how far you can go before the paper, either wrinkles or tears. I like to use this Japanese CO so paper as it's rather durable and strong, but it still is fairly easy to print with. As you can see when using the Bone folder, I use my other hand to hold the paper down and this insurance that it won't move around and ruin the print. When you've been over the whole surface, it can be helpful to lift a corner to see if you're getting even in coverage or if there's an area you need to work more on. Just be mindful not to lift the paper too much. As you can end up, Mr Lining had been placing it back down. If there's a spot to need some extra work, place the paper back down, then go over these areas again with your spoon or bone folder. When you're satisfied, it's time. For the moment we've all been waiting for pulling your print. There's nothing quite like pulling your first print, seeing it all come together. It's such an amazing feeling, and it's extremely satisfying to do this. Simply grab two corners and slowly pulled the paper away from the line up. And there you have it, your own line occurred. Print. If you want to print more than one print, simply roll some or ink onto your line. Oh, and repeat the process as many times as you want. 7. Cleaning: when you're done printing, it's time to wash the ink off your tools. I started by applying a small amount of soap and rubbing it around with sponge until I've covered all the ink with soap. This includes the ink on the role as well. Then you simply rinse it off in a sink and leave your tools to dry. 8. The End: thank you for following this class. You now know the basics of Lina cut print making, and I can't wait to see what you come up with. I have included a list of tools and materials in description. And if you have any questions, don't hesitate to ask. I'll be sure to answer as best as I can. Happy printmaking.